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Published by bailey, 2017-06-07 17:24:38

Pretrip-Wellness-Regimen-Final

Pretrip-Wellness-Regimen-Final

PRE

trip

wellness

regimen

Crested Butte, Colorado


Welcome

Congratulations on signing up for programming with the Adaptive Sports Center! Your
time with the Adaptive Sports Center will provide you with an amazing experience that
will get you closer to nature as well as yourself. In order to get the most out of your time
we suggest that you begin to prepare yourself physically prior to your trip. In the
following pages you will find suggested exercises, stretches, and nutritional tips to help
you start your journey with the Adaptive Sports Center.
Our hopes are that this simple health regimen will be a kick-starter for a healthier, more
fun-filled lifestyle for you. With a healthy, balanced diet and regular exercise you will find a
plethora of benefits not only physically but also mentally. Exercise can improve
cardio-vascular health, bone health and density, and stamina. The lesser-known benefits
of exercise are the beneficial changes that it creates in brain chemistry. The endorphins
released during exercise can increase mood, decrease stress, heighten brain function
immediately after your workout, and in the long term can even help to stave off
depression, Alzheimer’s, and dementia. Basically, there are no real downsides to living an
active, healthy lifestyle.
**As with any exercise regimen, make sure to consult with a doctor or healthcare provider
prior to beginning training.**

1


2


preventing
altitude sickness

Crested Butte is at high altitude (nearly 9,000 feet above sea level) and there is a chance you may
experience some symptoms related to altitude. It is important you are aware of the symptoms and take
preventative measures. Regardless of physical condition or age, altitude can affect anyone.
The most common symptoms include: sleeplessness, headache, nausea, lack of coordination, fatigue,
coughing, shortness of breath and vomiting. Symptoms can be similar to the flu but usually occur 6-24
hours after reaching altitude and it can take two to three days for your body to fully acclimatize.
Tips for preventing or minimizing the effects of altitude:
• Take it slow at first. Slow ascent to altitude is the key to acclimatizing. Almost anyone will get
altitude illness if they go too high, too quickly. Give your body time to adjust and avoid significant
exertion at first.
• Drink water!!!! Staying hydrated is important as it aids your body in acclimatizing. Clear urine
indicates adequate hydration. Don’t wait until you feel thirsty to drink water – stay ahead of the curve.
• Avoid alcohol – the fun of the alcohol will definitely not be worth the pain that will follow.
• Avoid excess caffeine. It is a diuretic and contributes to dehydration – and doesn’t exactly help
the sleep situation.
• Avoid sugar prior to trip. Sugar will dehydrate the body. The short energy boost will not be worth

the crash later.
• Eat light, well balanced meals. Even if you don’t have an appetite, it is still VERY important to
eat!
• Do not take over the counter meds to try to induce sleep – most of them will not compensate for
the effects of altitude sickness and can often make you feel worse.

3


What to do if altitude has got the best of you…
• Get a minimum of 8 hours of sleep a night.
• Deep breathing. Hydrate. Rest. Take medications according to the advice of your doctor. Descend

– going down in elevation is sometimes the only option for alleviating symptoms.
• With severe symptoms or if ever in doubt, call 911 or seek professional medical care right away.
*Institute for Altitude Medicine at Telluride

4


Rest and Sleep

Sleep and rest are essential for a person’s overall health and well-being. Whether you live a very active
lifestyle or spend long days in the office, getting the proper amount of sleep and rest is important to consider
when leading a healthy lifestyle.
Studies show that an individual needs 8 hours of sleep a night in order to function at a “normal” level the
following day. Due to the stresses of work, families, activities, lifestyles, etc, most Americans on average
sleep 6 hours a night. While we are sleeping, our brain is preparing itself for the tasks of the next day. A good
night’s sleep also improves our ability to learn, make decisions, and to pay attention. Physically, sleep is impor-
tant because it helps keep our immune system strong and healthy. One of the most beneficial aspects of get-
ting enough sleep is it allows our muscles time to rest and recover from the day’s activities. This will be very
crucial with your time here since you will be participating in different activities on a daily basis.
Below, you will find suggestions to help get a good night’s rest:
• Keep a regular sleep/wake schedule
• Don’t drink or eat caffeine four to six hours before bed and minimize daytime use
• Don’t smoke, especially near bedtime or if you awake in the night
• Avoid alcohol and heavy meals before sleep
• Get regular exercise
• Minimize noise, light and excessive hot and cold temperatures where you sleep
• Develop a regular bed time and go to bed at the same time each night
• Try and wake up without an alarm clock
• Attempt to go to bed earlier every night for certain period; this will ensure that you’re getting enough
sleep.

Use the chart below to see what your recommended amount of sleep is!

Age
  Recommended
 Amount
 of
 Sleep
 
Newborns
  16–18
 hours
 a
 day
 
Preschool-­‐aged
 children
  11–12
 hours
 a
 day
 
School-­‐aged
 children
  At
 least
 10
 hours
 a
 day
 
Teens
  9–10
 hours
 a
 day
 
Adults
 (including
 the
 elderly)
  7–8
 hours
 a
 day
 

 

5


nutrition

Proper nutrition is one of the easiest ways to increase your overall health. Eating foods full of nutrients can
increase metabolism, improve body function, and increase energy. One of the best things that you can do to
eat healthier is to avoid processed and packaged foods. Eating fresh, colorful foods is a sure way to ensure that
you are getting the maximum benefit from your meals. These suggestions are not meant to serve as a diet, but
simply as a guide to eat healthier.

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day. If you
fuel your body properly in the morning, you will have
more energy and be less hungry as the day
progresses. Breakfast should be your largest meal of
the day, making sure to include protein, fiber, and
fruits.
A good way to start the day is a bowl of oatmeal with
fruit in it. This will provide some protein as well as a
healthy serving of fiber to keep you feeling full for a
while. Another healthy option would be Greek yogurt
with fruit and a side of whole grain toast or a bagel;
similar to the oatmeal breakfast, this will provide you
with lots of protein and fiber. Eggs are also a great
way to start your day, especially when paired with a
Lunch is the second most important meal of the day,
and if done properly can help you avoid the afternoon
“crash”. Similarly to breakfast, making sure to include
protein, fiber, fruits, and vegetables in your lunch is a
great way to get valuable nutrients that will help you
power you through the rest of your day.

6


Dinner should be on the smaller side of the three
daily meals. If you have eaten breakfast and lunch,
by dinner time you shouldn’t be too hungry. Dinner
should be focused on simple ingredients prepared in
a simple fashion. Making sure to choose lean protein
and colorful ingredients can make dinner both tasty
and packed with nutrients. The general rule of thumb
with dinner is the protein source should be about the
size of your fist and the rest of the plate should be
filled with vegetables and maybe an occasional starch.

Snacking is great! In fact you should snack between all
of your meals. You want to make sure that your snack
foods are healthy and nutritious. Try pre-packing your
snacks while making breakfast. Trail mix is an
awesome snack; it has protein from the nuts, fiber
from the dried fruit, sugars to fuel you in the short
term, and sweet and salty flavors that we all love so
much. Fruits and vegetables, once again, are a great
way to snack. Try apples, sugar snap peas, carrots, or
bell peppers for a quick snack in between lunch and
dinner.
One of the best ways to get in the habit of eating
healthy is to allow yourself an occasional burger, ice
cream, candy bar, or other favorite treat. The
important thing is to take quantity and frequency into
account so that you are not overdoing it. Try to
remember that moderation is key.
7


sample meal plans

Breakfast Options:

1. ½ cup of oatmeal with one of the options below:
a. 2 tablespoons of raisins
b. 2 tablespoons of nuts of some sort
c. Any type of fresh fruit diced up
d. Sweetener such as agave, honey, splenda, etc.

2. Omelets: (with 2 eggs or 3 egg whites)
a. Veggies diced up
b. 1-2 tablespoon of cheese (cheddar, provolone, mozzarella, feta, etc.)
c. Spices of any sort (pepper, salt, Italian seasoning, etc.)

3. Toast, bagel, English muffin with one of the options below:
a. 2 tablespoons of Peanut Butter/Almond/Cashew Butter
b. 1 tablespoon of Light Butter
c. 2 tablespoon of Light or Fat Free Cream Cheese/Laughing Cow Cheese

4. Fruit Smoothies (try and use fresh fruit but you can use frozen fruit as well)
a. Any type of fruit (strawberries, blueberries, bananas, raspberries, melon, pine
apple, etc.)
b. 3-4 cubes of ice
c. ½ cup of skim milk
d. Protein Powder optional

5. Greek Yogurt (Fat Free or Light) and can add any of the following in if it desired:
a. Any fresh fruit diced up
b. ¼ cup of granola
c. ¼ cup of raisins
Lunch Options:

1. Deli Meat Sandwiches with options below:
a. 4 thinly slices of turkey, ham, chicken, etc.
b. Two pieces of wheat or whole grain bread
c. A slice of cheese
d. Any vegetables that you like on sandwiches
e. Condiments such as mustard, light mayo, etc.

8


Lunch Options (cont’d):

2. Salads:
a. Always try and use green leafy lettuce (mixed greens) or use romaine over ice
berg due to the nutritional value it provides to the body. Things you can add to
the salad to make it filling.
i. Cheese: 2 tablespoons of light or fat free cheese preferred.
(cheddar cheese, feta cheese, and parmesan cheese).
ii. Meat: white meat chicken is a good choice but you can also but
other meat choices such as tuna, deli meat, turkey bacon, etc.
iii. Any type of vegetable you like (onion, peppers, cucumbers,
carrots, peas, corn, etc.)

3. Fruit Smoothies with Protein (See previous in Breakfast Section)

4. Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich and can add the following if needed or desire:
a. 1-2 tablespoon of granola
b. Agave or honey
c. Banana

Dinner Options:

1. Examples of protein sources:
a. Grilled or baked fish (white fishes preferred over dark fish like Tuna and Salmon)
b. Grilled, baked or sautéed Chicken
c. Buffalo Meat
d. Red Meat (although this should be eaten in moderation due to the high
cholesterol that is found in red meat)
e. Grilled, baked, or sautéed Pork

2. Examples of Vegetable Sources:
a. Steamed broccoli/Sugar Snap Peas/Green beans, etc with a little bit of butter on
it and any seasoning you like
b. Sautéed squash, zucchini, peppers, etc. with seasoning mixed in with them
c. Steamed carrots
d. Corn on the cob
e. Cabbage
f. Onions

3. Examples of Starches
a. Sweet Potatoes (baked or sautéed)
b. A piece of bread of some sort

9


Snack Options:
1. ¼ cup of trail mix
2. ½ cup of Greek yogurt (fat free or light)
3. Any piece of fresh fruit
4. ¼ cup of nuts (preferably almonds, cashews, macadamia, walnuts, pecans)
5. Any raw or cooked veggies with fat free ranch dressing (or no dressing if you do not want any)
6. ¼ cup of hummus and pita chips, veggies, crackers, etc.
7. One cheese stick or cheese equivalent to one cheese stick


10


STRETCHING

Stretching is a very important part of living a healthy, active lifestyle. There are many different types and phi-
losophies of stretching, but the two most common are static stretching and dynamic stretching. Static stretch-
ing is the most common kind of stretching and involves stretching the muscles while at rest. Dynamic stretch-
ing involves stretching the muscles while they are in motion. Both types have their time and place and will help
to reduce injury and improve performance.
One of the most important ways to get the full benefit of stretching is to never stretch “cold” muscles. This
means that a quick cardio warm-up should happen before you stretch. This gets the blood flowing into the
muscles and starts to loosen them up which allows for a better stretch and less chance of injury.
Dynamic stretches should be used during warm-ups. Not only does this increase blood flow to the muscles, but
it also helps to simulate the motion of the activity and prepare the muscles for use. One key benefit of dynamic
stretching is that it stimulates the central nervous system and increases blood flow, which helps to increase
performance, strength, and power.
Static stretching is a great way to end a workout. After a short cool down your muscles are loose and warm,
and stretching will help to prevent collection of lactic acid and tightening of muscles in the time after the work-
out. This will help decrease soreness and decrease the risk of injury.
For almost every activity offered at the Adaptive Sports Center it is important to stretch all of the muscle
groups. Even if a certain muscle is not one of the primary muscles used in an activity it is more than likely as-
sisting motion and stabilization of the body. To achieve the maximum benefit of stretching you should do static
stretches twice a day for anywhere between 4 and 15 minutes. On top of this you should make sure to do
dynamic stretches before a workout and static stretches as you cool down from your workout.

11


static STRETCHING
regimen

Lower Body Static Stretches

Calves: Start by standing in an
upright position with your feet
together facing a wall/counter/desk.
Lean forward and brace yourself
with your arms while keeping your
back straight. Keep one leg straight
with the heel on the ground and
slightly bend the other leg to put
pressure onto the straight leg,
lean into your arms until you feel a
stretch in your calf. Hold for 15 to 30
seconds and repeat with the other
leg.

Soleus/Achilles Tendons: In the
same position as the calf stretch,
bend the knee of the stretching
leg while keeping your heel on the
ground. You should feel a stretch in
your lower leg/heel/ankle. Hold for
15 to 30 seconds and repeat with
the other leg.

12


Hamstrings: Stand with your legs shoulder width
apart. Slowly bend down with your arms crossed in
front of you. While keeping your upper body parallel
to the ground, push your bottom back until you feel
a stretch in your hamstrings. While breathing slowly
try to decrease the angle between your upper body
and legs. You can also use a table or wall to stabilize
yourself during this stretch. Hold for 15 to 30
seconds.
Upper Hamstring/Gluteus/Hip: Lay on your back
with your knees bent. Cross your left leg over your
right knee so the ankle is just above your kneecap.
Use your arms to pull your right leg towards your
chest until you feel a stretch in your upper left leg.
Hold for 15 to 30 seconds and repeat with the right
side.
Quadriceps: While standing, raise your left leg so
that your heel is touching your bottom. With your
right hand reach back and grab on to your foot. Push
your pelvis forward and put tension on your leg with
your arm until you feel a slight stretch. Increase the
stretch while breathing slowly. Hold for 15 to 30
seconds and repeat with the right leg. There are
many variations to this stretch including holding on
to something for balance, lying down, or even
kneeling. Find what works best for you.

13


Hip Flexor: From a kneeling position raise
your left leg so that your foot is flat on the
ground and your leg is bent at a 90 degree
angle. Push your pelvis forward and
upward until you feel a stretch in your
upper quadriceps and hip area. Hold for
15 to 30 seconds and repeat with the
Groin: While sitting on the floor place
the bottoms of your feet together so that
your knees are pointing outwards. Use
your elbows to push your knees towards
the floor until you feel a stretch in your
groin. Hold for 15 to 30 seconds.

14


Upper Body Static Stretches
Lower Back/Obliques: While sitting on
the floor with your legs straight out take
your left leg and cross it over your right
leg so that your foot is next to your right
knee and your left knee is pointing up.
Take your right arm and cross your body
so that your elbow is resting on your
thigh. Press into your leg so that your
torso twists toward the back and you feel
a stretch. Hold for 15 to 30 seconds and
repeat on the other side.

Shoulders: Find a corner of a wall and, with your arm held out horizontally, place your palm on the wall. With
your hand firmly on the wall rotate your body away from the wall until you feel a stretch in the front of you
shoulder. Hold for 15-30 seconds and repeat with the other arm. Now extend your arm vertically and place
your palm against the wall corner so that your body won’t run into the wall. Push your body forward with your
palm firmly on the wall until you feel a stretch. Hold for 15-30 seconds and repeat with the other arm.

15


Neck: Press your left ear to
your left shoulder and slowly
roll your head so that your
chin is touching your chest.
Roll your head so that your
right ear is touching your
right shoulder and finally roll
your head so that the back
of your head is touching your
back. Slowly move through
all of the steps making sure
to get a good stretching feel-
ing at each position. Repeat
for 30 seconds to 1 minute.
Forearms: Grab your left
hand with your right hand
and extend your arm so its
palm side up. Pull your left
hand down so that you feel a
stretch in your forearm and
bicep. Repeat but this time
with the palm side down.
Hold for 15 to 30 seconds
and repeat on the other arm.

16


DYNAMIC
STRETCHING regimen

Lower Body Dynamic Stretches

High Kicks for Hamstrings: Standing with your feet shoulder width apart and a counter or wall on your left side,
swing your right leg in front of your body keeping your leg straight. Swing back until your leg is just behind your
body. Repeat for 15-20 repetitions on the right side and then switch to your left side.

Heel Kicks for Quadriceps: In the same position as the high kicks swing your leg backwards so that it bends
at the knee and your heel is behind your bottom. Return the leg to a position just in front of your body and
repeat 15-20 times before switching to the other leg.

17


Leg Swings for Glutes and Groin: With a chair or wall in front of you and your feet shoulder width apart, swing
your right left out laterally and then swing it back across your body. Repeat for both sides 15-20 repetitions
each.

High Knees for Glutes and Quads: This is very similar to the high kicks, but rather than keeping your leg straight
bend at the knee and raise the knee to your chest, then return to a standing position. Repeat for both legs for
15-20 repetitions each.

18


Upper Body Dynamic Stretches

Side Bends for Obliques/Abs/Lower Back: With your arms stretched out at shoulder height alternate bending
laterally at the waste from left side to right side. Continue for 15-20 repetitions on each side. An addition that
could assist with this exercise would be to hold a broomstick or pole across your shoulders, behind your neck
while performing the repetitions. This can be done either standing with your feet shoulder width apart or in a
chair that allows for a good range of movement and good stability.

Spinal Twists for Lower Back/Upper Back/Shoulders/Abs: With a straight back, hold your arms at shoulder
height and rotate your trunk from left to right. Do this movement for 15 to 20 repetitions on each side. This
exercise can once again use a broomstick or pole to assist with the arm positioning. This can be done either
standing with your feet shoulder width apart or in a chair that allows for a good range of movement and good
stability.

19


Arm Crossovers for Chest and Shoulders: Lift your arms from your sides so that they are parallel to the ground.
In a steady motion, swing your arms in front of your body so that they cross over each other and steadily re-
turn them to the original position. Repeat alternating which arm is on top for 30-40 repetitions. This exercise
can be done standing with your feet shoulder width apart or seated in a stable chair.

Arm Circles for Shoulders: Starting with both hands down by your side, make big forward circles with your
arms. Continue this for 15-20 repetitions and then switch the direction of the circles for another 15-20 repeti-
tions. This exercise can be done either standing with your feet shoulder width apart or seated in a stable chair
that allows for a good range of motion.

20


Shrug Circles for Shoulders: With both hands by your side shrug your shoulders up towards your ears creating
big circles. Do 15-20 repetitions in the forward direction and then change directions and make backward circles
for 15-20 repetitions. This can be done either standing with your feet shoulder width apart or sitting in a stable
chair.
Neck Flexion/Extension: See Static Stretching neck stretch.
References
http://www.steadystrength.com/how-to-effectively-warm-up-with-dynamic-stretching
http://www.livestrong.com/article/116739-upper-body-dynamic-stretches/
http://www.tricktutorials.com/contect/flx3
www.beta.active.com/cycling/7-simple-stretches-for-cyclists
www.mikesbikes.com/articles/stretching-before-you-ride-pg241.htm
www.mikesbikes.com/articles/stretching-after-you-ride-pg240.htm
www.dummies.com/how-to/content/stretching-before-riding-a-horse.html
www.rockclimbing.com/articles/Training_and_Techniques/warming_up_is_EVERYTHING_44.html
http://www.runnersworld.com/stretching/dynamic-routine

21


Cardio

Adding a couple of short cardio routines to your weekly schedule can greatly increase your physical health. All
it takes is getting your heart rate up to around 60% to 70% of your maximum heart rate for about 30 minutes
a couple of times a week. This will help you to begin to prepare yourself for the physical exertion that you will
undergo at altitude in Crested Butte.
Cardio is one of the easiest types of exercise to get. All you need is your body and about 30 minutes. It can
be anything from a daily walk, jogging, or pushing your wheelchair around the block, to walking up and down
stairs, doing jumping jacks, or doing a seated cardio routine that focuses on repeated movement of your upper
body. It can be cost effective, no purchase necessary, or can use the assistance of machines such as ellipticals,
treadmills, and stationary bikes. They important thing is to get your heart rate up and enjoy what you are do-
ing. Use it as time to clear your head after or before your day, a break from work, a social time with a friend, or
just a time to think by yourself.
manandwomanrunningtogether

22


Adventure Activities
and User Groups

Summer Activities
Canoeing and kayaking are appropriate activities
for all disabilities and all ages. Balance issues need
to be considered for participant and instructor
safety. Fear issues with water are a consideration
in determining whether or not someone would
enjoy canoeing/kayaking.
Canoeing muscles used – Trapezius, Deltoids,
Biceps, Abdominals, and Triceps

Kayaking muscles used - Rotator Cuff, Biceps,
Triceps, Trapezius, Lattissimus Dorsi (Lats), and
Rhomboids
Whitewater rafting is an appropriate activity for all
disabilities and almost all participants. The major
limitation to rafting on the more difficult water is
size and age. Using adaptive seating, an individual
with a high level disability can participate. Big
rapids and cold water may be inappropriate for a
participant with a heart condition. As with all ac-
tivities, it is critical that participants communicate
their medical concerns to staff. Swimming ability is
not required to whitewater raft.
Muscles used – Upper Body Muscle Group
Rock Climbing is appropriate for many disabilities.
The most common disabilities seen at the crag are:
• Learning Disabilities
• Cerebral Palsy
• Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
• Cognitive Disabilities
• Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)
• Spina Bifida
• Amputations
Muscles used – Forearms, Biceps, Back,
Abdominals, and Legs

23


Adaptive Downhill Mountain Biking is an appropriate
activity for many disabilities. The most common
disabilities seen in our gravity bikes are:
• Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)
• Spina Bifida
• Balance Impairment
• Amputations
Muscles used – Biceps, Abdominals, Gluteus Maximus,
Hamstrings, and Calves
On-Road/Off-Road Hand-Cycling is appropriate for
many disabilities. The most common disabilities seen
hand-cycling are:
• Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)
• Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
• Balance Impairment
• Amputations
• Visual Impairments
Muscles used – Shoulders, Core, Back, and Chest

Hiking and Backpacking activities are most
appropriate for ambulatory participants. There are
some adaptations and areas (ex. Lower Loop) that
allow an individual who uses a wheelchair to
participate.
Muscles used – Gluteus Maximus, Quadriceps, Ham-
strings, Calves, Abdominals, Lower Back, and Obliques
Horseback Riding is an activity that is adaptable for
many individuals. Many of the populations that we see
at the ranch are the following:
• Cognitive Disabilities
• Learning Disabilities
• Amputations
• Visual Impairments
• Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
• Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
• Spinal Cord Injuries
• Down Syndrome
• Physical Disabilities
Muscles used – Shoulders, Back, Arms Hands, Abdomi-
nals, Thighs, and Calves

224


Winter Activities
Mono-skiing & Bi-Skiing
Mono-skiing and bi-skiing are appropriate for
many disabilities. Some of the most common dis-
abilities seen in sit skis are:
• Amputations
• Balance Impairments
• Cerebral Palsy (CP)
• Cerebrovascular Accident (CVA/stroke)
• Intellectual Disability
• Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
• Muscular Dystrophy (MD)
• Spina Bifida
• Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)
• Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
In addition, there are some skiers who have
progressive or degenerative disabilities. They
may have started skiing as a two, three- or four-
tracker but may eventually sit-down ski due to
the progressive nature of their disease.
Muscles Used – Triceps, Pectorals, Core, Neck,
Shoulders, Forearms, and Biceps
3-Track/4-Track
As in other adaptive skiing classifications, this
category includes a varied and vast population;
sometimes their only commonality is the use of
outriggers. Some examples of disabilities includ-
ed in this 3/4-track classification are:
• Amputations
• Balance impairments
• Cerebral Palsy (CP)
• Cerebrovascular Accident (CVA/stroke)
• Congenital anomalies of hip/leg/foot
• Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
• Muscular Dystrophy (MD)
• Spina Bifida
• Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)
• Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
Muscles used – Quadriceps, Hamstrings, Glutes,
Shoulders, Triceps, Calves, Abdominals, and Hip
Flexors

215


Slider
As in other adaptive skiing classifications, this
category includes a varied and vast population.
Some examples of disabilities included in the
slider classification are:
• Amputation
• Cerebral Palsy (CP)
• Cerebrovascular Accident (CVA/stroke)
• Congenital anomalies of hip/leg/foot
• Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
• Muscular Dystrophy (MD)
• Spina Bifida
• Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)
• Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
Many standing students with balance impair-
ments, decreased lower body strength, de-
creased cognitive understanding, or even psy-
chological fear would benefit from the stabilizing
ability of the slider.
Muscles used – Abdominals and Legs

Snowboarding
Snowboarding is appropriate for many disabili-
ties. Some of the most common populations for
snowboarding are as follows:
• Cerebral Palsy
• Amputations
• Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
• Learning Disabilities
• Cognitive Disabilities
• Muscular Dystrophy
• Muscular Sclerosis
• Stroke (CVA)
Muscles Used – Quadriceps, Calves, Hamstrings,
Knees, Hip Flexors, and Abdominals

262


Nordic Skiing, like alpine skiing, is fit for many
different individuals. Those with balance issues
often times will find it more difficult to do
nordic skiing due to the width of the ski. There
are many adaptations that can be used in order
for nordic skiing to be successful for individu-
als with different disabilities. Some of the most
common populations for nordic skiing are as
follows:
• Amputations
• Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
• Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
• Cognitive Disabilities
• Learning Disabilities
• Spinal Cord Injuries
Muscles used – Quadriceps, Hamstrings, Calves,
Abdominals, Triceps, Biceps, and Shoulders

Ice Climbing is a high risk, unique activity. This
activity is appropriate for many disabilities. The
most common disabilities seen on the ice are:
• Amputations
• Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
• Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
• Cognitive Disabilities
• Learning Disabilities
Muscles used – Forearms, Biceps, Back, Lats,
Abdominals, and Legs (especially calves)

27


strength
Training

Strength training is a great way to get in shape by building muscle. It can be incredibly
rewarding and progress comes quite quickly. Try to focus on for rather than weight to avoid
injury. You will get more out of your workout if you are correctly performing each exercise
rather than going for higher weight.
Try to strength train 3-4 times a week. A good example of a routine would be to complete
back and bicep exercises in one day, chest and triceps exercises on the next day, and a full
body workout on the third day. Taking a rest day where you focus on stretching or cardio will
help to reduce the likelihood of injury.

28


Home Exercises for Strength Training
Set up to do a push up:
• Step 1: When down on the ground, set your hands at a distance
that is slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. Depending on
your strength and experience, your hands should be angled in a
way that feels comfortable to you.
• Step 2: Your feet should be set up in a way that feels right and
comfortable to you. For some, that might be shoulder width
apart. For others, it might be that the feet are touching.
Generally speaking, the wider apart your feet, the more stable
you’ll be for your push ups.
• Step 3: Think of your body as one giant straight line – from the
top of your head down through your heels. Your rear end
shouldn’t be sticking way up in the air or sagging.
• Step 4: Your head should be looking slightly ahead of you, not
straight down.
• Step 5: At the top of your push up, your arms should be straight
and supporting your weight. You’re now ready to do a push up.
Complete one repetition of a push up:
• Step 1: With your arms straight and abs braced, steadily lower
yourself until your elbows are at a 90 degree angle or smaller.
Depending on your level of experience, age, and flexibility, 90
degrees might be the lowest you’re able to go.
• Step 2: Try not to let your elbows go flying way out with each
repetition. Keep them relatively close to your body, and keep
note of when they start to fly out when you get tired.
• Step 3: Once your arms go down to a 90 degree angle, pause
slightly and then push back up until you’re back in the same
position.
Repeat 10 times.

29


Standing Squats:
• Step 1: Start with your feet flat on the
ground shoulder width apart. Place your
hands in front of you to counter-balance
your weight.
• Step 2: Engage your abdominal/core muscles
to stabilize your spine. While keeping your
back straight bend your knees and hips at the
same time finishing in the squatting position.
It is important when squatting to make sure
your knees does not go over your toes and
that you keep you back straight by keeping
your core engaged.
• Step 3: While keeping your abdominal/core
muscles engaged push back up using your
leg muscles and return to the starting
position. Do 3 sets of 10-12 reps each.

30


Forward Lunge:
• Step 1: Start with your feet flat on the ground shoulder width a part. Place your hands on your hips for
this exercise. Engage your abdominal/core muscles to stabilize your spine. While keeping your back
straight take a step out with your right leg finishing in a lunge position. It is important with doing a
lunge to make sure your knee does not go over your toes and that you keep your back straight by
keeping your core engaged.
• Step 3: While keeping your abdominal/core muscles engaged push back up using your leg and core
muscles to return to the starting position.
• Step 4: Do the same thing with your left leg alternating until you have completed 3 sets of 10-12 reps
alternating arms.

Side Lunge:
• Step 1: Start with your feet flat on the ground shoulder width a part. Place your hands on your hips for
this exercise.
• Step 2: Engage your abdominal/core muscles to stabilize your spine. While keeping your back straight
take a step out with our right leg to the side finishing in a side lunge position. It is important with
doing a lunge to make sure your knee does now go over your toe and that you keep back straight and
your core muscles engaged.
• Step 3: While keeping your abdominal/core muscles engaged push back up using your leg and core
muscles to return to the starting position.
• Step 4: Do the same thing with your left leg alternating until you have completed 3 sets of 10-12 reps.

31


Calf Raises:
• Step 1: Start in a standing position with your feet flat on the ground shoulder width apart. Place your
hands on your hips or at your side for this exercise. If you have trouble with balance you can hold onto
a chair, table, etc to help with balance.
• Step 2: Exhale and slowly raise your heels off the floor, allowing your entire body leaning slightly
forward to maintain balance. Do not lose your alignment, especially in the hips and low back. Keep
your knees straight and abdominals strong. Continue rising until your weight is on the balls of your feet
and hold this position for 3 seconds.
• Step 3: Inhale and slowly lower your heels back to the floor. Shift your weight back into your heels and
stand tall.
• Step 4: Continue this process until you have completed 3 sets of 10-12 reps.

Glute Bridge:
• Step 1: Lie on your back on an exercise mat or the floor in a bent knee position with your feet flat on
the floor. Place your feet hip-width apart with the toes facing away from you. Gently contract your
abdominal muscles to flatten your back into the floor. Attempt to maintain this gentle muscle
contraction through the exercise.
• Step 2: Gently exhale. Keep the abdominals engaged and lift your hips up off the floor. Press the heels
into the floor. Stop at the point when your hips begin to cause your back to arch. Hold for 3 seconds
and then lower to the starting position
• Step 3: Continue this process until you have completed 3 sets of 10-12 reps.

32


Upper Body Strength Exercises for the Gym

Pull-ups:
• Step 1: Place your hands slightly wider that shoulder width apart on a pull-up bar.
• Step 2: Focusing on using you lats (latissimus dorsi) to pull your body upwards in a smooth motion until
your chin is above the bar.
• Step 3: Smoothly lower yourself until your elbows are at least at a 90-degree bend. Repeat this
motion until your form is no longer good and your muscles feel fatigued (this varies depending on
strength and weight). Do 3 sets trying to get as many reps as you can.

Back Rows:
• Step 1: With dumbbells lay face-down on a bench with your arms extended to the ground.
• Step 2: Grab a lightweight dumbbell in each hand and pull upwards focusing on pinning your scapulas
together. Hold at the peak for a second.
• Step 3: Exhale and bring them down while being in control. Do 6-15 reps for 3 sets. This can also be
done with a back row machine.

33


Pectoral Fly:
• Step 1: Lay on a bench in the same position as you would for bench press. Using light weights extend
your arms out horizontally from your body.
• Step 2: Smoothly raise your arms upward above your chest until the weights tough each other. Return
to the starting position and repeat 6-15 reps for 3 sets.

Bicep Curls:
• Step 1: Stand with your feet shoulder width apart, holding a dumbbell that is a comfortable weight in
each hand.
• Step 2: Raise the weight upwards bending your arm at your elbow. Keep your upper arm pinned to
your side. Do this exercise with focus on smoothness and control. Avoid straining your back to lift the
weight, and try to focus on not swinging your arm to gain momentum, but rather come to a complete
stop before starting the next rep.
• Step 3: Exhale as you bring the dumbbells back down to the starting position. Do this 6-15 times for 3
sets. There are many variations of curls that can be done in addition to traditional curls. Look up some
others such as preacher curls or hammer curls.

34


Lying Triceps Extension:
• Step 1: Lie down on a flat bench with a lighter weight in your hands.
• Step 2: With your arms extended straight above your chest and the weight held with two hands. Slowly
bend at your elbows so that the weight lowers just above the top of your head and hold for 3 seconds.
• Step 3: Now steadily bring your arms back to the spotting position. The key is to focus on triceps
isolation rather than weight. Repeat for 3 sets of 10-20 repetitions. **This exercise can begin to hurt
your elbows if done improperly or too often. If this happens try to find another triceps exercise that is
easier on your elbows.**
Lower Body Strength Exercises for the Gym
All lower body exercises described for the home can be duplicated in the gym with added weight to increase
difficulty.

35


Thank you for
taking your time to
read the suggested
materials. We look
forward to working

with you at the
adaptive sports
center. We hope you
have a fun and

successful
adventure with us!

36


Regimen created for the
Adaptive Sports Center

by

Robert Guenther
University of Colorado at Boulder

Robyn Perez
SUNY Cortland
Brooke Shinaberry
Eastern Washington University
Vanderbilt University

Special Thanks to
crested butte crossfit
for the use of their facility

Design by Emily Shiraki


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