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Published by andrew, 2022-05-17 18:06:39

Executive Committee Meeting Book

Executive Committee Meeting Book Flip boook

BOARD OF DIRECTORS CALENDARS

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETINGS

FRIDAYS, 7:30AM UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

MAY JUN
20 17

JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC

15 19 16 21 18 5

MONDAY, 4PM

BOARD MEETINGS

FRIDAYS, 7:30AM UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

MAY JUN

27 28

AT DOUBLETREE

AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC

26 23 28 NO MEETING 6

10:00AM TUESDAY, 4PM

EXCEPTIONS THAT CHANGE BOARD MONTHLY MEETINGS TO SAME DAY
6/28 - INCLUSIVE SUPPLY CHAIN PROFESSIONALS LUNCHEON (11:30 AM)
9/28 - INCLUSIVE SUPPLY CHAIN PROFESSIONALS LUNCHEON (11:30 AM)
11/18 - E AWARDS
12/6 - ANNUAL MEETING (5:30 PM)

May 20, 2022
7:30 am – 8:30 am
Location: Zoom Meeting

Attendees: Bonnie Clinton – Margo Posey – Brandon Rakestraw – Rob Simpson -
Monica Menzel – David Sanchez – Pamela Nelson – Terri Quinton –
Don McNeely

Item #1 Call to Order Bonnie
Chair Remarks

Item #2 April Minutes Monica Menzel

Item #3 April Financials David & James

Item #4 Reports Jeni
Item #5 Pam
Item #6 ISCWG Margo
MBEIC
President Report

Item #7 Council Update
1% Plus.

Additional Instruction:

1% Plus Metrics Working Group

BTTBU

Mentoring Working Group

Marketing Working Group

Membership Working Group

Dallas Fort Worth Minority Supplier Development Council, Inc
Statement of Revenue and Expenses

For the One Month Ended April 30, 2022

ACTUAL BUDGET VARIANCE
TO

BUDGET
FAV/(UNFAV)

REVENUE: 9,250 7,000 -
Corporate Memberships - New 2,250
Corporate Memberships- Renewal 18,924 20,133
Interest Income -
NMSDC National Dues 6,310 6,000 (1,209)
NMSDC National Compliance BONUS 20,130 18,500
MBE Certification Fees-New-Local -
MBE Certification Fees-Renewal-Local 4,600 4,000 310
MBE Out of Region Subscriber Fees-Renewal 1,050 850 1,630
MBE Out of Region Subscriber Fees-New - 600
Expedite Fees 700 200
Education Scholarship 700
Donation 60,964 56,483
Uncategorized -
-
TOTAL REVENUE -
4,481

EXPENSES: - - -
NMSDC Functions 15,000 15,000 -
Software Maintenance 16,016 (8,600)
Office Expense 7,416 (4,302)
Telecommunication 5,552 1,250 (532)
Credit Card Processing 2,032 1,500 (2,495)
Board Installation 2,495 -
Cartage/Delivery - -
Outsourcing 6,250 - -
Lease-Office Space 6,668 6,250 490
Lease-Equipment/Other 1,260 6,668 1,500
Insurance/Taxes 1,750 3,290
Professional Fees - 1,500 (704)
Temporary Services 2,960 6,250 15,716
Salary 4,870 4,166 4,363
32,200 47,916
TOTAL EXPENSES 95,303 99,666

NET CURRENT YEAR REVENUE/(LOSS) (34,339) (43,183)

TOTAL SPECIAL EVENTS REVENUE/(LOSS) 81,058 30,000

TOTAL CURRENT MONTH NET REVENUE/(LOS 46,719 (13,183)

YourControllerPlus
5/16/2022
5:06 PM

Dallas Fort Worth Minority Supplier Development Council, Inc
Statement of Revenue and Expenses

For the One Month Ended April 30, 2022

ACTUAL BUDGET VARIANCE
TO

BUDGET
FAV/(UNFAV)

TOTAL CURRENT YEAR NET REVENUE/(LOSS 46,719 (13,183) 13,000
-
PRIOR YEAR PAYMENTS 13,000 -
Prior Year Revenue 13,000 - 13,000
Prior Year Expense 59,719 -
(13,183) 13,000
TOTAL PRIOR YEAR INCOME/(LOSS)

TOTAL NET REVENUE

Notes:

YourControllerPlus
5/16/2022
5:06 PM

Dallas Fort Worth Minority Supplier Development Council, Inc
Statement of Revenue and Expenses

For the Four Month Ended April 30, 2022

VARIANCE 2022 2021
TO
ACTUAL BUDGET NUMBER NUMBER
BUDGET
FAV/(UNFAV)

REVENUE: 6,250 22,000 6,250 18 11
Corporate Memberships - New 36,500 14,500 45
Corporate Memberships- Renewal 80,532
Interest Income 150 150
NMSDC National Dues 85,341 14,000 4,809
NMSDC National Performance BONUS 64,883 54,000 64,883
MBE Certification Fees-New-Local 25,220 11,220
MBE Certification Fees-Renewal-Local 83,760 3,500 29,760
MBE Out of Region Subscriber Fees-Renewal 1,000 5,400
MBE Out of Region Subscriber Fees-New 8,900
Expedite Fees 1,970 970
Education Scholarship 700
Donation 700
Uncategorized
3,395 - -
TOTAL REVENUE 317,069 175,032 3,395
142,037
EXPENSES:
NMSDC Functions 15,000 15,000 - (1)
Software Maintenance 43,987 46,400 - (2)
Office Expense 11,596 2,413
Telecommunication 5,000 (6,596)
Credit Card Processing 5,863 6,000 137
Board Installation 21,151 (20,651)
Cartage/Delivery 500 -
Outsourcing -
Lease-Office Space 25,000 25,000 5,000
Lease-Equipment/Other 21,672 26,672 872
Insurance/Taxes 6,000
Professional Fees 6,128 7,000 7,246
Temporary Services 6,000 97
Salary 17,754 25,000 41,993
20,903 21,000 36,511
TOTAL EXPENSES 149,673 191,666
338,727 375,238 -
NET YEAR END REVENUE/(LOSS)
(21,658) (200,206)
TOTAL SPECIAL EVENTS REVENUE/(LOSS)
97,511 145,000
TOTAL YEAR END NET REVENUE/(LOSS)
75,853 (55,206)
NOTES:
(1) A T & T Network Bandwith upgrade 10M to
150M
(2) Westin venue costs plus escalated food
cost, expected Inkind.

YourControllerPlus
5/16/2022
5:06 PM

Dallas Fort Worth Minority Supplier Development Council, Inc
Statement of Revenue and Expenses

For the Four Month Ended April 30, 2022

ACTUAL BUDGET VARIANCE
TO

BUDGET
FAV/(UNFAV)

TOTAL CURRENT YEAR NET REVENUE/(LOSS 75,853 (55,206) -

PRIOR YEAR PAYMENTS

Prior Year Revenue 17,800 - 17,800
Prior Year Expense 14,191 - 14,191

-

TOTAL PRIOR YEAR INCOME/(LOSS) 3,609 - 3,609

TOTAL NET REVENUE 79,462 (55,206) 3,609

Notes:

YourControllerPlus
5/16/2022
5:06 PM

Dallas Fort Worth Minority Supplier Development Council, Inc
Statement of Revenue and Expenses

For the Four Month Ended April 30, 2022

REVENUE: ACTUAL FULL YEAR 2022 VARIANCE 2021 (1)
Corporate Memberships - New YTD FORECAST APPROVED BUDGET ACTUAL
Corporate Memberships- Renewal
Interest Income April 30, 2022 50,000 BUDGET TO AS
NMSDC National Dues 166,000 FORECAST 12/31/2021
NMSDC National Performance BONUS 6,250 50,000 FAV/(UNFAV)
MBE Certification Fees - New-Local 36,500 - 166,000 59,750
MBE Certification Fees - Renewal-Local 221,600 - 100,250
MBE Subscriber Fees-Renewal 150 - -
MBE Subscriber Fees-New 85,341 216,900 241,600 - 636
Expedite Fees 64,883 70,000 (20,000) 287,841
Uncategorized 25,220 17,000 216,900 -
83,760 11,000 70,000 - 50,310
TOTAL REVENUE 4,500 17,000 - 277,360
8,900 11,000 -
EXPENSES 1,970 757,000 4,500 - 80,330
NMSDC Functions - 22,600
Software Maintenance 700 777,000
Office Expense 3,395 (20,000) 8,570
Telecommunication 317,069 4,900
Board Installation 1,875
Credit Card Processing 894,422
Cartage/Delivery
Outsourcing 15,000 14,000 14,000 - 460 (2)
Lease-Office Space 43,987 15,000 15,000 - 15,000 (3)
Lease-Equipment/Other 11,596 89,000 89,000 - 95,670
Insurance/Taxes 21,151 18,500 15,000 (3,500) 13,752
Professional Fees (9,000)
Temporary Services 5,863 9,500 500 - 0
Salary 18,000 18,000 - 18,844
25,000 -
TOTAL EXPENSES 21,672 500 500 - 0
75,000 75,000 - 60,000
NET CURRENT YEAR REVENUE/(LOSS) 6,128 95,000 95,000 - 77,477
21,000 21,000 - 15,174
17,754 18,000 18,000 - 17,748
20,903 75,000 75,000 - 69,650
149,673 50,000 50,000 59,587
575,000 575,000 (12,500) 500,339
338,727
1,073,500 1,061,000 (32,500) 943,701
(21,658)
(316,500) (284,000) (49,279)

TOTAL SPECIAL EVENTS REVENUE/(LOSS) 97,511 308,375 284,000 24,375 275,734
TOTAL CURRENT YEAR NET REVENUE/(LOSS) 75,853 (8,125) - (8,125) 226,455

PRIOR YEAR PAYMENTS 17,800 - - - 38,040
Prior Year Revenue 14,191 (2,040)
Prior Year Expense 3,609 - - - (40,080)
(8,125) - (8,125)
TOTAL PRIOR YEAR REVENUE/(LOSS) 79,462 186,375

TOTAL NET REVENUE

Notes:
Forecast
(1) Based on what we are tracking at this point, year end
will result is $14,000 decrease, however, given all
indication from conversation with NMSDC, lowering the
Forecast by $20,000 is prudent
(2) AT&T 5G conversion

(2) As a result of cost of venue and escalating food costs.

YourControllerPlus
5/16/2022
5:06 PM

Dallas Fort Worth Minority Supplier Development Council, Inc
Statement of Revenue and Expenses

For the One Month Ended April 30, 2022

For the One Month Period Ended April 30, 2022 Golf Classic Hard Hat Annual MBEIC Quarterly Supply ACCESS Top Total
Meeting Chain Golf
Awards
Banquet Professionals
Luncheon

Funds Received 4,505.00 60.00 - 78,531.00 83,096.00 -
Event fees - --
Grants - -
Discount Packages -
Accounts Receivable - --
-
Total funds received - - 4,505.00 - 60.00 - 78,531.00 - 83,096.00
Disbursements 285.00 -
Event expense 285.00 - - --

Total disbursements (285.00) 1,427.00 326.00 2,038.00
Excess Funds Over
-
Disbursements
- - - 1,427.00 - 326.00 - 2,038.00

- 4,505.00 - (1,367.00) - 78,205.00 - 81,058.00 -
-

YourControllerPlus
5/16/2022
5:06 PM

Dallas Fort Worth Minority Supplier Development Council, Inc
Statement of Revenue and Expenses

For the Four Month Ended April 30, 2022

For the Four Month Period Ended April 30, 2022 Awards Golf Classic Hard Hat Annual MBEIC Quarterly Supply ACCESS Top Total MBDA MBDA CARES CRR
Banquet Meeting Chain Golf 1/1/2021- 7/1/2021- 1/1/2021- 7/1/2021-
2022 FORECAST 308,375.00 6/30/2021 04/30/2022 6/30/2021 04/30/2022
2022 ORIGINAL BUDGET Professionals
Funds Received Luncheon 284,000.00
Event fees
Grants 113,000.00 15,000.00 76,375.00 (4,000.00) (1,000.00) (16,000.00) 125,000.00 188,721.00
Discount Packages 113,000.00 15,000.00 52,000.00 (4,000.00) (1,000.00) (16,000.00) 125,000.00 -
Accounts Receivable 100,610.00 -
60.00 2,220.00 85,831.00 -
Total funds received 11,935.00 341,670.00
Disbursements - 150,837.00 129,630.00 363,690.00
Event expense -
200,656.00
Total disbursements 11,935.00 -
Excess Funds Over
- - 112,545.00 - 60.00 2,220.00 85,831.00 - 103,145.00 150,837.00 341,670.00 129,630.00 363,690.00
Disbursements 7,785.00 2,726.00 6,711.00 44,326.00 - - 150,837.00 129,630.00 -
YTD Budget 7,785.00 2,726.00 - 6,711.00 44,326.00 150,837.00 262,862.00
YTD Favorable (Unfavorable) 2022 103,145.00 - 282,825.00
(7,785.00) (2,726.00) 36,170.00 5,427.00
Actual 2021 97,511.00 262,862.00
36,170.00 - 5,427.00 129,630.00 282,825.00

76,375.00 - (5,367.00) (4,491.00) 41,505.00 - 78,808.00 80,865.00

(7,785.00) (2,726.00) 76,375.00 (5,367.00) (4,491.00) 41,505.00 -
111,389.00 10,183.00 42,111.00 112,051.00

YourControllerPlus
5/16/2022
5:06 PM

Dallas Fort Worth Minority Supplier Development Council, Inc
Balance Sheet

For the Four Month Ended April 30, 2022

ASSETS As of As of As of
4/30/2022 12/31/2021 12/31/2020
CURRENT:
CASH-SPECIAL-BANK OF TEXAS 547,354 381,196 33,235
CASH-OPERATING-BANK OF TEXAS 352,081 233,290 1,062,372
CASH-COMERICA BANK MONEY MARKET 225,536 225,518
CASH-COMERICA BANK CHECKING 202,766
CASH-VERITEX FORMERLY GREEN BANK MONEY MARKET 24,525 24,525 24,525
CASH -REGIONS BANK 250,153 250,091
INVESTMENT-REGIONS BANK 168,592 168,592 156,336
CASH-CHASE CHECKING 53,197
CASH-CHASE CHECKING II 81,408 81,408 81,408
CASH-PLAINSCAPITAL BANK MONEY MARKET 71,853 71,882 71,875
CASH-CAPITALONE-CHECKING 12,541 12,541 12,541
CASH-CAPITALONE-SAVING 250,071 250,040 27,434
CASH-TRUIST BANK 97,054 97,054 4,385
INVESTMENT-CAPITALONE CD 153,110 153,072 0
PETTY CASH 250,000 250,000
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE-MBDA 152,746
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE-CRR 0 0 150
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 500 150
134,725 10,970
DEPOSIT-2020 GOLF AND TENNIS 0 4,991
DEPOSIT 2020 ACCESS 0 0 4,100
DEPOSIT-2019 TOP GOLF (APRIL AND AUGUST) 11,935 17,800
PREPAID EXPENSES-2020 AWARDS 2,631,438 2,217,159 1,903,031

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS 0 0 2,673
0 0 1,000
FIXED ASSETS: 7,812 7,812 7,812
SOFTWARE-CSC 0 0 4,050
FURNITURE & FIXTURES
EQUIPMENT & COMPUTERS 7,812 7,812 15,535
LESS: ACCUMULATED DEPRECIATION
50,796 50,796 48,796
TOTAL ASSETS 65,810 65,810 65,810
81,928 73,015 68,058
LIABLITIES & FUND BALANCE (122,299) (122,299) (78,429)
76,235 67,322 104,235
LIABILITIES
2,715,485 2,292,293 2,022,801
PREPAID FEES/DUES
ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 838,191 711,398 588,580
NOTES PAYABLE-COVID-19 PPP ($66,500) 83,114 68,923 51,371
NOTES PAYABLE-SBA EIDL ADVANCE 0 0 66,500
NOTES PAYABLE-SBA EIDL LONG-TERM 5,000 5,000 5,000
FUND BALANCE:
150,000 150,000 150,000
FUND BALANCE
NET REVENUE/(LOSS) 1,559,718 1,170,597 922,276
79,462 186,375 239,074
TOTAL LIABILITIES & FUND BALANCE 2,292,293 2,022,801
2,715,485
2,292,293 2,022,801
2,715,485

YourControllerPlus
5/16/2022
5:06 PM

Dallas Fort Worth Minority Supplier Development Council, Inc
Statement of Revenue and Expenses

For the Four Month Ended April 30, 2022

CASH--BANK OF TEXAS 4/30/2022
CASH-OPERATING-BANK OF TEXAS 547,354
352,081
CASH-COMERICA BANK MONEY MARKET 899,435
CASH-COMERICA BANK CHECKING
225,536
CASH-CHASE CHECKING 24,525
CASH-CHASE CHECKING II
250,061
INVESTMENT/REGIONS BANK
CASH-BUSINESS MONEY MARKET 71,853
CASH -REGIONS BANK 12,541
84,394
CASH-PLAINSCAPITAL BANK MONEY MARKET
50,241
CASH-VERITEX/GREEN BANK MONEY MARKET 31,167
168,592
CASH -CAPITALONE CHECKING 250,000
CASH-CAPITALONE SAVINGS
250,071
CASH-TRUIST BANK CHECKING 250,071

250,153
250,153

97,054
153,110
250,164

250,000
250,000

2,484,278

YourControllerPlus
5/16/2022
5:06 PM

Dallas Fort Worth Minority Supplier Development Council, Inc
DOS Report

Name Amount 1-30 2022 61-90 91-120 121-Over

HARD HAT 11,935.00 0.00 31-60 0.00 0.00 0.00
11,935.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
11,935.00
11,935.00

YourControllerPlus
5/16/2022
5:06 PM























May 9 Board Report

A. Call to Order

The meeting was called to order at 9:04 AM

• Greetings
o Jeni Rajbhandari Buying Entity Co-Chair
o Clifton Miller Interim MBE Co-Chair

B. Membership participation and attendance

Buying Entity Company MBE Rep Entity
Rep
Nokia Clifton Miller Cemetrics
Jeni Rajbhandari Vistra Energy Betty Manetta Argent
Mary Gano The container Store Pam Nelson Bracane Company
LaTisha Brandon MBEIC chair
SCPWG Chair Texas Instruments Evelyn Molina All Janitorial
Brad Woodson SGWS Eric Bates
Nicole Reeves Vistra Energy
Luis Jenkins AT&T
Greg Obar

Fredericka Odame Council Staff
Lartey Michael Garett

C. President’s Opening Remarks

Margo was not able to attend the call due to personal reasons.

D. 2022 Program of Work

1. The next Quarterly Luncheon date was discussed as the working group was
planning for June 22nd. It was pointed out by Greg that the announcement sent
out by the council on Friday, May 6th indicated June 28th as the date for the next

quarterly supply chain professional luncheon. During the call Michael confirmed
after checking that the QSCPL is scheduled for June 28th. Confirmation of Topic

“What is trending?”. Venue to be re-confirmed. Greg Obar will represent Supplier

Diversity on the panel. The CEO of SGWS is a tentative speaker for the panel

representing the buying entity. Clifton is to provide Nicole Reeves an example of a

ISCWG Review and Planning Session Page 1 of 3
Monday, Monday, May 10, 2022

Speakers briefing document to assist in confirming and preparing the SGWS
speaker.
2. The QSCPL on September 28th will cover Environmental Sustainability and
Governance as the topic. The speakers are being finalized.
3. Additional details of the 2022 programming to be planned during the working
group meeting in June.

-continued-
A. Supply Chain Professionals Quarterly Luncheons

Date/Venue Topic/Mode Team Lead/Team Status
March 23 “Talent Acquisition, Delivered
Venue TBD Development, and Retention” Mary Gano Lead
Evelyn Molina In development
June 22/ “What’s Trending?” Darcel Webb*
Venue TBD Pamela Nelson

Darrol Walker
LaTisha Brandon
Nicole Reeves

September 28/ “Environmental, Sustainability and Clifton Miller In development
Venue TBD TBD
Governance” Betty Manetta
December 7/
Venue TBD TBD TBD

2022 Program Topics Survey Ratings Results

Topic Team Lead/Team Rank/Avg. Comments
TBD
Talent Acquisition, Rating
Development, and Retention
Electric Vehicle Charging T#2/ 4.07 69% rated between “4-5”
Infrastructure (Responding to
Climate Infrastructure Federal TBD 2.93 38% rated between “4-5”
Funding)
Digital Transformation TBD 3.86 77% rated between “4-5”
2022 Innovation Outlook: Betty Manetta T#2/4.07 77% rated between “4-5”
Retail/Grocery (includes AI,
Supply Chain, Shopper Clifton Miller (2021) #1/ 4.21 85% rated between “4-5”
Engagement, Store
Experience, Sustainability, TBD 3.5 62% rated between “4-5”
Retail 3.36
Operations, etc.) 31% rated between “4-5”
ESG’s (Environment Social Betty Manetta (2021) 3.14
Governance) Emerging Impact 31% rated between “4-5”
on Supply Chain
Cyber Security Tools and Page 2 of 3
Certification
Dallas Broadband Digital
Equity Infrastructure
Edge Computing

ISCWG Review and Planning Session

Monday, Monday, May 10, 2022

Dallas Broadband Digital TBD 31% rated between “4-5”
Equity Infrastructure TBD for this question
3.14 46% rated between “4-5”
H.R.3684 - Infrastructure
Investment and Jobs Act
Related
Opportunities

THE MEETING WAS ADJOURNED AT 09:53 AM.
The next meeting will take place on Monday June13th, 2022 at 9:00 AM.

ISCWG Review and Planning Session Page 3 of 3
Monday, Monday, May 10, 2022

April 2022

4/5/2022: New Supplier Orientation:

Evelyn Molina addressed the new suppliers, who provided an overview of the MBEIC, opportunities for
engagement, and recognized the MBEIC leadership. Pam Nelson also attended the orientation.

Other Information:

The MBEIC initiated event evaluation/survey to capture participants feedback with each program. The
information gathered will be used to direct programming.

Upcoming Events

May 25, 2022 MBEIC Leadership Meeting via Teams (Open to all MBEs)

June 22, 2022 MBEIC Leadership Meeting via Teams (Open to all MBEs)

July (TBD) Pending Program to discuss ESG impact to MBEs

July 27, 2022 MBEIC Leadership Meeting via Teams (Open to all MBEs)

August 17, 2022 Marketing and Branding Consumer Products

August 24, 2022 MBEIC Leadership Meeting via Teams (Open to all MBEs)

September 28, 2022 Creating Excellence

Pamela Nelson / Guy Toliver

• 4/20/2022: Health Industry Group

The Health Industry Group hosted an in-person forum at the council office on HITRUST with the HITRUST
Alliance. Our guest speaker, Monique Henderson is the HITRUST Director of Third-Party Risk Management
(TPRM). This is a very important topic for any healthcare entity, third party supplier, or vendor. More and
more health-related agencies are requiring risk management assurances (such as HITRUST certification)
as a prerequisite for business partnership.

In follow-up to the presentation, Ms. Henderson will provide an encore discussion with Pam Nelson, HIG
co-chair to be placed in the DFW MSDC archives.

Other Information:

The MBEIC initiated event evaluation/survey to capture participants feedback with each program. The
information gathered will be used to direct programming.

• June 15, 2022 HIG MBE Forum in-person Networking Event

DFW MSDC At Work ‘Activity Requiring Participation April 2022

Council Host

1. April 1st, 2022 DFW MSDC & Founders Meeting for Texas Fast Path Pitch Event. 20. April 14th, 2022 FRBD- DFW MSDC Meeting

2. April 1st, 2022 Hard Hat 2022 – Debrief. 11. .April 14th, 2022 Marketing Team Update (DFW MSDC)

3. April 1st, 20th, &, 22nd 2022 MBDA Meeting. 12. April 14th, 2022 MBDA Business Opportunities Breakfast.

4. April 4, 2022 Sponsorship Meeting. 13. April 15th, 2022 Executive Committee Meeting.

5. April 5th, 2022 1% PLUS initiative & logos Meeting 14. April 18th, 2022 MBDA Virtual Site Visit – DFW MSDC.

6. April 5th, 2022 Blue Wave Session One. 15. April 19th, 2022 Blue Wave Session 3.

7. April 5th, & 19th, 2022 Dallas County Commissioner's Court Meeting. 16. April 19th, 2022 DFW SDPWG Meeting.

8. April 5th, 2022 Dallas Fundraising Committee Meeting. 17. April 19th, 2022 MBN Magazine - D/FW MSDC Access Photo Shoot.

9. April 5th, 2022 New Suppliers Orientation. 18. April 19th, 2022 Website Assessment Implementation Meeting.

10. April 7th, 14th,&, 21st, 2022 ACCESS Virtual Planning Meeting. 19. April 20th, 2022 Access Meeting..

11. April 7th, 20th, &, 21st, 2022 DFW MSDC Healthcare Industry Group –, Executive Team 20. April 20th, 2022 Membership Working Group Meeting.

Meetings. 21. April 22nd, 2022 Board of Directors Meeting.

12. April 7th, 2022 DFW MSDC CRRA Digital Marketing Weekly Meeting. 22. April 22nd, 2022 DFW MSDC Metrics Committee Meeting.

13. April 8th, 2022 DFW MSDC Inclusive Supply Chain Working Group (ISCWG) 23. April 22nd, 2022 National & Strategic Accounts & DFWMSDC Meeting.

Monthly Review & Planning Session. 24. April 25th, 2022 Access 2022 Sync.

14. April 11th, 2022 Virtual Site-Visit W/ Ms. Toria - Frederick CRRA- The Step Stool 25. April 25th, 2022 May 2nd, ACCESS Preparation,

Chef LLC. 26. April 25th, 2022 Blue Wave Session 4.

15. April 12th, 2022 Blue Wave Session 2 27. April 27th, 2022 DFW MSDC MBEIC Leadership Meeting.

16. April 13th, 2022 DFW MSDC February 2022 Financial Stmts. Meeting. 28. April 27th, 2022 ShaRon & Fredericka's Construction Event Prep Zoom Meeting,

17. April 13th, 2022 McCarthy Builders MBE Trade Partner Event at DFW MSDC-A 29. April 28th, 2022 1% Plus Meeting.

Discussion on Upcoming Opportunities for the DFW Airport Terminal C Project, & 30. April 28th, 2022 ACCESS Virtual Planning Meeting.

Various Projects with the City of Fort Worth. 31. April 28th, 2022 CRRA Presents DFW MSDC Construction Connecting Construction

18. April 13th, 2022 Self-Assessment Launch. Industry Group -The Council: National & Regional Buying Entities Webinar Event.

19. April 14th, 2022 Department of Commerce & DFW MSDC Meeting. 32. April 29th, 2022 Mohr Partners & DFW MSDC Meeting,

Certification Plan Room Acquisition

1. April 1st, 2022 Recertification Meeting. Plans / Specifications Acquired -147-
2. April 5th, 2022 Webinar Orientation for Newly Certified MBEs GC Invitations to Bid Sourced -70-
3. April 12th, 2022 Certification Informational Meeting. Procurement Opportunities Non-Construction Related Sourced -27-
4. April 14th, 2022 Certification Committee Meeting/Orientation Architectural/Engineering Opportunities Sourced -10-
Construction News Development Proposed -0-

Council Outreach | Inclusion | Attendance

1. April 1st, 2022 Arlington ISD & City of Arlington Monthly Meeting. 25. | DFW Airfield Remediation Package 1 Virtual Information Session.
2. April 4th, &, 5th, 2022 DFW Airport Capability Statement Workshop Discussion with Gregory Spoon. 26. April 19th, 2022 UT Systemwide HUB Opportunities- Goods & Services Virtual Event.
3. April 5th, 2022 Federal Invitation Procurement Listening Session. 27. April 20th, 2022 MBDA Houston Subs and Sandwiches with McCarthy Building, Inc.
4. April 5th, 2022 World Wide Technology-2022 Events Meeting. 28. April 20th, 2022 SBA 8(A) Certification Workshop Session 2
5. April 5th, 2022 XL Alliance, LLC & DFW MSDC -Collaboration Meeting. 29. April 20th, 2022 UT Southwestern Medical Center Dallas Supplier Diversity/HUB and Supply
6. April 6th, &, 20th, 2022 City of Fort Worth Diversity & Inclusion & DFW MSDC WebEx Meeting.
7. April 6th, 2022 Get your S.A.M Event. Chain Management
8. April 6th, 2022 Mentoring Group Meeting. 30. April 21st, 2022 Collin County Purchasing Department Virtual Meet & Greet Events to Connect
9. April 6th, 2022 Monthly Presidents Meeting.
10. April 7th, 2022 DFW Airport Board Meeting. with Purchasing Professionals & Learn About Upcoming Opportunities.
11. April 7th, 2022 April FOC Meeting. 31. April 21st, 2022 Dallas ISD MMBE Knowledge is Power Business Conference.
12. April 7th, 21st, &, 28th, 2022 GMSDC Financial Summit Planning Meeting. 32. April 21st, 2022 Mentoring Working Group Meeting.
13. April 7th, 2022 Membership Committee Meeting. 33. April 21st, 2022 Panelist for DFW Coronavirus Response & Relief Hosts - Train Your
14. April 11th, 2022 City of Dallas Outreach: Pivot to Possibilities Brown Bag Event! Learn How to Do
Workforce. Transform Your Business.
Business With & In The City of Dallas. 34. April 22nd, 2022 Capabilities Statement Training.
15. April 12th, 2022 Brasfield & Gorrie Equip Webinar. 35. April 25th, 2022 NMSDC Meet the New Buying Entities.
16. April 12th, 2022 Mentoring Program Discussion Suggestions Meeting. 36. April 25th, 2022 PepsiCo -Intro New Supplier Diversity Manager.
17. April 12th, 2022 Women's Business Council Event. Irving Convention Center. 37. April 25th, 2022 President's Public Policy.
18. April 13th, 2022 MBDA National Network of Equities Monthly Call. 38. April 26th, 2022 Coca Cola – Intro.
19. April 13th, 2022 SBA 8 (A) Certification Workshop Session 1.
20. April 14th, 2022 Dallas Fort Worth Planning Session - MM365. 39. April 26th, 2022 DISD Minority/Women Business Enterprise Advisory Committee.
40. April 26th, 2022 Texas Women's Foundation Leadership Forum & Awards Celebration.
21. April 14th, 2022 Department of Commerce & DFW MSDC Meeting. 41. April 27h, 2022 Special Meeting for Presidents -Public Policy,
22. April 15th, 2022 AMN’s 100 Diverse Supplier Pledge. 42. April 27h, 2022 AIXORA-DFW MSDC Intro/Collaboration.
23. April 15th, 2022 Mentoring Working Group Follow-up Meeting. 43. April 27h, 2022 SBA 8(A) Certification Workshop Session 3.
24. April 19th, 2022 Austin Bridge & Road | EJ Smith Virtual MBE Outreach Bid Opportunities 44. April 28th, 2022 The BECK Group UTD | APC Athenaeum Phase-I HUB Outreach Event.
45. April 28th, 2022 Business Equity Board Meeting – In-Person & Hybrid.





Dallas/Fort Worth Supplier Minority Development Council

2019 BUY THOSE THAT BUY USTM

Meaningful Connections…Impactful Growth
The Buy Those That Buy UsTM initiative of the
Dallas/Fort Worth Minority Supplier
Development Council continues to expand the
dialogue and champion the utilization of
certified minority-owned businesses in the
supply chain of corporate America. The
commonsense name suggests that each of us
should spend our dollars tied to organizations

who value and encourage minority inclusion. Why not make a decision to
buy goods and products from those who believe what you believe? It is
done every day when we make choices to help preserve our planet –
paper straws instead of plastic, re-using towels in a hotel, recycling parts,
paper and plastics, reducing our carbon footprint through carpooling,
ridesharing or hybrid vehicles. Buy Those That Buy UsTM promotes
emphasis on spending that can help enhance our supply chain, increase
business performance, multiply minority job opportunities and build
economic wealth in diverse communities around our country.

Supplier Diversity Today

In a world where we are always looking for the next great thing, it is no
wonder people are asking “what’s next?” when it comes to Supplier
Diversity. Some programs have been in existence for more than 40 years
and the underlying question is what results and impact have the
programs had upon our businesses, communities, economy and
minority-owned business growth and sustainability?

Dallas/Fort Worth Supplier Minority Development Council

According to a 2018 study conducted by CVM Solutions, there are some
key positives we can highlight when talking about supplier diversity
programs. Here are a few of their findings:

*From CVM Solutions 2018 State of Supplier Diversity – Supplier Diversity

Programs

• 72 percent of respondents cite corporate social responsibility as
a key driver for their supplier diversity programs, followed by
customer requirements and alignment with corporate culture
and workforce

• The larger the company and the more mature the supplier
diversity program, the more likely the company was to measure
Tier 2 spend (62 percent)

• Diverse suppliers were primarily found through certification
agencies (72 percent) and other diverse suppliers (54 percent)

When asked “How effective would you say your supplier diversity
program is?” three-quarters of the respondents were satisfied with the
effectiveness of their supplier diversity program.

But the underlying question is, how do we define “effective?” While this
white paper “is designed to stimulate “The Conversation,” it also

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highlights several best practices that are delivering real minority business
inclusion results.

What Is An Effective Program?

Have we lived up to our ideals and the goals we first established related
to supplier diversity programs? Have we infused the supply chain with
capable and sustainable minority-owned businesses that can help
business performance now and into the future? Have we captured and
highlighted the best metrics to tell the story?

The answer is sometimes. We have experienced glimmers of true impact
when a minority-owned business is able to hire new people after winning
a sizable multi-year contract. A business is able to allocate dollars for
training existing personnel on new technologies that will enable the
company to better address future opportunities. A supplier provides a
cost-effective manner to tackle some portion of the supply chain needs
that reduces costs, adds innovation or simplifies processes. A minority-
owned business helps its corporate partner tackle a whole new market
segment with culturally related products/services.

Suppler diversity programs have helped create several multi-million-
dollar minority-owned companies, a Fortune 500 minority-owned
company and a $10 billion+ company. The underlying common factors in
each of these success equations is the ability of the company to scale,
maintain a sizeable multi-year contract and expand their footprint (inside
or outside their original industry). More importantly, the Buying Entity
continued to believe, support and utilize these successful companies as
they navigated the growing pains of scaling and growing to size.

Studies show that because of programs like supplier diversity initiatives
and affirmative action, minority-owned businesses saw tremendous
growth from 1960s to the 1990s. These programs created important
access points for minority entrepreneurs, allowing unprecedented
business opportunities in a diverse set of industries. The public sector was
the impetus for minority businesses changing their business strategies
toward industry diversification, scaling and growth and represented a
sizable portion of the revenue for companies earning more than $1
million annually. When a number of private companies followed the
public sector’s lead, minority-owned companies were able to diversify

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Dallas/Fort Worth Supplier Minority Development Council

their portfolio even further, building stronger and more sustainable
firms.

Data compiled by The Business Journals in 2017 showed there are more
than 11 million minority-owned businesses in operation nationwide,
nearly double the number of 10 years ago. These businesses employed
more than 6.3 million people and generated more than $1.8 trillion in
revenue annually. Plus, in the spirit of BUY THOSE THAT BUY USTM, 85%
of minority business owners surveyed said wireless services and
applications like cloud services were critical to operational success and
growth, compared to 68% of non-minority business owners.

Diverse small businesses are the fastest growing segment of our
economy. Each year, there are more and more startups being created.
Where do they fit in the marketplace? Are they ready to do business with
corporate America or the government? Is there proper financing to
create growth and sustainability? Will GenZs (Millennials) actually wait to
go through the supplier diversity process or strike out on their own to
attack the marketplace using their familiarity with technology? Will the
next generation even seek business through the supply chain process?
What about those services not sourced through the supply chain? Will
there be more or less demand on supplier diversity professionals to
contribute to supply chain successes?

These are all questions worth examining as supplier diversity programs
position themselves within their organizations and externally to continue
to bring value and return on investment to the stakeholders involved.

A Look at Continuous Improvement

Despite the resounding commitment and perceived effectiveness of
supplier diversity programs, especially mature programs, a 2017 Hackett
Group study suggests successful supplier diversity programs include the
following:

• Develop supplier partnerships
• Mentor local suppliers
• Collaborate with suppliers on product innovation
• Share their experiences with other companies
• Use supplier diversity as a reputation-builder to help increase

market share and retain talent

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Dallas/Fort Worth Supplier Minority Development Council

• Rely on social media to develop customer and brand awareness
• Actively educate internal stakeholders on the value of supplier

diversity
• Interact with local communities of suppliers and consumers to

better understand the market, establish relationships and share
supplier diversity goals
• Partner with corporate diversity groups, which manage
workforce diversity
• Working with third parties that can help companies connect with
diverse suppliers

A couple of examples can be taken a step further.

• Enabling Innovation – Collaboration is a key element in the
process of innovation. Close proximity between a supplier and
buyer is especially important in creating trust and high-
performing teams. Even more telling for one corporation was
when its operational footprint was near high concentrations of
people who could benefit from their products and services. This
increased the percentage of small and diverse suppliers and the
likelihood that collaborative innovation could occur.

• Community Impact -- Instead of simply assuming a company that
is owned by an underrepresented individual or group will
positively impact an underrepresented community, go a step
further and confirm that impact by adopting location-based
indicators, such as jobs supported by state and economic
contribution. These indicators can be measured by working with
third-party economic impact suppliers. By systematically
measuring these indicators, a company can prioritize contracting
resources and maximize the impact of their supplier inclusion
programs on underserved communities.

Continuous improvement requires us to ask:

1. How do we measure or determine effectiveness or success in
today’s environment? Is it just how much is spent, or can we
really capture the impact upon business performance and
communities?

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Dallas/Fort Worth Supplier Minority Development Council

2. What’s next? What approach or emphasis should we be
addressing? Are global programs the next step or must we get
better in the U.S. first?

These questions can direct our emphasis with supplier diversity programs
and minority-business inclusion as they evolve into the future. Whatever
the answers are, collaboration, emphasis and engagement between
constituency groups will make the answers easier to discern.

What is BUY THOSE THAT BUY USTM?

BUY THOSE THAT BUY USTM ties directly into collaboration and sharing
best supplier diversity and minority business inclusion initiatives by
highlighting best practices that deliver real results. MBE leaders of the
Dallas/Fort Worth Minority Supplier Development Council first created
the BUY THOSE THAT BUY USTM initiative and presented it to the Board of
Directors for approval in 2007. The initiative was designed to encourage
people to intentionally buy products/services from companies that
believed in minority business inclusion. The Council leadership
understood that advocacy, recognition and sharing on behalf of minority
business inclusion was part of the core of core of the organization’s
existence.

The BTTBUTM initiative was created with three core objectives:

1. To recognize those leading corporations and public-sector
agencies that have developed supplier diversity programs that
deliver real minority business inclusion and utilization

2. To highlight best practices that deliver quantifiable impact

3. To encourage people to buy (for business and personal use)
from those that support minority business inclusion

“We were certain 12 years ago that BUY THOSE THAT
BUY USTM was the right message,” said Margo J. Posey,
President and CEO of D/FW Minority Supplier
Development Council. “The message is even more
relevant today as we encourage people to use their
spending power to support businesses focused on full

inclusion of minority-owned businesses in our
Margo J. Posey, economic landscape.”

President/CEO

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Dallas/Fort Worth Supplier Minority Development Council

BTTBU Recognition

• Buying Entity Partner honorees are acknowledged at the D/FW
MSDC Annual BTTBUTM Recognition Breakfast. Executive-level
leaders, supplier diversity professionals and procurement
personnel are invited to attend, along with the D/FW MSDC
Board of Directors.

• BTTBUTM logos of the honorees are displayed on the BTTBUTM
Wall of Honor located in the Council’s Board Room and included
on the Council’s website.

• A banner of recognition is on display at each of the D/FW MSDC
events throughout the year.

• Honorees are included in marketing materials associated with
the Council events.

• BTTBUTM Buying Entity Partners with small business solutions are
invited to participate in the BTTBUTM Business Solutions Pavilion
at the D/FW MSDC ACCESS Business Expo. The Council
encourages ACCESS attendees (MBEs, Council Staff and Buying
Entity Partners) to buy business and personal solutions from
these participating companies.

Tied to Business Markets and Economic Impact
The Dallas/Fort Worth Minority Supplier Development Council recognizes
the importance of supplier diversity professionals and programs in
bringing about more inclusion and utilization of MBEs. For the past 45
years, the Council has continued to stay focused on delivering quality
programs and activities for its constituents, while advocating for minority
business inclusion. But the Council also understands that it must
continually look for methods to improve on the process and deliver
results. In particular, BTTBUTM works for Buying
Entity partners looking to impact their business
performance and ties to the community
marketplace.

“Vistra Energy is especially excited about the Heather Herndon-
message of this initiative,” said Heather Herndon- Wright
Wright, co-chair of BTTBUTM and Director of Co-Chair of BTTBUTM
Supplier Diversity at Vistra Energy. “We believe in and Director of
the power of minority business inclusion to help Supplier Diversity,
make our communities better, and we encourage Vistra Energy

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Dallas/Fort Worth Supplier Minority Development Council

businesses and consumers to vote with their dollars when making buying
decisions. We certainly do.”

The BUY THOSE THAT BUY USTM Process

The BUY THOSE THAT BUY USTM Council initiative focuses on results and
the processes that help achieve results in the minority business inclusion
arena.

The BUY THOSE THAT BUY USTM process requires each Buying Entity
Partner to complete and submit electronically a scorecard outlining their
minority business spending results. In addition, they are asked to provide
narrative on at least one of three essay questions summarizing a best
practice that helped them achieve their spending results.

An MBE panel composed of former MBE Input Committee chairs and MBE
members of the Board of Directors review the narratives and determine
the “Best-in-Class” practices.

Key factors used in evaluating and scoring best practices were the
following:

1. The Best Practice contained examples of quantifiable results
with certified D/FW MSDC MBEs.

2. The Best Practice was viewed as innovative, unique and/or
forward thinking.

3. The Best Practice could be replicated by other organizations.

The D/FW MSDC 2019 BTTBUTM Best Practices

Each year, the challenge in reviewing best practices is
making sure responses include actual examples of
results. In addition, the panel works hard to include
new questions relevant to supplier diversity thought
leadership.

Terri Quinton “If we are to see real economic progress in our
Co-Chair of communities and less divisiveness in our nation, we
BTTBUTM and CEO, must intentionally find ways to include all segments
Q2 Marketing and cultures,” said Terri Quinton, BTTBUTM co-chair
Group and CEO of Q2 Marketing Group and ADP-LLC. “We
must continue to work at improving our communities
through strong minority business inclusion efforts.”

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Dallas/Fort Worth Supplier Minority Development Council

As the MBE panel reviewed the best practices submitted, the team chose
those that encouraged both buying entities and MBEs to be better at
what they do in terms of minority inclusion. The three questions in the
survey were:

1. DOWNSTREAM IMPACT – Not every certified MBE has the
capacity to work with large companies. However, expansion of the supply
chain opportunities through prime suppliers offers the opportunity for
more business inclusion and economic growth. Explain how your
company has worked with your prime suppliers (MBE and non-MBE) to
increase their minority business spending and involvement in supplier
diversity goals and objectives. Provide a specific example with
quantifiable results of the impact of your efforts with primes.

2. SIGNIFICANT ACHIEVEMENT IN CREATING MINORITY BUSINESS
INCLUSION. Describe a significant achievement of your organization
related to minority business supplier diversity. Cite the area and/or issue
you addressed and how your accomplishment helped achieve success in
the area. Examples might include a new MBE brought into your supply
chain and/or increased business in new areas going to existing MBE(s).
Provide at least one MBE example positively impacted by this
achievement.

3. ECONOMIC IMPACT – Describe how the efforts of your
organization and your utilization of certified MBEs is impacting our North
Texas community, i.e. job creation/retention, innovative new business
opportunities, increased educational support, economic growth and/or
tax base increases, economic development in a sector of the community,
etc. Provide specific examples.

Each Buying Entity that participated in the BTTBUTM Best Practices section
was asked to answer one of the three questions. Each Buying Entity
Partner was also required to cite an example of results utilizing the best
practice.

“We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a
habit.” ―Aristotle

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Dallas/Fort Worth Supplier Minority Development Council

2019 Best Practice Honorees

• AT&T
• Austin Commercial
• City of Dallas
• City of Fort Worth
• Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART)
• Methodist Health System
• North Texas Tollway Authority (NTTA)
• Raytheon
• Toyota Motor North America
• UNT System
• Vistra Energy

HONORABLE MENTIONS
• JCPenney
• UT Southwestern Medical Center

AT&T

RESPONSE TO QUESTION 1 --
DOWNSTREAM IMPACT

In 2018, AT&T evaluated its Prime Supplier Program to improve Tier-2
spend. AT&T Supplier Diversity advocates conducted an assessment of
prime suppliers and developed a strategy to assist with improving Tier-2
performance.

This included conducting one-on-one meetings to review and assist the
prime company with submitting their required annual plan. Frequent
communication with the Prime allowed the team to position and
facilitate introductory meetings with diverse suppliers for potential
opportunities. In addition to evaluating Prime suppliers, AT&T Supplier
Diversity determined it was necessary to conduct refresher training
sessions with Sourcing Managers.

Sourcing Managers are an asset to the program by promoting the value
of submitting an annual plan and reporting spend during the contract
phase. By assisting AT&T Supplier Diversity with encouraging the Primes
to fully participate, the Sourcing Managers helped drive increased Tier-2
spend.

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Dallas/Fort Worth Supplier Minority Development Council

This collaborative effort with the Supplier Diversity team, Sourcing
Managers and Prime Suppliers resulted in an increase of more than $600
Million in reported Tier-2 spend in 2018.

AUSTIN COMMERCIAL

RESPONSE TO QUESTION 1 -- DOWNSTREAM IMPACT

Austin Industries has incorporated a proactive mindset
when it comes to Multi-Tier inclusion. Austin has
implemented strong and specific bid package contract
language to its prime contractors that aids in maximizing inclusion at the
sub-tier level(s). Some of the language includes:

• Utilization of more than one MBE firm on any given scope of work
• Utilization of different MBE Female Businesses on any given

scope of work
• Designating a percentage cap on how much can be

subcontracted through material purchases with minority firms to
allow more “work-in-place” opportunities
• Designated minimum amount of MBE firms to be included in plan

In addition, Austin has also taken steps in its internal processes to modify
existing “sub-tier” tracking documents to allow for real time knowledge
of payments, percentage paid to date, amount remaining to be paid and
where the prime contractors are against their original inclusion
commitments. This allows Austin to identify any early potential issues
regarding commitments between primes and their MBE subcontractors
and leaves time for any specific strategic planning that may be needed in
order to maintain and uphold commitments.

CITY OF DALLAS

RESPONSE TO QUESTION 2 - SIGNIFICANT ACHIEVEMENT

The Office of Business Diversity has worked diligently with
the Bond Program Office to ensure not only that the M/WBE goals were
met, but also to include diverse teams on the bond program projects. This
includes a four-year consultant contract to manage various aspects of the
bond program, which include street projects, city facilities and park
infrastructure. We are pleased to announce that, in addition to each item
exceeding the M/WBE goal of 36.30%, 2 of the 3 teams are joint ventures;

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Dallas/Fort Worth Supplier Minority Development Council

one of which is a 100% minority joint venture. Finally, through a joint
venture, we were able to introduce one new firm that has never done
business with the City of Dallas. These three items total $14.98M with an
overall M/WBE participation of $9.79M or 65.33%.

2017 Bond Program

• Program Manager Consultants
• Three contracts awarded: Horizontal, Vertical, Parks
• Total Value: $14.98M
• Total M/WBE participation: $9.79M or 65.33%
• 2 of the 3 teams are joint ventures
• One team is 100% minority joint venture

2018 - 41 M/WBE Primes totaling $57.2M

In addition, the Office of Business Diversity is using an innovative training
approach to show businesses that may be lacking capacity or competency
in one area that they can team with another business in order to
successfully participate on a City of Dallas project. The model is one in
which the subcontractor and prime join for a business agreement. The
subcontractor brings the skills and competency, and the prime brings the
human capital. The contract ecosystem is now created for optimal
performance. This is a known model, but the Office of Business Diversity
is delivering specialized training with attorneys, certified public
accountants and businesses who have had success with this model.

CITY OF FORT WORTH

RESPONSE TO QUESTION 2 - SIGNIFICANT
ACHIEVEMENT

Community organizational leaders met with the City Manager and
Economic Development Director to express their concerns about the low
participation of MBEs in the City of Fort Worth’s supply chain (specifically
African Americans). The Office of Business Diversity (“OBD”) developed a
strategy to target new MBEs.

The City hosted a Saturday morning event explicitly targeting members
of key organizations. Additionally, the OBD staff participated in D/FW
MSDC‘s Hard Hat event and was successful in meeting many new MBEs.

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Dallas/Fort Worth Supplier Minority Development Council

The Staff was persistent in following up with each of the MBEs. As bid
opportunities became available, each MBE was contacted by staff and
asked to attend the pre-bid meetings.

The final result is that fourteen (14) “new” MBEs were awarded contracts
as first-time bidders, in Prime and subcontracting roles, with the City of
Fort Worth. Four of the fourteen MBEs were certified by the DFW MSDC.
Contracts awarded to MBEs included (7) African Americans, (6) Hispanics
and (1) Native American.

The total value of contracts awarded was approximately $7M. One MBE
firm was awarded an $800,000 contract as a prime to provide millwork,
an area where there had been no MBEs in this space. The Office of
Business Diversity continues to track each of these vendors to ensure that
they are still engaged and bidding on more work.

DALLAS AREA RAPID TRANSIT
(DART)

RESPONSE TO QUESTION 2 - SIGNIFICANT
ACHIEVEMENT

In 2018, DART had an RFP for the replacement of rail within our Central
Business District. The project had an M/WBE goal of 25% MBE and 7%
WBE participation. The lowest bid received was by a leading national rail
and construction firm while the non-successful firm was a Joint Venture
(JV) company that included an MBE as a JV member. When the Diversity
Department reviewed bid documents, it was determined that the lowest
bidder only had commitments of 2.7% MBE and 6.2% WBE participation.
Included with this information was documentation that supported their
claims on why the goal was unattainable. Diversity Department staff
investigated their claims and made a determination that they did not act
in good faith to meet the goal. Concerning to Diversity Department staff
were the letters of invitation to bid to potential M/WBE subcontractors.
The letters were dated December 4, 2018 and their deadline to respond
back was December 7, 2018. Requiring firms to provide sufficient pricing
in less than 3 days for a project of this magnitude does not show “good
faith”.

The Diversity Department proceeded to make a strong recommendation
to contracting officer not to award based on our findings. This was a

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Dallas/Fort Worth Supplier Minority Development Council

controversial decision because (1) their price was lower than the second
bid and (2) the contractor is a large conglomerate firm with a long history
at DART. However, advocating for the inclusion of M/WBE firms within
our procurement processes is very important to DART. Because of this,
the contract was awarded to the second-place firm that had M/WBE
commitments of 40% MBE and 7% WBE (contract valued at $13.4
million).

METHODIST HEALTH SYSTEM

RESPONSE TO QUESTION 3 - ECONOMIC
IMPACT

Methodist Health System partnership with RAM Surgical has made it
possible for RAM Surgical to expand their business and manufacture a
much broader range of products - from isolation gowns to tongue
depressors.

The higher volume, multi-year guaranteed contractual business
commitment from Methodist has allowed RAM Surgical to gain a foothold
in the disposable medical supply market and become a viable competitor.
This strategyt benefits both parties. RAM has been able to consistently
deliver quality products at a very competitive price. As a result of this
growth, RAM has recently opened a distribution center in Duncanville.
This has added to the local tax base. RAM purchases gas, vehicle
maintenance and other business services in the southern sector.

In addition, RAM has added several full and part-time employees to
handle accounting, sales, warehouse and delivery functions in order to
support the increased order volume from five Methodist Hospital
campuses.

NORTH TEXAS TOLLWAY
AUTHORITY (NTTA)

RESPONSE TO QUESTION 1 -- DOWNSTREAM IMPACT

Relationships and Opportunities Advancing Diversity (ROAD) Program
seeks to promote and facilitate relationships between prime contractors
and consultants to foster opportunities for M/WBEs to participate in
large contracts with NTTA. It is a voluntary program which also equips
M/WBE firms to compete for larger projects.

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Dallas/Fort Worth Supplier Minority Development Council

Benchmark Environmental Consultants and URS Corporation were
selected to participate in the ROAD program. Mentor firm URS and
protégé firm Benchmark Environmental Consultants achieved a big win
within a few short months. After their initial ROAD kick-off meeting, both
mentor and protégé met to discuss joint marketing strategies. Both firms
agreed to share potential opportunities in service areas that augmented
their strengths to pursue projects together.

Three months after their ROAD partnership started, one of Benchmark’s
existing clients, an international Fortune 500 telecommunications
company, asked them to bid on an environmental consulting project in
Italy. The project required a strong understanding of Italian regulations
and experience negotiating with Italian regulators. Benchmark had
previously conducted work in other countries, including Europe and Asia,
but they did not have the regulatory expertise required for this project.
URS did. Benchmark proposed that URS support the project as a
subcontractor, using local URS environmental staff from Milan. The
Benchmark/URS team submitted a proposal and won the contract
together.

NTTA’s ROAD Program was the conduit that helped facilitate the
relationship between the two organizations and created an environment
for the firms to team together on this international pursuit. It was a huge
win for Benchmark, URS and the ROAD program.

RAYTHEON

RESPONSE TO QUESTION 3 - ECONOMIC
IMPACT

As a key element of our Strategic Sourcing strategy, Raytheon establishes
aggressive small business goals for inclusion of MBEs and diverse
suppliers. Our sourcing process employs a collaborative cross-functional
team to maximize and leverage MBEs throughout the entire integrated
product lifecycle.

The team is comprised of the Supplier Diversity Office and
representatives from Supply Chain, Engineering, Quality, Programs and
Operations. Advocates lead, sponsor and attend customer matchmaking
and networking advocacy events on a local and national level.

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Dallas/Fort Worth Supplier Minority Development Council

These events enable Raytheon to understand supplier capabilities and
develop strategies to actively integrate qualified MBEs and small
businesses into enterprise program opportunities. The Supplier Diversity
strategy resulted in more than 55% of Raytheon’s supply base being small
and diverse suppliers.

In 2018, Raytheon SAS spent over $402M with small and diverse suppliers
and over $41M with MBEs.

TOYOTA NORTH AMERCIA

RESPONSE TO QUESTION 2 - SIGNIFICANT
ACHIEVEMENT

Toyota works hard to include diverse businesses in their program,
particularly through education and mentorship to continuously improve
diverse supplier capabilities. Toyota concentrates on sustainability and
growth as a focus area for all suppliers, current and potential – diverse
and non-diverse.

Toyota collaborated with D/FW MSDC in 2018 to develop and implement
a specialized Inaugural Mentorship Program. This pilot year was kicked
off with four D/FW MSDC MBEs: Alpha Business Images, CVAL
Innovations, DSI Systems and Real. Toyota is implementing the initial
process utilizing Indirect Procurement Senior Managers, along with a
Toyota Executive for each Mentee. Mentees are responsible for
developing the criteria, planning, and structure based on their specific
needs and goals. The purpose is to allow a breadth of knowledge and
level of management to provide guidance, support and advice to this MBE
for a full year.

The D/FW MSDC program with Toyota is designed to set the groundwork
for creating a long-lasting mentorship program with additional
sponsoring Buying Entity partners and certified MBEs. The goal is to
ensure MBEs have access to as many resources as possible to successfully
grow, while enhancing the understanding and participation of Buying
Entity representatives in the goal of minority business inclusion.

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Dallas/Fort Worth Supplier Minority Development Council

UNT System

RESPONSE TO QUESTION 2 - SIGNIFICANT
ACHIEVEMENT

The UNT System HUB Program initiated a new process for departments
obtaining informal quotes for purchases between $5,000 - $25,000.
Previously, the departments would use the State of Texas Centralized
Master Bidders List to identify HUB certified vendors. The efforts resulted
in up to 2 bids being received from HUB vendors. Now, the HUB Program
staff completes the informal bids through the use of the UNT HUB
internal network of vendors whom they have met.

The number of bid opportunities provided to women and minority
businesses has increased significantly. This has led to more awards to
M/WBEs from the UNT System.

UNT System spends more than $11.9 million with HUB-certified vendors
with commodities ranging from scientific equipment to promotional
items to athletic equipment.

VISTRA ENERGY

RESPONSE TO QUESTION 2 – SIGNIFICANT
ACHIEVEMENT

In 2018, Vistra Energy implemented their
Growth and Capacity Building initiative
designed to increase spend with existing suppliers (grow) and expand
capacity and sustainability through diversification. Vistra’s most
significant accomplishment was with Warfab, Inc., a Hispanic woman
owned fabrication company and one of the company’s long-time, top
mining suppliers supporting draglines in East Texas. Vistra was
decommissioning four of their five mines. Vistra recognized that the
decommissioning would have a dramatic negative result on Warfab’s
business and sustainability.

Vistra Energy targeted Warfab to deploy the Growth and Capacity
Building process. The company worked with the supplier to introduce
them to new areas to build their capacity and increase sustainability.
Vistra made introductions and helped the supplier develop relationships

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Dallas/Fort Worth Supplier Minority Development Council

across the Utility Industry, with Vistra prime suppliers and with
companies OUTSIDE the Utility Industry.

The introductions resulted in Warfab increasing spend with Vistra’s
Central Texas mine managers at Kosse Mine by $3.78 million. In addition,
an introduction to the Vistra’s Power Generation business resulted in an
additional $90,000 at the Martin Lake Power Plant. Finally, Vistra Energy
sponsored Warfab’s atendance to the 2018 NMSDC Conference,
introducing them to several peer companies in the Utility Industry Group,
as well as the Oil & Gas Industry. To date, this has resulted in Warfab
being added to bid lists with several other companies and to continued
growth with Vistra Energy/Luminant despite the decommissioning of the
East Texas mines.

HONORABLE MENTIONS

JCPENNEY

RESPONSE TO QUESTION 2 - SIGNIFICANT ACHIEVEMENT

Despite the various industry challenges and leadership changes, the
JCPenney Supplier Diversity Program was able to make a strong impact in
the areas of education, development and exposure of diverse owned
businesses in 2018. Through the JCPenney Supplier Academy and
Readiness Program, JCPenney provided training and development
opportunities for more than 150 current and prospective vendors.

The annual Diverse Supplier Summit included workshops and panel
discussions designed to give suppliers the tools to better succeed and
sustain growth with JCPenney and in the retail industry. Prospective
suppliers also had the opportunity to showcase their product offerings
during a product expo and/or to participate in round table discussions
with members from the sourcing and procurement team. One current
supplier was able to expand its footprint in 2018 from a test in 45 stores
to 350 of the JCPenney stores and online shopping.

As an active member in NMSDC’s Retail Industry Group (RIG), JCPenney
assisted with the planning and execution of the first Retail Pitch
Competition held during the national minority conference in the Retail
Pavilion of the Expo Hall. The RIG Pitch competition awarded four MBE’s
with scholarships to educational programs, conference registration and
an Expo booth.

2019 BUY THOSE THAT BUY USTM White Paper Page 18


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