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Published by City of Winston-Salem, 2019-06-25 12:51:50

2020-2024 WSFC Utilities Strategic Plan

FISCAL YEAR

2020-2024
STRATEGIC




PLAN


Message from
the Director




Providing safe drinking water, treating wastewater, and managing
solid waste has always been the foundation of Winston-Salem/
Forsyth County Utilities. Our focus on technology and innovation,
reliable infrastructure, stewardship of the environment, and meeting
the needs of our customers and stakeholders drives our commitment
to be a more effective and resilient organization.

Achieving our mission is complex and relies on:
• Support from the City of Winston-Salem, Forsyth County, and the
WSFC Utility Commission
• A team of employees dedicated to executing our mission
• Extensive, modern, and well-maintained infrastructure
• Efficient operations
• Satisfied customers and engaged stakeholders

WSFC Utilities has developed a new strategic plan to help us
pursue a well-defined, positive vision for the next five years. The
plan described and presented in this document lays out a path to
continued future success.

I would like to express my appreciation for the support and
contributions of the many employees who participated in this
strategic planning effort, including those who provided initial input on
direction, those who participated in goal teams to define success and
develop actionable strategies, and those who served on our Core
Strategic Planning Team to craft our future direction. Ultimately, it will
be our employees who will implement this plan and I am very proud
of our progress so far.


Courtney Driver, P.E.
Director
Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Utilities


FISCAL YEAR 2020-2024 STRATEGIC PLAN 01










Introduction






Overview

Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Utilities initiated a
strategic planning process in July 2018 to create
an organizational vision and a framework for
guiding our utility into the future. The strategic
framework presented in this document will help
guide investments, allocate resources and provide
a structure for annual organizational progress
review. This will assure that long-term goals and
objectives are achieved.
01 Introduction


Overview Process
Process A structured process was used to develop this stra-
tegic plan. A Core Strategic Planning Team of WSFC
Utilities staff helped draft a Project Charter with the
following goals:
04 Community Profile • Be achievable, realistic and feasible
• Ensure alignment of the organization internally
Industry Trends and Local Context and externally
Strengths, Opportunities, Aspirations, • Be results-oriented, with defined outcomes to
and Results support continued focus on results
• Build organizational support and buy-in
• Communicate both the process and the desired
18 Strategic Direction • Facilitate seamless WSFC Utility Commission
outcomes
Vision
Mission engagement
Values These stakeholder groups were engaged to
Goals accomplish the Project Charter goals:
Measures and Strategies • Employees, through participation in interviews,
Strategic Framework an online survey, employee focus groups, goal
teams, and presentations
• Utility Commission members, through a
dedicated workshop, and presentation of the
24 Communication • External stakeholders, through a series of
draft strategic plan
interviews and surveys
• Senior management, through interviews, active
25 Implementation participation in strategic planning workshops
as members of the core team, and goal team
activities






Cover photo: Sides Road Water Tank


02 WINSTON-SALEM/FORSYTH COUNTY UTILITIES















An evaluation of

Winston-Salem/Forsyth


County Utilities was

documented through:










Discussion of governance, community

demographics, and other influences







Consideration of key industry trends
and their potential impact







Analysis of WSFC Utilities’ Strengths,
Opportunities, Aspirations, and Results


Hanes Mill Road Landfill 03
























The Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Utility
Commission was formed in 1976 to provide
a unified water and sewer system that was
operationally and financially efficient. Governance
of solid waste disposal was added in 1990. The
Utility Commission is an 11-member appointed
body that oversees the publicly-operated water,
wastewater and solid waste facilities that serve the
City of Winston-Salem and Forsyth County. As the
policy-making board, the Utility Commission has
the authority and responsibility to set rates and
provide for operational improvements.





































Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Utility Commission
November 2018


04 WINSTON-SALEM/FORSYTH COUNTY UTILITIES

Community







Profile















WSFC Utilities provides
water, wastewater and
solid waste services for the
City of Winston-Salem and

Forsyth County, as well
as wholesale services to
adjacent counties in North
Carolina's Triad region.



























Winston-Salem is

home to six colleges
and universities,

which help create a

dynamic atmosphere
in the city.



Wait Chapel, Wake Forest University
Photo credit: Kevin Eby


2019-2023 STRATEGIC PLANAL YEAR 2020-2024 STRATEGIC PLAN
FISC 05
R.A. Thomas Water Treatment Plant and Winston-Salem State University
The City of Winston-Salem

Winston-Salem is known as the "City of the Arts
and Innovation" for its dedication to fine arts,
theater and technological research. The area’s
unique blend of historical charm and diverse job
opportunities makes it a popular destination to
live and work. In addition to a four-season climate
and mountains or beaches within a day’s drive,
the City’s urban neighborhoods, including the
Downtown Arts District, provide a draw for visitors
and new residents. Winston-Salem has become
known as a hub for medical, nanotech and biotech
research. The Wake Forest Innovation Quarter, a
mixed-use site located on 240 acres in downtown
Winston-Salem, is home to over 60 companies.
Additionally, the City hosts start-up business
incubators for entrepreneurs, and the City's six
colleges and universities create a diverse and
dynamic community.



Forsyth County

In addition to the City of Winston-Salem, Forsyth
County includes the cities and towns of Bethania, Wake Forest Water Tank
Clemmons, Kernersville, King, Lewisville, Rural
Hall, Tobaccoville, and Walkertown. Forsyth
County experienced a 23% increase in population
between 2000-2017, according to the US Census
Bureau. The most recent census estimates for
the City of Winston-Salem put population at just
under 245,000, and for Forsyth County at 376,000
residents. The Triad Business Journal reports that
metropolitan area growth is expected to continue
over the next 25 years. With urban growth
comes the need to expand excellent municipal
services. WSFC Utilities has the important task of
maintaining quality while scaling up services to
accommodate growth.


1 in = 20,000 ft



Surry County Stokes County
Rockingham
County
WSFC Utilities

maintains operations

while meeting or
surpassing state and

federal environmental Tobaccoville Rural Hall

regulations. ! !
£ ¤
311
£ ¤
158


Bethania
Yadkin County !



Walkertown
!


Forsyth County
Kernersville
!
Lewisville Winston-Salem
! !

§ ¨ ¦
40
£ ¤
421


§ ¨ ¦ Guilford
40
County
£ ¤
52
Clemmons
!





Sewer Service Area

Water Service Area

Davie County Davidson County
¯










Water & Wastewater

Service Areas


1 in = 20,000 ft
07

Surry County Stokes County
Rockingham
County











Tobaccoville Rural Hall
! !
1 in = 20,000 ft
£ ¤
311
158
Surry County Stokes County £ ¤ WSFC Utilities Profile
Rockingham
1 in = 20,000 ft County
Bethania Operating under the governance of the Utility
Yadkin County Surry County Stokes County Rockingham Commission, WSFC Utilities' 380 employees
!
County serve Forsyth County and provide wholesale
service to parts of surrounding counties.

Tobaccoville Rural Hall Walkertown WSFC Utilities maintains operations while
! ! ! meeting or surpassing state and federal envi-
£ ¤
311
£ ¤ ronmental regulations, ensuring that the City
158
Forsyth County Rural Hall and County remain safe and beautiful places
Tobaccoville
!
Bethania ! Kernersville to live.
311
Yadkin County ! £ ¤ ! £ ¤
158
Lewisville Winston-Salem Walkertown WSFC Utilities operates and maintains three
! Yadkin County ! Bethania ! water treatment plants, two wastewater
!
treatment plants and a collection/distribution
Forsyth County § ¨ ¦ system that includes 4,107 miles of water and
40
£ ¤ Walkertown Kernersville sewer lines. The water supply relies on two
421
!
!
Lewisville Winston-Salem sources: the Yadkin River and Salem Lake.
Forsyth County
§ ¨ ¦ ! ! Kernersville Guilford The 215-mile Yadkin River is the principle
40
County
hydrological artery of central North Carolina,
!
40
£ ¤ £ ¤ § ¨ ¦
52
421
Lewisville Winston-Salem and one of the largest in the state.
! !
Clemmons § ¨ ¦ Guilford
40
40
! £ ¤ £ ¤ § ¨ ¦ County The Solid Waste Division is responsible for
52
421
Clemmons managing two landfills, two yard waste col-
! § ¨ ¦ Guilford lection sites and several closed landfill sites.
40
County
£ ¤ The Division is also responsible for recycling
52
Clemmons Sewer Service Area scrap tires and appliances, and administering
! Sewer Service Area a program to divert household hazardous and
Water Service Area electronic waste from the landfill.
Water Service Area
Water Service Area
Davie County Davie County Davidson County Davidson County Sewer Service Area
Sewer Service Area
¯
¯
Water Service Area
Davie County Davidson County
Water & Wastewater ¯
Service Areas
Water & Wastewater
Water & Wastewater
Service Areas Service Areas


08 WINSTON-SALEM/FORSYTH COUNTY UTILITIES









Industry Trends







& Local Context












The services provided by
WSFC Utilites are central
to assuring the sustained
vitality of the region. To
achieve continued success,
we must address several
significant national and state-
wide trends as we work to
implement this strategic plan.
These include meeting future
regulatory requirements,
changes in usage patterns,
and growing concerns about
the impact of global climate
Salem Lake Dam
change. These challenges
must be understood within
the context of the City of
Winston-Salem and Forsyth
County to adequately plan
for the future.


Key trends, expectations
for the future, and potential
responses, many of which are
embodied in this strategic
plan, are presented on the
following pages.






Hanes Mill Road Landfill


FISCAL YEAR 2020-2024 STRATEGIC PLAN 09







TREND NO.
Population 01








Current State and Expectations for the Future
The population of Forsyth County has experienced significant growth in recent
decades, and has seen an increase of more than 25,000 people since 2010,
which represents a 7.4% population increase. Downtown revitalization efforts will
continue to bring a new supply of repurposed spaces, and residential construction
is increasing in the County, which may increase demand for services.

Potential Responses
Continue looking for opportunities to support economic development
and optimize support services. Increase outreach and public engagement
opportunities to educate citizens with "Can the Grease/No Wipes in Pipes" and
conservation campaigns.






Political TREND NO.



Environment 02







Current State and Expectations for the Future
The Utility Commission enjoys a good working relationship with the Winston-Salem
City Council and Forsyth County Commissioners, as it navigates the complexities of
serving multiple jurisdictions with a variety of service needs.

Hanes Mill Road Landfill’s life expectancy is another 15 to 20 years, and expansion
would likely have political and community impacts. The ability to create ordinances
around waste disposal has been affected by changes to NC General Statutes, and
WSFC Utilities may face increased competition from private haulers.

Potential Responses

Evaluate water and wastewater rates through a cost-of-service study and explore
options to increase landfill capacity over the next five years. Ensure transparent
communication through ongoing engagement with the Utility Commission and the
public. Continue the water and wastewater rate simplification process to position
the organization as a preferred partner for other utilities in the region.


10 WINSTON-SALEM/FORSYTH COUNTY UTILITIES








TREND NO.
Regulations 03








Current State and Expectations for the Future
Regulations pertaining to the services provided by WSFC Utilities are becoming more strict,
including regulations for wastewater discharge, potable water treatment and surface and
groundwater protection. Meeting these Environmental Protection Agency requirements and
funding other compliance actions will continue to increase expenses.
Potential Responses

Continue focusing on proactive compliance for all the services we provide. Continue to
improve facilities to meet changing regulatory requirements and engage in the regulatory
process at the local, state and federal levels.








TREND NO.
Workforce 04








Current State and Expectations for the Future
Staffing levels are lean in some areas and WSFC Utilities is focused on ensuring its ability
to attract and retain qualified employees. Many senior staff members are at retirement
age and different generations have different work preferences and values. The City’s
compensation package must compete with private companies. Given our need to maintain
regulatory compliance, WSFC Utilities must ensure that trained staff can successfully maintain
infrastructure systems and facilities.


Potential Responses
Focus on developing a specific hiring strategy and elevate the workforce issue through
strategic planning efforts. Improve internal and external communication by participating in
high school and college career days, which can help grow a recruitment pipeline. Better
articulate recruitment needs and review job descriptions to ensure that candidates have
appropriate skills and qualifications. Developing a succession plan and supporting career
ladders to sustain the workforce. Consider opportunities for employee rewards and
recognition.


FISCAL YEAR 2020-2024 STRATEGIC PLAN 11



































































WSFC Utilities is continuing


to focus on proactive P.W. Swann Water

Treatment Plant
regulatory compliance for



all the services it provides.


12 WINSTON-SALEM/FORSYTH COUNTY UTILITIES






























































WSFC Utilities is an active


participant in regional



conversations regarding
Archie Elledge
Wastewater Treatment Plant
holistic water management.


FISCAL YEAR 2020-2024 STRATEGIC PLAN 13


TREND NO.
Technology 05








Current State and Expectations for the Future

WSFC Utilities uses technology to support all aspects of operations, including
ensuring regulatory compliance, meeting customer needs, and improving its
infrastructure. Technology is constantly evolving. WSFC Utilities has a team of
dedicated information systems staff with primary concentrations in Geographic
Information Systems (GIS), Computerized Maintenance Management Systems
(CMMS), Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA), business analysis, and
data management. Several initiatives are planned, including Advanced Metering
Infrastructure (AMI), Enterprise Integration Platform implementation, and a GIS
architecture upgrade, as well as implementation of data management, performance
management, and advanced analytics programs. Customer expectations will
continue to increase, and technology will help WSFC Utilities to meet those
expectations.


Potential Responses

Ensure that as technology becomes more integrated, redundancies are in place
for continuous operations. Focus on business intelligence outcomes to keep data
useable and useful. Commit to systems training and implementation activities for
new technology.




Total Water TREND NO.



Management 06







Current State and Expectations for the Future

Total Water Management refers to the holistic management of water, wastewater and
stormwater for a given region. While WSFC Utilities manages water and wastewater,
stormwater activities occur through the City's Stormwater/Erosion Control Division.
WSFC Utilities works closely with these colleagues and also participates in several
regional organizations monitoring the latest research on emerging contaminants.
Additional resources and expertise are shared collaboratively through membership
in the Yadkin-Pee Dee Water Management Group and the Yadkin-Pee Dee River
Basin Association.


Potential Responses

Continue to work collaboratively through regional and state partnerships to share
ideas with peer utilities and seek opportunities to increase involvement in water
management.


14 WINSTON-SALEM/FORSYTH COUNTY UTILITIES







Customer TREND NO.


Expectations 07








Current State and Expectations for the Future
While our services generally meet or exceed customer expectations, some customer
service- and quality-related complaints are to be expected. To help mitigate
these complaints, our website is being redesigned to support information sharing
and customer convenience. The logo and brand have also been redesigned to
help raise community awareness. Customer engagement preferences will likely
continue to change and expectations will increase; however, AMI and other service
enhancements will allow customers to manage their water usage more actively.


Potential Responses

Proactively manage customer expectations and conduct additional outreach and
educational activities to better understand consumer needs. Maintain a focus on
enhancing the customer experience through improved service levels.






Financial TREND NO.



Constraints 08







Current State and Expectations for the Future
Although financially sound, more resources will be necessary to support new
initiatives, compliance requirements, and infrastructure renewal. These investments
will necessitate issuing debt over the next five years, which will likely require
increased rates.
Potential Responses

Continue to engage the Utility Commission and City Finance Department to ensure
that financial resources are sufficient to meet regulatory requirements and support
service demands.


15


































































WSFC Utilities is conducting



public outreach and
Archie Elledge Wastewater
Treatment Plant
education events to raise


community awareness


16 WINSTON-SALEM/FORSYTH COUNTY UTILITIES





Energy and


Environmental TREND NO.


Impact 09








Current State and Expectations for the Future

WSFC Utilities has focused on renewable energy at solid waste and wastewater
facilities where methane gas production is either used on-site or sold to offset other
energy costs. We currently treat an average of 32 million gallons of wastewater daily
and ensure that effluent discharged into the Yadkin-Pee Dee River Basin meets all
regulatory requirements. All of our environmental control systems are designed to
protect surface and groundwater, as well as air quality.


Potential Responses

Focus on efficient operations, where feasible, to optimize energy. Capitalize on
other opportunities to mitigate environmental impact and increase sustainability.







Increased TREND NO.



Risk Profile 10







Current State and Expectations for the Future

The City's risk management staff works closely with WSFC Utilities, and our new
dedicated communications team is focused on improving how customers and
stakeholders are notified of service interruptions. Cyber security is a global concern
and our service area is susceptible to natural disasters such as hurricanes, but we
have a great track record for emergency response and there are excellent action
plans in place.


Potential Responses

Conduct a vulnerability assessment. Be more proactive by revisiting emergency
response plans, documenting contingencies, and focusing on cyber security.


FISCAL YEAR 2020-2024 STRATEGIC PLAN 17




Hanes Mill Road Landfill

An evaluation of Strengths provides
input to the development of a Mission
that builds upon what the organization
does extremely well. Strengths include:

• Customer service
• Leadership and governance
• Resources – both water supply and
financial
• Employee dedication, knowledge,
experience and expertise
• Product quality




Identification of Opportunities helps the
goal teams and the core team develop
Goals to identify and explore innovative
approaches to meet future needs.
Opportunities fell into the following
categories:
• Product Quality
• Workforce
• Infrastructure
• Technology and Innovation
• Customers and Stakeholders
• Financial Viability




Discussion of Aspirations focuses on
the expectations or hopes of internal
and external stakeholders to inform the
Vision. WSFC Utilities' most compelling
Strengths aspirations include:

• Proactively protecting public health
and the environment while maintaining
Opportunities • Being an employer of choice
affordability

• Leveraging existing and new
technology to drive efficiency
Aspirations • Being recognized as an industry leader




Results Agreeing on Results leads to
determining the Measures of strategic
progress. Some of the most significant
indicators for strategic progress include:
• Regulatory Compliance
Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Utilities used a • Customer and Stakeholder Satisfaction
Strengths, Opportunities, Aspirations and Results • Employee Recruitment and Retention
• Infrastructure Reliability
analysis as a foundation for its strategic plan. • Financial Strength


18 WINSTON-SALEM/FORSYTH COUNTY UTILITIES






Archie Elledge Wastewater Treatment Plant wins Operational and Maintenance Excellence Award

















































Strategic Direction








This strategic plan serves as a blueprint for future decision making. The Strategic
Plan contains WSFC Utilities’ Vision, Mission Statement, Values, Goals, Measures and
Strategies to address current and future challenges.


This plan provides a structure by which annual reviews can be accomplished to ensure
that goals and measures are tracked and retain their relevance over time. By laying out a
course of action, this plan represents a disciplined process for making the fundamental
decisions that will shape our future.


FISCAL YEAR 2020-2024 STRATEGIC PLAN 19











OUR VISION


Ultimately, implementation of this plan will enable us to achieve the desired
future state articulated in our Vision:

A top-performing utility proactively safeguarding public health and the
environment through a culture of continuous improvement.







OUR MISSION



Our Mission describes our purpose and role within the service area:

Our dedicated team provides quality water, wastewater, and solid waste
services to the region through responsible use of resources.






OUR VALUES



Deeply held beliefs, norms and qualities drive the day-to-day activities that
shape our Values:

Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Utilities is committed to meeting the
needs of the region through:










Integrity Dedication Quality Stewardship

Being open To our customers Providing safe and Of our environment
and honest and our employees reliable services and public health


20




Goals










Our goals are driven by

the factors most critical

to our future success.










Meter Services






Product Quality - To ensure the quality of our services by proactively managing
and safely operating our systems

Drawing on a history of utilizing our top-quality water supply from the Yadkin
River and Salem Lake, we are dedicated to meeting and surpassing regulatory
standards, going above and beyond to provide the best service to customers.







Workforce - To recruit, develop, and retain a dedicated team prepared to provide
water, wastewater and solid waste services today and tomorrow
Ensuring that employees are recognized for their hard work and dedication is
paramount. We strive to reward excellence while building a pipeline of expert
professionals who will ensure that the organization continues to safeguard
public health and the environment.






Infrastructure - To proactively maintain and improve our infrastructure while
ensuring compliance and sufficient capacity
As regulatory requirements evolve and critical infrastructure ages, we will be
prepared with proactive and efficient management.


FISCAL YEAR 2020-2024 STRATEGIC PLAN 21









Technology and Innovation - To develop innovative and customer-focused
solutions by harnessing technology and process improvement
Technological innovation is an integral part of assuring success as a resilient
service provider. We are committed to technology solutions for all branches of
the organization, from customer service to process optimization.










Customers and Stakeholders - To effectively communicate, engage and respond
to the needs of our customers and stakeholders

We plan to increase customer and stakeholder awareness and engagement
through meeting and exceeding expectations and proactive community outreach.









Financial Viability - To enhance financial stability while ensuring product and
service quality
We are committed to thorough evaluation of financial strategies and long-term
financial planning, ensuring that financial resources are utilized efficiently and
responsibly.

















MEASURES AND STRATEGIES


Progress towards goals must be assessed through various measures, or quantifiable
benchmarks. Measures inform the success of strategies—the specific approaches used to
achieve each goal. These critical elements of the Strategic Plan, as well as the Vision, Mission,
Values and Goals, are presented in the strategic framework on the following pages.


STRATEGIC Goals

FRAMEWORK




PRODUCT QUALITY
Vision To ensure the quality of our services by proactively
managing and safely operating our systems

A top-performing utility proactively
safeguarding public health and the
environment through a culture of
continuous improvement.


WORKFORCE
To recruit, develop, and retain a dedicated team
Mission prepared to provide water, wastewater, and solid
waste services today and tomorrow


Our dedicated team provides quality
water, wastewater, and solid waste
services to the region through
responsible use of resources.
INFRASTRUCTURE
To proactively maintain and improve our
infrastructure while ensuring compliance and
sufficient capacity
Values



Winston-Salem/Forsyth County
Utilities is committed to meeting the
needs of the region, through:
TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION
To develop innovative and customer-focused
Integrity
Being open and honest solutions by harnessing technology and process
improvements
Dedication
To our customers
and our employees

Quality
Providing safe
and reliable services
CUSTOMERS AND STAKEHOLDERS
Stewardship To effectively communicate, engage, and
Of our environment respond to the needs of our customers and
and public health stakeholders









FINANCIAL VIABILITY
To enhance financial stability while ensuring
product and service quality


Measures Strategies






• Sanitary Sewer Overflows per 100 Miles of Pipe 1. Increase proactive engagement with regulatory groups
• Reported Violations of Any Water, Wastewater, 2. Enhance operational programs with a focus on quality assurance
or Solid Waste Disposal Permit or Standard 3. Expand the use of business analytics focused on product quality
• Technical Service Complaints per 1,000 enhancement
Accounts
• Average Response Time to Sanitary Sewer
Overflow





• Retention Rate 4. Develop a program to reward job-related certifications
• Number of Employees with Certifications 5. Develop an enhanced employee recognition program
Above What is Required for their Positions 6. Develop relevant and progressive training programs
7. Develop a structured program for succession planning and knowledge
transfer






• Average Daily Water Treatment Capacity as a 8. Develop and regularly update Master Plans
Percentage of Permitted Capacity 9. Expand the use of business analytics focused on infrastructure and
• Average Daily Wastewater Treatment Capacity process data to enhance capital investment
as a Percentage of Permitted Capacity 10. Increase public outreach related to infrastructure operations and capital
• Projected Remaining Life of Landfills projects
• Water Main Breaks per 100 Miles of Pipe
• Percent of Sewer Lines Cleaned Annually





• Percent of Utilities Information Management 11. Complete and implement the Utilities Information Management Master
Master Plan Completed Plan
• Number of Employee Innovations Proposed, 12. Develop and advance a continuous improvement and innovations
Reviewed, and Selected for Implementation program









• Number of Public Outreach Events Held
13. Define and achieve enhanced customer experience service levels
• Number of Website Hits
14. Expand stakeholder outreach and engagement
• Number of Customer Inquiries Received
through CityLink






• Percent of Targeted Cash Reserves
15. Identify and communicate financial needs
• Total Debt Service Coverage Ratio
16. Leverage improved data to enhance long-term financial planning
• Bond Ratings
17. Evaluate and consider rate simplification
18. Develop a process for evaluating regionalization opportunities


24 WINSTON-SALEM/FORSYTH COUNTY UTILITIES








ENHANCED COMMUNICATIONS WILL

BE A MAJOR INITIATIVE THROUGHOUT

THE ORGANIZATION TO ENSURE THAT


ALL TEAMS AND INDIVIDUALS ARE

WORKING TOWARDS THE ULTIMATE


VISION AND MISSION.








Customer Service










Communication









WSFC Utilities is committed to improving internal and external communications.

Effective communication is critical not only for implementation of the strategic plan, but also
for the overall success of the organization. The issue of communication, which surfaced
in the stakeholder input process, cuts across various goals. As indicated in the strategic
framework, communication will be enhanced through the following efforts:


• Facilitate internal knowledge transfer through an employee succession planning program
and employee training programs
• Increase awareness and appreciation of infrastructure by updating our Master Plans and
increasing public outreach related to capital projects
• Increase the number of public-facing events to boost stakeholder and citizen engagement
• Improve organizational culture by recognizing and celebrating employee successes
• Clearly communicate financial requirements to ensure operational and human resource
needs are met


FISCAL YEAR 2020-2024 STRATEGIC PLAN 25





Implementation









The goals, measures and strategies contain a series of initiatives and projects that, when
implemented, will move WSFC Utilities toward achievement of our desired outcomes.
Careful attention and focus on implementation is essential to achieving strategic

success. These measures are aligned with open measures and key performance
indicators monitored by the City Manager's Office and will be reported annually to the
Utility Commision.








Leverage Goal Teams: The goal teams are knowledgeable, energized and committed
to the implementation of the Strategies for their respective Goals; therefore, they will
be instrumental in implementation planning and ultimate implementation process.
Specifically, goal teams will:
• Draft implementation plans for each strategy that will include:
> Tasks necessary for implementation
> Assigned individuals or groups
> Due dates for key tasks
> Resources required
• Monitor implementation progress
• Report on implementation progress to senior management




Involve Senior Management: During the implementation process, the goal teams will
communicate with senior management concerning issues such as:
• Implementation progress
• Resources required (people, money, equipment, etc.)
• Strategies, which after initial implementation efforts, may require updates
• Goals achieved




Report to Utility Commission: Senior management is accountable to the Utility
Commission for implementation of the approved strategic plan and achievement of the
stated goals and objectives. Accordingly, senior management will periodically update
Commissioners on progress, achievements, and issues related to the strategic plan.


STRATEGIC PLANNING IS A WAY

OF THINKING THAT GUIDES AN


ANALYSIS OF THE PRESENT AND

HELPS CREATE A VISION OF

THE FUTURE FOR LONG-TERM


STRATEGIC SUCCESS.


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