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Published by jeff, 2019-05-28 10:37:28

PC Style Magazine Summer/ Fall 2019

PC Style Magazine Summer/ Fall 2019

PCPark City & the Wasatch Lifestyle ®

Summer/Fall 2019

IAnBsOpiUraNtiDonS

THE ART OF PARK CITY

®



“DN04182” | 43” x 46” | Mixed Media | Kaori Takamura

SUMMER SCHEDULE 305 Main Street
Park City, Utah 84060
JULY 26: Britton Snyder and Spencer Budd
AUGUST 3: Kaori Takamura 435.649.8160
SEPTEMBER 27: “Small Works Show”

meyergallery.com



Conceptual rendering only. Subject to change.

No Federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. This is neither an o er to sell, nor a solicitation of o ers to buy, any property in those states where such o ers or solicitations cannot be made. Not available to residents in the State of New
York. WARNING: THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF REAL ESTATE HAS NOT INSPECTED, EXAMINED, OR QUALIFIED THIS OFFERING. Illustrations are artist’s conceptual renderings only and are subject to change without notice. Amenities depicted herein are anticipated but
not guaranteed and may not be completed by seller. Neither seller nor seller’s agents assume responsibility for the accuracy of the information contained herein. Buyers should review the purchase agreement and other o ering materials provided by the seller
prior to signing any contract to purchase a unit. ©[CPRC17 LLC ]. Unauthorized use of the images, artist renderings, plans or other depictions of the project or units is strictly prohibited. A member of the franchise system of BHH A liates.
The project described herein (the “Project”) and the Residential Units located within the Project (the “Residential Units”) are not developed or sold by KT HOTELS, LLC or any of its respective a liates (collectively, “Pendry”) and Pendry does not make any
representations, warranties or guaranties whatsoever with respect to the Residential Units, the Project or any part thereof. CPRC17 LLC uses the PENDRY brand name and certain other Pendry trademarks (collectively, the “Trademarks”) in connection
with the sales and marketing of the Residential Units in the Project under a limited, non-exclusive, non-transferable and non-sublicensable license from Pendry. The foregoing license may be terminated, in which case neither the Residential Units nor
any part of the Project will be identified as a PENDRY-branded project or have any rights to use the Trademarks.

Introducing Pendry Residences Park City, a new luxury offering
by Montage coming to Canyons Village. Contemporary living,
vibrant après-ski, expertly curated dining and retail, a rooftop
pool and Spa Pendry are part of the experience.
Our new Sales Gallery in Canyons Village is open daily.
Visit us to learn about our fully furnished studio to four bedroom
residences priced from the $400s to $3M+.

P E N D RY R E S I D E N C E S PA R KC I T Y. C O M

R E T R E AT

RELAX

3000 Canyons Resort Drive, Park City, Utah, 84098

RENEW

REJOICE

435.940.9444 www.wgparkcity.com

WGPC 114696

What’s Inside ®

88 12 WELCOME
22
Publisher’s Note
52 About the Cover
80 Words From the Editor
The PCStyle Team
58 78 Visitor’s Guidepost

64 20 TTHHAETAIRNTEOXPFRPEASRSKIBCLIETYS:OMETHING

Depth
Connections
Magic
Conversations

30 CALENDAR OF EVENTS
32 INSPIRE

Inspiration Abounds
Transforming Trash
Music’s Calling
The Art of the Spa Experience
Seeking Inspiration

44 HIGHSTYLE PROFILES

Generations of Gem Art
Everyday Altars
A Serene Sense of Place
Fine Fin Art

52 BASECAMP

Art on the Fly
Survive. Thrive. Repeat.
Play Every Day
Adventure Hound
Summer-Centric Fun

64 MOUNTAINSTYLE LIVING

Love Where You Live
Immerse: Historic Park City
Passion, Promotion, Participation
Finesse: Deer Valley
The Art of the Perfect Vacation
Play: Canyons Village
The Art of Giving

80 DINING

Edible Art
The Art of the Amateur Kitchen
Perfecting Produce
A Brazilian in Snow Country

88 NIGHTLIFE

The Art of Music
Park City’s Piano Man
Out & About After Hours

94 PCSTYLE CATALOGUE

World-Class Shopping
Beyond the Surface
The Queen of Gems
The Matchmaker

10
Park-CityStyle.com | SUMMER • FALL 2019

LIKEANssistOing COliTentHs ER

Page has represented us on the sale
of two homes and the purchase of two
homes in the Park City area. All four
transactions went very smoothly, and
fully met our expectations from both
a financial and logistical standpoint.
Page brings a high degree of passion,
sophistication, and class to each
transaction. Her attention to detail
and extensive experience makes for a
stress-free process.
Page’s roots in Park City, as well
as her reputation for exceptional
professionalism, serves her clients
well. She has a deep understanding
of the Park City market, including Old
Town. It is also worth noting that Page
is very adaptable and flexible, she
catches curve balls in stride, keeping
the process moving along in a manner
that is seamless to the client.

– Seller/Buyer Testimonial

March 2019

With deep family roots in Park City and
20+ years of real estate experience,
Page is passionate about providing both
buyers and sellers an exceptional experience.

801.671.9761
[email protected]
summitsothebysrealty.com

CURATE YOUR NEXT MOVE WITH PAGE!

This material is based upon information that we consider reliable, but because it has been supplied by third parties, we cannot represent that it is accurate or complete, including price, or withdrawal without notice; square footage is an estimate only. ©MMXIX Sotheby’s International
Realty Affiliates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Copyright© Summit Sotheby’s International Realty 2019.

PUBLISHER’S NOTE

The Art of Life ®

Over the past three decades it has been an honor to Publisher
be in the business of showcasing people’s passions. Jeffrey C. Bush
From professional stargazers and spider hunters to Creative Director
backcountry rescue teams and stone carving masters—each Kristal Franklin
storyboard has confirmed my belief that our journey here is Senior Account Executive
to embrace art as life and life as art. Jill McGlashon
For me, art comes with conversation; wanting, truly, to know Managing Editor
your story. Not to judge, but to gain a deeper understanding
of what makes you ... you. Where, or how, did you discover Evie Carrick
your drive to bag three 14ers in a day, to aspire to be the Advertising Sales
best chef in the valley, to start that one-of-a-kind business— Deborah DeKoff
to essentially, live your dream. Those are the stories PCStyle
seeks to share. Gillian Hunter
As you unplug and enjoy the pages of PCStyle you will discover Social Media
a new theme with each magazine: a path of discovery or an Amanda Hill
element of the community worth exploring and sharing. If you Management Consultant
missed our inaugural issue last winter—The Soul of Park City— Mark Mullins
please enjoy our e-edition at Park-CityStyle.com. Market Consultants
In this issue, we thread the artistic fabrics of Park City into Sharon Backurz
each narrative. From the art of fly-fishing, artistic edibles,
and local artist profiles to the celebration of the 50th anni- Erin Hirtle
versary of the Kimball Arts Festival, PCStyle hopes you dis- Jeff Good
cover something new and exciting about Park City and the Writers
Wasatch lifestyle. Ashley Brown, Darby Doyle,
Steve Phillips, Tiffini Porter, Ted Scheffler,
–Jeff Bush Natalie Taylor
Photographers
“Look at each day as a new masterpiece.” Deborah DeKoff, Angela Howard,
Gillian Hunter
PCPark City & the Wasatch Lifestyle – unknown ®
J.C. Bush Creative Media, LLC
PARKCITY P.O. Box 684 • Wilson, WY 83014
PARK CIT YThe Soul of Park City—The Silver Lining
(307) 699-5190
® email: [email protected]
JCBush.com • Park-CityStyle.com
Summer/Fall 2019 Award-Winning Publisher
Certificates of Excellence
IAnBsOpiUraNtiDonS Winter • Spring 2018-2019 Western Publications Association Maggie Awards
Best Overall Visitor’s Guide
THE ART OF PARK CITY Best New Consumer Publication
Best Table of Contents
Explore, share, and connect with Printed by Hudson Printing Company
Park-CityStyle.com
Salt Lake City, Utah
12 Copyright© 2019.
Park-CityStyle.com | SUMMER • FALL 2019
No part of this publication may be
reproduced without the written consent

of the publisher.

Our mission
is to take care of
your home with a
personal touch.

ELISE ST. JOHN
OWNER

St. John’s Property Management is a Premier Estate Management Company providing professional property
monitoring and concierge services for second home, seasonal homes and vacation properties.

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WORDS FROM THE EDITOR

EVIE CARRICK A City of Artists
Evie is a grammar and spelling fanatic who has
worked with J.C. Bush Creative Media for over 10 PARKITES FIND THEIR FLOW STATE
years. She studied journalism at the University of
Denver and publishing at New York University. It’s mesmerizing to watch someone do something that they do well. As they drop into a flow
state–or get “in the zone”–their dedication and passion is apparent. For those who are lucky
enough to witness it, it’s inspiring.
When our team was talking about the theme of this issue–The Art of Park City–we wanted to
feature people with such a pointed dedication to their craft that the flow state is inherent. We
also wanted to showcase people traditionally considered artists–painters, sculptors, musicians,
and designers–alongside unconventional artists–the mountain bikers whose calculated move-
ments let them glide through trees with ease; the yogis with intense focus and graceful, dance-
like movements; and the business owners who have fine-tuned every aspect of what they do to
create a polished, seamless product.
When you consider art to be something someone does well, it’s easy to see artists all around
us. People who are creating both tangible and intangible beauty out of a dedication to their art–
whether it be painting, hospitality, food, movement, or design.
These are the people who contribute to the art of Park City.

–Evie Carrick

PCPark City & the Wasatch Lifestyle ®

About the Cover Summer/Fall 2019

Hens, horses, and plenty of hay surrounded model and University of Utah student IAnBsOpiUraNtiDonS
Clara Schmae for this Bohemian barnyard session. Clara is the perfect artist’s muse
and was game to pose on bales of prickly hay or stand in a field of manure to get the THE ART OF PARK CITY
perfect image.
Our session began early in the morning with the welcoming cacophony only dawn on a farm
can bring. Selecting outfits with a Bohemian twist—yet farm appropriate—and choosing
locations with props and background were the next steps.
Setting up single-source lighting to create the mood and feel was the final element needed
to bring this session together.
Deborah’s work can be viewed at: ParkCityPhotographers.com

14
Park-CityStyle.com | SUMMER • FALL 2019

An exciting
new partnership
between 350 Main and
Alpine Distilling
pairing modern
American cuisine with
award-winning spirits.

350 Main Street
435.649.3140
350Main.com

PARK CITYSTYLE TEAM

Creative Director

KRISTAL FRANKLIN

If a layout catches your eye as you flip through this magazine or you are drawn into an article you
would otherwise skip over, Kristal is to thank. As the magazine’s Creative Director it’s her job to make
each story visually appealing so we can properly showcase Park City’s vibrant personalities—and it’s
a job she knows well.

Kristal has been an integral part of J.C. Bush Creative Media for 20 years. She’s helped the company
publish numerous award-winning magazines and guides, including the current roster of mountain-
lifestyle brands: JHStyle, KidsStyle, and now, PCStyle Magazine.

A true mountain girl herself, Kristal was born in Telluride, Colorado. She studied graphic design in Arizona
before founding Kristal Graphics. When she isn’t making words and images harmonize on a page, Kristal
and her husband Jon love traveling, golfing, camping, and spending time with friends and family.

ANGELA HOWARD Photographers GILLIAN C. HUNTER
Angela is a nationally published Gillian’s photography career
photographer who lives in DEBORAH DEKOFF is driven by connection and
Utah but travels abroad to Deb grew up with a passion she describes her work as
photograph commercial for visual artistic expression, Soultography. She seeks to
projects, special events, so it’s no wonder she’s been capture what’s at the heart of
editorials, and food. In addition toting cameras as an additional her subject. She grew up on the
to photographing amazing appendage for 40 years. When slopes of Park City and her heart
stories, she loves traveling, not photographing portraits belongs to Utah. When she’s
working out, cooking (and or food, this former Floridian not creating she’s skiing,
eating!), and hanging out with educates students, runs a breast practicing yoga, riding horses,
her husband, kids, and pups. cancer support group, and or hiking with her hubby
lifts weights. Brad and doggie Aria.
TED SCHEFFLER
Originally trained as an Writers STEVE PHILLIPS
anthropologist, Ted is a Steve has lived in the Park
seasoned food, wine, and travel DARBY DOYLE City area since the 1980s. He
writer based in Utah. Prior to A food writer, cocktail historian, worked for the Utah Division of
moving to Utah, Ted lived on and recovering archaeologist, Wildlife Resources for 30 years
four different continents. Yes, it’s Darby covers the gamut of the as a public relations officer.
a cliché, but Paris is his favorite U.S. West’s gastronomic and Since retiring, he’s worked as a
city. He enjoys cooking, travel, natural wonders. When not at freelance writer and actor. He’s
skiing, and music, spending her keyboard, you’ll find her an avid mountain and road biker,
an inordinate amount of time puttering in the garden, runner, kayaker, and hot air
tending to his ever-growing herd skiing, or fly-fishing Utah’s balloon pilot.
of guitars, amplifiers, and vinyl. blue-ribbon rivers. TIFFINI PORTER
ASHLEY BROWN Born and raised in Utah, Tiffini
Ashley is a Utah native. NATALIE TAYLOR is an art lover, hiker, foodie,
Wilderness conservation is a Natalie has been freelance and traveler. In both her writing
key component to her writing writing for local magazines for career and personal life she
and recreational interests. To nearly three decades, and in loves connecting with creative
fuel her stories and to find that time has met some of the people who are willing to
inspiration, she climbs rocks most talented, creative, and experiment and explore new
and mountains, snowboards interesting people in the state. ideas. A dedicated arts and
and splitboards, takes journeys A hot springs enthusiast, she culture advocate, Tiffini has
into the quiet wilderness, and enjoys soaking in natural mineral served on numerous nonprofit
practices a yogic lifestyle to water, hiking with her beloved boards and committees and is
help her integrate into our (albeit marginally trained) excited to share stories about
human-constructed society. pooch, and writing poetry. Park City’s vibrant arts scene.
16
Park-CityStyle.com | SUMMER • FALL 2019

KAY STRATMAN

Canyon Shower ~ Watercolor ~ 14 x 20

Wasatch Twilight Timelapse ~ Watercolor ~ 16 x 24
Enhancing the Traditional • Introducing the Innovative
(307) 739-1540 | HORIZONFINEARTGALLERY.COM | 30 KING ST | PO BOX 4920 | JACKSON, WY 83001

VISITOR'S GUIDEPOST

Park City

FACTS AND STATISTICS

Time zone: .............................. MST UTC-7 (Summer MST UTC-6)
Park City founded: ................................................................1869
Park City incorporated: .........................................................1884
Park City 2018 population: ..................................................8,378
Park City elevation: ...................................................... 7,000 feet
Average snowfall: ........................................300-400 inches/year
County: ............................................................................ Summit
Zip codes: ...................................................84060, 84068, 84098
Mountain range: ............................................................. Wasatch
Highest peak: ....................................Mount Nebo at 11,928 feet

PARK CITY MOUNTAIN

# of ski runs: ...............................................................................341
# of chairlifts: ...............................................................................41
Skiable terrain: ........................................................................7,300
Base elevation: ........................................................................6,800
Peak elevation: ......................................................................10,026
Resort winter closing date: ......................................... April 7, 2019
Summer opperations begin:....................................May 24, 2019
Year opened: ....................................... 1963 as Treasure Mountain
Owner: .......................................................................... Vail Resorts
Multi-resort pass partnership: .......................................... Epic Pass

DEER VALLEY RESORT

# of ski runs: ...........................................................................103
# of chairlifts: ............................................................................21
Skiable terrain: ....................................................................2,026
Base elevation: ....................................................................6,570
Peak elevation: ....................................................................9,570
Resort winter closing date: ...................................... April 7, 2019
Summer opperations begin:................................... June 14, 2019
Year opened: ........................................................................1981
Owner: .............................................. Alterra Mountain Company
Multi-resort pass partnership: ....................................... Ikon Pass

WEATHER (in Fahrenheit)

Climate: .............................................................. humid continental
Winter average high/low: ...................................................... 35/14
Spring average high/low: ....................................................... 54/28
Summer average high/low: .................................................... 79/46
Fall average high/low: ............................................................ 58/30
Record high: .................................................96.5 (recorded in July)
Record low: ................................................ 6 (recorded in January)

USEFUL PHONE NUMBERS

Area code: ..................................................................................435
Emergency: ................................................................................911
Road conditions: ....................................................(866) 511-UTAH
Park City hospital: ...................................................(435) 615-5301
Park City police: .......................................................(435) 615-5500
Central reservations: ...............................................(800) 453-1360
Park City Mountain: ................................................(435) 649-8111
Deer Valley Resort: ..................................................(435) 649-1000
Salt Lake City Airport (SLC): .....................................(801) 575-2400
Park City Transit: .....................................................(435) 615-5301
Park City Chamber of Commerce: ..........................(435) 649-6100
IMAGE Deborah DeKoff

18
Park-CityStyle.com | SUMMER • FALL 2019

Park City’s Best Kept Secret!

Unique Apparel, Laser-Cut Leather Jackets, Handcrafted Boots, Italian Purses, Jewelry, Gift Services and More.

580 Main Street (Inside The Galleria Mall) • 855-4DIJORE



OFTPHAERAKRCTITY
THAT INEXPRESSIBLE SOMETHING

WORDS Evie Carrick | IMAGES Gillian Hunter, Angela Howard, and Deborah DeKoff

ART DOES SOMETHING THAT’S HARD TO PUT YOUR FINGER ON. A PIECE OF MUSIC CAN BRING YOU TO TEARS, A
PAINTING CAN TAKE YOU TO ANOTHER WORLD, AND A LINE OF POETRY CAN TRANSPORT YOU BACK TO A PLACE
IN TIME. BUT FOR SOMETHING THAT DOES SO MUCH, IT’S STILL HARD TO EXPLAIN. EVEN THE LEADERS OF PARK
CITY’S BIGGEST ARTS ORGANIZATIONS STRUGGLE TO EXPRESS THE OFTEN-FELT, BUT INDESCRIBABLE POWER OF ART.

As the adage goes, “actions speak louder eyes before allowing their taste buds to do the visitors to art showings and performances, and
than words” and that inexpressible something is same. People like Juanita Marshall (page 46), who arts organizations to helpful resources.
the reason why Jory Macomber (page 23) often creates pottery as perfect as it is imperfect, and • P ark City Film creates community through film
spends his lunch break in front of paintings in the Emily Quinn Loughlin (page 36) who takes trash by presenting independent documentaries,
Kimball Art Center’s gallery and transforms it into wearable art. feature films, and local cinema.
or why Kathryn Burns (page If you look, artists are every- • P ark City Live hosts big-name acts in diverse
27) left her career for one where; they create beauty with genres to bring people together.
that revolved around music. “ART TAKES US their hands, bodies, and minds, • Egyptian Theatre is a historical venue that
While not always inspiring the rest of us to notice, consistently showcases comedy acts, theatre,
AWAY FROM THEexpressible, and rarely quan- question, think, and consider. Art and music, while also hosting community func-
takes us away from the day-to-day tions and special events.
tifiable, art has a vital role and encourages us to look deeper. • K imball Art Center makes art accessible and
in making Park City a sus- But as powerful as their cre- sustainable, bringing a level of depth to the
tainable, enjoyable place DAY-TO-DAY AND community.
to live. Every night of the ations are, artists need a platform; • Park City’s Public Art Advisory Board creates
week there’s live music, gal- ENCOURAGES they need the space to share their collaborations between artists and community
lery receptions, workshops, work, the support to create it, and members to pepper the city with free, public art.
and events that encourage the inspiration to stay motivated. • S undance Institute provides the space and
Parkites and visitors to ques- US TO LOOK This is where Park City’s arts orga- resources for artists in film, theatre, and digital
tion, think, explore, and act. nizations come in. Each of the arts media to thrive.
The arts are what make Park DEEPER.” organizations and venues in Sum-
City so much more than just mit County do their part to foster, Without organizations and venues like
a beautiful mountain town encourage, and promote art in our these, the artists who are so integral to the
with world-class skiing. With- community. vibrancy of the Park City community would lose
out artists creating and sharing, Park City would • P ark City Institute programs thought-provok- a vital source of support. As Jocelyn Scudder,
be a shell of what it is today. ing performances that spark conversations in managing director of Park City Summit County
To add depth, Park City needs people like Briar safe spaces. Arts Council (page 24) said so perfectly, “When
Handly, Handle’s chef and owner (page 81), who • P ark City Summit County Arts Council con- the arts are prioritized magical things happen.”
puts art on a plate–inviting guests to feast their nects artists to residencies and funding,
Park City, let’s keep it that way. n

21
Park-CityStyle.com | SUMMER • FALL 2019



THE ART OF PARK CITY

DEPTH

CREATING AN ARTS COMMUNITY WITH SOUL

WORDS Evie Carrick | IMAGE Angela Howard

“ICAME FOR THE SKIING, I STAYED FOR THE [BLANK]” IS A STATEMENT YOU HEAR FAIRLY OFTEN IN
SKI TOWNS. PEOPLE COME FOR “JUST A WINTER SEASON” AND END UP FALLING IN LOVE WITH
THE SUMMERS, THE COMMUNITY, THE MOUNTAINS–OR IN PARK CITY, THE ARTS.
Like so many others, skiing is what lured Jory Macomber “ART IS CLEARLY PART OF
from his home in New Hampshire. Macomber and his wife, PARK CITY’S DNA.”
Martha, moved to Park City in 2014 after he accepted a job
with the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association TEAM Academy as – JORY MACOMBER
the vice president of athlete career and education. The ski job
might’ve lured Macomber to Park City, but the arts are to thank year Macomber says artists sold $1 million in art, and this sum-
for keeping him here. mer he’s expecting those numbers to increase as the festival
celebrates its 50th anniversary.
“For Park City to be a well-rounded and sustainable com-
munity, it needs to be more than just a ski town. If people are In honor of the occasion and the community that has
going to stay here and thrive here they need arts and culture,” helped Kimball Art Center flourish, entry to the festival will be
says Macomber, explaining that in late 2017, he left his job with free for all Summit County residents. Both Macomber and Kim-
the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association to work with Kimball Art ball Art Center are big believers in making sure art is accessible
Center and quickly transitioned into the role of executive director. to everyone, which is why they have classes for all ages and free
exhibitions and events. “It’s part of what makes a vibrant com-
In the position, Macomber is charged with steering one of munity,” Macomber explains. “Any community without arts and
Park City’s oldest and most respected arts organizations. Kim- culture, well, there’s kind of a void. Arts are the heart and soul
ball Art Center offers free exhibitions, arts education programs of a community.”
for all ages, and events like the Art Starts Here Gala, free art
talks, and the Park City Kimball Arts Festival. The latter is one of As Macomber knows from experience, skiing is great, but
Park City’s premier events and one of Kimball Art Center’s big- without the depth delivered by the arts, the city wouldn’t be
gest fundraisers. “It’s ironic that in a ski town the two biggest the vibrant place it is today. n
events of the year are the Sundance Film Festival and the Arts
Fest. Art is clearly part of Park City’s DNA,” says Macomber.

Each August, the Arts Festival brings over 225 juried artists
from around the country and around 50,000 attendees. Last

23
Park-CityStyle.com | SUMMER • FALL 2019

THE ART OF PARK CITY

CONNECTIONS

BRINGING PEOPLE TOGETHER THROUGH THE ARTS

WORDS Evie Carrick | IMAGE Angela Howard

WHEN JOCELYN SCUDDER TRADED IN NEW YORK CITY FOR PARK CITY, SHE FOUND A WAY TO
CONNECT THE TWO SIDES OF HERSELF: THE IDEALIST AND THE REALIST. THE IDEALIST LED
HER TO NYC IN THE FIRST PLACE. IT ARGUED THAT 80 HOUR WEEKS WORKING AT A PRINT
SHOP DURING THE DAY AND WAITING TABLES AT NIGHT WAS WORTH IT. THE REALIST SIDE OF HER
WANTED STABILITY, OR AT LEAST SOME LEVEL OF BALANCE, WITHOUT COMPROMISING HER CAREER.

That’s where Park City came in. “WHEN THE ARTS ARE PRIORITIZED
Scudder had spent her first winter out of college in Park MAGICAL THINGS HAPPEN.”
City and loved it. She envied her friends who stayed. She
missed the mountain lifestyle. Then, she landed a job at the – JOCELYN SCUDDER
Kimball Art Center.
“Park City ended up being the perfect intersection between conversations. To put a not-so-simple concept simply, Scudder
my true joys and career ambitions,” she says. “There’s an says: “Art is a language that spans every ethnicity, language,
incredibly vibrant and connected community here and it’s and boundary.”
something you don’t get as much in big cities.”
In Park City, Scudder found, you could live in a world-class One recent example of this was 2018’s youth engagement
destination that attracts big name talent and cultural events public art project, Future Is Now. It encouraged Summit County
without sacrificing the mountain-town lifestyle. youth to gather and create text-based art with Brooklyn street
This idea of connecting two ideals is something that has artist Bisco Smith in the pedestrian tunnel between the Park
translated over to her work with the Park City Summit County City Visitor Information Center and Redstone. The project was
Arts Council (PCSC Arts Council), a nonprofit organization that is executed with the help of the Summit County Public Art Advi-
literally in the business of connecting. As the managing director, sory Board and Basin Recreation. Scudder says the project
Scudder and her team work to connect artists to residencies showed how art can be used as a tool, in this case, to connect
and funding, visitors to art showings and performances, and kids and provide an outlet for them to express themselves.
arts organizations to helpful resources.
This, Scudder says, is one of her favorite parts of the job. “We On any given day, Scudder might be sharing data from Proj-
serve as a central resource for arts organizations and creatives who ect ABC, Summit County’s new cultural plan, with an arts orga-
are looking to engage with the local community,” she says. “We nization; acting as a liaison to the Public Art Advisory Boards;
have the privilege of connecting with all of the arts and culture writing blog posts that promote local artists; or advocating for
stakeholders who make a difference in this community–creative statewide investment in the arts. In every role, Scudder is con-
people, organizations, businesses, and government leaders.” tinuing her work of establishing connection through the arts.
The ability for anyone to access the arts is hugely important Because, as she says, “When the arts are prioritized magical
to Scudder. She believes the arts promote community vibrancy, things happen.” n
aid with communication, and act as a platform for difficult

24
Park-CityStyle.com | SUMMER • FALL 2019





THE ART OF PARK CITY

MAGIC

THE POWER OF MUSIC

WORDS Evie Carrick | IMAGE Angela Howard

RINGING PEOPLE TOGETHER FOR LIVE MUSIC DOES SOMETHING POWERFUL, SOMETHING
KATHRYN BURNS HAS SEEN HAPPEN TIME AND TIME AGAIN AT PARK CITY LIVE.

B“It’s hard to explain the power and influence of music,” she

“IT’S HARD TO EXPLAIN THE POWERsays. “Music is an escape. It’s a way for people to get away from
their hectic lives and come together. When I listen to music it’s
almost like a meditation. As I sing the words, the memories con- AND INFLUENCE OF MUSIC.”
jured up by the song and the meaning of the lyrics literally take
me away.” Booking acts and putting on events that bring about
that feeling is what Burns loves about Park City Live, a concert – KATHRYN BURNS

venue she has owned and operated since 2012.
Unlike most venue owners, Burns doesn’t have a history in town, which is what Burns loves about it. “We bring all genres
the entertainment industry or a musical background. In fact, of music to Park City, from EDM to country to pop to rock n’
she’s a self-described “numbers gal” with an undergrad in engi- roll; my goal is to have something for everyone.”
neering and an MBA in finance. After taking a step back from In addition, Burns says “As Park City has developed into such
her career and having kids–a son, Connor, and a daughter, a high-profile ski town, Park City Live has really kept pace by
Corinne–she was ready for a new challenge. transforming the venue from a simple nightclub into a world-
class concert venue.” She says, “I can’t tell you how many of my
Enter Park City Live.
“I’ve always loved music and I have a knack for lyrics and a customers have told me that when they are deciding where to
good ear for it. I wanted to do something different and I knew take their ski vacation one important part of their decision is
that opening a venue in Park City would be a unique adven- the type of nightlife and caliber of music the town has to offer.”
ture,” explains Burns. “I wanted to open a small, quaint apres Burns feels excited and blessed to play a part in building up the
ski restaurant but this opportunity kind of landed in my lap and attractiveness of Park City to promote tourism.
I decided it was the challenge I needed.” Not only does Park City Live entice locals and visitors, but
Anyone who’s seen a show at Park City Live knows that it has also impacted her own family, primarily her son Con-
“small” is not how you’d describe the space. It’s the larg- nor. After growing up with Park City Live–and meeting his idol,
est music venue in Park City with a capacity over 850, a giant Skrillex–he started his own career as a budding EDM artist,
stage, and state-of-the-art lighting and sound systems. “Small” recently signing a record label deal with Capitol Records.
also isn’t a word you’d use to describe the acts Park City Live “Park City Live has been a positive influence on the commu-
hosts. Burns and her team have brought stars like Snoop Dog, nity, but I never thought it would have such an impact on my
Avicii, the Foo Fighters, Calvin Harris, The String Cheese Inci- kids,” Burns says. Looking back, she knows better. Music does
dent, One Republic, Drake, and Macklemore to town. And it’s that. It may be hard to explain, but music has a magic to it that
not always the type of music you’d expect to find in a mountain inspires, changes, and brings people together. n

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THE ART OF PARK CITY

CONVERSATIONS

IT ALL STARTS WITH A STORY

WORDS Evie Carrick | IMAGE Angela Howard

T ERI ORR ARRIVED IN PARK CITY IN 1979, BUT UNLIKE MANY PARKITES, SHE WASN’T LURED BY
THE MOUNTAINS OR THE LIFESTYLE; SHE CAME TO FIND REFUGE AFTER DIVORCING HER
ABUSIVE HUSBAND. “WE DIDN’T REALLY HAVE THE LANGUAGE IN THE ‘70S FOR DOMESTIC
VIOLENCE, BUT LOOKING BACK, I WAS IN A DOMESTICALLY VIOLENT RELATIONSHIP,” SHE EXPLAINS.

Orr and her two young children left their home near Lake “WE WANT TO MAKE
Tahoe and arrived in Park City with one contact and a plan to SURE THAT WE KEEP TALKING
stay six months. She got a job folding sweaters at a ski shop ABOUT SOCIAL JUSTICE ISSUES
and eventually started writing a column for The Park Record for
$10 a month. Eventually, she was promoted to editor and real- IN OUR COMMUNITY.”
ized Park City was a great place to raise kids. Six months turned
into 40 years. – TERI ORR

Orr explains that Park City is “kind of like cosmic Velcro in Eccles Center and summer’s St. Regis Big Stars, Bright Nights con-
that people come here and attach” and that living here “feels cert series.
like you’re on a vacation in your hometown.”
Orr views Park City Institute’s role in the community as one that
When Orr–then a reporter–heard that the historic Egyptian ignites conversation. Not only do they bring big names and beautiful
Theatre had been purchased by Randy and Debbi Fields of Mrs. performances to the stage, but many shows dig into topics like sui-
Fields Bakeries and was slated to become condos, she went to cide, climate change, and the LGBTQ community. Orr’s vision is to
the Fields and asked what it would take to save and refurbish use the arts to tell a story that initiates conversation off the stage.
the theatre. Their answer: raise $50,000 in the next six weeks.
Like her own story of domestic violence, Orr knows that art
“[This] was mission impossible in the ‘80s because there has the power to spark tough, but important conversations.
wasn’t much going on or much money. I just went around and “We have a stage and a platform, where timely, complicated
asked people,” Orr remembers, eventually securing $48,000. conversations can be initiated in a safe atmosphere,” she says.
The Fields, impressed, graciously accepted Orr’s proposition, “We want to make sure that we keep talking about social justice
gifting another $300,000 to renovate the building and restore issues in our community.” n
the Egyptian.

Orr’s involvement in saving the Egyptian was a precursor to
her next big gig: Raising money for the yet-to-be-built George S.
and Dolores Doré Eccles Center for the Performing Arts. It was
a task that eventually resulted in her current role as executive
director of Park City Institute, the nonprofit that programs the

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Park-CityStyle.com | SUMMER • FALL 2019



CALENDAR OF EVENTS

10 Can’t Miss 1Park Silly Sunday Market, June 2-Septem-
Summer Highlights ber 22: On Sundays during summer (except
August 4, 11, and 18), visiting the Park Silly
IN AND AROUND PARK CITY Sunday Market is a must. Park Silly is an open-
air, eco-friendly market and street festival fea-
PWORDS Ted Scheffler | IMAGES Deborah DeKoff and Courtesy Dino Perrucci turing a wide array of food and drink, music
ARK CITY HAS BECOME A YEAR-ROUND DESTINATION IN RECENT and performance art, regional arts and crafts,
YEARS, WITH AS MUCH (OR MORE) TO DO IN THE SUMMER AS IN THE antiques, imports, farmers market produce,
WINTER. HERE ARE 10 GREAT OPTIONS FOR SUMMER OUTINGS. baked goods, and more.

30 2Monster Drawing Rally, June 6: Over the
Park-CityStyle.com | SUMMER • FALL 2019 course of the evening artists take shifts
drawing and making art for 50 minutes
while spectators spy on the creative process. The
finished drawings will be immediately available
for purchase for $50 apiece.

3Rickie Lee Jones, June 7-9: The renown
singer/songwriter and American music leg-
end performs for three nights at the Egyptian
Theatre. “The West is my home,” Jones says. “Park
City is one of those jewels of the West that makes
this stop so special to me. I’m trying out extra musi-
cians and material to make the Park City shows the
unique highlight of this year’s tour.”

4Savor the Summit, June 22: Dubbed the
world’s largest outdoor dinner party, Savor
the Summit showcases Park City’s finest
chefs, restaurants, and cuisine with an out-
door dinner table that spans the length of Main
Street. It’s a summer solstice al fresco evening
of food, wine, and music as the sun sets behind
Main Street and attendees dine under the stars.

5Michael Franti and Ziggy Marley, June 30:
Michael Franti & Spearhead will remind
concert goers to “Stay Human” as he and
Ziggy Marley bring their sunny sounds to Deer
Valley Resort’s Summer Concert Series at the
Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater.

6Fourth of July Parade and Celebration, July • Hands-on cooking classes - Private cooking parties
4: One of the perennial highlights of sum- • Enjoy a meal and a spectacular view
mer in Park City is the annual July 4 parade • Perfect for newcomers, date nights, vacation activities
down Main Street, pancake breakfast, Cole Sport • Sign up on our website for a class today!
5K Fun Run, and the live music, barbecue, rugby,
volleyball, and kids activities held in City Park. At www.mindfulcuisine.com
dusk, enjoy fireworks at Park City Mountain.

7Park City Kimball Arts Festival, August 2-4:
Now in its 50th year, the Kimball Arts Festival A Cooking and Dining Experience in Park City
will feature more than 220 jury-selected art-
ists from over 30 states, plus 30 live musical acts, MODERN
a beer garden, killer culinary options, and an array
of art programs for kids and adults. The festival is VINTAGE GRAPHICS
the primary fundraiser for the Kimball Art Center.
ARCHIVAL PRINTS • FREe shipping
8Summit County Fair, August 3-10: The first www.stevenbeutlerdesign.com
week of August signals the annual Summit
County Fair, a popular family event complete 31
with clowns, a carnival, bucking broncos and cow- Park-CityStyle.com | SUMMER • FALL 2019
boys, beauty queens, food booths, a beer/wine/spir-
its garden, 4-H exhibitions, horse shows, petting zoo,
livestock judging, dancing, entertainment, and more.

9Autumn Aloft, September 14-15: Would you
like to ride in a beautiful balloon? Or at least,
watch some? Autumn Aloft is a gorgeous
spectacle that’s free to the public. Watch dozens
of colorful hot air balloons launch from a single
location as Park City residents and visitors alike
celebrate and embrace the coming of autumn.

10Park City Wine Festival, October 3-5:
Attendees will experience more than
100 food artisans, wineries, winemak-
ers, gourmet food purveyors, distilleries, craft
breweries, and more at various locations through-
out Park City during the festival. Whet your appe-
tite at the Wine Classic, attend an informative
seminar or luncheon, or indulge in an exciting out-
door adventure followed by lusty libations.

INSPIRE

INSPIRATION ABOUNDS
PARK CITY DRAWS TALENT LIKE A MAGNET

WORDS Steve Phillips | IMAGES Courtesy

P ABLO PICASSO ONCE SAID, “INSPIRATION EXISTS, BUT IT HAS TO FIND YOU WORKING.” FORTUNATELY,
THAT’S NEVER BEEN A PROBLEM IN THIS TOWN, WHICH DRAWS TALENTED, CREATIVE PEOPLE LIKE A
MAGNET. PARK CITY IS HOME TO MANY INSPIRED ARTISTS, WORKING IN MANY MEDIUMS.

“YOU CAN’T USE
UP CREATIVITY.
THE MORE YOU USE,
THE MORE YOU HAVE.”

– MAYA ANGELOU

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People like JILL ORSCHEL, an award-winning indepen-
dent filmmaker and photographer. It’s a calling to which
she seemed destined. “When I was 6 years old I would
daydream that I was making movies and shooting a real
film camera,” says Orschel. Appearing in  national televi-
sion commercials in high school, she was fascinated by
the filmmaking process. She graduated with a journalism
degree from Colorado State University, then earned a
MFA in film studies at the University of Utah after mov-
ing to Park City from Aspen, in 1990. SISTER WIFE, her
award-winning short documentary about a polygamist
wife in southern Utah, premiered at the 2009 Sundance
Film Festival and screened worldwide. She’s nearing com-
pletion of SNOWLAND, a feature-length documentary
about  a child-bride-turned-artist from a secluded polyg-
amist sect. Orschel shares her passion with other Utah
filmmakers as the founder and director of the  Annual
Filmmakers Showcase in Park City, where artists screen
their films for the public free of charge.

People like ELIZABETH CARRINGTON, a Park City-based multi-disciplinary artist and
designer renowned for her colorful, pop-art paintings, public art, textiles, and furni-
ture. Carrington, who grew up going to museums, galleries, and cultural events, holds
a BFA from the University of Arizona. She says her work often contains a “subliminal
message of hope for the next generation. The possibility of peace and happiness are
woven through the paintings as unexpected, bold graffiti images…” Carrington has
done design work for many major businesses, including Wells Fargo, Charles Schwab,
American Express, and Travelocity. Her work graces the walls and halls of serious art
collectors and many major corporations across America. “My pieces sometimes com-
ment on dogmas and widely held beliefs in popular culture and pay homage to times
of revolution and upheaval that move the needle of society’s moral compass. My work
is fun, whimsical, and sometimes subversive, and is informed by a lifelong love of
travel, music, the outdoors, and action sports,” says Carrington.

People like ROB SMITH, a personal fitness trainer and
professional bodybuilder whose canvas is the human
body. Sculpting the three-dimensional human form is in
his DNA, explains the soft-spoken mountain of a man,
descended from a long line of bodybuilders. From his
“studio” at the Basin Recreation Center at Kimball Junc-
tion, Smith works with all kinds of people, from serious
bodybuilders and competitive athletes to “weekend war-
riors,” who simply want to get healthier and stronger. His
clients must adhere to a rigorous routine. “Nutrition is
the most important part of preparing the canvas,” Smith
says. “If they will not keep on their diet, I will not train
them. Then we talk about injuries and weaknesses so I
can figure out if there are any holes in the canvas,” Smith
says. The veteran fitness trainer says he likes to keep
things “Da Vinci-esque” when molding bodybuilders. “I
do this because I love it,” he concludes.

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Park-CityStyle.com | SUMMER • FALL 2019

People like BRUCE LARRABEE, a veteran People like RILEY ELIZABETH OLSON, whose
Park City potter who has been creating ele- stunning, state-of-the-art animation has attracted
gant, earthy, practical pottery at his Summit the attention of the worldwide online animation
Park studio for almost 40 years. It’s an art community. “I started animating because I was so
form for which he seemed destined. “Ever inspired by other artists online and I wanted to learn
since I was a little boy I knew I wanted to how to make art like them,” says Olson. The 15-year-
make things with my hands. When I sat at old phenom explains she started drawing at age 10
the wheel and threw my first pot in a high as a way to deal with her loneliness. “I’ve always
school pottery class, I was hooked,” he felt a little bit like an outsider and drawing relaxes
says. He went on to earn a BFA at the Uni- me and makes me feel comfortable with myself. My
versity of Utah. Larrabee works primarily favorite part about creating art is seeing my imagi-
with white stoneware and porcelain clays. nation come to life on the screen.”  That imagina-
All his works are original designs and hand- tion is prominently on display in her artwork for a
made one by one. “The fluidity of my glazes delightful new children’s book, “How to Throw a Fit
is a trademark of my work,” he says. As the for Kids.” The impressive 9th grader sets a high bar
owner of Artworks Gallery in Park City, Lar- for other aspiring artists. “I hope my story and art
rabee has served on several arts-related inspires other kids to use their imagination, trust it,
boards in town, working on behalf of artists explore with it, and see how far it can go. Your imag-
in the community and across the state. ination really describes who you are.”

People like SARA SHEPHERD EDGAR, everyday life.” Edgar says her most powerful Imagination– the common denominator.
whose evocative, often surreal mixed-me- childhood memories were of creating art. “You can’t use up creativity. The more you use,
dia works are “inspired by the subtleties of “My mother continually offered art projects the more you have.” ~ Maya Angelou n
for my sisters and I to do.” Edgar graduated
34 from the University of Washington with a
Park-CityStyle.com | SUMMER • FALL 2019 BFA in 1994. She studied metal-smithing,
and many of her early works were jewel-
ry-scale sculptures. Edgar moved to Park
City in 2005 and focused on painting. “Paint-
ing, for me, is a view of life, a piece of evi-
dence, an opinion, a statement. My work
is narrative, known only to me, yet lets the
viewer interpret the story using their own
experiences,” she says. “I observe every
day, taking notes of things people say and
do, looking for moments that may not be
apparent to others. I find ways in my work to
express those instances, to symbolize them
in obvious and not so obvious ways.”

Live where you play,
call Park City “home.”

It’s about so much more than just a house.
Enjoy the community & lifestyle that

comes with living in the Wasatch Back.

Because you’re here
for the good stuff.

MEREDITH REED LoveLivingParkCity.com 435.571.1090

Creative Photography. Incredible Stories.

BRANDING & FAMILIES FOOD & WEDDINGS
C O R P O R AT E E V E N T S FOOD STYLING

www.angelahowardphoto.com | @angelahowardphoto

35
Park-CityStyle.com | SUMMER • FALL 2019

INSPIRE

36
Park-CityStyle.com | SUMMER • FALL 2019

Transforming
Trash

FINE ART THAT HELPS HEAL THE PLANET

WWORDS Natalie Taylor | IMAGE Deborah DeKoff
HEN YOU CONSIDER THAT THERE IS
AN ISLAND OF TRASH THE SIZE OF
TEXAS FLOATING IN THE OCEAN, IT’S
IMPERATIVE TO THINK ABOUT THE EFFECT OF
WASTE. FOR PARK CITY NATIVE EMILY QUINN
LOUGHLIN, USING WASTE CONSCIOUSLY IS AN
INTEGRAL ELEMENT OF HER FINE ART PRACTICE.
SHE USES RECYCLED MATERIALS TO CREATE
SCULPTURES, MIXED MEDIA, WEARABLE ART,
AND EVEN PORTRAITS.

Inspired by painters that use earth-based pigments and soy-
based gesso, Loughlin takes the concept of creating a sustain-
able art practice one step further. “I ask myself two questions,”
she says. “One: How can I help clean up the mess? And two:
How can I use materials that don’t contribute to the mess?”

It all started with a (now defunct) local ski and snowboard
company, Ramp Sports. “They opened their doors and invited
artists to use their castoff materials,” she says. “I realized that
rather than buying supplies, I could take waste that would have
gone to the landfill and transform it into art.”

Seeing opportunities to solve the global climate crisis trans-
formed her relationship with waste. In her hands, cardboard
scraps become canvases, artificial flowers become feathers on a
headdress, and bicycle tires and ski goggle straps become sculp-
ture. The options are endless for castoff tissue, magazines, fabric
scraps, and inner tubes.

Loughlin earned her BFA in fibers from the Savannah Col-
lege of Art and Design, a degree that informs her methodol-
ogy. She builds the skeleton of her sculptures by repurposing
materials into something that can be woven, stitch by stitch,
cementing each wire and bending it. Then, she articulates a
different material on top of that. Her latest project is a series
of saguaro cacti that are built with sculpture wire and embel-
lished with recycled materials. “They grow like plants, one cell
at a time,” she explains.

“I love the idea of taking a monofilament, like a string, and
creating a two-dimensional plane.” Case in point: “Someone told
me one of my sculptures looked so familiar, but they couldn’t
place why,” she says. “It was made from zip ties.”

Loughlin believes in the restorative power of art. “I want to
have a healthier relationship with the planet and help repair it,”
she says. “There are no wrong answers in art. Environmentally
sustainable practices help heal the planet and art helps heal our
souls. Together, they create a symbiotic relationship between
waste and art, creativity and productivity.” n

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INSPIRE

Music’s Calling

TEACHING A LOVE FOR MUSIC

KWORDS Steve Phillips | IMAGE Deborah DeKoff
ELLY WALLIS, THE BAND DIRECTOR AT ECKER
HILL MIDDLE SCHOOL IN PARK CITY, BEGAN
HIS MUSICAL ODYSSEY HALF-A-CENTURY
AGO. HE WAS JUST 5 YEARS OLD WHEN HIS FATHER
HEARD HIM BANGING AWAY ON A PIECE OF
WOOD, KEEPING THE BEAT WITH AN ELTON JOHN
TUNE. HIS MEMORY OF THAT DAY REMAINS VIVID.
“MY DAD ASKED ME HOW I LEARNED TO DO THAT
AND I TOLD HIM JUST BY LISTENING. HE MUST
HAVE SENSED SOMETHING BECAUSE HE WENT
RIGHT OUT AND BOUGHT ME A DRUM SET,” HE
REMEMBERS. FOR THE NEXT FEW YEARS WALLIS
TORTURED HIS PARENTS AS HE LEARNED TO PLAY.
BUT HIS FATHER WAS RIGHT, HE HAD A GIFT.

At Brighton High School in Salt Lake City, the prodigious drummer
developed into a well-rounded percussionist, even tutoring other
drummers at school. His innate talent for teaching was a harbinger of
things to come.

Wallis won a scholarship to attend the University of Utah. There,
he blossomed into an accomplished musician on an astounding array
of percussion instruments. He continued to tutor and teach, giving
private lessons to other college students who needed help. But he
never got a teaching certificate, “I was young and I just wanted to be
a ‘player,’” he explains.

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Park-CityStyle.com | SUMMER • FALL 2019

And play he did! Throughout the late
1980s and early ‘90s, Wallis played with
big-name artists like Ray Charles, Peter
Cetera, and Chuck Berry. He worked in
the studio recording jingles and theme
music for films and television shows like
“Good Morning America” and “The Ricki
Lake Show.” But teaching kept knock-
ing on the door. He was asked to be an
adjunct professor for the University of
Utah’s School of Music and has held that
job for the past 20 years.

“They learn a lot
more than just how to
play, they learn about

themselves.”

– Kelly Wallis

Wallis became frustrated when he
couldn’t find decent equipment while
touring. He and a partner opened Back-
beats, a rental and retail music store in
Salt Lake City. The business was very suc-
cessful and, for the next 22 years, Wallis
made a good living between the store and
all his “gigs.” During those years, he mar-
ried, began a family, moved to Park City,
and later, to nearby Midway.

When the profitable equipment rental
business sold, Wallis took a break, though
it didn’t last long. “The phone rang one
day and it turned out they needed a sub-
stitute music teacher at Ecker Hill. I gladly
accepted. That was in 2016 and I’m still
there,” he says.

The last three years have been a blur
for Wallis. He went back to school, earning
his teaching certificate and learning to play
virtually every instrument in the band.

Wallis has really found his calling
working with middle schoolers. “I feel like
I’m teaching more than music. I’m teach-
ing kids how to think creatively, develop
good work habits, and solve problems.
They learn a lot more than just how to
play, they learn about themselves. It’s a
great gig.”

When asked if he has a bucket list,
Wallis chuckles, “Well, first of all, you need
a bucket,” he quips. Maybe it’s best he
doesn’t. Chances are he’d just bang on it. n

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INSPIRE

The Art of
the Spa
Experience

IT’S ALL IN THE DETAILS

IWORDS Ted Scheffler | IMAGE Deborah DeKoff
THINK OF SPA PROFESSIONALS
AS ARTISTS, OF SORTS. THEY
USE THEIR KNOWLEDGE,
TECHNIQUES, AND TALENTS TO
HELP CREATE A “NEW YOU.” THAT
IS CERTAINLY TRUE OF PARK CITY’S
ALIGN SPA, WHOSE EMPLOYEES ARE
THE CREAM OF THE CROP–WELL-
TRAINED, SEASONED PROS WITH
AN EXCELLENT (MASSAGE) BEDSIDE
MANNER. I SAT DOWN WITH TWO
OF THEM–BRAND MANAGER AND
MASSAGE THERAPIST THOMAS
FLOCCO AND AESTHETICIAN LISA
HALES–TO CHAT ABOUT THE ART OF
THE SPA EXPERIENCE.

As a former professional snowboarder with
a background in exercise science from Keene
State College in New Hampshire, Flocco was
already well acquainted with massage therapy
and bodywork, “which helped me perform and
compete,” he says. “So getting all that bodywork
and having that health science background got
me interested in massage school. I went to the
Myotherapy College of Utah, which was really
fun and taught me a ton.” Fast-forward to today
and he’s been with Align Spa for 15 years.

Hales was on track to become a registered
nurse and laughs when she says, “but realized I
didn’t really want to be bedside during surgeries
and things like that, so I went more to the path
of aesthetics and went to Cameo College in Salt
Lake.” She wound up teaching at Cameo and
joined Align Spa 11 years ago.

Flocco, who is nothing if not buff, lights up
when he talks about the therapeutic angle of
the spa experience. “The nice thing about our
spa is that just about everything we do has a
therapeutic bonus to it. With bodywork and
facials there are so many benefits like improved

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Park-CityStyle.com | SUMMER • FALL 2019

circulation, stress reduction, anxiety relief,
physically lengthening of muscle tissue,
getting a better mindset … there are more
benefits than I could talk about during a
one-hour massage. One thing I love more
and more about this industry is the thera-
peutic aspect and that we’re really helping
people treat pain.”

Because they’re based in a ski town,
Align Spa tends to draw clients who are
more active and athletic than you’d prob-
ably find in many other cities. Hales notes
that because of our dry, high-altitude,
sunny climate skin care is essential. “We
do a lot of skin cancer prevention, hydrat-
ing, collagen induction–things that you
might not have to worry about so much at
sea level.”

“Everything we do
has a therapeutic

bonus to it.”

– Thomas Flocco

Each spa experience is different for WWW.PARKCITYPHOTOGRAPHERS.COM
each person and Hales advises clients
to not be afraid “to communicate your Deborah DeKoff • 435.513.3814 • [email protected]
expectations. Your treatment and your spa 41
experience can kind of be whatever you
want it to be. For instance, we don’t have Park-CityStyle.com | SUMMER • FALL 2019
specific facials–everything is customized.
And with massages, it’s the same: you can
do deep tissue, therapeutic, or more of
a relaxing massage. If you communicate
your expectations, you’re going to get the
exact treatment you want.”

When asked what they themselves
look for when visiting a spa, both Hales and
Flocco agree that cleanliness is key. “My big-
gest pet peeve when walking into a spa is a
dirty bathroom,” says Flocco. And they look
for a very positive vibe, from the check-in at
the front desk to how your therapist or aes-
thetician greets you. “Are they pushy, or do
they allow you to guide the session? Those
are the types of things we really pay atten-
tion to at Align Spa. At the end of the day, it’s
all in the details.” n

INSPIRE

SEEKING INSPIRATION
PUBLIC ART DELIVERS COLOR, MUSIC, AND TACTILE EXPERIENCES
WORDS Natalie Taylor | IMAGES Angela Howard, Gillian Hunter, and Courtesy Park City Public Art
PARK CITY IS KNOWN FOR ITS WORLD-CLASS ARTISTS. SO, IF
YOU’RE IN THE MOOD TO EXPLORE, WALK AROUND TOWN
AND YOU’LL FIND ART IN UNEXPECTED PLACES.

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Park-CityStyle.com | SUMMER • FALL 2019

That’s thanks to the Park City Public Art Advi- example, the tunnel mural, “A Sacred Commu-
sory Board, a group of folks dedicated to acquiring, nity,” was donated in 2015 by Danny Stephens,
installing, and maintaining Park City’s public art col- Miguel Galex, and Jessika Jeppson who were
lection. “Our goal is to have a collection that rep- all students in the MFA program at the Univer-
resents our history, diversity, and community,” says sity of Utah. The trio sketched templates in the
Jenny Diersen, Park City’s special event and eco- tunnel and asked people walking or cycling by
nomic development program manager. With more to paint the blank spaces. The Deer Valley Drive
than 30 pieces around town and Bonanza tunnel, painted by local artist Trent
that include sculptures, paint- Call, showcases iconic emblems of Park City.
“OUR GOAL IS TO ings, murals, and the “Sound
Garden,” the collection offers The most recent example of commu-
ample opportunities to interact nity involvement to create public art is titled
HAVE A COLLECTION with and celebrate art. “EmPOWERment.” Nine local artists ranging from
THAT REPRESENTS OUR The collection’s first piece elementary school students to professionals will
was acquired in 1984. The sculp- be covering utility boxes with images of energy
ture, “Park City Scape” by James conservation. “Park City has the most ambitious
HISTORY, DIVERSITY, McBeth, was commissioned by energy goals in North America,” says Diersen,
the Park City Foundation and who says they’re working to “change behavior
nearly 40 local individuals and and work together to meet those goals.”
AND COMMUNITY.” businesses. It’s exhibited south
of the Miner’s Hospital Commu- We suggest taking two or three days to see
nity Center at City Park. “It’s one the area’s full public art collection. Spend one
– JENNY DIERSEN of the most important pieces in day on Main Street, another day walking the
trails, and then take free transit (with art on
the collection because it rep- most bus shelters) to see the art that’s out of
resents the beginning of our collection and our his- walking range. For example, you won’t want to
tory, and is centrally located,” says Diersen. miss the Olympic sculpture “Making Tracks” by
Today, the public art collection ranges from artist Cliff Garten of Marina Del Ray, California
historical to contemporary and features local, near the historic McPolin Barn or “Symphony
regional, and national artists. And in some of Movement” by Colorado-based artist Joshua
cases, artists include community members. For Weiner, located at Quinn’s Junction just adjacent
to the city’s dog park.

During your public art tour, be sure to watch
wind move the purple “School of Fish” sculpture
made of recycled metals by artist Scott Whita-
ker; play the chimes at the “Brian Hess Memo-
rial Sound Garden” created by artist and design-
er-in-residence, Frank Youngman of Cadillac,
Michigan; and get oriented with the “Wild City”
mural by Virginia-based artist Emily Herr in the
China Bridge parking structure.

For more information, including a map and
community involvement opportunities, visit
parkcity.org/about-us/public-art. n

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HIGHSTYLE PROFILE

Generations of Gem Art

IT’S ALL IN THE FAMILY AT PARK CITY JEWELERS

AWORDS Ashley Brown | IMAGES Gillian Hunter
N APRECIATION FOR GEMSTONES AND DINOSAUR BONES IS A WHIPPLE FAMILY TRADITION. AT AGE 5,
KEN WHIPPLE FELL IN LOVE WITH GEMS THANKS TO HIS GRANDPA, MAX PEACOCK, WHO TOOK KEN,
“INTO THE DESERT LOOKING FOR ROCKS.” KEN BEGAN MAKING JEWELRY AT A YOUNG AGE, WHEN HIS
GRANDPA, “GOT [HIM] INTO CUTTING ROCKS.”

“That is when I knew Park City
Jewelers [was] the place for me.

I love it here.”

– Cole Whipple

Ken, a Utah native, carved out his destiny at the age of 16. He came “After spending a couple of years helping my dad around the shop, I
to the Park City Kimball Arts Festival in 1976 and decided that he would found that there was something about it I enjoyed,” says Cole. That’s when
someday own a jewelry store on Main Street. He spent 17 years, “building Cole buckled down and found a computer-aided design (CAD) class. After
skills and inventory,” before purchasing his store on Main Street in 1993. learning to work with CAD, Cole became a partner in the business, explain-
Nearly 15 years after Ken started Park City Jewelers, his son, Cole Whipple, ing, “That is when I knew Park City Jewelers [was] the place for me. I love
began working in the shop. it here. Plus, I get to work with my dad each day and what could be better
than that?”

At Park City Jewelers, families are welcome. Ken and his wife, Jeanna,
have 10 children and 14 grandchildren. Children of all ages are invited
downstairs to the jewelry creation studio. Ken has “a bucket of geodes and
will cut one in half for kids, just to see the light in their eyes when they
look inside a new rock.”

Special treatment for children and families is just one of the ways Park
City Jewelers sets themselves apart. The shop is renowned for its unique
creations. “We offer people things that they have never seen,” says Ken.
In addition to displays of jewelry crafted with dinosaur bones, meteorites,
Megalodon teeth, and rare stones like Utah’s red emerald, Park City Jew-
elers does dozens of custom jobs a day. Ken beams while explaining that,
“we pride ourselves on doing a killer job.”

Ken says that at Park City Jewelers, “We do the whole process; design
the pieces, mix the metal, and cast the pieces. The basement is a manufac-
turing shop.” Every creation purchased from Park City Jewelers comes with
a lifetime manufacturing warranty.

Ken uses a handmade approach to jewelry, while Cole uses CAD to cre-
ate pieces. Despite their different techniques, Ken and Cole share a favor-
ite medium: dinosaur bone. Ken has been making dinosaur bone jewelry
since he was a kid and enjoys, “cutting it to see the incredible cell struc-
ture.” Cole loves creating jewelry with dinosaur bones, Paraiba Tourmaline,
or Watermelon Tourmaline, “which have a special place in his heart.” n

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HIGHSTYLE PROFILE

Everyday Altars

CERAMICS IMBUED WITH CHARACTER

SWORDS Darby Doyle | IMAGES Gillian Hunter
OME OF POTTER JUANITA MARSHALL’S PIECES ARE HEFTY AND ORGANIC: PEBBLED AND RIPPLED WITH BOLD
PATTERNS EVOKING MOSSY FOREST FLOORS, GRITTY BEACHES, AND RUGGED TALUS SLOPES. OTHERS ARE AS
DELICATE AND TRANSLUCENT AS A ROBIN’S EGGSHELL, WITH SUNLIGHT STREAMING THROUGH TO CREATE
ANOTHER DIMENSION OF FLUID SUBTLETY. ALL OF THEM ARE AS ELEGANT AS THEY ARE EARTHY.

“I’ve always loved working with my hands,” says Marshall as we tabletop reliquaries. But the practical backbone of her work is the glazed
peruse some of the work she keeps at her Park City home. “Clay is a great earth-toned workhorses of every home: plates, mugs, and bowls. “Those
medium for that,” she says of the visceral connection between the artist are the things we use every day,” she says of the satisfying aspect of cre-
and resulting creations. ating usable art.
Marshall describes her work as having consistent elements that are A 30-plus year Park City resident, Marshall also enjoys the frequent
natural, layered, and interactive. From dainty sake cups to large vases and opportunities she has to give back to the community. With the Clay Arts
memorial vessels, these stylistic touchstones mark her collected work. They Utah group, she often contributes work to the “Empty Bowls” fundraiser
all incorporate a distinct feeling of reverence for the outdoors and the natu- to combat hunger with St. Vincent de Paul, and considers it an honor to
ral landscape, a joy in nature she has appreciated since she was very young. share her time and talents with groups like the National Ability Center. A
Although art was always a big part of her creative life, her professional work portion of all her ceramic sales goes to local groups that support educa-
in ceramics didn’t start until much later. “When I started working with clay,” tion, the environment, arts, and humanity. A longtime member of the Park
she says of her BFA program at the University of Utah in 2010, “It was diffi- City Professional Artists Association, she also teaches ceramic classes for
cult to learn how to throw on a wheel,” and she found the challenge to cre- all ages at the Kimball Art Center.
ate “perfect” and consistent pieces frustrating. “I had to embellish them to As friends and family around her have grown older and face the chal-
distract from the [perceived] imperfections.” This ornamental aspect of her lenges of life’s transitions, Marshall says she’s more often creating commis-
work—initially intended to cover up “mis- sioned work celebrating the many stages of
takes”—has become her trademark. life, from births and weddings to memorial
Her ceramics have a playful and inter- This ornamental aspect pieces. “Things have changed,” Marshall says
active quality, as a result. of the shift in her work. “It’s become more
Marshall says of a recent group show of her work—initially about self-expression and remembrance
for the Utah Council on Aging at Art instead of refining the craft.” She’ll even
Access Gallery in Salt Lake that she cre- intended to cover up make an exception to her usual earthy pal-
ated pieces she calls “everyday altars,” ette she says with a laugh, “If some youngster
intended to be more contemplative than “mistakes”—has become likes purple.” But regardless of the hue, the
functional, with sliding pendants and curi- naturalistic and organic elegance that result
osities reminiscent of household altars or her trademark. are unmistakably Juanita Marshall. n

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Park-CityStyle.com | SUMMER • FALL 2019





HIGHSTYLE PROFILE

A Serene Sense of Place

ENCAUSTIC ART WITH DISTINCTIVE DEPTH

“ IWORDS Darby Doyle | IMAGES Gillian Hunter and Courtesy Bridgette Meinhold
T’S A PRETTY ACTIVE PROCESS,” SAYS PARK CITY VISUAL ARTIST BRIDGETTE MEINHOLD OF HER COMPLEX
ENCAUSTIC MULTI-MEDIA WORKS THAT HAVE DRAWN INTERNATIONAL ACCLAIM. THE COMPELLING AND
UNIQUE DEPTH OF FIELD IS BUILT LAYER UPON LAYER STARTING WITH A WOOD BASE, THEN REFINED WITH
OVER A DOZEN APPLICATIONS OF WATERCOLOR, MILK PAINT, MELTED BEESWAX, AND PIGMENT THAT IS RUBBED
BY HAND INTO THE WAX. ADDITIONALLY, EACH WAX LAYER IS SPREAD AND FINISHED USING A BLOWTORCH AND
VARIOUS HAND TOOLS.

“The light,
atmosphere,
and depth are

all things
I try to capture.”

– Bridgette Meinhold

The process brings a unique luminescence and ethereal intensity to settings because I show in mountain towns,” like Gallery MAR in Park City,
each work, which begins weeks–sometimes months–in advance with pho- as well as galleries in Jackson, Wyoming; Bozeman, Montana; Truckee, Cal-
tographs Meinhold shoots during adventures skiing and hiking all over the ifornia; and Durango, Colorado. Her work has also been featured in several
western U.S. She uses these images to frame initial watercolor studies, books cataloguing the top encaustic artists in the country, such as “Encaus-
refining her vision for the final encaustic piece. But each painting’s genesis tic Art in the 21st Century,” written by Anne Lee and E. Ashley Rooney.
has a grounding theme: Meinhold’s connection to nature.
Even the journey from studio to gallery is imbued with a sense of
Meinhold says of this inspiration, “I live well outside of town in an adventure for Meinhold, especially in the winter when she and her hus-
aspen forest,” where she and her husband have a tiny A-frame house and band wrap each painting in blankets and then tow them a few at a time
shared adjacent studio (he’s a woodworker) made from a retrofitted ship- on a sled behind their snowmobile to the road access where their truck
ping container they installed in 2009. is parked. It’s nerve-racking just watching the video of this process on her
Instagram highlights reel. But she says of her remote crucible of creativity,
Rather than trying to re-create a specific place, Meinhold says her “My inspiration always starts outdoors. The light, atmosphere, and depth
work is intentionally evocative of an overall feeling of moving within are all things I try to capture.” n
a landscape. She says of her primary focus, “I typically have mountain
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Park-CityStyle.com | SUMMER • FALL 2019

HIGHSTYLE PROFILE

Fine Fin Art

FULL CIRCLE FLY-FISHING ART

WWORDS Ashley Brown | IMAGES Gillian Hunter
ALTER FOSTER HAS BEEN CATCHING AND SKETCHING FISH SINCE HE WAS 7 YEARS OLD. GROWING UP
IN VERMONT, FISHING WAS A CONSTANT IN FOSTER’S LIFE, AND HE CARRIED A SKETCHPAD TO DRAW
REPLICATIONS OF FISH EVEN AS A YOUNG CHILD.

“It is so unique how things come
full circle in your life.”

– Walter Foster

When Foster graduated with a degree in environmental science from Foster uses watercolor, paint, or colored pencils to finish the scene
Southern Vermont College, he intended to “pursue a career in environ- after he completes the initial sketch in pencil. He creates a realistic depic-
mental science.” The occupation didn’t suit Foster. “I can’t stay in the tion of the fish his clients catch with particular attention to detail and repli-
office for more than two hours at a time. One day, I decided to go out cates the identity of each fish by accurately mimicking spot patterns.
West and be a fishing guide.”
Fly-fishing and art, the focal points of Foster’s childhood, are now the
Foster first came to Utah in 1992 as a ski racer, then visited several center of his existence as a business owner. Foster marvels at the cyclical
times with friends. In 2005, Foster and his wife Andrea decided to make nature of life. “It ties back to childhood. The two things that I fully envel-
Park City their home. He began guiding for the fly-fishing outfitter Trout oped myself in as a kid were fishing and art. At 42, I am taking those two
Bum 2, while working as a server at the restaurant Chimayo. things and making a living out of them.” n

In March 2012, Foster started his own independent guiding service,
Trout Tales. His dedication to “developing relationships with clients” sup-
ported a successful business launch, and by 2013, Trout Tales was Foster’s
only job and sole focus. Trout Tales now has a staff of full-time and part-
time guides, and takes clients out on the river year-round.

His second business, Fine Fin Art, is a natural extension of Trout Tales
that started out of “necessity and accident.” When a long-term fly-fish-
ing client simultaneously caught a 20-inch rainbow trout and a 20-inch
brown trout, Foster placed both fish in a net and captured the image on
his iPhone. The client asked where he could turn the image into art and
Foster offered to give it a try. The commissioned piece marked the birth
of Fine Fin Art.

Foster reflects, “It is so unique how things come full circle in your life
through interactions or certain people. Fine Fin Art spawned out of a client
and a fishing experience.”

Foster is responsible for every aspect of his Fine Fin Art creations, “I tie
the flies that catch the fish, guide the client into the fish, take the photo
with my iPhone, and create the drawing or painting.” In a competitive mar-
ket, his work stands out. “The art element with my fly-fishing guide ser-
vice is a unique combination,” he says. Fine Fin Art is what separates Trout
Tales from other guiding services.

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Park-CityStyle.com | SUMMER • FALL 2019


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