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This exhibit highlights differing phases of influence on the Navajo
weaver. Showcasing historic textiles we have collected over the years, as well as those commissioned from weavers we have worked with over the last 45 years.

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Published by NavajoRug.com, 2017-12-11 15:18:06

Timeless Treasures of Two Grey Hills Navajo Rugs

This exhibit highlights differing phases of influence on the Navajo
weaver. Showcasing historic textiles we have collected over the years, as well as those commissioned from weavers we have worked with over the last 45 years.

Keywords: navajo,navajo rug,navajo weaving,two grey hills,two gray hills,nizhoni ranch gallery,Steve Getzwiller,JB Moore,Arizona

From The Getzwiller Collection

TIMELESS TREASURES
OF TWO GREY HILLS

October 2017 - April 2018


Two Grey Hill rug designs reflect differing phases of
influence through time, as you will see in the Timeless
Treasures of Two Grey Hills exhibition.

This exhibit highlights differing phases of influence on the Navajo
weaver. Showcasing historic textiles we have collected over the years, as well
as those commissioned from weavers we have worked with over the last 45
years.

Historically traders encouraged unique and signature designs for Navajo
rugs in their particular area, in this case Toadlena and Two Grey Hills, to
enhance marketability and cultivate regional styles. Sheep and their wool
were vital to the livelihood of the Navajo. Using this natural resource of the
sheep’s wool to make rugs, weavers created a viable economic collaboration
with post traders. The traders helped the Navajo by marketing the rugs they
made beyond the borders of the reservation to the rest of the country. This
brought “béeso” or money to their artisan economy by turning the sheep’s wool
into decorative and functional goods.

RESERVATION Design innovation and progression by osmosis… J.B. Moore,
TRADERS the resident trader at Crystal (1896-1911), influenced the early Two
Grey Hill rug design. The weavers from the Two Grey Hill area had
INFLUENCE summer camps for grazing their sheep in the Chuska Mountains
near Crystal Trading Post.

THE MOLDING J.B. Moore generally offered to pay a very fair price to these
OF THE weavers depicting the designs presented in his mail order catalogs.

The catalog designs along with the Two Grey Hill area weaver’s

TWO GREY HILL preference to use the natural wool colors of their sheep, brought the
design style of J.B. Moore to the Toadlena and Two Grey Hill areas,
DESIGN located on the east side of the Chuska Mountains.
The J.B. Moore designs, such as the storm pattern, influenced
the Ganado and western reservation area weavers and contributed to the
evolution of other regional styles such as Teec Nos Pos and Bistie. The Two
Grey Hills regional style became more clearly defined by the 1920s, evidenced
by the progression of the styles presented in this exhibit.

From the 1940s – 1950s, traders living in the area west of the Chuskas,
(Leighton at Two Grey Hills and Davies at Toadlena) encouraged design
innovation with the addition of small amounts of color, blue and red, to the
Two Grey Hill rug design. You will see a few examples of this hint of color, in
the following pages, along with some notable examples in the J.B. Moore style
from the 1920s.

Cover photo: Helena Taugelchee Nez Begay – National Archives, Regional Branch, College Park. Maryland. (circa 1945)
Peter Iverson discovered this photograph while doing research for his books and recognized the rug in the photo as
being one in our private collection. He was kind enough to give us a copy.


Historically Master Peter Iverson, Regents Professor of History at Arizona
Weavers from the State University, and leading scholar American Indian history,
Toadlena and Two offers this short snapshot of the development and influences of
Navajo rug designs:
Grey Hills areas have
been some of the most ….. The Depression affected the course of Navajo
talented of the Navajo weaving during the 1930s. Adverse economic times
Nation. The elegant did not encourage the market. Nevertheless, the Santa
simplicity of the color Fe Railway, the Fred Harvey Company, and other
boosters of Southwest tourism continued to bring new
palette, intricate and return visitors to the region. The founding of the
geometric design, Gallup Intertribal Ceremonial and the development
and expert carding of museums in Arizona and New Mexico furnished
and spinning made important venues for the display of high quality work.
their textiles some
of the best and finest Trading posts struggled in the wake of the
examples of Navajo Depression. One major figure, J.L. Hubbell, passed
rugs and tapestries away in 1930. Enthusiastic newcomers, such as
to emerge from the Bill and Sallie Lippincott, arrive at Wide Ruins. In
certain areas, traders played a significant role in
Navajo Nation. promoting particular regional styles. For Example,
Cozy McSparron of Chinle, the Lippincotts, and others
helped promote the use of vegetable (plant) dyes

Even under these difficult circumstances,
Navajo weavers continued to create extraordinary
work. Daisy Taugelchee of the Toadlena-Two Grey
Hills area (photos page 32, 33), arguably the greatest
of all Navajo weavers, came into her own as a
remarkable artist. Other area weavers, such as Bessie
Manygoats (photos page 10, 14, 15, 16), contributed to
an outpouring of weaving that established Toadlena-
Two Grey Hills weaving as the premier Navajo regional
style.*

* Excerpted from Dine – A History of the Navajo (2002)
by Peter Iverson.

“Steve Getzwiller is another entrepreneur who… trys to honor the past, attempt to live in the present,
and work to help forge the future. Even if in many ways the century in with Getzwiller is operating differs
dramatically from the early 1900s, he, too, is going to leave a lasting legacy.” Peter Iverson


GHT2008

Woven during the Transitional period
and reflects J. B. Moore influence.
Native Wool, grey wool mohair blend,
white and brown Churro wool, hand
carded, hand spun.
Weaver: Unknown
DATE: 1910
SIZE: 63” x 84”

GHT2193

Likely the same weaver as the
above weaving, woven during the

Transitional period.
Native wool, hand carded, hand spun,

all natural wool color.
Weaver: Unknown
DATE: 1910
SIZE: 50” x 81”

PAGE 2


PC 140

This weaving is Plate XXX from the J.B. Moore catalog, with a Hero Twin border design.
It is finely woven by a master weaver.

All natural wool colors, hand carded, hand spun Churro wool.
Weaver: possible attribution to Bi-leen Al-Pai-Bi-Zha-Ahd from the J.B. Moore catalog.

DATE: 1910 - 1920 SIZE: 49” x 73”

PAGE 3


PC 136

Early Two Grey Hills based on J. B. Moore Plate XXXI.
Hand carded, hand spun, Churro wool, all natural wool colors.

Weaver: Unknown
DATE: 1910 - 1920 SIZE: 46” x 76”

PAGE 4


PC 135

J. B. Moore design, Plate XXX Brown is likely vegetal dye brown, only occurred in the
Sanostee area, north of the Two Grey Hills area.
Hand carded, hand spun, native wool.
Weaver: Unknown
DATE: 1920s SIZE: 48” x 72”

PAGE 5


PC 129

Early Two Grey Hills, Storm Pattern variant. J. B. Moore plate XXIII.
White border with designs is also the weavers signature.
Churro wool, hand carded, hand spun.
Weaver: Attributed to Mrs. Police Boy or Barber Bitsi.
DATE: 1920 - 1925 SIZE: 46” x 65”

PAGE 6


PC 24

Classic J. B. Moore design, Plate XXVII, influence with fabulous wool.
All natural dye, except aniline red, Churro wool, hand carded, hand spun.

Weaver: Unknown
DATE: 1920s SIZE: 53” x 72”

PAGE 7


GHT 2258

J. B. Moore Plate XXVII; use of the Valero Star design.
Native wool, hand carded, hand spun.
Weaver: Unknown
DATE: 1920s SIZE: 39” x 66”

PAGE 8


PC 266

Textile pictured on the cover
with Helena at the loom - 1945.
Helena was also the weaving instructor at
the Toadlena Boarding School in the 1940s.
Native wool, hand carded, hand spun.
Weaver: Helena Taugelchee Nez Begay

DATE: 1945
SIZE: 46” x 69”

PAGE 9


PC139

Storm Pattern variant. Classic Bessie
Manygoats pattern designs, stylized
water bugs. Brass metal tag attached
with the trading post information.
Natural wool color, Churro wool,
hand carded, hand spun.
Weaver: Attributed to Bessie Many goats
DATE: 1930s
SIZE: 51” x 63”

PC133

Unusual negative pattern. Black design
element possibly represents Churro sheep

head or Yei figure.
Likely Churro wool,
hand carded, hand spun.
Weaver: Attributed to
Mary Yanabah Curly or a family member.

DATE: 1920 - 1930
SIZE: 36” x 59”

PAGE 10


PC142

Classic example of a monumental Two Grey Hills rug.
Featured in the exhibition: “Art & History Woven Together: The Getzwiller Collection of
Historic Navajo Weavings,” Desert Caballeros Western Museum, Wickenburg, AZ, (1999)

Native wool, natural native wool colors, hand carded, hand spun
Weaver: Attributed to Mary Yanabah Curly or a family member.

DATE: 1930 - 1940s SIZE: 82” x 129”
PAGE 11


PC99

Extremely well woven by a master
weaver, stylized Hero Twin design.
All natural Lincoln wool,
hand carded, hand spun.
Weaver: Unknown
DATE: 1920
SIZE: 72” x 95”

PC70

Extremely well woven like a blanket.
4 direction motif.

Natural wool color, Churro wool,
hand carded, hand spun.

Weaver: Attributed to Mary Police
DATE: 1920s

SIZE: 50” x 80”

PAGE 12


PC131

Storm pattern variant, extremely finely woven.
Outstanding example of a Storm pattern variant, extremely finely woven.

Hand carded, hand spun, Churro wool.
Weaver: Attributed to Sagebrush Hill Woman or daughter, Mrs. Police Boy

DATE: 1920 SIZE: 48” x 72”

PAGE 13


PC137

Signature floral design made to look like stained glass panels.
Churro wool, hand carded, hand spun.

Weaver: Attributed to Master Weaver Bessie Manygoats (1900-1964)
DATE: 1930 SIZE: 50” x 80”

PAGE 14


GHT2109

Extremely well woven and classic design by this weaver.
Native wool, hand carded, hand spun.

Weaver: Attributed to Master Weaver Bessie Manygoats (1900-1964)
DATE: 1930 SIZE: 50” x 73”

PAGE 15


PC267

Powerful positive/negative design aspect. The inner border reminisant of birds flying.
All natural wool colors. Churro wool, hand carded, hand spun.
Weaver: Atrributed to Ruby John
DATE: 1930 SIZE: 48” x 78”

PAGE 16


PC132

Unsusal salt and pepper grey field, with just a hint of brown.
Natural wool color, native wool, hand carded, hand spun.

Weaver: Attributed to Frances Manuelito
DATE: 1940s SIZE: 43” x 74”

PAGE 17


PC138

Bessie Manygoats was a master weaver from the Toadlena area.
She produced some the finest designs of the Two Grey Hills- Toadlena weavings.

Woven with Churro wool, hand carded, hand spun.
Weaver: Attributed to Bessie Manygoats or family member.

DATE: 1920 - 1930 SIZE: 52” x 77”

PAGE 18


GHT377

Intricate and tightly woven, introducing Bistie elements to the Two Grey Hill design.
All natural wool colors. Woven with Churro wool, hand carded, hand spun.
Weaver: Attributed to Marie Police Klah.
DATE: 1920 SIZE: 39” x 59”

PAGE 19


GHT2183

Classic style, early Two Grey Hills
layout with great wool.
Lincoln wool, hand carded,
hand spun.
Weaver: Unknown
DATE: 1920 - 1930s
SIZE: 57” x 74”

PC130

Early Two Grey Hill, all natural
wool color, arts and craft design.

Possibly Churro wool, hand
carded, hand spun.

Weaver: Attributed to
Blind Man’s wife or

daughter Frances Manuelito.
DATE: 1920 - 1930s
SIZE: 60” x 71”

PAGE 20


PC143

Spider woman cross designs with arrow border.
All natural wool color, Lincoln wool, hand carded, hand spun.

Weaver: Unknown
DATE: 1920 SIZE: 54” x 89”

PAGE 21


GHT837

Hero Twin imagery on border.
Tightly woven by a master weaver.
Churro wool, hand-spun natural dark brown,
variegated brown, tan and cream.
Weaver: Unknown
DATE: 1920
SIZE: 36” x 56”

PC134

Weaver known for adding elements of red,
aniline dye red. Border design,
prehistoric pottery designs.

Churro wool, hand carded, hand spun.
Weaver: Attributed to Yanabah Curley.

DATE: 1920 - 1930
SIZE: 36” x 61”

PAGE 22


PC101

Bistie style Navajo rug woven at
Two Grey Hills.
Aniline dyed Black. Native wool,
hand carded, hand spun.
Weaver: Attributed to
Mary Henderson:
DATE: 1940
SIZE: 54” x 78”

Close up of Two Grey Hills style, also
by Alice Henry, demonstrating the

use of red in the Two Grey Hill design
influenced by the Trader, circa 1950.

PAGE 23


PC120

Most unusual positive/negative designs. Bistie design elements. Extremely well woven.
Natural wool colors. Native wool possibly Churro wool, hand carded, hand spun.
Weaver: Attributed Bessie Shorty or daughter Alice Henry.
DATE: 1940s SIZE: 74” x 127”

PAGE 24


PC103

Two Grey Hills area Bistie runner. This is the only Bistie rug Steve has seen in the runner size.
Native wool, likely Churro, hand carded, hand spun.

Weaver: Attributed to Alice Henry or possibly Ester Silentmen.
DATE: 1940s SIZE: 49” x 122”

PAGE 25


GHT1938

A common practice . . . was to commission
Saddle Blankets with their brand, in this case,
HE brand.
Crystal/Two Grey Hills area.
Natural wool color. Churro wool, hand spun,
hand carded.
Weaver: Unknown
DATE: 1920
SIZE: 35” x 60”

GHT2247

Yei Be Chei dancer, most likely
woven in Two Grey Hills area.
Lincoln wool, hand carded, hand spun.

Weaver: Unknown
DATE: 1940s

SIZE: 66” x 49”

PAGE 26


GHT2268

Crystal design elements with the stylized Whirling Log.
All natural wool color. Lincoln wool, hand carded, hand spun.

Weaver: Unknown
DATE: 1930 - 1940s SIZE: 48” x 89”

PAGE 27


PC208

Made for a Navajo Saddle in the Crystal/ Two Grey Hills Area.
It features a rare rounded woven back end and whirling logs motif.

All natural wool colors. Churro wool, hand spun, hand carded.
Weaver: Unknown

DATE: 1920 SIZE: 27” x 29”

GHT2269

Single Saddle Blanket Pictorial from Crystal/Two Grey Hills area.
Maltese cross with feathers.

All natural wool, hand carded, hand spun.
Weaver: Unknown

DATE: 1920 - 1930 SIZE: 34” x 25”
PAGE 28


GHT2279

Willard Leighton was the trader at the Two Grey Hills trading post.
He inspired the use of turquoise as an accent color for region’s weavers.

Natural wool color with a hint of turquoise blue.
Native wool, possibly a Lincoln cross wool, hand spun, hand dyed.

Weaver: Attributed to Katherine Nathaniel
DATE: 1950s SIZE: 53” x 87”

PAGE 29


Framed 11

Daisy Taugelchee masterpiece tapestry, 130 wefts per inch. Enclosed in glass and framed.
Native wool, likely Churro, hand carded, hand spun to the very finest quality.
Weaver: Daisy Taugelchee
DATE: 1970s SIZE: 18” x 27.5”

PAGE 30


Framed 12

Photo of Daisy Taugelchee spinning wool for this masterpiece tapestry included in the framing.
120 wefts per inch.

Native wool, likely Churro, hand carded, hand spun to the very finest quality.
Weaver: Daisy Taugelchee

DATE: 1970s SIZE: 16” x 29.5”

PAGE 31


PC215

Outstanding classic Two Grey Hills tapestry
with 100-110 wefts per inch. Woven by one of the
most famous of Navajo weavers.
Native wool, likely Churro, hand carded,
hand spun to the very finest quality.
Weaver: Daisy Taugelchee
DATE: 1980
SIZE: 14” x 27”

PC216

Ganado/ Two Grey Hills tapestry.
Steve provided the red wool for Pricilla,
which she respun to create this extremely tight

tapestry with 100 wefts per inch.
Pricilla wove only two red tapestries.
New Zealand Romney, hand carded,

hand spun, hand dyed.
Weaver: Pricilla Taugelchee

DATE: 1980
SIZE: 16” x 27”

PAGE 32


B-7

This weaver is known for her runners and learned
from her Grandmother, Emma.
Native wool, likely Churro, hand carded,
hand spun to the very finest quality.
Weaver: Emma Benally
DATE: 1990 - 1995
SIZE: 41” x 73”

3275

From the Phoebe Hearst Cooke collection.
Natural wool color, Native wool,
hand carded, hand spun .

Weaver: Attributed to James Sherman
DATE: 1980 - 1990
SIZE: 22” x 33”

PAGE 33


1349

Unusual design graffic that creates a
fluid motion.
All natural wool color, hand carded,
hand spun wool.
Weaver: Anna Chee
DATE: 2013
SIZE: 36” x 48”

3148

Double diamond design using 6 colors.
All natural wool color with hand carded

and spun native wool.
Weaver: Zerena Begay

DATE: 2014
SIZE: 34” x 48”

PAGE 34


1260

Classic double
diamond Two Grey
Hill design, very well
woven.
All natural wool color
with hand carded and
spun native wool.
Weaver: Rhonda Begay
DATE: 2013
SIZE: 43” x 34”

3277 SG PAGE 35 3189

From the Phoebe Hearst Cooke collection. 2nd place winner at
Natural wool colors, Native wool, 2016 Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonial.
hand carded, hand spun.
Weaver: Unknown Natural wool colors, Native wool,
DATE: 1980 - 1990 hand carded, hand spun, super fine weaving.
SIZE: 25” x 38”
Weaver: Mark Nathaniel
DATE: 2015

SIZE: 28” x 37”


Steve Getzwiller & Grace Nez (1937 - 2013) with the last rug she made -
a Two Grey Hills woven with all natural Navajo Churro Wool

IN THE TRADITION OF THE they would have the freedom to work
EARLY TRADERS, Steve also on more important works as well as
eliminating time constraints. In the
encouraged design innovation and early days regular visits, sometimes
devoted himself to marketing their twice a month, were necessary to stay
rugs and blankets to the world outside in touch with the weavers living so
the borders of the Navajo Nation. remotely.

Steve has collaborated with Today with a strong foundation of
Navajo weavers for over 4 decades, trust, built over 45 years, advances in
providing them with various fibers technology and communications have
(Lincoln, New Zealand Romney, brought in a new era for trading. The
Churro, Alpaca, and silk) over the relationships and creativity between
years, to elevate the material quality the talented master weavers and
of their weaving. He supports them Trader, Steve Getzwiller, thrive.
with regular deposits of béeso, so

PAGE 36


Steve Getzwiller and Grace Nez in the Nez sheep corrals with one of Grace’s Two Grey Hills rugs,
Churro 2060, 8’ x 12’ (14 months on the loom). It was featured in the exhibition: “The Getzwiller
Collection of Contemporary Navajo Weavings 1975-2000”, at the Desert Caballeros Western Museum,
Wickenburg AZ. (2000)

Grace Nez sitting by one of her
Two Grey Hill Masterpieces while
reading an article about herself.

Grace Nez was the matriarch of
the Nez family of Master Weavers,
she won Best of Show twice at

Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonial (2004
and 2007) plus a multitude of awards

over her lifetime. (1937 - 2013)
PAGE 37


Master Weaver: Helen Bia
Born: December 5, 1945
CLAN : Tangle Clan :Ta’neeszhni
Coyote Pass :Ma’iideeshgiizhnii

Helen Bia is one of the many talented
weavers of the Bia family, that Steve has
worked with since the 1970s. She said, “I
have been weaving since I was 15, it keeps me
balanced.” Helen’s talented sisters Ruth Ann
Tracy, Lucy Begay, daughter Gloria Bia and
niece Irene Bia are also master weavers. The
gem-like quality of the Bia’s tapestries demand
a fine and tight weave to achieve the design’s
sophisticated symmetry and can require a year
or more to complete.

Helen Bia (wearing the skirt) with her cousin Irene Bia (photo 1986).
A Three Turkey Ruin Burntwater woven by Helen Bia is featured on
page 6 of “The Fine Art of Navajo Weaving” written by Steve Getzwiller.
(1984)

PAGE 38


CHURRO1527

1st place wnner
2017 Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonial.
Woven by a master weaver.
Very unique interlocking border design.
Custom spun and hand dyed Churro wool
with all natural colors.
Weaver: Helen Bia
DATE: 2017
SIZE: 40” x 61”

CHURRO1503

2nd place prize wnner
2017 Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonial.

Woven by a master weaver.
All natural colors. Churro wool,

custom spun and hand dyed.
Weaver: Helen Bia
DATE: 2016
SIZE: 39” x 62”

PAGE 39


CHURRO1524

Cara’s interpretation of
J.B. Moore’s plate XXX.
Special award wnner
2017 Gallup Inter-Tribal
Ceremonial.
All natural, Alpaca wool
colors, custom spun and
hand dyed. Finely and
tightly woven..
Weaver: Cara Gorman.
master weaver
DATE: 2017
SIZE: 47.5” x 73”

Cara Yazzie Gorman is a multi-talented artist Master Weaver: Cara Gorman
who can master any design and work with any Born: August 11, 1961; CLAN:
type of wool. Cara started working with Steve Near Water: Toha’na Coyote Pass:
when she was 18 years old, when he was working
with Cara’s mother Rose Yazzie. Steve and Cara Ma’iideeshgiizhnii
have been working together for 40 years now.
Cara’s daughters Harriet Evans, Karrie Yazzie;
sisters Emily Malone, Rosalyn Begay and cousin
Selena Yazzie are also talented weavers. Cara said,
“I enjoy putting design and colors together. I like
to keep the tradition of weaving going and I am
glad I met Steve”.

PAGE 40


Cara Yazzie Gorman with
Steve Getzwiller at Canyon de
Chelly and Spider Rock with
one of her Churro Two Grey
Hill Masterpieces. (2012)

Cara Yazzie Gorman
with her daughters

Karrie and Harriet at
Canyon de Chelly
with another

Churro Two Grey Hills
Masterpiece. (2013)

PAGE 41


Master Weaver: Elsie Bia CHURRO on the loom
Born: August 25, 1951
CLAN: “Big Water Clan” for “Tangle People Clan” Two Grey Hills Navajo rug on the
Elsie Bia is a versatile master weaver, she loom of master weaver Elsie Bia.
says, “Weaving is my tradition, it is challenging
and I love it”. Steve met Elsie five years ago Her interperatation of a Clara
and they have been working together ever since. Sherman design.
She demonstrates her art for the Nizhoni Ranch
Gallery Exhibits. Elsie is also a cousin to Helen All natural colors. Churro wool,
Bia and Cara Gorman. I guess you can say great custom spun and hand dyed
talent runs in the family. Weaver: Elsie Bia
DATE: 2017
PAGE 42 SIZE: TBA


Elsie Bia and Steve Getzwiller at Canyon de Chelly and Spider Rock. Steve was on one of his
many trips to the Navajo Nation to pick up rugs and make deposits on works in progress.

Master Weaver Elsie Bia
putting finishing touches on
a Navajo Churro Collection
weaving at one of the Nizhoni

Ranch Gallery Shows.

PAGE 43


CONTEMPORARILY, Like the traders of the past, he is making his own
STEVE GETZWILLER contribution to the present day evolution of the “Fine
HAS BEEN WORKING Art of Navajo Weaving”, which you may know is the
title of the book he and Ray Manely co-published in
DIRECTLY WITH 1984. From their first discovery of Navajo weaving
NAVAJO WEAVERS they both believed greatly in the art, talent and history
SINCE THE 1970S. of the Navajo weaver and they considered the Navajo
Rug a very important Indigenous Art Form.

Ray Manley, Steve Getzwiller and Marjorie Hardy looking over Marjorie’s latest
Crystal weaving on a photography trip to the reservation
for their book, The Fine Art of Navajo Weaving.
(Ray Manley Photo 1983)

PAGE 2434


Many thanks to Peter Iverson
for his contribution to this catalog.

Photography
Christopher Richards, Steve Getzwiller, Gail Getzwiller,

Leah Carpenter, Robin Demayonvich
Editing

Meg Linton and Susan Sorg
Design

Karen Scott of Great Scott Design
Tremendous thanks to Ray Manley (1921-2006)
for his many beautiful photographs and books which helped to educate the world about
the arts and crafts of the Navajo and Hopi Native Americans of the Southwest.
“It was my pleasure and privilege to have been able to collaborate with Ray, a good friend,
on the ‘Fine Art of Navajo Weaving’ book in the 1980s”, Steve Getzwiller.

Published by Nizhoni Ranch Gallery, PO Box 815, Sonoita, AZ 85637

© copyright 2017 Steve & Gail Getzwiller


Nizhoni Ranch Gallery

Steve & Gail Getzwiller

Sonoita, Arizona
520-455-5020

www.navajorug.com


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