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Published by info, 2019-05-12 00:30:30

Mahi Tahi May 2019

A national journal written by economic development professionals, for economic development professionals.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT NZ ISSUE 2 | MAY 2019

MAHI TAHI

THE ED
PROFESSION
- ARE YOU UP
FOR IT? - BY DR
DAVID WILSON

HOMELESSNESS AND ED - BY ALAN JOHNSON NOBODY LEFT BEHIND - BY FLETCHER TABUTEAU

INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT AND INCLUSIVE THE FUTURE OF WORK - BY PAM FORD
GROWTH - BY PATRICK MCVEIGH


EDITORIAL

THE TEAM

THE GOOD, THE BAD Editor in Chief
AND THE REST LINDA STEWART

The good news is that the launch of the World of Learning for Executive Editor
economic development practitioners, elected representatives HEATHER WARWICK
and officers is proving to be a popular initiative with dozens
of practitioners already registered and enjoying the wealth of Contributors
resources and courses that it provides. PAUL CASSON
The bad news is that Dr David Wilson has stepped down DR DAVID WILSON
from the Chair of EDNZ as a result of his resignation from
Northland Inc. David has served as Chair for three years PAM FORD
and under his stewardship EDNZ has thrived. On behalf of FLETCHER TABUTEAU
the Board and members, thank you David.
Other things of note are that registrations for ‘Delivering MARY JENSEN
Inclusive Growth” 2019 are now open, as are the Award ALLISON BECKHAM
nominations. Don’t be shy, we would love to celebrate your PATRICK MCVEIGH
success. ALISTAIR SCHORN
Finally, it is with much sadness that I too will be stepping SARAH GAUTHIER
down from the role of Chair as my role as CEO of Venture
Southland ends. A heartfelt thank you to members and ALAN JOHNSON
Board members for your support in my role as Deputy chair JUSTINE GILLILAND
and more latterly as Chair. There will be an election for the
new Board in July. That is your opportunity to step up and Production Manager
make a difference. In the meantime, Pam Ford of ATEED SUSAN HOUSTON
will serve in the role of Chair and Mark Rawson of NRDA
will serve as Deputy Chair. Congratulations Pam and Mark. Head of Design
SUSAN HOUSTON
PAUL CASSON, CHAIR OF EDNZ
Proof Reader
2 MAHI TAHI 2019 MARIA LOW

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SPONSORED BY
MARTINJENKINS

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING
CONTRIBUTIONS TO MAHI TAHI PLEASE
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4 IN THIS ISSUE

THE ED 46
PROFESSION - ARE
MARLBOROUGH
YOU UP FOR IT? SMART + CONNECTED

26

THE FUTURE OF
WORK

CONTENTS

10 NOBODY LEFT BEHIND 34 SOUTHLAND YOUTH
16 HOMELESSNESS AND FUTURES

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 42 INCLUSIVE GROWTH
INITIATIVE
22 FIND YOUR EDGE
33 DELIVERING INCLUSIVE 56 ROADMAP TO HYDROGEN
ECONOMY
GROWTH
59 MEET JUSTINE GILLILAND
62 INFRASTRUCTURE,

INVESTMENT AND GROWTH

3MAHI TAHI 2019


THE ED PROFESSION - ARE YOU UP FOR IT?

THE ED
PROFESSION -
ARE YOU UP FOR
IT?

As I step down as CEO We must improve our conceptual
understanding of the context,
of Northland Inc and chair of goals and purpose of our actions,
EDNZ, I have reflected on over we need to organise better, and
20 years of engagement of one we need to implement better. We
sort or another with economic also need some philosophical
development (ED) and EDNZ. and ethical guidelines as we are
In fact, with the revitalisation often intervening, or providing
of professional development for advice to others to intervene, in
ED practitioners it almost feels complex social, environmental and
like full circle. But it isn’t. economic systems. This should
Things have moved on as they not be done lightly. Foremost, we
should, but we have had a long need to recognise that actions have
period where there hasn’t been effects and a considered approach
a strong forum to support is necessary.
the profession. Thanks to The Some still naïvely believe that ED
Provincial Growth Fund and is the enemy of sustainability or
MBIE that has changed. social progress and some have a
There are a great number of narrow view of what ED is and
people engaged in economic what can be achieved. Many of
development and our the solutions to today’s big issues,
understanding of the practice however, lie in good strategic
and profession has improved. regional economic development.
However, it is still far from Take the government’s forthcoming
optimal and there are immense well-being framework and budget;
challenges ahead. inclusion will be a theme, so shared
prosperity and the future of work
are issues we will need to work on.

4 MAHI TAHI 2019


THE ED PROFESSION - ARE YOU UP FOR IT?
AS ED PROFESSIONALS, WE MUST BE MORE
THAN POLICY MAKERS, STRATEGISTS,
CHEERLEADERS, CONSULTANTS,
PROGRAMME OR PROJECT MANAGERS,
BUSINESS ANALYSTS OR DEVELOPERS.”
SAID DR DAVID WILSON

But we, as ED professionals, must be
more than policy makers, strategists,
cheerleaders, consultants, programme
or project managers, business analysts
or developers. We must try to see the
big picture, understand our context,
complexity and interrelated factors,
observe and interpret patterns, and,
then, we must act and reflect. This is
hard, continual and evolutionary. In
short, we must be able to synthesise not
just analyse.
Synthetic thinking is different to analytic
thinking. Analytic thinking tries to
unpack or break things down to their
component parts to try and understand
them. Synthetic thinking asks what the
component parts may be but also seeks
to understand how different phenomena
come together to effect change, identify
patterns, discover why and how things
evolve, and how there may be several
interrelated factors affecting each other
let alone an overall outcome. In short it
is an holistic approach.

5MAHI TAHI 2019


THE ED PROFESSION - ARE YOU UP FOR IT?

This is at the heart of so many of YOU NEED TO INVEST IN YOURSELF AND
YOUR OWN DEVELOPMENT TO SURVIVE,
today’s big issues, we don’t always THIS IS NOT FOR THE FAINT HEARTED,
understand why things are the BUT THE REWARDS FAR OUTWEIGH
way they are, how we got here or THE PRESSURES.” SAID DR WILSON
where they will lead us. But we
can observe, learn, strategise, act,
learn and evolve. Take the future
of work as an example; is our
future to be dictated by algorithms,
artificial intelligence, big data,
digital technologies and robots?
Or is it that the millennials have
different values, we are aging, living
longer and taking more notice of
the unpaid parts of our (working)
life? Are these good things or bad
things? How do they interact, what
are the likely effects on society and
what can we do about them?

Fundamentally, the practice of These things are hard to manage One of the goals was to produce
economic development is a noble constantly. You need support a cadre of ED professionals with
one. Its not easy, you are constantly networks, collegial and peer a grounded and substantive
weighing up opportunities, support, continual learning, understanding of their craft.
interests and impact against and a framework, philosophy, Build a profession. I am pleased
programmes, projects and actions. moral and ethical code for your to say in that first foray we went
You are constantly worried about own practice to navigate these some way to achieving those
opportunity cost, efficiency and kinds of pressures. You need goals. Many of those graduates
effectiveness, at least you should to invest in yourself and your are now your colleagues, CEOs,
be. All of which must be part of own development to survive. consultants, officials, community
some coherent plan and/or vision This is not for the faint hearted, activists, business developers and
for your community. It’s a team but the rewards of being part of learning facilitators – there’s a
sport and a long game. And, it’s something bigger than yourself, circle there at least. But we lost
simply not enough to have a well for the betterment of society, in momentum. The government of
written policy, strategy, plan or my view, far outweighs those the day was not that interested
even funding. When there’s public pressures. in Regional ED. Tertiary
money at stake you’ve got to do the In 2003 I wrote a chapter for a institutions came to ED and RED
right thing with it for the long-term book on economic development from an array of disciplines, each
benefit of your community, region about professional development with their own part of the answer
and nation. No pressure! for ED professionals. but lacking a coherency to suit
ED professionals.
6 MAHI TAHI 2019


THE ED PROFESSION - ARE YOU UP FOR IT?

Yet, governments the world over Local government was and is the only roles for government
grapple with the subject, politicians established through an act of in ED. Increasingly, national
the world over get elected or thrown parliament. The regions did not governments are realising
out because of it, and nations get together in the early days that regions are different
grow and develop, or don’t, as a and form a national government and different approaches
result of it. It is fundamental to the to legislate, forge international are required to get the best
development of New Zealand that trade agreements, negotiate out of those regions. This
we have great people with a strong foreign affairs and handle inevitably leads to the need for
understanding and professional national defence, while they got development agencies to act
practice working in ED. on with the job of supporting as orchestrators, facilitators
The policy emphasis and political their communities to grow and and implementers. Working
will for RED has waxed and waned prosper. at multiple levels and with
for years. This is mainly due, I Many in governments gone multiple partners to deliver
believe, to the fact that we have a by have seen national policy, programmes and projects in
unitary, rather than federal, govern- legislation, macroeconomic the public interest.
ment in New Zealand. settings, and infrastructure as
the only roles for government
in ED. Increasingly, national
governments are realising that

7MAHI TAHI 2019


THE ED PROFESSION - ARE YOU UP FOR IT?

Most EDAs in New Zealand were formed Yes, good macroeconomic policy is still
the basis for RED, but evidence is now
bylocal government as a result of external shocks and much stronger that regional economics
the inadequacy of national policy to deal with those and RED are primary focal points for
shocks. Enterprise agencies formed in Auckland mainly policy and action. Both the Prime
as a response to high unemployment following the Minister and Deputy Prime Minister
1986 stock market crash. Most of their programmes have eschewed a continued reliance
were aimed at getting people into self-employment on ‘leave it to the market’ neoliberal
or starting their own small business. This required economics, that it has not delivered the
business support programmes, access to finance and trickle-down effect or choice, freedom
advice that was previously very limited. One of the and equality of opportunity it promised.
main issues then was the relationship between central Some regions have not prospered, others
government departments and local EDAs and the have. Neoliberal economics has at its core
system was rife with duplication and role confusion. a market fundamentalism that relegates
Many businesses complained that they would have the things that really matter to us to
someone from the local EDA visiting one day and two externalities; like pollution, housework,
people from central government agencies the next environmental and social outcomes.
offering the same or solutions. Programme funding Abstract macroeconomic theories are
was centrally controlled, and local government’s varied not enough, economic development
considerably in their support and understanding of ED must deal with complexity and big issues
work. like climate change, the future of work
Hmmm, has this picture changed? I would say yes, and inclusiveness on the ground, in
where considerable effort has gone in to collaborating, projects and with communities. In short,
but even so it is still an exercise in air traffic control on where you do something. This requires
the front line. a range of skills and expertise - not just
This was not, however, NZs first foray into regional economic.
development. Think Big and other national policies Its time to power up the profession,
were aimed at the regions. I once read out a regional the organisations that support the
development policy at a conference in the early 2000s, profession, and the regions. This is a
when Jim Anderton was the champion of the regions, whole of government undertaking, not
and asked the audience whose words they were – “Jim just a local government undertaking, in
Anderton of course” they chimed. Answer; Bill Birch in partnership with business, Maori, NGOs,
the 1970s. The words were great. The point is, regional civic and community leaders. It requires
development has always been led from the centre. The a joined-up approach, a synthesis, not
time is right to think about how we deliver RED in the endless analysis, pilots and evaluation. If
future. The current foray is in danger of repeating the government has any chance of gaining
same pattern when the answer to so many of todays the outcomes it truly believes it can
pressing issues lie in organising government (all of through its well being framework here is
government) in the regions and communities we serve. a good place to start.
We can do this so much better.

8 MAHI TAHI 2019


THE ED PROFESSION - ARE YOU UP FOR IT?

THE FUTURE FOR EDNZ AND ITS MEMBERS IS EXCITING AND
CHALLENGING. IT NEEDS TO BE AT THE HEART OF PROVIDING
SOLUTIONS TO THE COMPLEX ISSUES FACING NEW ZEALAND, AND
INDEED THE WORLD.
ARE YOU UP FOR IT? ASKS DR DAVID WILSON.

Article written by Dr David Wilson, Executive Director,
Cities and Regions NZ www.citiesandregionsnz.com

9MAHI TAHI 2019


NOBODY LEFT BEHIND

BUILDING
THRIVING AND
SUSTAINABLE
REGIONS

As Parliamentary Under-
Secretary, Fletcher Tabuteau
is part of the team in the
coalition government which
is tasked with advancing
a bold and ambitious
plan to build thriving and
sustainable regions across
Aotearoa.

NOBODY SHOULD BE
LEFT BEHIND IN OUR
PLAN TO GROW NEW
ZEALAND’S REGIONS,”
SAID FLETCHER
TABUTEAU.

10 MAHI TAHI 2019


Central to our thinking That is exactly what the a part of a vibrant, thriving local
government is doing through the community.
behind this plan is to ensure Provincial Growth Fund (PGF).
that we build inclusive growth When you scratch the surface That work has already started
across our regions. When I on the objectives behind our with the investments we have
think of inclusive growth, I plan to grow our regions, you made so far. Unlocking the
think about how the measures will see that supporting people, potential of Māori owned
that determine whether we are protecting our environment and land, planting one billion trees,
successful as a country should enabling Māori all sit equally and investing to get at-risk
go beyond measuring just pure alongside our goal to advance rangatahi into training or work
economic growth. economic growth. are just some examples of
If we are to make good on our commitment to inclusive
our plan to build thriving growth. Nobody should be left
and sustainable regions, we The PGF is ultimately about behind in our plan to grow New
will improve the health and improving the lives of regional Zealand’s regions.
wellbeing of entire communities. New Zealanders. We want to
It’s about economic growth that support everyday Kiwis who
benefits us all. just want the chance to get a job,
provide for their whānau and be

11MAHI TAHI 2019


NOBODY LEFT BEHIND

PEOPLE ARE AT THE HEART
OF WHAT WE’RE DOING AS A
COALITION GOVERNMENT,” SAID
FLETCHER TABUTEAU.

Taking a step back, inclusive growth As I move around the country in my role as
Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Regional
also sits at the heart of how the coalition Economic Development, I hear more optimism
government plans to make budget decisions coming from those living in our provincial
through this year’s first Wellbeing Budget. towns and cities than ever before. They are
The Minister of Finance Grant Robertson optimistic about the future of their community
has been clear about how this government because of the ongoing commitment and
will be guided by measures of economic investment of this government into our regions.
growth: “strong economic fundamentals and I see this optimism no less in my home region,
sustainable economic growth remain integral the Bay of Plenty. When the local sawmill
to New Zealand’s success but they are a means closed down in the late 1980s, the small
to an end, not an end in themselves.” township of Minginui became challenged with
From environmental sustainability, to lifting high unemployment, poor living standards and
opportunities for Māori and Pasifika, the a population fast on the decline.
PGF’s objectives run parallel to our priorities Last year we listened to the town’s calls for
in this year’s Wellbeing Budget. support and delivered a $5.8 million boost to
Ultimately, it is not just about building the Minginui nursery, allowing them to grow
business confidence, but people’s confidence in up to one million native trees every year and
a growing economy. People are at the heart of expand its workforce from nine to 90 jobs in
what we’re doing as a coalition government. the future. With a bit of support from central
One year on from the first PGF announcement, government, we’ve helped that town break the
we continue to make sure it is local people who existing cycle of dependency and the locals are
have benefited from our plan to build strong now optimistic about their future prospects of
regions. the town that they call home.

12 MAHI TAHI 2019


NOBODY LEFT BEHIND

Leon Symes - Tatau Tatau Chair (PSGE), Steven May- CEO WDC, Cameron Osmond (PDU), Denise Eaglesome (Wairoa Dep. Mayor), Fletcher Tabuteau -
Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development, Craig Little (Wairoa Mayor) Toro Waaka (Ngati Pahauwera Development Trust Chair)
Peter Eden (Ngati Pahauwera (Seconded from MSD)

However, I want to ensure that central The West Coast is a great example of
government does not take all the credit for transitioning from a traditional economic
turning around the prospects of provincial base centred on commodities such as dairy
towns like Minginui. The success of the Fund and mining. It made sense for local players to
is down to the work that local people and maximise the tourism opportunities that are
organisations such as economic development ever present on the West Coast.
agencies (EDAs) do on the ground. EDAs have A plan was developed that acknowledged the
an important role of bringing local players value of traditional industries, but vitally, also
together to develop a plan and tell New Zealand the opportunities that tourism presented to
what their region has to offer. In fact that was the region.
the subject of my piece in the inaugural issue of It is the local people who hold the
this journal – EDAs are essential players in the knowledge, and alongside EDAs allow central
work that the PGF seeks to do. government to identify how best we can
support them to do the best job they can for
EDAs with their strong connections across their communities. That is exactly why the
PGF was introduced – to bring out the best of
the economic development ecosystem, are able New Zealand’s regions so that they have the
to bring together local politicians, business confidence to grow and prosper.
leaders, iwi, central government and the wider
community to develop plans and assess what
their regions have to offer. This establishes
united front and a plan on how to collectively
future-proof entire regions’ economies.

13MAHI TAHI 2019


NOBODY LEFT BEHIND

We know that the PGF has presented At the time of writing this, we are just 28

an exciting opportunity for those tasked with days after the most devastating event in New
regional economic development. It has brought Zealand’s history.
local players together to collaborate all in the It has affected us all, as a nation, and
name of regional development. But we know individually as we have all grappled with
that with a little more support, economic how this act of violence could happen in this
development agencies and other regional country we all hold dear.
organisations could collaborate so much more It has also been heartening to see how New
across provincial boundaries and maximise the Zealanders have drawn closer together in the
opportunity of the Fund. face of the Christchurch mosques’ terror attack
That’s why I’m pleased to have recently on the values we hold dear – community,
announced that we are going to invest in those tolerance and compassion.
working at the frontline of regional economic On the day of the attack, I had just attended
development. We will invest up to $5.6 million and celebrated, alongside our Prime Minister
over the next two years towards helping Rt Hon Jacinda Ardern and Minister of Energy
economic development agencies and other and Resources Hon Dr Megan Woods, the
actors push forward their best and brightest launch of the H2 Taranaki Roadmap.
propositions in their region. This will be up to But this event was quickly overshadowed
$200,000 per region each year for the next two with the distressing events in Christchurch
years to maximise the opportunities of the PGF. as they unfolded. I was able to attend a vigil
Those on the frontline of regional economic in Rotorua the next day which reinforced the
development are working on behalf of importance of community, inclusiveness and
communities, regions and our country. They togetherness.
deserve to be supported in this important It meant a great deal to me to be part of the
work and that is why we have prioritised this awards ceremony upon the completion of the
investment. Rotorua Walking Festival on the Sunday, to
promote wellness in the community and the
14 MAHI TAHI 2019 coming together of people and cultures from
around the world.
And on 19 March I conducted a minute’s
silence at the opening of the Inclusive Growth
Conference, a joint initiative of Royal Society
of Arts ANZ, Economic Development New
Zealand (EDNZ) and Local Government Think
Tank - held in Wellington.


NOBODY LEFT BEHIND

The theme of the conference of inclusiveness also IT IS HEARTENING TO SEE HOW
couldn’t be more appropriate and important to NEW ZEALANDERS HAVE DRAWN
highlight at this time. CLOSER TOGETHER IN THE FACE
OF THE TERROR ATTACK ON
I wished everyone at the conference a fruitful day THE VALUES WE HOLD DEAR -
and every success in their endeavours to improve COMMUNITY, TOLERANCE AND
outcomes for our communities and regions and COMPASSION.”
reminded them, if we are genuine about growing
regions, we will seek to improve the health and Looking to year two of the PGF, we are building
wellbeing of entire communities. on the foundation that it has laid in the regions
and focusing our investment on the areas that
WHAT NEXT? will drive local economies, such as tourism,
forestry and food and beverage.
We are fast approaching the halfway mark of our
three-year programme of work to deliver $1 billion We will also be guided by the investments
per year to the regions. we announced back in Waitangi weekend –
unlocking the potential of Māori-owned land,
Most of the investments we have made so far have boosting skills, employment and capability, and
been in the PGF’s surge regions – six regions where stepping up much-needed digital connectivity
the measure of deprivation has painted the worst across the regions.
picture – Northland, Bay of Plenty, Tairāwhiti,
Hawke’s Bay, Manawatū-Whanganui and the West As we go about these investments, we will
Coast. continue to be accountable for the work we do
and the investments we make.
These investments have primarily been about
playing catch-up to invest in much-neglected So over one year on, we have made great
infrastructure. progress on our plan to build thriving and
sustainable regions. We look forward to our
work with local communities in provincial New
Zealand to keep that work going well into the
future.

Article written by Fletcher Tabuteau,
Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Regional
Economic Development

15MAHI TAHI 2019


HOMELESSNESS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

HOMELESSNESS
AND ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT

A plea for shared prosperity by Alan HOMELESSNESS IS NOT
Johnson, author of the ‘State of the A GIVEN IN ANY LOCAL
Nation’ Report. COMMUNITY OR ANY
REGIONAL ECONOMY,”
Homelessness and local economic development sit SAID ALAN JOHNSON.

uneasily together for at least two reasons. At the more These methods and motives can
superficial level street homelessness is bad for local business. be malevolent as witnessed by a
At a more considered level addressing homelessness and recent council by-law prohibiting
housing need should be seen as an essential part of any local begging and rough sleeping in its
or regional economic development strategy. CBD. In justifying this measure
An often bitter and intractable battle is being fought in the local mayor is quoted as saying
numerous towns, suburbs and CBD’s across New Zealand. ‘At some stage you have to stick
This battle is between local business owners and a group up for the people who are actually
of people who have been labelled ‘homeless’. The dispute paying their ways’.1
is essentially over space and most often the public spaces Whether such measures are
in retail precincts. Put plainly so-called ‘homeless’ people effective remain to be seen but
are seen to be bad for business because they are untidy and they are certainly not helpful as at
sometimes a nuisance to would-be customers. best they simply move people on
The general image of homeless people begging or simply to other places and perhaps put
sleeping in doorways or on street furniture makes most them in more danger.
of us feel uncomfortable to the point that we may become
reluctant to shop in our mainstreet or to visit the CBD. 1 https://www.radionz.co.nz/news/nation-
Such images and their detractions are behind efforts of local al/385985/tauranga-begging-bylaw-starts-to-
business groups and local councils to address homelessness.
The methods and motives behind these efforts can vary morrow
considerably from community to community however.

16 MAHI TAHI 2019


HOMELESSNESS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Other more considered These people/households And it is this queue for
are then supported in social and public housing
responses include the Housing their tenancies with an which is a burgeoning
First model being offered in expectation that the social problem for government
Auckland, Hamilton, Tauranga, work support being offered and those concerned
Rotorua and Christchurch. can eventually be withdrawn about the wellbeing of
This response claims to be and people become self- the most disadvantaged
about ‘ending homelessness sufficient. There aren’t of New Zealanders. Between
not managing it’ although course any more dwellings December 2016 and
strictly speaking this isn’t the created with this brokering/ December 2018 the priority
case as it probably just shifts placement service. It’s just waiting list for social and
it. In Auckland between that perhaps those with the public housing rose almost
May 2017 and February 2019 most serious housing needs 125% to more than 10,700
a consortium of five social get to jump the queue and households . 3
services NGO’s claimed to have get into a house very quickly.
housed 922 people including This is as it should be from ____________________
431 children.2 The model places a social equity position but 3. Ministry of Housing and Urban
people or households with acute it is really just one way of Development (2018) Public Housing
homelessness such as sleeping managing a social allocation Quarterly Report – December 2018,
rough outdoors or in cars, system for the scarce p.9. Available at https://www.hud.
directly into social or public resource of social and public govt.nz/assets/Community-and-Pub-
housing. housing. lic-Housing/Follow-our-progress/
_____________ December-2018/Housing-Quarter-
ly-Report-December-2018-accessi-
2. https://www.housingfirst.co.nz/results
ble-web.pdf

17MAHI TAHI 2019


HOMELESSNESS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

In response to those with immediate The mum and dad investor driven private
rental housing strategy worked for as long
housing needs the government increased house prices continued to rise and the
the number of places in so-called associated capital gains were forthcoming.
transitional housing by 40% between later These windfalls more than compensated for
2017 and late 2018 to almost 2700.4 So- the poor returns which private rental housing
called because the transition can be an offered – gross returns of around 4%.6 With
extended period of six months or more house prices plateauing recently and even
while a family wait in what is normally falling in some regions, the lustre of such
a bedsit for a tenancy in social or public low yields has faded and with this investor
housing. interest in rental housing. Total residential
The rapid and recent growth in social mortgage lending to investors fell from $22
housing waiting lists is probably due to billion in 2016 (March year) to $13 billion in
two factors. As a country we have not been 2019 and from 32% of total mortgage lending
building enough social and affordable to 21%. On top of this there is some evidence
houses and have instead relied on private that the rental housing stock is not now
sector rental housing owned by mum growing as quickly as the population and
and dad landlords to house low income that this is resulting in rents rising faster than
households. wages and headline inflation.7
This default housing strategy has been well _______________
supported by a default tax policy which
has neglected to tax capital gains in any 6 See Quotable Value’s estimates of gross rental yields at
comprehensive way and so encouraged https://www.qv.co.nz/property-trends/rental-analysis
investment in housing perhaps to the 7 For example the number of active tenancy bonds grew by
detriment of investment elsewhere in our less than 10,000 between March 2018 and March 2019 (data
economy. This default tax policy has in from MBIE Tenancy Bond data based which is available at
turn been supported by a default banking https://www.mbie.govt.nz/building-and-energy/tenancy-
regulation which allowed banks to rapidly and-housing/rental-bond-data/), while the estimated
expand housing debt. This debt has grown number of tenant households grew 15,000 over the same
by $100 billion over the past decade and period (Statistics NZ household estimates)
from 85% of GDP in 2009 to 89% in 2019.5
THE ABILITY TO FUDGE THE
_____________ SOCIAL HOUSING WAITING LIST
4 Ibid p 7 POINTS TO A MORE GENERAL
5 Reserve Bank’s bank lending and GDP statistics which PROBLEM WE HAVE IN COUNTING
are available at https://www.rbnz.govt.nz/statistics. THE HOMELESS.” SAID ALAN
JOHNSON.
18 MAHI TAHI 2019


HOMELESSNESS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The other reason for the sharp increase in the This ability to fudge the social housing waiting
list points to a more general problem we have in
numbers of people and households on the waiting counting the homeless. Homelessness and the
list is simply that the current government is more related housing poverty is not just about people
inclined to count them than the previous one sleeping rough on the streets or in cars.
was. Through the agency of Ministry of Social Comprehensive and worthwhile definitions of
Development the previous national-led government homelessness are available such as that developed
worked out subtle ways of blocking people with by Statistics New Zealand in 2009. This definition
housing needs from getting on the social housing considers homelessness and housing exclusion as
waiting list and so making unmet housing demand arising through three domains – the social domain
and homelessness seem less of a problem. One such of social relations, privacy and safety, the legal
way was to promote predatory property managers domain of exclusive possession and security of
renting out garages to homeless families. This was tenure, and the physical domain of the structural
done in MSD offices.8 and amenity aspects of the place you live in.

__________________ 19MAHI TAHI 2019

8 https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/new-zealand/2016/07/predatory-
property-managers-renting-out-auckland-garages.html


HOMELESSNESS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

THE CROWDING OUT AND DISPLACEMENT OF EXISTING RESIDENTS

BY NEW HOUSEHOLDS ARRIVING IN A COMMUNITY FOR JOBS OR

LIFESTYLE OPPORTUNITIES HAVE CONTRIBUTED TO INCREASING LEVELS

OF HOMELESSNESS ....” SAID ALAN JOHNSON.

This framing gave rise to four categories The crowding out and displacement of existing
residents by new households arriving in a community
of homelessness – without shelter, temporary for jobs or lifestyle opportunities have contributed to
accommodation, sharing accommodation and the increasing levels of homelessness we are seeing
uninhabitable housing.9 in many provincial cities and towns. Anticipating
Fundamentally local and regional economic and responding to this demand requires an explicit
development are not just about business recognition of the need to provide social and
investment, infrastructure development and affordable housing for low paid workers and low-
jobs but rather about the broader prosperity income households.
of communities and regions. Our efforts are ___________
incomplete if we overlook the role of housing in
this prosperity. Housing and its construction 9 Statistics New Zealand (2009) New Zealand Definition of
are of course important economic activities in Homelessness. Available at http://archive.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_
themselves but beyond this housing demand stats/people_and_communities/housing/homelessness-definition.aspx
is an essential consideration in any economic
development strategy.

20 MAHI TAHI 2019


HOMELESSNESS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Such recognition will be multi-faceted although Homelessness is not a given in any local
there are no simple cheap solutions available. community or any regional economy but will
For example the apparent cure all of regulatory only be addressed through a broadly-based
concessions like special housing areas and coalition of interests. Such initiatives should be
inclusive zones have achieved little if anything to seen as a part of any local or regional economic
date in Queenstown - a town where the tension strategy if we are to enjoy a shared prosperity
between economic growth and housing shortages which most of us hope for.
is now most apparent.10 While it is fair to lay some
of the responsible for the provision of social and _____________
affordable housing at government’s feet, it is quite
irresponsible to pretend that local Counci’ls and 10 See for example https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/mon-
local economic development agencies have little ey/79642369/queenstowns-housing-shortage-near-crisis-point
or no role to play here. Local advocacy alongside
local initiatives such as community-based NGO
housing providers are important tools to consider
and ones that have shown modest success in such
places as Queenstown, Nelson and Tauranga.

21MAHI TAHI 2019


FIND YOUR EDGE

FIND YOUR EDGE

Join the dozens of practitioners who are becoming accredited

Welcome to Aotearoa’s The World of Learning has been DR DAVID WILSON
supported by the Provincial
World of Learning for ED Growth Fund which has allowed ACADEMIC AND PRACTITIONER
professionals, associates and EDNZ to make the courses very
elected officials. affordable for members and David holds a BA in Psychology and
Enter your personal world of non-members. Social Policy, a Master’s in Public
learning and discover how it It is unlikely that the courses will Policy with first class honours and a
will help fast track your career continue to be so affordably priced PhD in Regional development.
and give you the tools and in the future so if ever there was a He was instrumental in initiating
knowledge that you need to time you were considering gaining and delivering the first formal
make a difference. a formal qualification in Economic education system for economic
Your journey starts with: Development now is that time. development practitioners in NZ
• Affordable learning for whilst at Auckland University of
MEET YOUR LEARNING Technology.
economic development FACILITATORS David also served as Chair of EDNZ
professionals, associates and CEO of Northland Inc.
and elected officials Your learning facilitators Dr Wilson will facilitate the
• Accreditation for economic have been carefully chosen to following courses:
developers (AcED) deliver a quality experience to *Introduction to development
• A rapidly growing and free learners that will equip them *Macro issues in contemporary
resource centre that anyone with a breadth and depth of economic development
can dip into understanding, along with *Regional economic development
• A team of dedicated experts an array of tools to make a
who are eager to support practical difference to the
your learning ambitions patterns and pace of growth
• Courses designed with you within their communities.
in mind, each offered at five
locations throughout NZ.

22 MAHI TAHI 2019


FIND YOUR EDGE

DR CAROL NEILL JOSEPH STUART DR JASON MIKA

ACADEMIC PRACTITIONER ACADEMIC AND CONSULTANT
Carol is an experienced Joseph is an experienced
academic with teaching and Director with a demonstrated UgfiettdhDiniacyeoroSdlRPNNDMRinaloensvnPnciavaieoitcggrnreāvnholuneiWsttefāālmodoJeuoerouoobdcttairmsraiirnrorprhtlhessiirseuomsiKAolirmiacoicnoBrttrasconakwihyalacPtu.eaadnoNfaohdliaPonDttosCsatfdMnueie,iZālftaMnlnTarviedn.WnaucTNpagneeewuMgBaeylHneoPlstoacuhsAoAMhcsraalwhsinearinapehkigune&cttDld.kiiimuwnheiaysydtknoRathm,,odLaaiieUatnrwpasaanlsōeennfaeoitnnislashasaMiintdrRigyAgnysidsvseTtspvyceesatscaeaeueb.hūeidrtgthosrrcnnecarroaohitisal-miskuocinenrahlnouoitolrnnmsgtdiaei,r’ysp-sf-an,ttoe’slhhdnree-
research interests in economic history of working in the HEDIDenNrhdaMiZgseiaaknnlasod’osuCrsseeEesrnOevaterrodecfphaNrsfeooCnrcehtuuhasrilearsshnooidfpn,Inc.
and social development. Her management consulting
PhD in History focused on the industry for both the private management and research
development of NZ’s external and public sector. methods.
trade policy over the 20th Joseph has a BA in Economic Dr Mika will facilitate the
Century. History and a graduate diploma following courses:
Carol is published and has co- in Economic Development. * Engaging in Māori economic
ordinated and taught Economic He is an accredited Economic development: Nuts and bolts to
Development at a post-graduate Development Professional get you started
level in NZ and internationally. (AEcD NZ) and a member of
Dr Neill will facilitate the the Institute of Directors. 23MAHI TAHI 2019
following courses: Joseph will facilitate the
*Introduction to development following courses:
*Macro issues in contemporary *Business Growth
economic development


FIND YOUR EDGE

BENJE PATTERSON KIRI GOULTER

How well do you engage CONSULTANT PRACTITIONER AND CONSULTANT
with Maori? Allow Dr Benje is an economist. He has Kiri is a highly accomplished
a Masters degree in Economics tourism and economic
Jason Mika to assist you by and Politics from the University development professional
sharing with you the nuts of Freiburg in Germany where with extensive experience
and bolts to get you started he studied on scholarship from in destination management,
the German Academic Exchange marketing, product and industry
How do you measure Service. His undergraduate development.
success? Economist, Benje education in economics and Kiri has worked extensively across
finance was completed at Otago the public and private sectors
Patterson will take you University. and is currently working with
beyond GDP to measures Benje will be facilitating the central and local government,
following courses: and industry, to develop a more
Enjoy the journey as Dr *The evidence of economic sustainable, productive and
David Wilson and Dr Carol development - beyond GDP inclusive sector through improved
Neill explore with you the Benje is not your run-of-the-mill destination management planning.
economist. He cuts to the chase Kiri will be facilitating the
history of development without the jargon. following courses:
* Destination management

24 MAHI TAHI 2019


FIND YOUR EDGE

DR PAUL COLLITS PROFESSOR ROY GREEN

ACADEMIC AND PRACTITIONER ACADEMIC AND DIRECTOR If growing or retaining
Emeritus Professor Roy Green business is your passion
Paul is a strategist, civic is Chair of Port of Newcastle to
entrepreneur, writer, university contribute to sustainable growth, then this is a must do
lecturer, independent researcher, innovation and diversification course with expert
policy adviser with over 25 years in the Hunter region. He has
experience. He has a BA (Hons) worked in universities, business business advisor, Joseph
and Masters degrees in political and government in Australia Stuart.
science from the Australian and overseas, including most
National University and a PhD recently as Dean of the UTS So what is horizontal and
in geography and planning from Business School at the University vertical alignment and
the University of New England, of Technology Sydney. Roy’s how do you collaborate
Australia. doctorate is from the University of in a best practice way?
Paul will be facilitating the Cambridge and he has published Dr Paul Collits has the
following courses: widely in the areas of innovation
*Effective strategic planning policy and management and
undertaken projects with
To learn more about any course the OECD and European
go to: Commission.
https://www.wol.economicdevel-
opment.org.nz Professor Green will be facilitating Why is regional ED
the following course: different and how does
* Work skills and inclusive growth knowing that help? Dr
David Wilsoin and Dr Carol

25MAHI TAHI 2019


FUTURE OF WORK

PREPARING FOR THE
FUTURE OF WORK IN
AUCKLAND

Converted shipping containers at Ports of Auckland Ltd take workers on a trip through time, where they learn that technology is not a threat but an enabler –
Photo credit, Ports of Auckland Limited

Auckland Tourism Events and Economic
Development (ATEED) is undertaking research
on the ‘Future of Work’, identifying opportunities
to prepare New Zealand’s largest city for an era
of rapid workplace change.

26 MAHI TAHI 2019


FUTURE OF WORK
ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (AI) HAS THE POTENTIAL
TO SIGNIFICANTLY BOOST OVERALL ECONOMIC
PRODUCTIVITY BUT THE BENEFITS MIGHT NOT BE SHARED
EQUITABLY, CREATING DIVIDES THAT FUEL ECONOMIC
INEQUALITY.”

Artificial intelligence and automation present new challenges
in an era of rapid workplace change ; Photo credit, Samuel
Zeller (Unsplash)

The ‘Future of Work’ is undergoing major shifts, driven by forces from technological

advancements, globalisation of economies to demographic realities. The rapid pace will present
various challenges to Auckland, a city where estimates show over 270,000 jobs will change due to
partial or full automation because of technological disruption.
As Auckland’s economic growth agency, ATEED’s purpose is to support the growth of quality jobs
for all Aucklanders. It is imperative the agency can support Auckland businesses and employees
to prepare for the future of work, notably the impact of artificial intelligence (AI) and automation
technology on jobs, skills and wages, and therefore on Auckland’s economy and people.

27MAHI TAHI 2019


FUTURE OF WORK

THE DIFFUSION OF THESE DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES HAS SEEN
EMPLOYMENT SHIFT TOWARDS HIGH-SKILLED OCCUPATIONS
BUT THERE REMAINS A MIS-MATCH BETWEEN JOBS AND
QUALIFICATIONS.”

While it’s impossible to predict the In New Zealand, the rise of AI and automation
will have critical implications for the future of
future, it is possible to understand the work, with predictions that nearly half of all
major forces shaping the future of work. As jobs are under threat of automation in the next
such, ATEED has embarked on a two-stage 10 to 15 years. The diffusion of these digital
programme of research to prepare for and act technologies has seen employment shift towards
towards developing the future skills needs of high-skilled occupations but there remains a
Aucklanders. This research will be launched mis-match between jobs and qualifications. As
at the Future Ready Summit 2019, where a result, New Zealand’s workforce will need to
ATEED will share insights on Auckland’s acquire more initial education in in-demand
future skills needs. fields and upgrade or reorient their skills during
Auckland and the Future of Work (2018), their working lives.
a working paper produced by ATEED’s A skilled workforce is crucial to successfully
Skills and Workforce team, addresses the navigate the future of work. In 2014, New
key technological drivers of the Fourth Zealand took part in a worldwide OECD survey
Industrial Revolution. While this era offers of adult skills, conducted to assess a range of
businesses opportunities for efficiencies and competencies including literacy, numeracy and
insights, it equally presents new challenges problem solving. This survey revealed a high
due to two key disruptors – artificial percentage of Auckland respondents had low
intelligence and automation. levels of literacy and numeracy compared to
Artificial intelligence (AI) has the potential the rest of New Zealand. Additional research
to significantly boost overall economic focused on adult skills distribution across
productivity but the benefits might not Auckland found skills gaps between geographic
be shared equitably, creating divides that areas and demographic groups, particularly in
fuel economic inequality. Automation is south Auckland.
reshaping the world of work and is no This skills gap is one of several discrete yet
longer restricted to repetitive processes, intersecting factors ATEED must consider when
with cognitive technologies now automating preparing for the future of work in Auckland.
elements of human decision-making. While The city’s population is growing rapidly and is
initial research reveals AI and automation predicted to reach 2 million as early as 2029. This
will disproportionally affect low-skilled jobs, population is young and diverse, with nearly 40
technological developments mean it is likely per cent born overseas, and young Māori and
all job types and levels will be affected. Pasifika representing over a third of Aucklanders
aged 0-24 years.
28 MAHI TAHI 2019


FUTURE OF WORK

THERE ARE TWO MAJOR DIFFERING VIEWS ON THE IMPACT
OF AI AND AUTOMATION TECHNOLOGIES ON AUCKLAND’S
WORKFORCE BUT THE BENEFITS MIGHT NOT BE SHARED
EQUITABLY.”

However, changes in work distribution of There are two major differing views on the
employment by age also indicates a shift
towards an aging workforce, with longer life impact of AI and automation technologies on
expectancy and better health care leading to new Auckland’s workforce. Firstly, AI creates more
opportunities for older people to engage in work. jobs than it displaces or alternatively, that a large
While Auckland’s diverse and growing population proportion of jobs will be rendered obsolete.
will increase demand for goods and services and However, these views are based on assumptions
potentially provide additional labour force capacity, that could see both scenarios occur concurrently
many industries are reporting challenges finding across different industry sectors. In Auckland,
both skilled and unskilled labour. Auckland the jobs that will change most are in retail trade,
businesses also report changes associated with manufacturing, professional, scientific, technology
the introduction of technology and anticipate services and construction, with younger workers
employees will be impacted by this in the next more at risk than experienced workers as
five years. The unknown is the preparedness of technology is applied in entry-level roles.
Auckland businesses and employees to embrace the
impact of technological change. 29MAHI TAHI 2019


FUTURE OF WORK

Aside from job creation and job losses, it is Secondly, while the general population will
need a level of digital literacy and capability
important to consider how AI augments current job to survive and engage in everyday life in the
tasks and how this can affect future job functions modern digital era, these skills will also be
and roles in Auckland. As organisations deploy vital for many roles in the future of work. A
AI solutions, jobs not newly created or destroyed workforce with a high supply of quality digital
evolve. AI may erase the muncane aspects of a job, skills can act as a catalyst to continued growth
enabling workers to spend more time on higher and improved social prosperity as digital
value tasks, meaning the combination of AI and literacy fosters creativity and innovation
human capital has tremendous potention to lift underpinning job creation.
productivity.
ATEED’s vision for Auckland is that the city’s
businesses and employees become increasingly
productive because productivity is the key driver
to inclusive prosperity and raising living standards.
With the rise in technological advancement there is
potential for the city to harness the combined power
of AI and human capital to increase productivity.
However, to ensure the city’s economic development
is inclusive, Auckland needs a coordinated strategic
approach to the future of work. In Auckland and
the Future of Work (2018), ATEED identified key
areas where it can support the growth of quality jobs
for all Aucklanders.
Firstly, Auckland’s future of work depends on
the development of a highly skilled workforce
that possesses the skills required for today and
tomorrow’s jobs. Enabling businesses and
employees to adjust to changes in technology and
markets by preparing for the skills needs of the
future is an approach endorsed by International
Labour Organisation Research. When applied
successfully, it nurtures a circle where education
and training fuels innovation, investment, economic
diversification and competitiveness as well as social
and economic mobility, leading to the creation of
better quality jobs.

30 MAHI TAHI 2019


FUTURE OF WORK

VISIONS OF ROBOTS REPLACING PEOPLE
OFTEN DISTRACTS FROM REALITY.”

Finally, the impact and opportunities Recognising that change can be unsettling for staff,
Ports of Auckland (POAL) has implemented an
available with technological advancement will extensive change programme to prepare employees
be transformative for Auckland. However, this for the future.
transformation is best achieved and leveraged Along with retraining and communications, POAL
with ongoing and active business and community introduced a future of work experience, where
involvement. ATEED recommends a coordinated staff take a journey from 1985 to 2035 in converted
approach where industry, employers and relevant shipping containers to see how port workers have
partners work together to understand, embrace and survived and thrived as technology has changed their
adopt new technologies to maintain competitiveness workplace and the world around them.
in the market and maximise the benefits and Diane Edwards, POAL General Manager People,
opportunities available to all Aucklanders. Systems and Technology says when people think of
Following ATEED’s initial research identifying the future of work, visions of robots replacing people
key areas where the agency can provide the most often distracts from reality.
support, it is undertaking primary research to help “By taking our employees on a trip through time, they
identify future jobs and skills needs in Auckland. learn that technology is not a threat but an enabler to
This research will provide a forecast analysis of a brighter, more sustainable future,” says Edwards.
Auckland’s future skills requirements, informing
ATEED’s ongoing engagement with local industries
to prepare for the future of work and guide practical
action towards skills development to support the
growth of quality jobs for all Aucklanders.

ATEED looks forward to presenting the Auckland
Future Skills research findings at the Future Ready
Summit in Auckland, Wednesday, 26 June 2019.
For more information on the Future Ready Summit
or to attend, please contact
[email protected], Head of Skills and
Workforce, ATEED.

HOW IS AUCKLAND PREPARING? Ports of Auckland Limited staff see how port workers have survived and
thrived through technological change. Photo credit: Ports of Auckland
From New Zealand’s most innovative container Limited.
port to an Auckland appliance rental business,
preparation for the future of work can take many 31MAHI TAHI 2019
different forms.


FUTURE OF WORK

EZ Rentals Stephanie Duvander says it is important the journey to the future is a collaborative
process with staff – Photo credit, EZ Rentals

While a much smaller enterprise than POAL, EZ Rentals

owner Stephanie Duvander agrees that the future of work isn’t all
about robots.

“When exploring the potential for business growth, EZ Rentals
made the move to future-proof operations by transitioning from
a paper-based Customer Relationship Module (CRM) to the
cloud.”

ATEED connected EZ Rentals with technology enabling For further information please
company FeatureIT and co-funded the transition through the contact the author Pam Ford,
Regional Business Partner Network programme. General Manager of Economic
Like POAL, Stephanie says it was important the journey to the Development with
future was a collaborative process with staff. ATEED.
“We refined the cloud-based CRM with input from the team,
allowing clear communication of changes to come, and included
their insights and ideas on the future of work at EZ Rentals.”

32 MAHI TAHI 2019


33MAHI TAHI 2019


SOUTHLAND YOUTH FUTURES

Anton Hoffman, a driver trainer with Tapanui-based transport company Road Transport Logistics Ltd, helps students experience a big rig driver
simulator on the Southland Youth Futures stand at last year’s CareerFest Southland. The two day event was attended by more than 2300 students
from 17 secondary schools and foundation studies providers.

SOUTHLAND YOUTH
FUTURES

34 MAHI TAHI 2019


Question: How do SOUTHLAND YOUTH FUTURES
young people gain
the experience Katharine Holdsworth, a microbiologist at the Fonterra Edendale plant, shows Southland Girls’
needed to win their High School students cheese testing procedures she carries out during the production process.
first job, and how
can employers be
confident young
people have the skills
they need and are
worth interviewing
and hiring? Answer:
A Work Ready
Passport.

A few years back, a farmer and a retired She and a group of secondary school students had
just finished a tour of Fonterra’s processing plant at
manager identified a problem in Southland. Despite Edendale when one of the students exclaimed: “Gee,
there being jobs aplenty in the primary sector, Miss. You bring us to a milk treatment plant and
employers were struggling to attract and retain they don’t even make milk you can drink.’’
young staff while the region’s youth unemployment
rate remained stubbornly high. In typical Southern He was right, Beckham said.
fashion, the duo got stuck in and did something
about it - gathering support from Venture Southland “His comment made me laugh, but I was also
and others to establish a practical career exploration pleased. A major focus of what we do is to demystify
programme. Southland workplaces, so in that respect we had
Almost four years on, Southland Youth Futures is succeeded.’’
achieving the goal of better connecting employers
and young people, has expanded its reach across HIS COMMENT MADE ME LAUGH,
the province, and attracts enthusiastic community BUT I WAS ALSO PLEASED. WE
support. HAD HELPED TO DEMYSTIFY THE
Southland Youth Futures co-ordinator Allison WORKPLACE.
Beckham won’t forget a comment which reinforced
that the programme was making a difference to
young people’s career thinking and understanding.

35MAHI TAHI 2019


SOUTHLAND YOUTH FUTURES WORK READY
STUDENTS
The vital numbers 2017/18
“Career opportunities are so vast
33 employer talks in these days and jobs are changing
so rapidly that it can be very
schools confusing for students and adults
to come to grips with.”
2705 students reached
81 speakers from Year 10-13 students across 15 Southland secondary
41 companies schools are involved, as well as students from Blue
25 wokplace visits Mountain College in West Otago, 20 minutes from
Gore.
involving As well as offering authentic career exploration
opportunities Southland Youth Futures also helps
257 students and provide young people and their careers advisers and
35 teachers/adults from teachers with up to date information about training
14 schools and pathways into a multitude of jobs, she says.
2 foundation studies “Career opportunities are so vast these days and jobs
are changing so rapidly that it can be very confusing for
providers students and adults to come to grips with.
“What does a process engineer do at the New Zealand
31 Employer Excellence Aluminium Smelter at Tiwai Point? What actually
happens day-to-day on a dairy farm? How do you
Partners become an environmental technician or a straddle crane
operator at South Port or a diesel mechanic or a forestry
30+ Business supporters manager or a plumbing apprentice? What software
5 employer events/ development and IT opportunities exist in Southland?
How many people know there are space industry jobs
seminars in Southland through Venture Southland’s relationship
with over 20 international space agencies?
4 careers expos

36 MAHI TAHI 2019


SOUTHLAND YOUTH FUTURES

Gore business owner Susie Bernard interviews a Gore High School Students learn about Venture Southland’s satellite tracking station at Awarua
Year 13 student during an interviews skills afternoon. The students from station engineer Matt Poole. Mr Poole, who grew up on a Taranaki dairy
took part in a one-hour interactive workshop before meeting an farm, is now completing a Masters in Aerospace Engineering at Stanford
employer and receiving verbal and written feedback. University in the US.

A group from Aurora College, Invercargill, visit a forestry harvesting operation with staff from Rayonier Matariki Forests.

37MAHI TAHI 2019


SOUTHLAND YOUTH FUTURES

MORE THAN FLIPPING
BURGERS

Southland Youth Futures initially focused on “Compared to the rest of the country, Southland
school leaver destination choices actually stack
the dairying, agriculture, and associated support up very well. Over the three years 2014-17, about
businesses such as trades, rural contracting and 78% of leavers went into some form of tertiary
processing. Since Beckham came on board as co- training, including university, polytechnic or
ordinator in late 2016 the focus has widened to apprenticeships. So school leavers are growing and
include forestry, apiculture, science and technology, learning, which is great.’’
IT, and rural professional services.
“We try to accommodate the needs and wants of Over the past year, Southland Youth Futures has
individual schools. Whatever a careers adviser or also begun to invite foundation studies students
teacher asks for, it’s a safe bet there will be a friendly from Community College Southland, YMCA and
employer willing to help.’’ Front-line Training on workplace visit tours.
Southland Youth Futures also encourages
employers across all sectors to Invest in Youth by Beckham says she had not been long in the job
offering work experience opportunities and entry- when she realised young people who had already
level positions. Employers are invited to advertise left the traditional secondary school system also
entry-level positions on the Southland Youth needed career exploration opportunities and
Futures Facebook page. Along with jobs gleaned assistance.
from online sources, the page has promoted more
than 75 jobs since Christmas alone. “THERE’S NOTHING WRONG
A common misconception is that Southland Youth WITH FLIPPING BURGERS, BUT
Futures is trying to encourage school leavers into THAT’S NOT THE SORT OF
jobs rather than into full-time tertiary training such WORK WE ARE PROMOTING.
as university, Beckham says. RATHER IT IS ENTRY JOBS WITH
“That’s not what we’re about at all. We are very clear CAREER PROSPECTS SUCH AS
that there are many different ways into work and APPRENTICESHIPS, CADETSHIPS
that university or polytechnic is the preferred path AND POSITIONS OFFERING
for many. But employers know that apprenticeships ONGOING INDUSTRY TRAINING.”
or gaining NZQA qualifications on the job are also
valid pathways and it is part of our role to make
sure young people and their teachers and parents
know that too.’’

38 MAHI TAHI 2019


SOUTHLAND YOUTH FUTURES

KNOWING WE ARE ADDING
TO PEOPLE’S KNOWLEDGE
AND OPENING DOORS
FOR THEM IS EXTREMELY
REWARDING.”

Gore High School students inspect some of the digital technology used by Gore
builder Peter Goodger and other builders

“There is a cluster of young people aged about Employers enjoy contributing, she says.
18-22 who are a couple of years out of school but “They get satisfaction from knowing they are making
who are at pretty much the same stage as Year a difference for young people. I had an example
12 or Year 13 students – still amassing NCEA of that recently when one of the participants at a
qualifications and still trying to find their way in forestry careers day told me as she was packing up
the world. that she had lots of ideas for how to make her display
“Their courses usually involve pre-employment even better next time.‘’
study, but they have welcomed the opportunity to
come on tours and learn even more.’’ As well as employers and educators, Southland
Beckham says Southland Youth Futures would not Youth Futures has support from training providers
be successful if it wasn’t for the contribution of such as the Southern Institute of Technology and
than 60 employers, including 31 who have signed others, from Southland territorial authorities, and
up as Employer Excellence partners. They commit from government agencies.
to regular involvement in talks and tours, offer It also works closely with other agencies in the
work experience opportunities such as Gateway or youth transition field. A group called the Southland
internships, hire young people whenever they can, Foundation Educators Forum established about
and mentor and support new young employees. two and a half years ago has the goal of ensuring
The partners range in size from Southland’s four someone is looking out for youth most at-risk
largest employers – meat processing company of leaving education early without adequate
Alliance Group, New Zealand Aluminium qualifications, Beckham says.
Smelters, Fonterra Edendale and HWR, whose “We’ve joined forces to instigate a ‘no closed doors’
business interests cover the gamut from transport policy. That means if one agency can’t help a young
to tourism - to family-owned farms and person or their family they refer the young person to
businesses. a more appropriate agency.

39MAHI TAHI 2019


SOUTHLAND YOUTH FUTURES

NO CHILD LEFT
BEHIND

I‘’ t always makes me think of that character in the Aparajita Goswami, a process engineer at the New Zealand Aluminium Smelter (NZAS)
reaction used to create aluminium. Last year NZAS opened its doors to students for the
movie Hunt for the Wilderpeople whose mantra is to organise three tours involving over 50 students and teachers. More tours are planned
‘no child left behind’. That’s exactly what we want to
achieve with our combined efforts – young people The booklet, launched to schools and foundation
who feel valued and supported and encouraged to studies providers in March (2019) enables students to
achieve to their potential at school and beyond.’’ record their learnings about essential employability
skills such as communication, teamwork, thinking skills,
Beckham says it is extremely positive that the resilience, personal well-being, and an understanding
number of young people leaving secondary school of drug-free workplaces and health and safety in the
in Southland without NCEA Level 1 has halved in the workplace. Students can also gain recognition for work
past three years and was down to 105 individuals in experience, volunteering, producing a CV and obtaining
2017. at least a restricted driver’s licence. The final step in the
Passport process is an interview with an employer.
How do young people gain the experience needed
to win their first job, and how can employees be Already, more than 150 students have begun working
confident young people have the skills they need and on their passports, a figure Beckham knows will
are worth interviewing and hiring? Southland Youth grow rapidly as more schools and foundation studies
Futures and the Careers and Transition Educators providers come on board.
Association New Zealand Southland branch began
working on a solution to this conundrum last year, The results of Southland Youth Futures’ work are starting
developing the Southland Work Ready Passport. to show as young people follow their training and career
dreams and gain apprenticeships and other positions.
40 MAHI TAHI 2019


SOUTHLAND YOUTH FUTURES

SUCCESS COMES IN
DIFFERENT FORMS
FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.
WHATEVER THEIR
GOALS, IT IS SATISFYING
KNOWING WE ARE
HELPING”

plant at Tiwai Point near Invercargill, talks students through the electro-chemical It was then he realised he did not want to be based
e first time in about eight years. Southland Youth Futures worked with the company in the same workshop day after day, he wanted a job
d. where he could travel to different work sites and talk to
clients.
The number of youth on jobseeker benefits is also “Success comes in different forms. For some teenagers
declining, although that is in part due to Southland it might be staying at school a few months longer and
buoyant economy and 4% unemployment rate. getting a qualification. Or attending a trades academy
Ministry of Social Development figures showing the course one day a week. Or gaining a Gateway work
number of Southlanders aged 18-24 on jobseeker experience placement or a driver’s licence. Or being
benefits has been steadily dropping for the past two accepted into their dream university or polytechnic
years. From an annualised average of 571 across course. Whatever their goals, it’s satisfying knowing we
Southland in 2016, the number dropped to 472 last are helping.’’
year.
More than that, young people are starting to think For further information please contact:
more strategically about their possible career paths, Allison Beckham, Venture Southland
Beckham says. [email protected]
“One young man now in a plumbing apprenticeship
thought he wanted to be an engineer until he did 41MAHI TAHI 2019
some work experience in a workshop and visited
another.


SSEP

INCLUSIVE GROWTH INITIATIVE

IMPACTS YOUNG MĀORI

Smart Waikato’s Secondary School Employer Partnerships (SSEP)
creates the environment for industry to engage with local
secondary schools and generate employment opportunities for
local youth.

Experiencing subject learning in a workplace Huntly College teachers and students at Mercury’s Karapiro Dam

context is having “positive and profound” effect
on secondary school students throughout
Waikato, with impact even more significant for
Latest 2018 student survey results show 78
percent of 704 respondents from 18 schools said
SSEP activities made them more interested in
the school subject area.
Furthermore, 82 percent said it helped them
understand why they are studying the subject at
school and 74 percent of students surveyed said
SSEP has changed the way they feel about what
they could achieve.
SSEP project manager Linda Nelson Caie said
the impact on students from the region-wide
collaboration involving 22 secondary schools,
2300 students, 110 teachers and 140 employers
has been extremely positive. “When separating
out Māori student response data we saw that
SSEP was having an even more profound impact
on this group.”

42 MAHI TAHI 2019


In comparison to results SSEP
from all student data, an
even greater impact was SSEP sees employers from a range of sectors interconnecting
seen in Māori students, with school faculties, such as science, maths and business, to
particularly the extent to contextualise learning for Year 9 and 10 students, and also
which SSEP has influenced introducing them to a wide range of careers. Almost half the
future school subject choices students participating in the programme identify as Māori.
(72% of Māori students “It is evident that all students benefit immensely from engaging
compared with 66% of all with industry while at school. What is really heartening to see is
students), how long students the increased benefits Māori students are gaining from these real-
think they will stay in school world learning opportunities and experiences,” Linda said.
(69% of Māori students) and Huntly College Deputy Principal Sharon Moller said SSEP had had
helped when thinking about profound impact on students participating from the school, the
their future career (74% of majority of whom are Māori.
Māori compared with 66% Students found visits to Karapiro Dam with Mercury and to
of all students). Waikato Milking Systems particularly inspiring.

Huntly College students at Mercury

43MAHI TAHI 2019


SSEP

SSEP NOW OPERATES
IN 21 SCHOOLS

“They saw a former Huntly College student working at Huntly College students at Waikato Milking Sytems
Waikato Milking Systems, and it was nice for them to see
themselves in somebody in the workforce. They were able to
ask him questions and it gave them confidence knowing that
this is a possibility for them too.”
“We are meeting with local employers this week to help us
develop our term two learning modules. This enables teachers
to deliver curriculum in the context of local industry and
expose the students to real career opportunities.”
Huntly College Year 10 Māori student Toni Comins said she
had been inspired by SSEP: “It was fascinating to learn about
the different careers and it also helped me broaden my scale
of job choices. It inspired me to think more about what I
would like to do.”
Cambridge High School Board of Trustees Chairman Karl
Thornton said SSEP had had significant positive impact and
fitted well with the school’s educational strategy.
“From a board perspective we’re all very much in favour
of SSEP. The students are coming back enthusiastic about
learning because they can see its relevance. SSEP also fits in
with the school’s strategy of getting our kids ready for life
outside the school gate. This is more how we would like to see
things from an educational perspective,” Karl said.
Cambridge High is keen to expand SSEP across all subject
areas, he said.
“We are looking to expand by a further seven schools this
year, with the aim to be running in all Waikato secondary
schools by 2023. It is clear all students benefit from better
engagement with industry and from the opportunity to see
their subjects contextualised in the workplace.”

44 MAHI TAHI 2019


SSEP

SSEP HAD EMPOWERED TEACHERS
AND ENCOURAGED THEM TO
CONSIDER INDUSTRY NEEDS WHEN
THEY DEVELOPED CURRICULUM.” -
SHARON MOLLER, HUNTLY COLLEGE

Other survey comments from students: “I enjoyed getting
to experience (industry) in person and seeing the type of
things they do instead of just hearing or writing or reading
about it,” Year 10 Fraser High School student.
“I enjoyed the site trip because I got to see how things
work behind the scenes and helped me get a better grasp
on what I might study later in high school,” Year 10
Rototuna Junior High School student.
“I liked meeting people who use what we learn in class
on a daily basis in their careers because it helped me find
s a purpose for what we are learning.” Year 10 Waikato
Diocesan School for Girls student.

SSEP was awarded Best Practice in Collaboration
(Business, Iwi and Community) at the 2018 EDNZ
conference.

SSEP is sponsored by Te Waka, Sky City Hamilton Community
Trust, WEL Energy Trust, Ministry of Business, Innovation
and Enterprise, Mercury-Waikato Tainui Partnership, Waikato
Farmers Trust, Glenice and John Gallagher Foundation,
Gallagher Charitable Trust and Community Organisation
Grants Scheme.

For more about SSEP see http://www.smartwaikato.co.nz/
initiatives/ssep/.

Contact Mary Jensen, CEO Smart Waikato

[email protected]

45MAHI TAHI 2019


MARLBOROUGH SMART+CONNECTED

MARL
SMART+

An innovative
Engagem
D

Radiance of the Seas at Shakespeare Bay wharf, Picton

Since 2013, Marlborough The Smart+Connected approach The approach provides guidance to
is designed to implement ensure that actions in the region’s
District Council (MDC) has the vision developed by the communities and industries are:
adopted an innovative economic Council in partnership with the Smart: Thinking strategically –
and community development community. becoming more efficient, creating
programme, aimed at maximising new solutions, and leveraging
the impact of Council’s resources THE VISION: MARLBOROUGH IS A those solutions to create new
in these areas, in partnership with opportunities;
local communities and industries. GLOBALLY-CONNECTED DISTRICT OF Connected: Acting collaboratively
Dubbed Smart+Connected, the SMART, PROGRESSIVE, HIGH-VALUE – staying informed, and supporting
programme uses a participatory, ENTERPRISE, KNOWN FOR OUR each other locally, nationally and
volunteer-based approach ECONOMIC EFFICIENCY, QUALITY internationally.
to industry development, LIFESTYLE AND WELL-BEING, Since its inception, the
community engagement and CARING COMMUNITY, DESIRABLE Smart+Connected programme
resolving common issues, each LOCATION AND HEALTHY NATURAL has proven to be a highly effective
of which is too complex for any ENVIRONMENT. replacement for traditional top-
single organisation to successfully down economic development
address by itself. approaches. It has allowed for
sustained investment into initiatives
46 MAHI TAHI 2019 that empower local industries to


MARLBOROUGH SMART+CONNECTED

LBOROUGH
+CONNECTED

approach to Community
ment and Economic
Development

Marlborough Aquaculture Week, Blenheim CBD, March 2019

partner with both the Council Ove the past five years, MDC Historically, the region’s
and communities, in developing has engaged Business Lab, industries were not highly
a sustainable economy for the a Top of the South- based focused on engagement with
region. consulting practice, to play local communities, while their
Most importantly, the this independent facilitation principal engagement with
programme recognises the key role for the Smart+Connected the Council was related to
role that communities play in programme. regulatory compliance. This
enhancing regional economic often resulted in somewhat
prosperity and wellbeing. Like most regions of New fractious relationships
A critical success factor has between corporate, public and
been the ongoing involvement Zealand, Marlborough is home community interests, regarding
of independent facilitation to several small communities, issues such as commercial
partners, which allows for often located in areas of high use of public space, access to
engagement between the environmental significance such freshwater for industrial use,
Council and industry or as the MarlboroughSounds. and the environmental impacts
community stakeholders to Other communities in the region of various industries.
happen on a constructive and are centres for grape cultivation To effectively address these
collaborative basis. and winemaking, supporting issues, a more inclusive and
the internationally renowned collaborative approach was
Marlborough wine industry. needed - one that could

47MAHI TAHI 2019


MARLBOROUGH SMART+CONNECTED

A HIGHLY EFFECTIVE
ALTERNATIVE

balance the often- Smart+Connected Community The Community Groups
contradictory interests Groups have been highly successful
of various sections of the • Havelock in mobilising volunteers
Marlborough community, while • Picton to participate in projects
fostering healthy economic • Renwick covering a range of activities,
development in the region. • Seddon including advocacy to Council,
This led to the development Smart+Connected Industry improvements to public spaces
of the Smart+Connected Groups and sustainable water use.
methodology. • Aquaculture One measure of the success
IMPLEMENTATION • Blenheim Business Assoc. achieved by these Community
The implementation of the • Labour and Skills Groups has been a marked
Smart+Connected approach is • Visitor Economy increase in community
two-fold. It focuses on both a • Wood Sector participation in the Council’s
Community and an Industry Annual and Long-Term Planning
workstream. As of Q1 2019, process. Another is the longevity
four Community Groups and of the Groups and the number
five Industry Groups have been of individuals (in some case
created across Marlborough: more than 40 people over a five-
year period) who have become
involved in the various Groups.

TO EFFECTIVELY
ADDRESS THESE ISSUES,
A MORE INCLUSIVE
AND COLLABORATIVE
APPROACH WAS NEEDED.

Opening of Marina to Marina Track, Picton, November 2018

48 MAHI TAHI 2019


MARLBOROUGH SMART+CONNECTED

THE LATEST
SMART+CONNECTED
INDUSTRY GROUP
FOCUSES ON LABOUR
AND SKILLS. THIS GROUP
WAS DEVELOPED IN
RESPONSE TO ONGOING
SKILLS AND LABOUR
SHORTAGE EXPERIENCED
THROUGHOUT
MARLBOROUGH.

Havelock Mussel and Seafood Festival 2019

The Industry Groups have succeeded Over the past three years, the Initiated in Q4 2018, the latest
in improving consultation and Group has built relationships Smart+Connected Industry Group
collaboration with the Council and with local communities through focuses on Labour and Skills.
local communities, and in promoting events such as Aquaculture This Group was developed as a
opportunities for value addition and Week, a series of events result of the chronic skills and
the development of downstream culminating in the Havelock labour shortage that has become a
industries. Mussel and Seafood Festival, constant issue for most industries
The Smart+Connected Aquaculture which is held annually in and businesses in Marlborough.
Group has been particularly March. Another focus area for Unlike the other Industry
successful since its inception in 2016. the Group has been innovation Groups that focus on a particular
When the Group was formed, the in the industry, particularly in economic sector or industry, this
aquaculture sector faced increasing terms of reducing environmental Group cuts across all the region’s
resistance from communities in impacts and promoting waste major sectors, and also includes
the Marlborough Sounds regarding minimisation. participation by youth, senior and
the environmental impacts of the Similarly the Visitor Economy social services organisations.
industry, the use of public water Group has focused the activities In February 2019, the Labour
space and the degradation of the of Marlborough’s tourism sector and Skills Group hosted the
marine environment in the Sounds. around some key themes, first Marlborough Labour
These issues represented a very real which were identified through and Skills Summit, which was
threat to the industry’s social license consultation with local tourism attended by over 100 people,
to operate within these Sounds operators. This has contributed drawn from across the region’s
communities. to substantial growth in the major industries, community
conference and cruise ship organisations and national and
segments of the region’s visitor local government.
economy.
49MAHI TAHI 2019


MARLBOROUGH SMART+CONNECTED

In February 2019, the Labour
and Skills Group hosted the
first Marlborough Labour
and Skills Summit, which was
attended by over 100 people,
drawn from across the region’s
major industries, community
organisations and national and
local government.

Marlborough Labour and Skills Summit, Ma

SOME ACHIEVEMENTS TO DATE

The Picton Community Group CFarmX Blue Mussel processing The original Blenheim CBD
has been responsible for a number – historically, blue mussels Group was formalised into the
of projects, including an annual were a zero-value byproduct of Blenheim Business Associatio
Cruise Ship Think Tank, the Greenshell™ mussel farming, independent organisation focu
Marina to Marina walking and and were discarded to landfill. on improving the attractivene
cycling track between the Picton A commercialisation project the Blenheim CBD and advoc
and Waikawa Marinas, and the was initiated in 2017 by the on issues affecting CBD retaile
inaugural Picton Matariki Festival Smart+Connected Aquaculture and other commercial operati
held in June 2018. Group, resulting in the The Group is currently develo
development of a blue mussel the Marlborough Mile, a walk
processing facility and a successful route through the Blenheim C
application to the Provincial that takes in major attractions
Growth Fund in 2018. showcases the region’s history
economy and communities.

50 MAHI TAHI 2019


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