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Published by brittany, 2018-03-23 19:34:25

LB_FallMag2017

LB_FallMag2017

LAGUNA
BLANCA

A MAGAZINE FOR THE
SCHOOL COMMUNITY

FALL 2017

REINVENTING EDUCATION


LAGUNA WRITERS GRAPHIC DESIGN MIDDLE AND UPPER SCHOOLS
BLANCA Tara Broucqsault Brittany Ragan 4125 Paloma Drive
Blake Dorfman ’02 Santa Barbara, CA 93110
MAGAZINE | FALL 2017 Pamela Ellgen PRINTING T 805.687.2461
Marcy Jacobs V3 F 805.682.2553
EDITOR Jessica Stonefield
Tara Broucqsault Laguna Blanca Magazine is LOWER SCHOOL
PHOTOGRAPHY published by Laguna Blanca 260 San Ysidro Road
COPY EDITORS Tara Broucqsault School. Every effort is made Santa Barbara, CA 93108
Tara Broucqsault Paul Chiment to avoid errors, misspellings, T 805.695.8143
Pamela Ellgen Mieke Delwiche and omissions. If, however, F 805.969.4783
Marcy Jacobs Brad Elliott an error comes to your
Blaire Ridge Jay Farbman attention, please accept our ON THE COVER
Oscar Gomez apologies and notify us at The Internet of Things Club
Marcy Jacobs tbrouc@lagunablanca.org. creates first-ever "Smart Garden"
Robert Leiter Thank you. on campus. Cover story on p. 34.
Camila Lemere ’18
Cynthia McClintock
Stephen Zeigler

WHAT'S 04 14 20
INSIDE COMMUNITY IDEAS
INDEPENDENCE


24 34 40 52 64
LEADERSHIP CELEBRATION ALUMNI
TESTING OUR LIMITS OF LEARNING ANNUAL REPORT

LAGUNABLANCA.ORG 1


DEAR LAGUNA FAMILIES, ALUMNI, AND FRIENDS,
The idea of going “beyond”—beyond what is expected, beyond what is common, beyond what is normal—has always been
a central tenet of a Laguna education. In fact, one of the things that has impressed me most since joining Laguna is that our
teachers are constantly investing themselves in the ongoing evolution of our school. They are finding new ways to teach, new
courses to offer, and new technologies to enhance the learning process. This issue of Laguna Blanca Magazine celebrates their
willingness to take chances—and our students’ willingness to take similar risks in their own lives.
For instance, this winter, Upper School students will take on an exciting feat: organizing their own TEDx event (P 4).
The project was made possible by Humanities Instructor Anna Alldredge, who, along with Sixth Grade Instructor Allison
Armstrong, went beyond their everyday teaching duties to become certified as TEDx Youth Coaches. Their eagerness to step
out of their comfort zones will allow our students to gain hands-on experience managing—and in some cases, speaking at—a
globally recognized event. It will also allow them to forge even stronger relationships with our alumni and the greater Santa
Barbara community—relationships they will carry with them for the rest of their lives.
Increasingly, our teachers are handing over the reins and allowing our students to take ownership of the learning process
(such as our entrepreneurship program, P 20). Why? Often, in traditional classroom settings, the students who are successful
are the ones who are good at following directions. That model works well at instilling good study habits, but it doesn’t teach
students how to ask hard questions, solve their own problems, and discover their own voices in real life. The latter is something
Laguna Blanca students are learning to do every day, in every classroom EK through 12.
The truth is, the world is changing so fast that most of the jobs our students will end up doing don’t even exist yet.That’s why
we’re committed more than ever to teaching our students how to find their place in the world, even amidst chaos and change.
We want to give them the skills to stay grounded in new and unfamiliar situations (as did last year’s Senior Project Award
winner Maddy Nicolson ’17, P 28). We want to teach students to communicate problems and find tangible solutions for
solving them (such as our K-9 engineering partnership, P 14). During their tenure at Laguna, we want to instill confidence,
a sense of responsibility, and an understanding of their strengths and how to apply them for the greater good. In short, we
want to give students more than a solid education; we want to help them become good people capable of building happy and
successful lives.
As we welcome new Board Chair Hani Zeini (P 36), I’m even more inspired than ever to be part of the Laguna
community. His sense of vision and entrepreneurial spirit will help lay the groundwork for Laguna’s own success in the coming
decades. Thank you all for joining us on this exciting journey as we continue to grow and advance our school community.

Warm Regards,

Rob Hereford, Head of School

2 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE


SAVE THE DATE

ALUMNI SOCCER GAME

November 25, 2017
For details, visit the alumni page at
lagunablanca.org.

UPPER SCHOOL PRODUCTION

January 11 and 12, 2018 | 7PM
January 13, 2018 | 2PM
Rumors a farce by Neil Simon
Set in the Palisades, the two-act
comedy follows a hilarious cast all
drawn into a dinner party gone awry.

TEDx LAGUNA BLANCA SCHOOL

January 31, 2018
Details on page 4.

SPRING BENEFIT

April 28, 2018
Bacara Resort & Spa

LAGUNABLANCA.ORG 3


INDEPENDENCE

PROJECT- Students embrace public speaking with
BASED first-ever TEDxLagunaBlancaSchool.

COURAGE

Fear of public speaking? Not at Laguna “Essentially, the students in this elective will mentor, and lead weekly board meetings.
Blanca. This fall, Laguna students are be running their own non-profit organization, “At Laguna, we value strong communication
embracing the challenge by hosting—and for top to bottom,” Alldredge says. “And the final
some, presenting at—their own TEDx event. project will be a daylong TEDx event open to skills and provide ample public speaking
The semester-long, project-based learning the entire Santa Barbara community.” opportunities so students are able to stand up and
initiative is part of a student elective led by deliver information confidently to any group,”
Humanities Instructor Anna Alldredge. The event will feature 10 to 15 speakers, all of Alldredge says. “TEDxLagunaBlancaSchool
whom will be vetted through a tight application provides an exciting opportunity to emphasize
“As an English teacher, I’ve always valued process and selected by the class members. the power of public speaking, innovation, and
the importance of public speaking,” Alldredge With TED’s focus on “ideas worth spreading,” collaboration to all of our students.”
says. “TEDx will allow our students to take the speaker lineup will include a mix of Laguna
that learning to an entirely new level.” students, alumni, and professionals from a One of the most exciting things about
variety of fields. organizing the event, according to Alldredge,
Both Alldredge and Sixth Grade has been the support and excitement among
Instructor Allison Armstrong were trained While some schools may struggle with Laguna teachers and students, all of whom
and certified to oversee TEDxYouth events getting kids interested in public speaking—one have expressed a willingness to help and be
during TEDWomen2016—an experience of the world’s greatest phobias—Laguna has part of the larger TEDxLagunaBlancaSchool
made possible by Laguna’s professional not had that problem. The school makes public process.
development fund. Though they will provide speaking a part of its education process starting
the foundation and structure for the students in kindergarten, when students have the chance “We want all of Laguna to feel ownership of
to grow and learn, the students themselves to recite poems, deliver lines, and perform in this amazing opportunity,” Alldredge says. “The
will be running the show, all to the same front of large groups of people. The goal is to students are chomping at the bit to get going.
standards as any other TEDx event. That get students comfortable serving as leaders in As a teacher, there’s nothing more exciting than
means identifying a meaningful theme, their own classrooms—and eventually their seeing that enthusiasm.”
selecting speakers, creating and managing own communities. That’s why, in addition to
a budget, and organizing professional- planning the TEDx event, all participants in
level audio and visual coverage so it can be the elective will present a mini-talk of their own
shared around the world. within the class, collaborate with a professional

4 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE


Executive Producers Emma Raith ’20, Camila Lemere ’18, Teacher Anna Alldredge, Hayley Bankhead ’19, Kiki Tolles ’20 (not pictured Lexi Andrews ’19)

TEDX: A LAGUNA TRADITION IN THE MAKING WHAT

The TEDx conference is just public speaking, developing a TEDxLagunaBlancaSchool
one exciting addition to Laguna’s speech, and presenting to selective
long legacy of public speaking audiences. WHEN
education. The Public Speaking
course—a requirement for Laguna “When students ask me why January 31, 2018, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
graduation—has been taught for Public Speaking is a graduation
more than 20 years by teacher Trish requirement, I tell them that our WHERE
McHale but has been in existence students often become leaders
even longer. The UC-accredited in whatever field they choose, Laguna Blanca’s Hope Ranch campus
class is open to students in grades and public speaking is a key to
9-12 and introduces students to great leadership,” McHale says. ABOUT
public speaking as an important “On back-to-school night, when
component of their academic and I present the course to parents, In the spirit of “ideas worth spreading,”
social lives. They develop skills many of them tell me that they wish TEDx is a program of local, self-
such as getting over the fear of that they’d had a public speaking organized events that bring people
class in high school.” together to share a TED-like experience.

WHO

Organized by Laguna students,
Grades 9-12

For more information, tickets,
and speaker line-up, visit
tedxlagunablancaschool.com.

LAGUNABLANCA.ORG 5


THEY'VE GOT GAME.

You probably already know that Laguna student athletes work hard. But did you know
how many different sports our students play—both on campus and beyond it? Whether
they are riding horses or dirt bikes, these students are calling their own shots and
following their passions wherever life takes them.

A RACER’S HEART For Ezren Colson ’28, dirt-bike racing is a matter of destiny.
Both his grandfather and father were acclaimed dirt bike riders,
EZREN COLSON and Ezren himself has been riding since the age of four. Now in
the third year of his accomplished motocross “career,” Ezren is
Ezren ’28 is destined to ride. working hard to create a life in professional racing—a sport he was
seemingly built for.
6 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE
“Racing is in his blood,” says mom Lindsay Colson. “It is in
every part of him.”

Ezren participated in his first race at the age of five, taking second
place in the California Gold Cup—a state-wide competition with
some 30 to 40 young riders. Since then, he’s continued to practice
up to 10 hours a week, competing in competitions such as the
Transworld MX Series and the MX Fall Series, making respectable
finishes in both. His most imminent goals: participating in the
Mammoth National Series and the KTM Junior Race, which is
raced on the same track used by his Supercross idols—including
his favorite, Ryan Dungey.

According to his mother, the Colsons let Ezren decide how far
to push his motocross ambitions, and they never stop stressing the
importance of his education. Indeed, to qualify for the KTM Junior
Race, the organization takes Ezren’s qualifications both on and
off the trails—including academic performance at Laguna—into
consideration.

This summer, Ezren took a few months off to explore a new
sport: tackle football. But he is back on the trails—with his father
managing his pit crew—again this fall.

FAVORITE BIKE

KTM Junior

FAVORITE TRACK TO RACE & TRAIN

Milestone MX in Riverside


HORSES' NAMES

Cosmo and Sinatra (Show names:
Cosmopolitan and Sinatra’s Ruhm)

HORSING AROUND

“I like to gallop my friends' horses on
the beach once in a while! The Hope
Ranch Beach is perfect for this. The
trails throughout Hope Ranch are
very fun to ride through because they
are so scenic and shady. I know that
the horses appreciate the change in
scenery from the regular arena.”

RIDING DAYS

Tuesday through Saturday (on her own
horses), with lessons practicing on un-
known horses on Sundays.

A COURSE IN HORSE

JULIA STONE

It’s more than a sport—it’s a relationship. That’s the reality for year, Stone will compete and travel two or three times a month,
Julia Stone ’19, who has been riding horses since the age of five. leaving on Wednesday or Thursday night so she doesn’t miss too
much school. The shows are long days—often lasting from 6 a.m.
“Horses are so much more than pets,” Stone says. “They are there to 7 p.m., followed by homework at the hotel, whether it be in San
for you when you are sad and can sense the slightest change in your Diego, Sacramento, or Palm Springs. Next fall, Julia plans to fly
emotions immediately. They react to all of your actions and truly with her horses to Washington D.C., Pennsylvania, and possibly
become your partner when you are on course at a competition.” Kentucky for two to three weeks to compete in multiple National
Finals. Despite the rigorous schedule, it’s riding that brings peace
Stone began riding competitively when she was 10 years old. and calm to Stone when she’s stressed about life in the “real world.”
She now competes in Hunter, Equitation, Jumper (or jumping)
riding, spending much of her time at Elvenstar with Jim Hagman “When I get on my horse, I forget about any stress that I am
in Moorpark, CA. feeling,” she says. “I am no longer worried about things like how
I did on my math test. I feel calm and carefree, focusing on my
The community is very tight at the barn, Stone says. “We are partnership with the two-ton horse beneath me.”
practically a family.” Indeed, riders put so much time into training
and the competition circuit, that it is no surprise they develop
such close relationships—with their horses and one another. This

LAGUNABLANCA.ORG 7


FAVORITE TEAMS

Yankees and Dodgers (Fell’s family
hails from New York and California)

FAVORITE COLLEGE TEAM

“UCSB. The players are so great to the
kids who come to see them play.”

HE FELL FOR BASEBALL For Nicky Fell ’22, baseball is a very mental sport—but it’s also
a social one. In fact, when he talks about his love of the game, Fell
NICKY FELL speaks just as much about his teammates as he does about his
own accomplishments.
8 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE
Fell started playing baseball at Goleta Valley South Little League
at age five. Now in eighth grade, he’s made a name for himself as
both a pitcher and second baseman, bringing home numerous
hits, wins, and even some all-star championships for Goleta Valley
South and his travel team, Surf Santa Barbara. A grounded kid—
Fell shows tremendous commitment to the sport of baseball. He
practices frequently, even during the off-season, and often plays
in numerous games each week. But he’s equally committed to the
teammates that make the sport so fun.

“Being part of a great team makes the hard work a lot of fun,” he
says. “They’re awesome guys all around.”

As with any student-athlete, the well-spoken Fell works hard
to find a good balance between his rigorous academic schedule at
Laguna and his work on the baseball field. His family has taught him
that sports come second, he says. Knowing he has their full support
behind him, he does his best to balance his school commitments
with this team commitments.

“My mom always tells me, ‘Your brain is more important than
your right arm,’” Fell says. “My baseball career won’t last forever, but
hopefully my brain will.”

For now, Fell is finding a good balance with both, and he’s
focused on making his dream of playing college ball a reality.

“My favorite schools are UCSB, Auburn, USC, and Vanderbilt.
I hope I am lucky enough to get to play for one of them,” Fell says
humbly. “All I want to do is keep playing.”


ALL GOOD IN THE LONG RUN These days, it seems most kids start training for sports when they’re
as young as five. Waiting until their junior year of high school to play
AURA CARLSON sounds impossible. But not at Laguna. Just ask Aura Carlson ’18, who
not only joined Laguna’s Cross Country team in her junior year, but
FAVORITE RUNNING ROUTE also helped the girls team win the Condor League, as well as took first
place in the girls individual Condor League Championship, all in her
To the bridge and back in Hope Ranch first year in the sport.
or around the Mission area.
“Aura is such an important member of the team,” says David
FAVORITE RUNNING SHOE Silverander ’01, Laguna’s Cross Country team coach and alumnus.
“She has a natural knack for running, a great work ethic, and a
Saucony consistently positive attitude that makes her an outstanding teammate.”

Carlson says she started running for fun when she was in eighth
grade. And though she enjoyed it, she chose to focus on volleyball and
soccer during her first two years of Upper School. But in her junior
year—she felt pulled to the trails and decided to leave volleyball to give
cross country a try. She hasn’t looked back since.

“To do cross country, you need to have a strong mental drive to keep
going,” she says. “Cross country has taught me that putting in hard work
and effort feels good—both mentally and physically. You think ‘Good
job! You ran five miles!’ You feel healthy.”

Since Carlson continues to participate in both cross country and
soccer, she says she’s noticed some differences in being a student-
athlete in each sport. On one hand, cross country meets are usually off
campus, making it more difficult for other students to attend and cheer
on the team like they do in soccer. On the other hand, the smaller,
tight-knit vibe of the team has helped them grow even closer—working
together to overcome arduous trails, even when they’re tired or their legs
are aching.

“I've learned that cross country feels like both an individual and a
team sport,” Carlson says. “It's individual because your body is, indeed,
running by itself. However, it also feels like a team sport because you are
constantly supporting your teammates and encouraging each other to
keep going. It would be a lot less enjoyable without running buddies to
talk to and motivate you!”

When it comes to her accomplishments on the trail, Carlson is
modest. She’s reduced her mile-time from eight minutes to seven
minutes, is getting better at running up hills, and is grateful for the
win at the Condor League Championship in 2016 with the rest of her
team. And for that, she credits not just her teammates, but her Laguna
teachers, as well. “Laguna values its student athletes and has always
done a great job of making sure all the teams feel supported if they
have to miss class for a game or meet,” she says. “It’s like they’re all an
important part of my team—helping me to find the balance I need
to be successful.”

LAGUNABLANCA.ORG 9


ChSaulclceens
It is time to build a bigger picture of success. That’s the
message being shared through Laguna’s Challenge Success
program, which aims to create a new paradigm for student
achievement—one with less stress and a greater love of
learning. In doing so, the program builds a more meaningful
and joyful educational experience—one that sets students
up for success not just in college admissions, but also life
beyond.
Launched in 2016, Challenge Success may seem like a
surprising addition for a school like Laguna, which prides
itself on academic rigor. But according to Dr. Kathy Piller,
the program's director, that is exactly why the program is so
important. In the midst of many challenging courses, sports
and theater practices, and service commitments, it is easy for
students to become overwhelmed. Laguna’s teachers want
to change that, Piller says. And they’re looking to parents
and students to help them.
The following is an overview of how the program works
and why it’s needed at every educational level to keep
Laguna’s students healthy and resilient. (continued on P 12)

10 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE


ging
s

LAGUNABLANCA.ORG 11


LOWER SCHOOL or life skill development—both of which are necessary for living
balanced, happy, and responsible lives.
Six-year-olds stressed out about life—sounds crazy, right?
But today’s kids are pulled in more directions than ever before. WHY IT’S IMPORTANT:
Students as young as kindergarten are experiencing the tug of High-achieving private and public high school students average
school, multiple sports, and other after-school activities that make 3.07 hours of homework each night, leaving little time for rest
it hard to be … well … kids. That’s one of the reasons Piller hopes and self-exploration.
to spread Challenge Success principles to the Lower School this
year through the Challenge Success Book Club. (See sidebar) COLLEGE

WHY IT’S IMPORTANT: Rather than seeing college as the end-goal, Challenge Success
Students in grades 4 through 6 who went to bed an average teaches students and parents to look at college as an experiential
of 30 to 40 minutes earlier improved memory, motor speed, stepping stone. The right college will allow them to pursue their
attention, and other abilities associated with math and reading passions and gain experience in the things that matter most to
test scores. them. It will allow them to develop their strengths and to find
new ones—ones that will help them play a meaningful role in
MIDDLE SCHOOL society once they graduate.

One of the largest stresses among Middle School students— LIFE BEYOND
getting into college. Yes, it seems early. But students today
have absorbed the frenetic pace of the world around them, says The ultimate goal of Challenge Success is to prepare students
Piller, taking everything from sports to academics incredibly for this stage of life. A confident, well-rounded student who
seriously. The result is not enough downtime and an increase in understands what they need to be successful in the world will
anxiety, especially in the Middle School years. Piller has created truly go on to become a success. That doesn’t just mean having a
Challenge Success events specifically for Middle School parents, good job. It means being fulfilled and happy with their work, life,
helping them to understand the different factors stressing their and family, as well.
children—and why academics are not the end-all, be-all of the
Middle School journey. “We know it takes a tremendous amount of trust to take on
this mind-shift in education,” Piller says. “It’s scary to let go of the
WHY IT’S IMPORTANT: concept of the traditional idea of success. But all of us at Laguna
More 9 to 13-year-olds said they were stressed by academics are here to help students and parents through the process. We’re
than any other cause—including bullying or family problems. ready to do it together.”

UPPER SCHOOL CHALLENGE SUCCESS BOOK CLUB

The tipping point of educational stress comes in the high Join the program. Attend an event or conference, join the
school years, when students feel the pressure to get into a good Challenge Success Book Club, and get firsthand insights
college. In a recent “fish bowl” experience, Laguna students were from your children on what they need to succeed in school
asked if they frequently go to the beach after school. The question and life. “We all have the students’ best interest at heart,”
was met with laughter. “Of course not! Who has time for the says Piller. “We want to make sure they get the most out of
beach? We have homework, APs, and sports practice to get to!” their education.”
Parents want their kids to take the toughest classes. Coaches want
them to be at every practice. And extracurricular activities feel The first book being shared through the Challenge Success
like a mandatory requirement for college admissions, rather than Book Club is The Gift of Failure by Jessica Lahey. Today’s
a fun hobby. The result? Stress and a continued lack of downtime generation of children tend to seek instant gratification and
give up when things don’t come easily to them. The book
12 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE teaches the importance of commitment, tenacity, and
working hard to make meaningful things happen. Everyone
is welcome! For more information, contact Kathy Piller at
kpiller@lagunablanca.org.


“We’re
encouraging
students and
parents to look
beyond college—
to set a goal of
having a happy
and meaningful
life.”

DR. KATHY PILLER, CHALLENGE SUCCESS


COMMUNITY

ENGINEERING BRIGHT FUTURES

Last year, Laguna kindergartners had enhancements—and the engineering Upper School students presented their
the chance to develop solutions for real- students were charged with bringing their working solutions to their kindergarten
world problems and see them come to often-unorthodox solutions to life. “bosses,” whose feedback accounted for 20
life with help from students in the Upper percent of their engineering course grade.
School Introduction to Engineering class. “The kindergartners were like a moving
The project was a collaborative partnership ship in a rough ocean,” Moore says. Although engineering skills were an
between kindergarten Teacher Mieke “The Upper School students were the important element of the project, Moore
Delwiche and EK-STEM Coordinator reality check. We’ve all been in situations emphasizes that technical communication
Zack Moore. where we’ve received assignments or is the foundation of every engineering
challenges that simply weren’t rational. course he teaches.To succeed in the modern
Since 2014, Laguna kindergarten The Upper School students had to learn world, he says, students need to be able to
students have been part of the school’s how to solve problems in that kind of collaborate, working with large groups of
growing STEM Program, enjoying hands- real-world environment.” people, often with unrealistic or competing
on LEGO building classes once a week. goals. The class was also empowering, as
This past year, Moore and Delwiche saw As the younger students worked it gave his students a chance to be leaders
an opportunity to bring even greater hard to clearly express their ideas, the and teach the things they’ve worked so
strength to the course through a new engineering team created sketches that hard to learn.
interdisciplinary partnership. Moore would work—or work around—the
also assessed the program through a ideas they were presented. According to According to Delwiche, communication
participant’s eyes; his son was a new Delwiche, ideas were as wide-ranging as was also a core principle for the
kindergarten student. retractable suction-cups, looping tracks, kindergarteners, who had to learn to develop
and trampoline jumps. The engineers then their own concepts and communicate them
“I’m always interested in more outreach went about sourcing materials, creating clearly and logically—not always a simple
to our younger students,” Moore says. CAD designs, and printing 3-D models to task for a 5-year-old. Another huge bonus
“It was an opportunity for our older test as part of the Magnawall design. for the kindergarten students: early exposure
budding engineers to showcase their to technology such as CAD design and 3-D
design skills and serve as mentors for our “One of the greatest lessons my students printing—things many students don’t have
younger students.” learned is that sometimes ideas don’t work regular hands-on experience with.
the first time around,” Delwiche says “It’s
Throughout the semester, the OK to go back to the drawing board—to The project went so well that Moore
kindergartners participated in numerous start over again or to make changes to repeated it with Laguna’s first graders in
design challenges. The largest of these was your original design. That doesn’t mean the spring semester. The greatest takeaway:
a project to study the school’s Magnawall you failed or did it wrong. It means you’re the confidence each student—Lower and
to determine how it could function taking risks and working to find the Upper School alike—was able to build
better and play an even greater role on right solution.” through their semester-long interaction,
campus. The kindergartners were charged both with engineering and one another.
with analyzing the wall and envisioning Throughout the semester, the students
met by video chat, and ultimately the

14 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE


GIRLS JUST WANT TO...

BUILD STUFF

One of the greatest parts of Laguna’s STEM program is that it
teaches that engineering—traditionally seen as a man’s field—is
for everyone, regardless of age or gender. Kindergarten Teacher
Mieke Delwiche supplies GoldieBlox in her classroom in addition
to LEGOs, to ensure the girls are equally drawn to bricks during
building time. According to STEM Teacher Zack Moore, the girls
were not only some of the best engineers in the class, they were
also some of the best communicators.

During the course, Upper School
students worked hard to capture the
imaginations of the kindergartners
on paper, sketching out the solutions
they created.

The engineering partnership
was made possible through both
professional development and
summer project funding. THANK
YOU for your support. Another
engineering partnership, involving
kindergarten and grade 3 and the
use of 3-D pens and coding, will be
added this year.

LAGUNABLANCA.ORG 15


YOU'VE GOT (ANOTHER)

FRIEND AT LAGUNA

It’s no secret, Middle School can be a challenging time for many the most of their Laguna education. The ultimate goal is for deeper
children. It’s filled with changes to their bodies, to their voices, and to relationships to develop over time without creating an extra stressor on
their relationships—changes that can be overwhelming when factored the students.
into a full academic schedule. That’s why this school year, Teacher
Kim Valentine is embarking on a mission to make sure no Middle “We want to make it as easy as possible for the Middle School
School student ever falls through the cracks. Her vision involves creating students to get the help they need, but we also realize it’s hard to reach
a peer-level network of support via a new Peer Mentorship program. out if you are struggling,”Valentine says. “We know that sometimes you
The project will allow Upper School students in Grades 10 through 12 have to meet people where they are. That’s where the empathy portion
to support those in Grades 5 through 8 by giving advice, guidance, and of the program comes in.”
feedback for challenges they’ve recently overcome themselves.
RISKS WORTH TAKING
MENTORS IN THE MAKING
Valentine knows launching a program like this requires a lot of
Some 40 Upper School students have already volunteered to mentor trust from the administration, student volunteers, and Middle School
their fellow students—all of whom completed a lengthy survey about students alike. Still, she emphasizes her confidence in the Upper School
their own personal experience before getting involved in the program. students, Dean of Students Shane Lopes, and the rest of the Laguna
team who have helped to build the program.
“What was clear in reading the students’ questionnaires is that each
and every one had a genuine interest and passion for participating in “Laguna is a place where we all know we’ll be supported in trying
the program,” Valentine says. “Over and over, I saw the comment, ‘I new things—and we’ll always have someone there with us to help make
wish I’d had a peer mentor when I was that age.’” the program a success,” Valentine says.

While Laguna is small, with many levels of support for each student, TIME TO HORSE AROUND
sometimes it takes a peer to get a message to sink in completely. “Often,
kids don’t hear adults the same way they hear other kids,”Valentine says. As part of their mentor preparation, the Upper School students
“That’s not a bad thing; it’s how they grow and find their independence. participated in an equine training course, learning to identify subtle
The Peer Mentorship program ensures they always have an older peer emotions and practice empathy with others. Valentine chose the hands-
they can turn to. We are lucky to have a fantastic group of Upper School on horse therapy program for the same reason so many other Laguna
students who can be that person for them.” teachers are turning to project-based learning.

As part of the program, Upper School students will break into “We didn’t want the students to sit in a room and listen to us talk
groups of four or five and visit Middle School advisory groups twice about being empathetic,” she says. “We wanted them to experience it
each quarter, leading discussions on topics like changing relationships, first-hand. Horses are one of the most emotionally resonant animals
time management, academic stress, and even the ways they’ve made there are. They’re incredibly intuitive—we knew there was a lot our
students could learn from them.”

16 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE


LAGUNABLANCA.ORG 17


SHOULD WE HIRE
A PRIVATE COUNSELOR?

BY MATT STRUCKMEYER, DIRECTOR OF COLLEGE COUNSELING

The extensive, highly individualized services offered by Laguna their unique needs, strengths, and interests. At Laguna, each student’s
Blanca’s College Counseling office are more than most families will ever college list is a culmination of an extensive process of self-examination,
need. Nevertheless, here are a few points to consider when evaluating interviewing, discussion, and journal writing. No two students’ lists
whether hiring an additional private college counselor would be helpful. should be the same because no two students are the same.

BEGIN EARLY EMPOWER THE STUDENT

Attend the Grade 9/10 College Night and similar events at College essay writing, when done right, empowers a student by
Laguna. We will cover everything a family needs to know to maximize expanding self-awareness, helping the student find his or her voice,
competitiveness and a healthy range of choices. Additionally, college and crucially, building confidence in taking risks. College admissions
admissions representatives will be available to discuss the finer points of personnel are drawn away from “overly packaged” candidates whose
what makes an excellent applicant and how colleges make their choices. essays are clearly the work of a private counselor. At Laguna Blanca, we
empower students to find their own voice and shine as an individual in
OWN THE PROCESS the college application process.

Make an appointment with me and attend college information GET ADMINISTRATIVE HELP
sessions at Laguna. Admissions officers—the people who actually read
and evaluate applications—will candidly discuss how admission really One helpful role for an additional college consultant is as a task
works, as well as what often backfires: the over-involvement of well- manager, keeping the less-organized student on top of the huge volume
meaning adults. You’ll see how much these professionals rely on a school's of college-related writing and tasks and sparing the “nag factor” that
college counselor to understand each student and why frequent meetings causes friction between applicants and their parents. This is a valuable
are the key. service, but it should cost far less than the fee many parents needlessly
pay years earlier.
BROADEN HORIZONS
THE FINAL WORD
If you do hire an outside counselor, choose one who is clearly familiar
with and recommends a broad range of schools and who will direct you Before soliciting help from an outside college counselor, schedule
to institutions that are in the best interest of your child—one size doesn’t an appointment with me. My experience in college counseling
fit all. I have personally visited nearly 300 of the nation’s best colleges and personal approach will empower each student to enter and thrive
and universities and can guide students to the schools that will best suit in the best college or university.

18 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE


N I C E TO ME E T YO U !

L A G U N A OP E N HO U S E EV E N T S

GRADES EK-4: NOVEMBER 30 & JANUARY 18 | 3:30-5:00PM | 260 SAN YSIDRO ROAD
GRADES 5-12: JANUARY 6 | 9:30AM-12:30PM | 4125 PALOMA DRIVE

REGISTER AT LAGUNABLANCA.ORG/OPEN

LAGUNABLANCA.ORG 19


IDEAS

S TA R T- U P

RevolutionA

LAGUNA HOSTS For three days this past June, Laguna
E D U C AT O R ' S Blanca’s Hope Ranch campus served
CONFERENCE ON as an incubator for entrepreneurship
ENTREPRENEURIAL education programs that will soon
STUDIES launch in schools all over the world.
Twenty-four educators from an array
of different schools and backgrounds,
came to campus to learn how project-
based business courses—like Laguna’s
own Entrepreneurship and Innovation
course—can teach students vital skills
for success in the 21st century.

20 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE


Developed at Hawken School in Cleveland "It was the students who came to me asking for
and spread globally by Wildfire Education, the
curriculum has been steadily anchoring itself more real-world experiences. I realized I can't tell
at Laguna and the greater community since it
was launched by Upper School Teacher Paul them to go out there and take chances if I'm not
Chiment and Middle School Teacher Blake
Dorfman ’02 two years ago. The idea is to get actually doing it myself." - PAUL CHIMENT
students to tackle real-world problems—an
education revolution for today’s changing world. universities, inner-city public schools, or FOR MORE INFORMATION
independent schools.
“In the past, my idea of success for the kids Special thanks to Doris Korda and Wildfire
was how well I had prepared them for their next “Because I have taught courses that Education for leading the three-day course
math class,” Chiment says. “It was the students are very content-driven, I am usually the on the Laguna campus. Check out Wildfire’s
who came to me asking for more real-world ‘expert’ on what I’m teaching,” Chiment “Do School Better” podcast (Season 3,
experiences. I realized I can’t tell them to go out says. “But this program forced me to walk Episode 56) for an interview with Blake
there and take chances if I’m not actually doing into a classroom where I didn’t have the Dorfman and Paul Chiment about the event:
it myself.” answer—and honestly, I didn’t even know Wildfire-Education.org/doschoolbetter.
what the question would be. I was no longer
After meeting Steve Blank, a billionaire in control of the content. That’s real life.”
who designed a hands-on entrepreneurship
course for Stanford University’s business By the end of the conference, teachers
school, Chiment was inspired to design a left the campus with concrete ideas for
course specifically for Laguna. In Chiment’s piloting programs in their own locations,
class, teams of Upper School students act as and personalizing them based on size, time
consultants to local businesses—including many constraints, and community access. That’s
owned by Laguna alumni—studying how they something Laguna will continue to do as the
operate and offering solutions to any issues they courses grow and develop on campus. And
may be facing. Meanwhile, Middle Schoolers in according to Chiment, those changes will
Dorfman’s class design and develop solutions for continue to be made with a new definition
clients on campus, learning the fundamentals of “success” in mind.
of Blank’s “Lean Launchpad,” which focuses on
building successful start-ups. “In my first couple years of teaching,
I basically just wanted to get through the
Since launching the course at Laguna, textbook and be liked by my students,” he
Chiment and Dorfman have been major says. “But now, as I’ve moved into 20-plus
proponents of the teaching and were thrilled years of teaching, I want to help students
to help other teachers learn more about it. to be better adults. I want them to have a
Their main goal: give teachers the confidence meaningful life.”
to take on an entirely new way of teaching
in their own learning environments, be it

LAGUNABLANCA.ORG 21


MELISSA ABRAMS

HER PATH
TO ART

Landscape by Melissa (Seawards) Abrams

22 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE


What does biology have to do with art? She spent 11 years there before moving into require keen observation. Those are skills our
A lot, if you’re Lower School Art Instructor the classroom at Laguna Blanca in 2011, when students can use in any career.”
Melissa Abrams. For a woman who didn’t take her own children, Ben ’10, Austin ’12, and
her first art class until she was a senior in high Danielle ’16 began attending the school. This fall, Abrams is partnering with Science
school, both art and science have played a huge Teacher Clara Svedlund to help Laguna’s third
role in her ever-evolving life. One of the things Abrams appreciates and fourth grade students create a 25-foot
most about Laguna’s art curriculum is that it mural featuring flora and fauna of the Channel
Abrams’ father was a doctor—with a love offers full-length art classes starting in EK. Islands habitat. Students will bring to life the
for drawing. And though he encouraged her Perhaps even more importantly, she says, art is animals and native plants they’re learning
passion for artwork from a young age, it wasn’t integrated into studies throughout the Lower about in their science courses and enjoy seeing
until later that she considered making it a School curriculum, ensuring the concepts those paintings in the garden for years to come.
central part of her career. In fact, when she truly hold. That could mean illustrating poetry
headed off to the University of New Hampshire, students have written or creating cave paintings Knowing that confidence in art often
she was planning to major in biology, until that correspond to students’ classroom studies decreases as children get older, Abrams tries
one special botany professor discovered her of California history. Or, it could mean using her best to ensure that students find a particular
talent for drawing. As luck would have it, his art to further understand cultural events such type of art that suits their passion and skillset
father was a well-known scientific illustrator. as the Chinese New Year and the Mexican and that the confidence they feel in their own
That connection led Abrams to make the Revolution. creativity truly endures.
unusual choice of double majoring in both art
and biology and eventually heading into the “I especially love formulating art projects “For some people, creating a piece of art can
medical illustration field. that tie to our science curriculum, since both feel like a big risk,” Abrams says. “But when my
of those subjects are close to my heart and help students get discouraged or feel like a piece isn’t
“I recognize the value that a teacher can students understand big concepts about their working out the way they’d like, I tell them to
have in forging one’s sense of self at a young world,” Abrams says. “I have always believed art keep pushing on. Some of the best things we
age,” Abrams says. “My high school art teacher and science are similar in many ways.Both focus create in life come from our biggest mistakes.
and university professor both believed in my on problem-solving—creatively constructing Once they realize they can work through those
skills as an artist. I would not have pursued a solutions where none existed before—and both challenges, they’ll know they are capable of
career in art if it hadn’t been for them.” anything. That’s a lesson for life.”

Abrams enjoyed a successful career in
illustration early on working for several
research universities. But when new
technology in graphic design emerged, she
knew she needed to reinvent the direction
her career was taking. After testing the
waters in a medical laboratory as a phlebotomist,
she then moved into the field of healthcare
public relations, where she could utilize her
graphic design skills, along with other creative
interests such as writing and event planning.
Still, art kept calling her back home—and soon
her career would change once again.

When her kids entered elementary school,
Abrams was given a special opportunity: to
teach art at her children’s school, El Montecito.

LAGUNABLANCA.ORG 23


TESTING OUR LIMITS

TAKING A BITE OUT OF

NEW YORK

24 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE


UPPER SCHOOL STUDENTS HIGHLIGHTS OF THE TRIP

EMBRACE THE COMPLEXITY OF After studying the history and culture of the Harlem
Renaissance, students met up with Harlem tour guides
URBAN LIFE IN NEW YORK CITY who welcomed them with open arms. They walked
together across the basketball courts their guides grew up
Through Laguna’s Global Urban Studies Initiative, Upper on, into the gospel services they still attend, and eventually
School students test classroom learning against real-world onto the stage of the historic Apollo Theater for its Mock
settings in some of the 21st century’s major cities. In March Amateur Night, where one talented Laguna student was
2017, 50 students and five faculty traveled to New York City invited to perform—a tremendous honor.
for a five-day trip through the neighborhoods and boroughs
of Chelsea, Harlem, Brooklyn, Lower Manhattan, and In Brooklyn, students met iconic 70s street artist Lady
Greenwich Village. Led by English Instructor and Experiential Pink, who established herself as a groundbreaking subway
Learning Coordinator Ashley Tidey, students deepened their artist at the age of 14. She chided Tidey for not taking the
understanding of the people and events that continue to shape kids to see more street art.
New York City.
In Greenwich Village, students visited New York University,
As with the other Urban Studies adventures—New Orleans where they met with the editors, writers, and cartographers
(2016) and London (2015)—the project involved months of behind Nonstop Metropolis and presented their own
research before the trip and synthesis after students returned. projects.
This three-stage process yielded myriad individual and group
projects, including essays, maps, performances, and works of art. In Chelsea, students met the people featured in Marc
Levin’s HBO documentary Class Divide, the centerpiece of
Students’ research was inspired in part by Rebecca Solnit and the class’s study of gentrification. The film tells the story
Joshua Jelly-Schapiro’s 2016 publication Nonstop Metropolis: A of class division through the eyes of two groups of young
New York City Atlas, which acted as a springboard, launching the people: those living in the Elliott-Chelsea housing projects
group deep into the mysteries of New York, in much the same and those who attend an elite private school just 115
way Solnit’s New Orleans Atlas had done the previous year. steps away. The Hudson Guild, a multi-service outreach
organization in Chelsea, hosted the conversation where
Learning continued after the trip as a team of a dozen students met executive director Ken Jockers and enjoyed
students, affectionately known as “The Mappers,” led the ninth a surprise visit from Class Divide director Marc Levin.
grade in a group art project. They used a design thinking model
to envision a map of New York with artistic icons representing Before the trip, students had met Lady Pink, Jockers, and
individual projects “pinned”in the relevant geographical borough. Jelly-Schapiro virtually, as part of a research task to send a
Another team of students worked over the summer to create a “cold call” email requesting an interview with someone they
website showcasing the range of essays and projects produced didn’t know who could shed light on their research topic.
throughout the program.
See next page for some of those research projects.
FINDING THEIR PLACES
LAGUNABLANCA.ORG 25
Not surprisingly, experiencing the people and places pivotal
to New York City connected students to them in immeasurable
ways and is another example of how Laguna develops students
with the courage to leave their comfort zones and find their
places in an increasingly diverse and complex world.

“I remember many moments during the trip when I felt
completely at home,” said current sophomore Beau Glazier,
“like a puzzle piece that finally found its fit in the concrete jigsaw
of New York City.”


THROUGH THEIR OWN EYES | IN THEIR OWN WORDS

The following are just a few excerpts from the essays students completed as part of their explorations—in class, in text, and in person—of New York.

BEAU GLAZIER '20 sidewalks, 2,872 blocks of streets, five boroughs can lead to crime and prison—a history of how
with at least 250 neighborhoods, and the one vendor can show one man a different view
THE PUBLIC RUNWAY: A CELEBRATION OF population of about 8.4 million people—each of the world—a history of how a dead historian
NEW YORK CITY STREET FASHION AND BILL with a story. A story of heartbreak, tragedy, can stir up the past to become equivalent with
CUNNINGHAM excitement, adventure, or all of the above. These the present. A history of how we coexist.
walkways and communities are melting pots
Through his photographs, Bill Cunningham of the dynamic and quintessential aspects that GRACE FITZPATRICK '20
(March 13, 1929 - June 25, 2016), a street feed into New York’s mysterious and diverse
fashion photographer for The New York Times, ways. The major story is a culmination of COLORFUL YOUTH: AN EXAMINATION OF HOW
captured the juxtaposition of these two diverse smaller narratives that lead you to realize New GRAFFITI EMERGED IN THE 1970s NEW YORK
definitions of the term “runway” and, most York is not one city but many cities that are
importantly, documented fashion’s reinvention diversified and allow “the ubiquitous presence Graffiti art was and still is part of a vibrant,
during the eighties. Cunningham’s journalistic of nonnative bodies” (Cadogan 98). The three world-wide cultural and artistic movement
and democratic observation is what declared million foreign people and immigrants who that will always contain a political message.
him an artist. As an observer of fashion myself, make up the population of this metropolis The fact that it is considered illegal to “tag”
I find Bill’s work incredibly inspiring and bring their culture, lifestyle, and characteristics shows its power—and also to the powerlessness
influential. It was recently when I last paid a that help make each block of each sidewalk that the graffiti artists still feel. These early
visit to the beloved (and incredibly loud) city of each neighborhood something bigger than artists, including Lady Pink, paved the way
where I found myself constantly seeing not one’s self. This idea of overlapping identities is for many young and old people living in poor,
only recherché outfits but also people just like present on the streets of Greenwich Village, underserved neighborhoods in the south Bronx
Cunningham: observers and photographers of where 160,404 people live. While the stories of and elsewhere to have a voice and a presence.
this marvelous artform which is street fashion. these people can range from being a Princeton Graffiti represents a lively expression of
college professor to an itinerant street vendor optimism and hope coming out of the slums,
JULIA GUGLIELMO '20 selling books, each contribute to the Village’s and it remains alive—perhaps not on subway
civic strength. Like all other sub-cities in New cars—but in tunnels, overpasses, and in any
ONE CITY WITH A MILLION STORIES: SIXTH York, there is a compelling history in the core of public place that is seeking attention.
AVENUE’S PUBLIC CHARACTERS AND THEIR Sixth Avenue, Greenwich Village—a history of
EFFECT ON GREENWICH VILLAGE how police corrupt the vendors by raiding their To view more class projects, including a
belongings—a history of how a single theory video about the trip created by Camila
New York City is a cosmopolitan city Lemere ’18, visit lbsnyc.weebly.com.
bustling with life and people who give it the rich
identity of something unique and unparalleled.
Throughout the metropolis lies 12,750 miles of

26 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE


To culminate their work and bring
the entire unit into focus, students
designed a class art project, including
boundaries of the New York boroughs
and icons from around the city related
to their research projects.

NEXT UP: PARIS!

The 2018 Global Urban Studies Initiative trip will be to Paris, with day
trips to Versailles, Verdun, and Normandy. Interdisciplinary and cross-grade-
level at its core, this French History & Paris Explorations trip will be tied to
courses in English, History, French, current events, and Art History. This
March, the trip is open to all high school students because it will have deep
curricular relevance not only for freshmen engaged in their urban studies
unit on Paris, but also for current and former sophomores studying modern
European history and literature with History Teacher Kevin Shertzer and
English Teacher Bojana Hill. The trip will, of course, offer an extraordinary
“live learning” experience for those studying French language and culture
with Dr. Valerie Yoshimura. As ninth graders move from literary analysis in the
fall—reading Modernist expat writers Hemingway and Fitzgerald—to urban
analysis in the spring, the freshmen will explore Paris’s history, art, music,
theater, politics, national identity, and other timely issues.

LAGUNABLANCA.ORG 27


PASSION T o understand why Maddy
Nicolson’s senior project was so
THAT STEMS inspiring, we need to step back
a few years.
FROM LEARNING It was in her ninth grade biology class
that Nicolson first learned about stem
Senior Project Award winner cell therapy. An upperclassman, Phoebe
Maddy Nicolson ’17 travels to Madsen ’16, had visited her class to present
Panama to study intravenous her own stem cell research, which focused
stem cell treatment. on the types of cells and their various
functions. After the presentation, Nicolson
28 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE says she was hooked. By sophomore year,
she was working with Science Instructor
Staci Richard to take on a stem cell study
of her own—one that would eventually take
her across the country and beyond it.


A WORLD BEYOND LAGUNA intimate view into this world of patients receiving life-altering treatments
did, in fact, alter her appreciation of how science and compassion can be
Although Nicolson’s interest in stem cell research started in so deeply intertwined.”
class, it quickly spread beyond the walls of the school. Over the next
three years, she explored the topic as deeply as possible, working at For instance, during her time in Panama, Nicolson met a patient—
the Texas Biomedical Research Center, focusing on therapies for around her age—who had been paralyzed from the waist down after being
Parkinson’s Disease; contacting researchers at Harvard, Stanford, and hit by a drunk driver. After receiving stem cell treatment, he had started
UC Santa Barbara; and even interviewing Eva Vertes, her “stem cell regaining feeling in his lower extremities—the thrill and joy of which
idol,” who was only 19 when she gave her first TED talk about stem would be difficult to put into words.
cell treatment. Nicholson's senior project, under the supervision of
Laguna Psychology Instructor Meghan Roarty, was a culmination “Most people seeking stem cell therapies have no other option and
of all these efforts, including the study of U.S. clinical trials and are desperate,” she says. “I was humbled by the patients’ courage and
stem cell legislation. willingness to try something new. It gave me a new sense of gratitude—to
be an observer and not a patient in the process.”
“The topic inspired me beyond anything I’d learned before,” she says.
“I couldn’t get enough.” LOOKING FORWARD

Eventually, Nicolson realized that the research side of stem cell therapy Nicolson’s multi-year research project is a prime example of how
would not be enough for her. She wanted to explore the actual treatment valuable it is to allow students to study a single topic intensely over the
side. And that’s how she ended up in Panama. course of many years. Nicholson plans to pursue a career in business and
pharmaceuticals and sees her experience in stem cell therapy as pivotal
MORE THAN RESEARCH to her future endeavors, which will include both business expansion and
investing to help bring new procedures to market.
Despite the promise stem cell therapy has for curing many diseases, the
United States prohibits intravenous stem cell treatments, which meant “I would like to thank Laguna for pushing me out of my comfort
Nicolson would need to travel overseas to make her dream of studying zone,” she says. “The collective experiences of my stem cell journey gave
the treatment side of stem cells a reality. In a stroke of luck, the medical me a perspective I could not have found anywhere else.”
director of the Stem Cell Institute in Panama—a world-class stem
treatment facility—happened to be a friend of the family. It wasn’t long Nicolson is taking a gap year to live in Madrid, Spain and will begin her
before she was learning firsthand about stem cell treatment for autism, studies in business, with a minor in biology, at the University of Southern
spinal cord injuries, multiple sclerosis, and cancer. California in fall 2018.

Throughout her work experience in Panama, Nicolson sat in on The Senior Project Award represents high honors for a
treatments and helped comfort patients during their stay. Each day, she collective body of work and outstanding participation in all
took notes on her experiences, debriefing with doctors and asking the senior project requirements. The top award is given to the
tough questions she would never learn from a book or case study. Even student who demonstrates activity that goes significantly
more impressive: she did it all in Spanish. beyond the required work.

“Never have I been so exhausted at the end of the day,” she says. “But
it was 100 percent worth it.”

HER BIGGEST LESSON: COMPASSION

Although Nicolson learned a lot about stem cell treatment during
her stay in Panama, one of the most important things she learned was
compassion.

“While Maddy’s journey undoubtedly strengthened her
passion for and enhanced her breadth of knowledge about
stem cell research, the surprising impact was how emotionally
transformative the experience ended up being,” says Roarty. “Maddy’s

LAGUNABLANCA.ORG 29


I love
Rock 'n' Roll

30 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE


A Laguna Lifer, Steve Hochman ’74 spent 13 AN INTERVIEW WITH LAGUNA
years at Laguna before going on to work as ALUMNUS & MUSIC JOURNALIST
a music critic for publications such as the LA Times
and Rolling Stone. In his career, he’s interviewed STEVE
Leonard Cohen, Lou Reed, John Lydon (Sex Pistols),
Elvis Costello, LL Cool J, and Yoko Ono (just to name HOCHMAN
a few). He has spent a week on a tour bus with Tom
Petty. He’s discussed heroin use with Keith Richards. He
received Moroccan travel tips from Mick Jagger. And,
he helped shed light on the AIDS and heroin epidemics
in rock ‘n’ roll before many in the industry were even
willing to acknowledge there was a problem. And yet,
when he left Laguna in 1974, a career in journalism had
never even crossed his mind. He recently sat down with
Laguna Blanca Magazine to share some insights into his
unexpected career, his willingness to take risks, and the
importance of never giving up.

WHEN DID YOU KNOW YOU WANTED TO BE A MUSIC JOURNALIST? I turned to the girl next to me and excitedly said, “The Beatles have
a new album coming out!” And she just stared at me, blankly. She
I always joke that I became a music critic when I was seven was completely disinterested. I couldn’t believe that not everyone
but didn’t get paid for it until I was 27. I remember being in Mrs. was as excited as I was! Throughout my career, that epiphany
DeLeon’s class in second grade. The Beatles had just had their first became more and more something I tried to keep in mind. I see
appearance on the Ed Sullivan show, and I had missed it. I have my role, the role of a critic, as to enhance and illuminate the music
a distinct memory of making my friend Rob Paratte ’74 tell me experience. And ideally, I can get others to at least understand my
every detail about the performance on the school bus the next day. enthusiasm for some things. But not everyone has the same tastes,
Of course, we had no idea then how historical that performance and not everyone is as passionate about some things as I am.
really was. But, it was such a big deal to me then, and I tie that
directly to the career I went on to have. Title Picture: A 1973 Laguna Blanca old-timey style jug band, the
Chug-a-Lug Jug Band performed at school and various other
THAT WAS AN AMAZING PERIOD IN THE HISTORY OF MUSIC. DID events, including a couple of appearances on SB TV station
EVERYONE AT LAGUNA SHARE YOUR PASSION FOR MUSIC BACK THEN? KEYT, which is where this photo was taken. Standing from
L-R: Jeff Lovelace ’75, Bill Urschel ’74, Doug Coughran ’74,
No! (Laughing) I had a huge revelation on the way to school Andres Surcouf ’75, Peter Nagel ’74, Whitney Heimlich ’75,
one morning—also on the bus and also involving the Beatles, five Steve Hochman ’74 (barefoot), and Jim Lovelace ’74
years later when Abbey Road was coming out. I had just heard
“Come Together” on the radio for the first time that morning, and

LAGUNABLANCA.ORG 31


Chatting with Ray Charles in the late 80s Interviewing Angeliqu Kidjo at New Orleans
Jazz & Heritage Festival, April 25, 2015

Chatting with Elvis Costello, New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, April 29, 2016 Interviewing Ringo Starr at 1993 charity event

Interviewing New Orleans trumpeter-composer Terrence Blanchard on stage at the Grammy Museum, Los Angeles, September 16, 2015

32 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE


WHAT ABOUT YOUR PASSION FOR WRITING? a try-out. I fully credit Bob—and the rest of the Times’ pop music
and calendar section team—with giving me the opportunities to
I think many Laguna teachers would probably be surprised that learn on the job. For whatever reason, they had confidence that
I became a writer. I wrote a few pieces for Tecolote, but in those I could do the job. And Bob gave me the chance to grow as a
days, my enthusiasm, my desire to make points, far outweighed my reporter—not just a critic and features writer—turning over the
communication skills! One of my strongest “writing memories” weekly “Pop Eye” music news column to me, which I wrote for
was from a class in ninth grade, I think. I don’t remember what the 14 years. Was I the best reporter? The best writer? No. But they
class was, but I very much remember that the teacher had told me gave me the chance to prove that I belonged in the role. And at
she loved a paper I wrote because it sounded just like me—as if I first I wasn’t a good interviewer, but I could write a good story
were talking right to her. That really stuck with me, that the goal is even from a bad interview. I learned not to be intimidated and
to communicate, not to be clever or fancy in my writing. became a good interviewer, built that confidence, which is pretty
important if you’re going to be interviewing Mick Jagger or
WHAT WERE YOUR PLANS WHEN YOU GRADUATED FROM LAGUNA? George Clooney. And yes, I interviewed Clooney on the set of
O Brother! Where Art Thou.
That’s a very good question! I truly have no idea. I went to
Occidental College and started as a philosophy major but soon HOW WOULD YOUR LIFE BE DIFFERENT IF YOU HADN’T MADE
found that academic philosophy didn’t suit me. I loved politics and THAT PHONE CALL?
had been active in that while at Laguna, but that became a little
too messy in the post-Watergate years. I thought about becoming a I can’t even imagine. For one, I would have been forced to find
teacher—an easy leap after studying at Laguna because there were a “real job!” Even more than the phone call, I’d say the mentoring
so many inspiring teachers there. But during college, I developed and support I received is what gave me a career as a journalist,
an interest in being a documentary filmmaker and pursued that writing not just for the Times for more than 20 years, but also for
for a little while, but it didn’t really work out. Around that time, Rolling Stone, Billboard and many other major publications, and
friends were involved in starting the Pasadena Weekly. I joined the now with regular music reviews featured on the big public radio
team and quickly found out I liked it and had some talent for station KPCC in Los Angeles.
journalism.

THERE’S A LOT OF PRESSURE ON STUDENTS THESE DAYS TO HAVE THEIR WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR SECRET TO SUCCESS?
LIVES LINED UP BY THE TIME THEY FINISH HIGH SCHOOL. WHAT ADVICE
WOULD YOU GIVE TO A LAGUNA STUDENT WHO ISN’T QUITE SURE WHAT The biggest thing I did was simply stick with it. I was passionate.
CAREER TO EXPLORE? I took the time to learn from those around me. I was willing to
work hard—earning $5 a story early on to prove myself. I was
I highly value a liberal arts education. I never took a journalism willing to take advice. And, just as importantly, I had a good, solid
class. My advice is to explore as many different fields as you can. sense of the world around me. I think that’s where Laguna really
Explore yourself and your life in as many ways possible. Find a helped me the most. It gave me that hunger for knowledge—the
subject that interests you and learn to research, write, and talk curiosity to understand the world around me. That goes a long
about it. For anyone interested in journalism, that’s a way to get a way in connecting with people, especially as a writer. It’s one
solid foundation. of the biggest reasons I’ve had such amazing opportunities and
experiences in my life.
IN 1985, YOU CALLED ROBERT HILBURN, THE POP MUSIC EDITOR AND
CRITIC OF THE LA TIMES, AND PITCHED YOURSELF AS A WRITER. THAT
HAD TO TAKE SOME GUTS.

I guess it did. And he gave me a polite but firm brush-off. But
a few months later, apparently he wanted to try some fresh voices
and I got a call from one of his associates to see if I wanted to have

LAGUNABLANCA.ORG 33


LEADERSHIP

THE INTERNET OF [AWESOME] THINGS

S T U D E N T S C R E AT E F I R S T- E V E R “ S M A R T G A R D E N ” O N T H E L A G U N A C A M P U S

34 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE


Project-based learning HOW IoT GOT STARTED use the information gathered to find ways to
is nothing new at help reduce Laguna’s ecological footprint. For
Laguna. What is new? According to Ary, the project first started instance, not only can the IoT@LBS help
Students creating their in his Arduino C++ course, a class focused on monitor the energy available for solar panels
own project-based the coding of micro-processors. The guide- so that he can make a case for installing them
learning opportunity: book used as inspiration for this journey into on campus—it can also help the students
linking the school’s IoT was authored by Simon Monk, who writes determine the best place to install them.
garden and composting books about micro-processors that are easily
areas to the Internet of understood and implemented. He always IoT CONNECTS PEOPLE, TOO
Things (IoT). includes numerous examples of buildable
projects, many of which Mr. Ary’s students The IoT@LBS has grown to become a
Deemed IoT@LBS, the student-led could layout, build, and implement in a realistic whole-school-multidisciplinary-project, with
initiative overseen by Math Teacher Dan time frame. These included both temperature multiple students and teachers jumping in
Ary features heat, temperature, and moisture and light sensors—which are now being used to support it. For instance, English teacher
sensors that allow the school garden to “talk” in the garden. Bojana Hill is helping to review an instruction
to the Internet 24/7. In doing so, the sensors manual created by programming master Kai
gather data to help students understand things Inspired by the opportunities to build Nakamura to ensure that it is technically sound
like the best places to capture sunlight and a smart garden at Laguna, Ary invested for readers, and other teachers, such as Zachary
the optimal time to water the vegetation. The in purchasing 10 Photons, the processors Moore, have also pitched in on 3-D printing.
project not only helps them gain insights on used to connect smart devices in the IoT. The ideas for the development of the garden
enhancing garden growth, but also helps them He passed one of the Photons on to student sensor bank came from Landon Neustadt,
to become better stewards of the land itself. Kai Nakamura ’20, and by the end of the the environmental science guru at Laguna.
summer, Nakamura had programmed the Even more astounding: Laguna already has
UNDERSTANDING THE IoT Photon to communicate via a “particle cloud,” its own dedicated Photon Internet that allows
allowing him to monitor and gather data, all the garden to talk to the Web, thanks to Tech
The IoT—the term used to describe via his iPhone. Director Frederic Skrzypek and Network
the growing mesh of “smart” objects Administrator Ladislav Laza.
communicating with one another every day— “IoT’S ALL ABOUT THE KIDS”
has been gaining momentum in the past few HOW IoT MIGHT GROW
years. IoT products include devices such as Three students have taken the lead
Nest home monitoring, which allow users to on Laguna’s smart garden. In addition to Right now, students are programming the
manage lighting, heating, and security controls Nakamura, Jackson Hurley ’18 manages the smart garden on their own time. In the future,
within their homes from anywhere in the high-level math needed to solve some of the Ary hopes IoT programming will become its
world, all from their own handheld device. garden’s more advanced technical issues, and own dedicated club. In fact, Amazon might
While the most obvious goal of devices like Natalie McCaffery ’20 manages the 3-D want to take note: Ary and the students have
Nest is to improve convenience for users, printing of boxes needed to house the Photons. also been working on programming an IoT-
another function—gathering data—is just as Still, Ary says numerous other students have connected drone, much like the drones they
important. In fact, many would say data is the also joined in the project, spending time before have been developing to assist in driverless
most powerful gift the IoT provides—in this and after school to solder and build the devices. delivery.
case, helping students make smarter decisions
about Laguna’s garden. “What it comes down to is that they are “The Internet of Things promises to be a
having fun working hard and doing complex trillion-dollar industry as our students head
technical work,” Ary says. “It’s all about having into college and beyond,” Ary says. “Imagine
an inspired and passionate group of kids.” the possibilities for them to make a difference.”

HOW IoT WILL BE USED

Gathering data is one thing. Using it is
another. Ary says ultimately the students will

LAGUNABLANCA.ORG 35


LAGUNA It is with great pleasure that Laguna welcomes Hani Zeini
WELCOMES (parent of Rhami ’20 and Lana ’25) as Board Chair. Zeini is a
HANI ZEINI AS successful business leader with nearly 30 years of experience in
BOARD OF the healthcare and medical device industries. He and wife, Amal,
TRUSTEES have been playing active leadership roles in the Laguna community
CHAIR for six years. He has served on our school board since 2013, and
according to Head of School Rob Hereford, is valued for his
strategic thinking and leadership on developing Laguna’s future
science center.

“It is truly and genuinely an honor to serve on the board of
trustees at Laguna,” Zeini says. “It is a daunting task following the
giants that preceded me (and we have had many!) but at the same
time, it is tremendously exciting to lead the board during this phase
of growth.”

Part of that growth, Zeini says, involves greater board focus
on Laguna’s "triple As"—Academics, Athletics, and the Arts.
He hopes to further accelerate and broaden the board’s efforts in
support of those programs, including its already advanced courses
in the humanities, project-based learning, robotics and engineering,
entrepreneurship, and the new two-year Science Research Program.

Zeini’s passion for the sciences is not a coincidence. He is a
veteran in the aesthetics and plastic surgery market. He started
his career at the Dupont Pharmaceuticals Company, later moving
on to Pharmasmarket.com, an internet healthcare marketplace;
AcurianHealth, a venture-capital-backed clinical trials company;
and Inamed Aesthetics, now Allergan Medical. In 2006, Zeini
founded Sientra, a medical device company focused on the aesthetic
and reconstructive plastic surgery markets, which he successfully
took public on the NASDAQ in 2014. Zeini served as its president,
chief executive officer, and board director until the end of 2015.
In 2017, Hani established a strategic advisory and investment
company advising Fortune 100 companies (the 100 largest public
and privately held companies in the United States) and investor-
backed startups in the medical aesthetics area.

Holding a Bachelor of Science in electrical and computer
engineering from the University of Miami, Zeini also completed
the Stanford Executive Program at Stanford University, Graduate
School of Business. In addition to his role as board chair at Laguna,
Zeini serves as the industry advisor on the board of directors for
the International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery and is on the
advisory board at Image Reborn Foundation in Park City, Utah,
which is focused on helping women reclaim their sense of personal
power following a breast cancer diagnosis.

Thank you, Hani, for your continued commitment to our school!

36 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE


"There is no
expiration on a
Laguna education.
It is a foundational
life and educational
experience that
prepares our students
beyond admission
to highly ranked
colleges. It prepares
them for life,
leadership, and their
roles as responsible
citizens.”

LAGUNABLANCA.ORG 37


LAGUNA WELCOMES

THREE NEW TRUSTEES

TO ITS BOARD

ANN LEVINE

Ann Levine is a law school admission consultant and the author of four books related to
law school. Her most recent book, The Law School Admission Game: Play Like An Expert,
3rd Ed was released on August 1, 2017 and quickly became the best-selling law school
guidebook on Amazon. Through her private consulting practice, LawSchoolExpert.com,
Ann works with individuals worldwide seeking admission to law schools in the United States.

Ann graduated from the University of Miami (B.S. 1996, J.D. Magna Cum Laude 1999)
and served as Director of Admissions at California Western School of Law and Loyola Law
School – Los Angeles before moving to Santa Barbara with her husband, Brent, in 2002.
She practiced business litigation at Hill & Associates and then started Law School Expert
in 2004.

Ann is active in the community and was a member of the board of the Anti-Defamation
League for 12 years, including serving as Regional Board Chair. She was the first recipient of
the Santa Barbara Tri-Counties Region ADL Leadership Award in 2007 and was recognized
nationally by ADL as a recipient of the Ginsberg Leadership Award in 2009.

Ann and Brent have two daughters in the Middle School at Laguna, Haley ’22 and
Nicole ’24, and are approved as a Resource Family for the County of Santa Barbara.

38 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE


MARY MOROUSE

Mary Morouse combines her love of technology and education as a businessperson,
a mom, and a community volunteer. After graduating from UC Berkeley, Mary joined
Xerox Corporation as an education sales specialist. At Xerox she saw the potential of the
nascent personal computer business. She transitioned into UCLA’s Anderson Graduate
School of Management to earn her MBA—paying her tuition by competing and winning
on the game shows “Super Password” and “Win, Lose or Draw”.

After a summer internship at Apple Computer, she joined Microsoft in 1989. There,
Mary led teams to market Microsoft Project and Microsoft Access. Escaping the rain of
Seattle for the sun of Santa Monica, Mary moved south to manage the Norton Group
at Symantec.

The pull of the Northwest called again in 1998, and Mary returned to Seattle to join
a startup bookstore called Amazon as Vice President of Merchandising. It was on this
second stint in Seattle that she met her husband, Jim.

After the birth of their first child, Mary and Jim—both native Californians—moved
to Santa Barbara in 2001. They have three children, two of whom attend Laguna
Blanca, Ava ’19 and Jack ’20. The Morouse family has traversed 49 out of 50 states in
various minivans.

Mary spent five years on the Montecito Union School District Board, including two years
as President. She is currently the Board Chair at Mission Springs Camp and Conference
Center near Santa Cruz, CA.

JOSH CONNOR

Josh is the Founding Partner of Connor Capital, which focuses on private investments
in transportation and transportation-related companies. He is also the Co-Portfolio
Manager and Managing Director of the transportation infrastructure fund at Oaktree
Capital Management. For approximately two decades, he has been a leader within the
transportation industries, having been an investor, a key strategic advisor, lender, and
leading banker to many transportation companies around the world. Prior to founding
Connor Capital, Josh was a Managing Director and the Co-Head of the Industrials Banking
Group at Barclays, a position he was appointed to in October 2013. Before that, he was
a Managing Director and Global Head of Transportation Banking at Barclays and also
spent fifteen years at Morgan Stanley, where he ran the transportation and infrastructure
practice; was a member of the Investment Banking Management Committee; and served
on the board for the Morgan Stanley Foundation. Josh also serves on the Board of
Directors of Copa Airlines and Frontier Airlines.

Josh is a graduate of Williams College, where he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in
Economics. He has previously been a Trustee of The Pingry School in New Jersey and a
board member of Youth, I.N.C., a New York City-based non-profit helping children.

Josh and his wife, Patricia, live in Montecito with their three children, Lily ’22, Jack ’24,
and Abigail ’28, all of whom attend Laguna Blanca School.

LAGUNABLANCA.ORG 39


CELEBRATION OF LEARNING

WE'VE
COME

A
LONG

WAY
FROM
WHERE

WE
BEGAN

Fifteen fourth grade students couldn’t contain their smiles as Faculty brought down the house with their surprise choral
they walked across the pavilion at the Lower School to receive their rendition of “You Make Me Feel” cleverly redubbed “You make me
certificates of completion at the annual closing ceremony on June 8. feel like a wonderful teacher.” Lower School Librarian Meredith Brace
spoke for everyone at Laguna Blanca when she sang, “And I am
Head of School Rob Hereford, Board Chair Mason Farrell ’80, never doubtful of what I’m working for; together we achieve oh so
Head of the Lower School Andy Surber, and Fourth Grade Teacher much more!”
Donna Brown congratulated students on their hard work and praised
them for their contributions to the learning environment at the Lower WAY TO GO CLASS OF 2025!
School.
Cyanne Blabey, Leona Blackmore, Dylan Comis,
“It has been a privilege to witness this fourth grade class learn and Cayden Costner, Tyson Deveze, Juliette DuPrau,
grow at Laguna Blanca,” Surber said. “This group of talented students Alexis Fell, Cyrus Formidoni, AJ Frank, Chloe Gidney,
will move to Middle School with a strong academic foundation and Ava Johnson, Jacob Keating, Madison McLeod,
skills in the areas of critical thinking, problem solving, and empathy.”
Evan Nocerino, Lana Zeini
The graduating class sang “See You Again” and reveled in their
traditional parachute performance to “Waka Waka.” They were
joined by the entire Lower School in singing “The Road Home.”

40 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE


“We look
forward to
seeing and
celebrating all
that this fourth
grade class
will achieve in
the next part of
their academic
journey!”

ANDY SURBER, HEAD OF LOWER SCHOOL

LAGUNABLANCA.ORG 41


MIDDLE SCHOOL CLOSING CEREMONY

“Through honing our public speaking
skills, we’re prepared to share our ideas
with the world. Furthermore, we have also
worked on design thinking and problem
solving. By building various things like rovers
and rockets, we have learned the process
of designing, redesigning, and redesigning
again to solve problems. Through all of these
tasks, we have grasped the importance of
teamwork. This year, we have learned to work
together to reach our goals. Collaboration
is the way of the future, and we are ready.”
JILLIAN LIN ’21, STUDENT SPEAKER

42 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE


MIDDLE SCHOOL AWARDS
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE FOLLOWING STUDENTS FOR THEIR OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENTS IN 2016-17

HISTORY AWARD RICHARD CLARK AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING
Emily Donelan ’21 EXCELLENCE IN MIDDLE ALL-AROUND FIFTH
SCHOOL SPANISH GRADER
SCIENCE AWARD Lily Farmer ’21 Spencer Hlavaty ’24
Jillian Lin ’21  
THOMAS AWARD OUTSTANDING
VISUAL ARTS FOR IMPROVEMENT ALL-AROUND SIXTH
Claire Tolles ’22 Arabella Cairone ’21 GRADER
Autumn Litten ’23
MATHEMATICS LAGUNA BLANCA SCHOOL
Nicholas Richmond ’21 AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING OUTSTANDING
COMMUNITY SERVICE ALL-AROUND STUDENTS
CREATIVE WRITING Georgia Avery ’21 Gus Sabino ’21
Emilia Thomas ’21 Emily Donelan ’21
HOUSE CUP
STEM San Miguel – Head Of House HEAD OF SCHOOL’S AWARD
Keenan Surber ’21 Haley Levine ’22 FOR OUTSTANDING
ATHLETICS &
AILEEN DURRANT AWARD SEVENTH GRADE SPORTSMANSHIP ON
FOR EXCELLENCE IN TOP SCHOLAR AND OFF THE FIELD
MIDDLE SCHOOL ENGLISH Lauren Neubauer ’22 Jillian Lin ’21
Tara Woodard ’21
EIGHTH GRADE HEAD OF SCHOOL'S
GORDON TIERNEY AWARD TOP SCHOLAR AWARD FOR CHARACTER
FOR EXCELLENCE IN Gus Sabino ’21 Nicholas Richmond ’21
MIDDLE SCHOOL LATIN  
Maria Amezaga ’24 LAGUNA BLANCA SERVICE
TO MIDDLE SCHOOL AWARD
Madeleine Nicks ’22
Haley Levine ’22

LAGUNABLANCA.ORG 43


CONGRATULATIONS
2017 GRADUATES

44 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE


WE WILL REMEMBER YOU—OFTEN AND FONDLY

WILLIAM BARTHOLOMEW MATTHEW GOLDSHOLL ZAIRA PAREDES-VILLEGAS
NICOLE BELTON NATASHA HEYER XINYI SHAN
ZIHAO CHEN CLARA HILLIS MELISSA SILVA
JACK COPELAND ZELIME LEWIS LUKE SMILLIE
JOAN CURRAN ZHAOWEI LI TRAVIS SMILLIE
HENRY FARRELL GRACE MACNEIL HOLLY TOBIAS
FIONA FLYNN MADISON NICOLSON

LAGUNABLANCA.ORG 45


COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY

“You changed the conversation at Laguna because you didn’t just
speak up in class, or even just sing and dance on the stage in Spaulding.
You marched in the streets of Los Angeles, you linked arms with a
mesmerizing tour guide in Harlem to act out civil rights marches, you—
Clara and Natasha—strew petals like good Gossip Girls up the stairs to
the top of the Empire State Building, you broke into spontaneous dance
parties on the streets of London, you sang Amazing Grace in music clubs
and churches in New Orleans, and you gave away socks and opened
your hearts in the parks of Santa Barbara. No other class has done the
things you’ve done.”
DR. ASHLEY TIDEY
2017 COMMENCEMENT SPEAKER

46 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE


COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES THAT ACCEPTED OUR CLASS OF 2017

BARD COLLEGE / BARNARD COLLEGE / BOSTON COLLEGE / BOSTON UNIVERSITY (COLLEGE OF
COMMUNICATION) / CAL POLY – SAN LUIS OBISPO / CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF THE ARTS / CALIFORNIA
LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY / CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY / CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY (2) / COLORADO
STATE UNIVERSITY / COLUMBIA COLLEGE / CSU FULLERTON / DENISON UNIVERSITY / DEPAUL UNIVERSITY
DREXEL UNIVERSITY / ELON UNIVERSITY / EMERSON COLLEGE / FORDHAM UNIVERSITY / GEORGE MASON
UNIVERSITY / GETTYSBURG COLLEGE / HARVARD UNIVERSITY / INDIANA UNIVERSITY BLOOMINGTON
ITHACA COLLEGE / LAWRENCE UNIVERSITY / LEHIGH UNIVERSITY / NEW YORK UNIVERSITY (2) / NEW YORK
UNIVERSITY (GALLATIN SCHOOL) / PACE UNIVERSITY NYC / PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY / PEPPERDINE
UNIVERSITY / REED COLLEGE / SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY / SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY / SANTA
CLARA UNIVERSITY / SKIDMORE COLLEGE / SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY / SOUTHERN METHODIST
UNIVERSITY (SCHOOL OF BUSINESS) / SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY / TEXAS CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY / THE NEW
SCHOOL – ALL DIVISIONS (EUGENE LANG COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS) / THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY / TULANE
UNIVERSITY / TULANE UNIVERSITY (NEWCOMB COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS & SCIENCES) / UNIVERSITY
OF COLORADO – BOULDER / UNIVERSITY OF DENVER / UNIVERSITY OF MAINE / UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO
UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO (SCHOOL OF BUSINESS/ENGINEERING) / UNIVERSITY OF SAN FRANCISCO (2)
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA / UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA (SCHOOL OF BUSINESS)
UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT / UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON / UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON / UC
BERKELEY / UC DAVIS / UC IRVINE / UC LOS ANGELES / UC SAN DIEGO / UC SANTA BARBARA / UC SANTA CRUZ
UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN / UNIVERSITY OF ST ANDREWS / WAGNER COLLEGE / WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY

Schools in bold indicate the institutions our students will attend.

LAGUNABLANCA.ORG 47


APPLAUSE! Congratulations to these seven
students who were inducted into
2017 Cum Laude Recipients the prestigious Cum Laude
Society in 2017.

CLASS OF 2017 CLASS OF 2018
Zhaowei (Sally) Li
Xinyi (Cindy) Shan Aura Carlson
Sophia Fay
Rose Houglet
Jackson Hurley
Clare Ogle

Inducted as juniors in 2016 were
Henry Farrell '17 and Grace MacNeil '17.

48 LAGUNA BLANCA MAGAZINE


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