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Published by emigdio.kaloyan, 2019-05-09 23:50:13

Xanathars Guide To Everything

Xanathars Guide To Everything

Chapter 1: Subclasses

The main figures in any D&D campaign are the characters created by the players. The heroics,
folly, righteousness, and potential villainy of your characters are at the heart of the story. This
chapter provides a variety of new options for them, focusing on additional subclasses for each of
the classes in the Player’s Handbook.

Each class offers a character-defining choice at 1st, 2nd, or 3rd level that unlocks a series of
special features, not available to the class as a whole. That choice is called a subclass. Each class
has a collective term that describes its subclasses; in the fighter, for instance, the subclasses are
called martial archetypes, and in the paladin, they’re sacred oaths. The table below identifies
each of the subclasses in this book. In addition, the section for druids presents details on how the
Wild Shape feature works, and the warlock receives a collection of new choices for the class’s
Eldritch Invocations feature.

Each of the class presentations leads off with advice on how to add depth and detail to your
character’s personality. You can use the tables in these sections as a source of inspiration, or roll
a die to randomly determine a result if desired.

Following the subclasses, the section called “This Is Your Life” presents a series of tables for
adding detail to your character’s backstory.

The chapter concludes with a selection of feats for the races in the Player’s Handbook, offering
ways to delve deeper into a character’s racial identity.

Subclasses

Class Subclass Level Description
Available
Calls on the spirits of honored ancestors to
Barbarian Path of the Ancestral 3rd protect others
Guardian Filled with a rage that channels the primal magic
of the storm
Barbarian Path of the Storm 3rd Fueled by a religious zeal that visits destruction
Herald on foes
Wields the beguiling, glorious magic of the
Barbarian Path of the Zealot 3rd Feywild
Entertains and slays with daring feats of weapon
Bard College of Glamour 3rd prowess
Plants fear and doubt in the minds of others
Bard College of Swords 3rd Clad in heavy armor, serves a god of the forge or
Bard creation
Cleric College of Whispers 3rd

Forge Domain 1st

Class Subclass Level Description
Available
Cleric Grave Domain 1st Opposes the blight of undeath
2nd Mends wounds, guards the weary, and strides
Druid Circle of Dreams through dreams
2nd Summons nature spirits to bolster friends and
Druid Circle of the 3rd harry foes
Fighter Shepherd 3rd Imbues arrows with spectacular magical effects
Defends allies and knocks down enemies, often
Arcane Archer on horseback
Combines resilience with courtly elegance and
Fighter Cavalier mighty strikes
Confounds foes through a martial arts tradition
Fighter Samurai 3rd inspired by the swaying of a drunkard
Channels ki through a set of mastered weapons
Monk Way of the Drunken 3rd Transforms ki into bursts of fire and searing bolts
Monk Master of light
Strikes terror in enemies and crushes the forces
Way of the Kensei 3rd of chaos
Offers redemption to the worthy and destruction
Monk Way of the Sun Soul 3rd to those who refuse mercy or righteousness
Unafraid of the dark, relentlessly stalks and
Paladin Oath of Conquest 3rd ambushes foes
Finds portals to other worlds and channels planar
Paladin Oath of Redemption 3rd magic
Hunts down creatures of the night and wielders of
Ranger Gloom Stalker 3rd grim magic
Roots out secrets, akin to a masterful detective
Ranger Horizon Walker 3rd A master tactician, manipulates others
Combines stealth with a knack for survival
Ranger Monster Slayer 3rd Delivers deadly strikes with speed and panache
Harnesses magic bestowed by a god or other
Rogue Inquisitive 3rd divine source
Rogue Mastermind 3rd Wields the grim magic of the Shadowfell
Rogue Scout 3rd Crackles with the power of the storm
Rogue Swashbuckler 3rd Forges a pact with a being from celestial realms
Serves a shadowy entity that bestows dread
Sorcerer Divine Soul 1st curses
Mixes evocation and abjuration magic to
Sorcerer Shadow Magic 1st
Sorcerer Storm Sorcery 1st
Warlock The Celestial 1st

Warlock The Hexblade 1st

Wizard War Magic 2nd

Class Subclass Level Description
Available dominate the battlefield

Barbarian

I have witnessed the indomitable performance of barbarians on the field of battle, and it makes
me wonder what force lies at the heart of their rage.

— Seret, archwizard

The anger felt by a normal person resembles the rage of a barbarian in the same way that a gentle
breeze is akin to a furious thunderstorm. The barbarian’s driving force comes from a place that
transcends mere emotion, making its manifestation all the more terrible. Whether the impetus for
the fury comes entirely from within or from forging a link with a spirit animal, a raging barbarian
becomes able to perform supernatural feats of strength and endurance. The outburst is temporary,
but while it lasts, it takes over body and mind, driving the barbarian on despite peril and injury,
until the last enemy falls.

It can be tempting to play a barbarian character that is a straightforward application of the classic
archetype — a brute, and usually a dimwitted one at that, who rushes in where others fear to
tread. But not all the barbarians in the world are cut from that cloth, so you can certainly put your
own spin on things. Either way, consider adding some flourishes to make your barbarian stand
out from all others; see the following sections for some ideas.

Rawr! I’m really angry! Funny, I don’t feel any stronger. Maybe because I’m always angry, I’m
always in top condition. Stands to reason.

Personal Totems

Barbarians tend to travel light, carrying little in the way of personal effects or other unnecessary
gear. The few possessions they do carry often include small items that have special significance.
A personal totem is significant because it has a mystical origin or is tied to an important moment
in the character’s life — perhaps a remembrance from the barbarian’s past or a harbinger of what
lies ahead.

A personal totem of this sort might be associated with a barbarian’s spirit animal, or might
actually be the totem object for the animal, but such a connection is not essential. One who has a
bear totem spirit, for instance, could still carry an eagle’s feather as a personal totem.

Consider creating one or more personal totems for your character — objects that hold a special
link to your character’s past or future. Think about how a totem might affect your character’s

actions.

Personal Totems

d6 Totem

1 A tuft of fur from a solitary wolf that you befriended during a hunt

2 Three eagle feathers given to you by a wise shaman, who told you they would play a role in
determining your fate

3 A necklace made from the claws of a young cave bear that you slew singlehandedly as a
child

4 A small leather pouch holding three stones that represent your ancestors

5 A few small bones from the first beast you killed, tied together with colored wool

6 An egg-sized stone in the shape of your spirit animal that appeared one day in your belt
pouch

Tattoos

The members of many barbarian clans decorate their bodies with tattoos, each of which
represents a significant moment in the life of the bearer or the bearer’s ancestors, or which
symbolizes a feeling or an attitude. As with personal totems, a barbarian’s tattoos might or might
not be related to an animal spirit.

Each tattoo a barbarian displays contributes to that individual’s identity. If your character wears
tattoos, what do they look like, and what do they represent?

Tattoos
d6 Tattoo
1 The wings of an eagle are spread wide across your upper back.
2 Etched on the backs of your hands are the paws of a cave bear.
3 The symbols of your clan are displayed in viny patterns along your arms.
4 The antlers of an elk are inked across your back.
5 Images of your spirit animal are tattooed along your weapon arm and hand.
6 The eyes of a wolf are marked on your back to help you see and ward off evil spirits.

Superstitions

Barbarians vary widely in how they understand life. Some follow gods and look for guidance
from those deities in the cycles of nature and the animals they encounter. These barbarians
believe that spirits inhabit the plants and animals of the world, and the barbarians look to them
for omens and power.

Other barbarians trust only in the blood that runs in their veins and the steel they hold in their
hands. They have no use for the invisible world, instead relying on their senses to hunt and
survive like the wild beasts they emulate.

Both of these attitudes can give rise to superstitions. These beliefs are often passed down within
a family or shared among the members of a clan or a hunting group.

If your barbarian character has any superstitions, were they ingrained in you by your family, or
are they the result of personal experience?

Superstitions

d6 Superstition

1 If you disturb the bones of the dead, you inherit all the troubles that plagued them in life.

2 Never trust a wizard. They’re all devils in disguise, especially the friendly ones.

3 Dwarves have lost their spirits, and are almost like the undead. That’s why they live
underground.

4 Magical things bring trouble. Never sleep with a magic object within ten feet of you.

5 When you walk through a graveyard, be sure to wear silver, or a ghost might jump into your
body.

6 If an elf looks you in the eyes, she’s trying to read your thoughts.

Primal Paths

At 3rd level, a barbarian gains the Primal Path feature. The following options are available to a
barbarian, in addition to those offered in the Player’s Handbook: the Path of the Ancestral
Guardian, the Path of the Storm Herald, and the Path of the Zealot.

Path of the Ancestral Guardian

Some barbarians hail from cultures that revere their ancestors. These tribes teach that the
warriors of the past linger in the world as mighty spirits, who can guide and protect the living.
When a barbarian who follows this path rages, the barbarian contacts the spirit world and calls
on these guardian spirits for aid.

Barbarians who draw on their ancestral guardians can better fight to protect their tribes and their
allies. In order to cement ties to their ancestral guardians, barbarians who follow this path cover
themselves in elaborate tattoos that celebrate their ancestors’ deeds. These tattoos tell sagas of
victories against terrible monsters and other fearsome rivals.

So ancestors are people who did the procreation thing to make more people before you were
born? Like how many people?
That’s a lot of the procreation thing.

Ew. You’re disgusting.

Path of the Ancestral Guardian Features

Barbarian Level Feature

3rd Ancestral Protectors

6th Spirit Shield (2d6)

10th Consult the Spirits, Spirit Shield (3d6)

14th Vengeful Ancestors, Spirit Shield (4d6)

Ancestral Protectors

Starting when you choose this path at 3rd level, spectral warriors appear when you enter your
rage. While you’re raging, the first creature you hit with an attack on your turn becomes the
target of the warriors, which hinder its attacks. Until the start of your next turn, that target has
disadvantage on any attack roll that isn’t against you, and when the target hits a creature other
than you with an attack, that creature has resistance to the damage dealt by the attack. The effect

on the target ends early if your rage ends.

Spirit Shield

Beginning at 6th level, the guardian spirits that aid you can provide supernatural protection to
those you defend. If you are raging and another creature you can see within 30 feet of you takes
damage, you can use your reaction to reduce that damage by 2d6.

When you reach certain levels in this class, you can reduce the damage by more: by 3d6 at 10th
level and by 4d6 at 14th level.

Consult the Spirits

At 10th level, you gain the ability to consult with your ancestral spirits. When you do so, you
cast the augury or clairvoyance spell, without using a spell slot or material components. Rather
than creating a spherical sensor, this use of clairvoyance invisibly summons one of your
ancestral spirits to the chosen location. Wisdom is your spellcasting ability for these spells.

After you cast either spell in this way, you can’t use this feature again until you finish a short or
long rest.

Vengeful Ancestors

At 14th level, your ancestral spirits grow powerful enough to retaliate. When you use your Spirit
Shield to reduce the damage of an attack, the attacker takes an amount of force damage equal to
the damage that your Spirit Shield prevents.

Path of the Storm Herald

All barbarians harbor a fury within. Their rage grants them superior strength, durability, and
speed. Barbarians who follow the Path of the Storm Herald learn to transform that rage into a
mantle of primal magic, which swirls around them. When in a fury, a barbarian of this path taps
into the forces of nature to create powerful magical effects.

Storm heralds are typically elite champions who train alongside druids, rangers, and others
sworn to protect nature. Other storm heralds hone their craft in lodges in regions wracked by
storms, in the frozen reaches at the world’s end, or deep in the hottest deserts.

You know one of the great benefits of living underground? No weather. Don’t mess this up for
me.

Path of the Storm Herald Features

Barbarian Level Feature
3rd Storm Aura
6th Storm Soul
10th Shielding Storm
14th Raging Storm

Storm Aura

Starting at 3rd level, you emanate a stormy, magical aura while you rage. The aura extends 10
feet from you in every direction, but not through total cover.

Your aura has an effect that activates when you enter your rage, and you can activate the effect
again on each of your turns as a bonus action. Choose desert, sea, or tundra. Your aura’s effect
depends on that chosen environment, as detailed below. You can change your environment
choice whenever you gain a level in this class.

If your aura’s effects require a saving throw, the DC equals 8 + your proficiency bonus + your
Constitution modifier.

Desert. When this effect is activated, all other creatures in your aura take 2 fire damage each.
The damage increases when you reach certain levels in this class, increasing to 3 at 5th level, 4 at
10th level, 5 at 15th level, and 6 at 20th level.

Sea. When this effect is activated, you can choose one other creature you can see in your aura.
The target must make a Dexterity saving throw. The target takes 1d6 lightning damage on a
failed save, or half as much damage on a successful one. The damage increases when you reach

certain levels in this class, increasing to 2d6 at 10th level, 3d6 at 15th level, and 4d6 at 20th
level.

Tundra. When this effect is activated, each creature of your choice in your aura gains 2
temporary hit points, as icy spirits inure it to suffering. The temporary hit points increase when
you reach certain levels in this class, increasing to 3 at 5th level, 4 at 10th level, 5 at 15th level,
and 6 at 20th level.

Storm Soul

At 6th level, the storm grants you benefits even when your aura isn’t active. The benefits are
based on the environment you chose for your Storm Aura.

Desert. You gain resistance to fire damage, and you don’t suffer the effects of extreme heat, as
described in the Dungeon Master’s Guide. Moreover, as an action, you can touch a flammable
object that isn’t being worn or carried by anyone else and set it on fire.

Sea. You gain resistance to lightning damage, and you can breathe underwater. You also gain a
swimming speed of 30 feet.

Tundra. You gain resistance to cold damage, and you don’t suffer the effects of extreme cold, as
described in the Dungeon Master’s Guide. Moreover, as an action, you can touch water and turn
a 5-foot cube of it into ice, which melts after 1 minute. This action fails if a creature is in the
cube.

Shielding Storm

At 10th level, you learn to use your mastery of the storm to protect others. Each creature of your
choice has the damage resistance you gained from the Storm Soul feature while the creature is in
your Storm Aura.

Raging Storm

At 14th level, the power of the storm you channel grows mightier, lashing out at your foes. The
effect is based on the environment you chose for your Storm Aura.

Desert. Immediately after a creature in your aura hits you with an attack, you can use your
reaction to force that creature to make a Dexterity saving throw. On a failed save, the creature
takes fire damage equal to half your barbarian level.

Sea. When you hit a creature in your aura with an attack, you can use your reaction to force that
creature to make a Strength saving throw. On a failed save, the creature is knocked prone, as if
struck by a wave.

Tundra. Whenever the effect of your Storm Aura is activated, you can choose one creature you
can see in the aura. That creature must succeed on a Strength saving throw, or its speed is
reduced to 0 until the start of your next turn, as magical frost covers it.

Path of the Zealot

Some deities inspire their followers to pitch themselves into a ferocious battle fury. These
barbarians are zealots — warriors who channel their rage into powerful displays of divine power.

A variety of gods across the worlds of D&D inspire their followers to embrace this path. Tempus
from the Forgotten Realms and Hextor and Erythnul of Greyhawk are all prime examples. In
general, the gods who inspire zealots are deities of combat, destruction, and violence. Not all are
evil, but few are good.

Path of the Zealot Features

Barbarian Level Feature

3rd Divine Fury, Warrior of the Gods

6th Fanatical Focus

10th Zealous Presence

14th Rage beyond Death

Divine Fury

Starting when you choose this path at 3rd level, you can channel divine fury into your weapon
strikes. While you’re raging, the first creature you hit on each of your turns with a weapon attack
takes extra damage equal to 1d6 + half your barbarian level. The extra damage is necrotic or
radiant; you choose the type of damage when you gain this feature.

Warrior of the Gods

At 3rd level, your soul is marked for endless battle. If a spell, such as raise dead, has the sole
effect of restoring you to life (but not undeath), the caster doesn’t need material components to
cast the spell on you.

Fanatical Focus

Starting at 6th level, the divine power that fuels your rage can protect you. If you fail a saving
throw while you’re raging, you can reroll it, and you must use the new roll. You can use this
ability only once per rage.

Zealous Presence

At 10th level, you learn to channel divine power to inspire zealotry in others. As a bonus action,
you unleash a battle cry infused with divine energy. Up to ten other creatures of your choice
within 60 feet of you that can hear you gain advantage on attack rolls and saving throws until the
start of your next turn.

Once you use this feature, you can’t use it again until you finish a long rest.

Rage beyond Death

Beginning at 14th level, the divine power that fuels your rage allows you to shrug off fatal
blows.

While you’re raging, having 0 hit points doesn’t knock you unconscious. You still must make
death saving throws, and you suffer the normal effects of taking damage while at 0 hit points.
However, if you would die due to failing death saving throws, you don’t die until your rage ends,
and you die then only if you still have 0 hit points.

Bard

Music is the fruit of the divine tree that vibrates with the Words of Creation. But the question I
ask you is, can a bard go to the root of this tree? Can one tap into the source of that power? Ah,
then what manner of music they would bring to this world!
— Fletcher Danairia, master bard

Bards bring levity during grave times; they impart wisdom to offset ignorance; and they make
the ridiculous seem sublime. Bards are preservers of ancient history, their songs and tales
perpetuating the memory of great events down through time — knowledge so important that it is
memorized and passed along as oral history, to survive even when no written record remains.
It is also the bard’s role to chronicle smaller and more contemporary events — the stories of
today’s heroes, including their feats of valor as well as their less than impressive failures.
Of course, the world has many people who can carry a tune or tell a good story, and there’s much
more to any adventuring bard than a glib tongue and a melodious voice. Yet what truly sets bards
apart from others — and from one another — are the style and substance of their performances.
To grab and hold the attention of an audience, bards are typically flamboyant and outgoing when
they perform. The most famous of them are essentially the D&D world’s equivalent of pop stars.
If you’re playing a bard, consider using one of your favorite musicians as a role model for your
character.
You can add some unique aspects to your bard character by considering the suggestions that
follow.

Music is stupid. Wait. I changed my mind. Music is fun. Play more music. No, I was right the
first time. Music is stupid. But I won’t maim you after all, in case I change my mind again.

Defining Work

Every successful bard is renowned for at least one piece of performance art, typically a song or a
poem that is popular with everyone who hears it. These performances are spoken about for years
by those who view them, and some spectators have had their lives forever changed because of
the experience.

If your character is just starting out, your ultimate defining work is likely in the future. But in
order to make any sort of living at your profession, chances are you already have a piece or two
in your repertoire that have proven to be audience pleasers.

Defining Works

d6 Defining Work

1 “The Three Flambinis,” a ribald song concerning mistaken identities and unfettered desire

2 “Waltz of the Myconids,” an upbeat tune that children in particular enjoy

3 “Asmodeus’s Golden Arse,” a dramatic poem you claim was inspired by your personal visit to
Avernus

4 “The Pirates of Luskan,” your firsthand account of being kidnapped by sea reavers as a child

5 “A Hoop, Two Pigeons, and a Hell Hound,” a subtle parody of an incompetent noble

6 “A Fool in the Abyss,” a comedic poem about a jester’s travels among demons

Instrument

In a bard’s quest for the ultimate performance and the highest acclaim, one’s instrument is at
least as important as one’s vocal ability. The instrument’s quality of manufacture is a critical
factor, of course; the best ones make the best music, and some bards are continually on the
lookout for an improvement. Perhaps just as important, though, is the instrument’s own
entertainment value; those that are bizarrely constructed or made of exotic materials are likely to
leave a lasting impression on an audience.

You might have an “off the rack” instrument, perhaps because it’s all you can afford right now.
Or, if your first instrument was gifted to you, it might be of a more elaborate sort. Are you
satisfied with the instrument you have, or do you aspire to replace it with something truly
distinctive?

Instruments

d6 Instrument
1 A masterfully crafted halfling fiddle
2 A mithral horn made by elves
3 A zither made with drow spider silk
4 An orcish drum
5 A wooden bullywug croak box
6 A tinker’s harp of gnomish design

Embarrassment

Almost every bard has suffered at least one bad experience in front of an audience, and chances
are you’re no exception. No one becomes famous right away, after all; perhaps you had a few
small difficulties early in your career, or maybe it took you a while to restore your reputation

after one agonizing night when the fates conspired to bring about your theatrical ruin.

The ways that a performance can go wrong are as varied as the fish in the sea. No matter what

sort of disaster might occur, however, a bard has the courage and the confidence to rebound from
it — either pressing on with the show (if possible) or promising to come back tomorrow with a
new performance that’s guaranteed to please.

Embarrassments

d6 Embarrassment

1 The time when your comedic song, “Big Tom’s Hijinks” — which, by the way, you thought
was brilliant — did not go over well with Big Tom

2 The matinee performance when a circus’s owlbear got loose and terrorized the crowd

3 When your opening song was your enthusiastic but universally hated rendition of “Song of
the Froghemoth”

4 The first and last public performance of “Mirt, Man about Town”

5 The time on stage when your wig caught fire and you threw it down — which set fire to the
stage

6 When you sat on your lute by mistake during the final stanza of “Starlight Serenade”

A Bard’s Muse

Naturally, every bard has a repertoire of songs and stories. Some bards are generalists who can
draw from a wide range of topics for each performance, and who take pride in their versatility.
Others adopt a more personal approach to their art, driven by their attachment to a muse — a
particular concept that inspires much of what those bards do in front of an audience.

A bard who follows a muse generally does so to gain a deeper understanding of what that muse
represents and how to best convey that understanding to others through performance.

If your bard character has a muse, it could be one of the three described here, or one of your own
devising.

Nature. You feel a kinship with the natural world, and its beauty and mystery inspire you. For
you, a tree is deeply symbolic, its roots delving into the dark unknown to draw forth the power of
the earth, while its branches reach toward the sun to nourish their flowers and fruit. Nature is the
ancient witness who has seen every kingdom rise and fall, even those whose names have been
forgotten and wait to be rediscovered. The gods of nature share their secrets with druids and
sages, opening their hearts and minds to new ways of seeing, and as with those individuals, you
find that your creativity blossoms while you wander in an open field of waving grass or walk in
silent reverence through a grove of ancient oaks.

Love. You are on a quest to identify the essence of true love. Though you do not disdain the
superficial love of flesh and form, the deeper form of love that can inspire thousands or bring joy
to one’s every moment is what you are interested in. Love of this sort takes on many forms, and
you can see its presence everywhere — from the sparkling of a beautiful gem to the song of a
simple fisher thanking the sea for its bounty. You are on the trail of love, that most precious and
mysterious of emotions, and your search fills your stories and your songs with vitality and
passion.

Conflict. Drama embodies conflict, and the best stories have conflict as a key element. From the
morning-after tale of a tavern brawl to the saga of an epic battle, from a lover’s spat to a rift
between powerful dynasties, conflict is what inspires tale-tellers like you to create your best
work. Conflict can bring out the best in some people, causing their heroic nature to shine forth
and transform the world, but it can cause others to gravitate toward darkness and fall under the
sway of evil. You strive to experience or witness all forms of conflict, great and small, so as to
study this eternal aspect of life and immortalize it in your words and music.

Bard Colleges

At 3rd level, a bard gains the Bard College feature. The following options are available to a bard,
in addition to those offered in the Player’s Handbook: the College of Glamour, the College of
Swords, and the College of Whispers.

College of Glamour

The College of Glamour is the home of bards who mastered their craft in the vibrant realm of the
Feywild or under the tutelage of someone who dwelled there. Tutored by satyrs, eladrin, and
other fey, these bards learn to use their magic to delight and captivate others.

The bards of this college are regarded with a mixture of awe and fear. Their performances are the
stuff of legend. These bards are so eloquent that a speech or song that one of them performs can
cause captors to release the bard unharmed and can lull a furious dragon into complacency. The
same magic that allows them to quell beasts can also bend minds. Villainous bards of this college
can leech off a community for weeks, misusing their magic to turn their hosts into thralls. Heroic
bards of this college instead use this power to gladden the downtrodden and undermine
oppressors.

Illusions? How quaint. Before I destroy you, make one that looks like a really big goldfish — like
as big as me! Hmm. That’s too big. Goodbye!

College of Glamour Features

Bard Level Feature

3rd Mantle of Inspiration, Enthralling Performance

6th Mantle of Majesty

14th Unbreakable Majesty

Mantle of Inspiration

When you join the College of Glamour at 3rd level, you gain the ability to weave a song of fey
magic that imbues your allies with vigor and speed.

As a bonus action, you can expend one use of your Bardic Inspiration to grant yourself a
wondrous appearance. When you do so, choose a number of creatures you can see and that can
see you within 60 feet of you, up to a number equal to your Charisma modifier (minimum of
one). Each of them gains 5 temporary hit points. When a creature gains these temporary hit
points, it can immediately use its reaction to move up to its speed, without provoking opportunity
attacks.

The number of temporary hit points increases when you reach certain levels in this class,
increasing to 8 at 5th level, 11 at 10th level, and 14 at 15th level.

Enthralling Performance

Starting at 3rd level, you can charge your performance with seductive, fey magic.

If you perform for at least 1 minute, you can attempt to inspire wonder in your audience by
singing, reciting a poem, or dancing. At the end of the performance, choose a number of
humanoids within 60 feet of you who watched and listened to all of it, up to a number equal to
your Charisma modifier (minimum of one). Each target must succeed on a Wisdom saving throw
against your spell save DC or be charmed by you. While charmed in this way, the target idolizes
you, it speaks glowingly of you to anyone who talks to it, and it hinders anyone who opposes
you, although it avoids violence unless it was already inclined to fight on your behalf. This effect
ends on a target after 1 hour, if it takes any damage, if you attack it, or if it witnesses you
attacking or damaging any of its allies.

If a target succeeds on its saving throw, the target has no hint that you tried to charm it.

Once you use this feature, you can’t use it again until you finish a short or long rest.

Mantle of Majesty

At 6th level, you gain the ability to cloak yourself in a fey magic that makes others want to serve
you. As a bonus action, you cast command, without expending a spell slot, and you take on an
appearance of unearthly beauty for 1 minute or until your concentration ends (as if you were
concentrating on a spell). During this time, you can cast command as a bonus action on each of
your turns, without expending a spell slot.

Any creature charmed by you automatically fails its saving throw against the command you cast
with this feature.

Once you use this feature, you can’t use it again until you finish a long rest.

Unbreakable Majesty

At 14th level, your appearance permanently gains an otherworldly aspect that makes you look
more lovely and fierce.

In addition, as a bonus action, you can assume a magically majestic presence for 1 minute or
until you are incapacitated. For the duration, whenever any creature tries to attack you for the
first time on a turn, the attacker must make a Charisma saving throw against your spell save DC.
On a failed save, it can’t attack you on this turn, and it must choose a new target for its attack or
the attack is wasted. On a successful save, it can attack you on this turn, but it has disadvantage
on any saving throw it makes against your spells on your next turn.

Once you assume this majestic presence, you can’t do so again until you finish a short or long
rest.

College of Swords

Bards of the College of Swords are called blades, and they entertain through daring feats of
weapon prowess. Blades perform stunts such as sword swallowing, knife throwing and juggling,
and mock combats. Though they use their weapons to entertain, they are also highly trained and
skilled warriors in their own right.
Their talent with weapons inspires many blades to lead double lives. One blade might use a
circus troupe as cover for nefarious deeds such as assassination, robbery, and blackmail. Other
blades strike at the wicked, bringing justice to bear against the cruel and powerful. Most troupes
are happy to accept a blade’s talent for the excitement it adds to a performance, but few
entertainers fully trust a blade in their ranks.
Blades who abandon their lives as entertainers have often run into trouble that makes
maintaining their secret activities impossible. A blade caught stealing or engaging in vigilante
justice is too great a liability for most troupes. With their weapon skills and magic, these blades
either take up work as enforcers for thieves’ guilds or strike out on their own as adventurers.

College of Swords Features

Bard Level Feature

3rd Bonus Proficiencies, Fighting Style, Blade Flourish

6th Extra Attack

14th Master’s Flourish

Bonus Proficiencies

When you join the College of Swords at 3rd level, you gain proficiency with medium armor and
the scimitar.

If you’re proficient with a simple or martial melee weapon, you can use it as a spellcasting focus
for your bard spells.

Fighting Style

At 3rd level, you adopt a style of fighting as your specialty. Choose one of the following options.
You can’t take a Fighting Style option more than once, even if something in the game lets you
choose again.

Dueling. When you are wielding a melee weapon in one hand and no other weapons, you gain a
+2 bonus to damage rolls with that weapon.

Two-Weapon Fighting. When you engage in two-weapon fighting, you can add your ability
modifier to the damage of the second attack.

Blade Flourish

At 3rd level, you learn to perform impressive displays of martial prowess and speed.

Whenever you take the Attack action on your turn, your walking speed increases by 10 feet until
the end of the turn, and if a weapon attack that you make as part of this action hits a creature, you
can use one of the following Blade Flourish options of your choice. You can use only one Blade
Flourish option per turn.

Defensive Flourish. You can expend one use of your Bardic Inspiration to cause the weapon to
deal extra damage to the target you hit. The damage equals the number you roll on the Bardic
Inspiration die. You also add the number rolled to your AC until the start of your next turn.

Slashing Flourish. You can expend one use of your Bardic Inspiration to cause the weapon to
deal extra damage to the target you hit and to any other creature of your choice that you can see
within 5 feet of you. The damage equals the number you roll on the Bardic Inspiration die.

Mobile Flourish. You can expend one use of your Bardic Inspiration to cause the weapon to deal
extra damage to the target you hit. The damage equals the number you roll on the Bardic
Inspiration die. You can also push the target up to 5 feet away from you, plus a number of feet
equal to the number you roll on that die. You can then immediately use your reaction to move up
to your walking speed to an unoccupied space within 5 feet of the target.
Extra Attack

Starting at 6th level, you can attack twice, instead of once, whenever you take the Attack action
on your turn.
Master’s Flourish
Starting at 14th level, whenever you use a Blade Flourish option, you can roll a d6 and use it
instead of expending a Bardic Inspiration die.

College of Whispers

Most folk are happy to welcome a bard into their midst. Bards of the College of Whispers use
this to their advantage. They appear to be like other bards, sharing news, singing songs, and
telling tales to the audiences they gather. In truth, the College of Whispers teaches its students
that they are wolves among sheep. These bards use their knowledge and magic to uncover secrets
and turn them against others through extortion and threats.
Many other bards hate the College of Whispers, viewing it as a parasite that uses a bard’s
reputation to acquire wealth and power. For this reason, members of this college rarely reveal
their true nature. They typically claim to follow some other college, or they keep their actual
calling secret in order to infiltrate and exploit royal courts and other settings of power.
Speak up! It’s really hard to hear you over the screaming. Nope. It’s no use. I’ll have to stop the
screaming. Disintegrations all around, then.

College of Whispers Features

Bard Level Feature

3rd Psychic Blades, Words of Terror

6th Mantle of Whispers

14th Shadow Lore

Psychic Blades

When you join the College of Whispers at 3rd level, you gain the ability to make your weapon
attacks magically toxic to a creature’s mind.

When you hit a creature with a weapon attack, you can expend one use of your Bardic
Inspiration to deal an extra 2d6 psychic damage to that target. You can do so only once per round
on your turn.

The psychic damage increases when you reach certain levels in this class, increasing to 3d6 at
5th level, 5d6 at 10th level, and 8d6 at 15th level.

Words of Terror

At 3rd level, you learn to infuse innocent-seeming words with an insidious magic that can inspire
terror.

If you speak to a humanoid alone for at least 1 minute, you can attempt to seed paranoia in its
mind. At the end of the conversation, the target must succeed on a Wisdom saving throw against
your spell save DC or be frightened of you or another creature of your choice. The target is
frightened in this way for 1 hour, until it is attacked or damaged, or until it witnesses its allies
being attacked or damaged.

If the target succeeds on its saving throw, the target has no hint that you tried to frighten it.

Once you use this feature, you can’t use it again until you finish a short or long rest.

Mantle of Whispers

At 6th level, you gain the ability to adopt a humanoid’s persona. When a humanoid dies within
30 feet of you, you can magically capture its shadow using your reaction. You retain this shadow
until you use it or you finish a long rest.

You can use the shadow as an action. When you do so, it vanishes, magically transforming into a
disguise that appears on you. You now look like the dead person, but healthy and alive. This
disguise lasts for 1 hour or until you end it as a bonus action.

While you’re in the disguise, you gain access to all information that the humanoid would freely
share with a casual acquaintance. Such information includes general details on its background
and personal life, but doesn’t include secrets. The information is enough that you can pass
yourself off as the person by drawing on its memories.

Another creature can see through this disguise by succeeding on a Wisdom (Insight) check
contested by your Charisma (Deception) check. You gain a +5 bonus to your check.

Once you capture a shadow with this feature, you can’t capture another one with it until you
finish a short or long rest.

Shadow Lore

At 14th level, you gain the ability to weave dark magic into your words and tap into a creature’s
deepest fears.

As an action, you magically whisper a phrase that only one creature of your choice within 30 feet
of you can hear. The target must make a Wisdom saving throw against your spell save DC. It
automatically succeeds if it doesn’t share a language with you or if it can’t hear you. On a
successful saving throw, your whisper sounds like unintelligible mumbling and has no effect.

On a failed saving throw, the target is charmed by you for the next 8 hours or until you or your
allies attack it, damage it, or force it to make a saving throw. It interprets the whispers as a
description of its most mortifying secret. You gain no knowledge of this secret, but the target is
convinced you know it.

The charmed creature obeys your commands for fear that you will reveal its secret. It won’t risk
its life for you or fight for you, unless it was already inclined to do so. It grants you favors and
gifts it would offer to a close friend.

When the effect ends, the creature has no understanding of why it held you in such fear.

Once you use this feature, you can’t use it again until you finish a long rest.

Cleric

To become a cleric is to become a messenger of the gods. The power the divine offers is great,
but it always comes with tremendous responsibility.
— Riggby the patriarch

Almost all the folk in the world who revere a deity live their lives without ever being directly
touched by a divine being. As such, they can never know what it feels like to be a cleric —
someone who is not only a devout worshiper, but who has also been invested with a measure of a
deity’s power.
The question has long been debated: Does a mortal become a cleric as a consequence of deep
devotion to one’s deity, thereby attracting the god’s favor? Or is it the deity who sees the
potential in a person and calls that individual into service? Ultimately, perhaps, the answer
doesn’t matter. However clerics come into being, the world needs clerics as much as clerics and
deities need each other.
If you’re playing a cleric character, the following sections offer ways to add some detail to that
character’s history and personality.
I don’t understand the attraction of gods. Why would anyone worship anything other than me?

Temple

Most clerics start their lives of service as priests in an order, then later realize that they have been
blessed by their god with the qualities needed to become a cleric. To prepare for this new duty,

candidates typically receive instruction from a cleric of a temple or another place of study
devoted to their deity.

Some temples are cut off from the world so that their occupants can focus on devotions, while
other temples open their doors to minister to and heal the masses. What is noteworthy about the
temple you studied at?

Temples

d6 Temple

1 Your temple is said to be the oldest surviving structure built to honor your god.

2 Acolytes of several like-minded deities all received instruction together in your temple.

3 You come from a temple famed for the brewery it operates. Some say you smell like one of
its ales.

4 Your temple is a fortress and a proving ground that trains warrior-priests.

5 Your temple is a peaceful, humble place, filled with vegetable gardens and simple priests.

6 You served in a temple in the Outer Planes.

Keepsake

Many clerics have items among their personal gear that symbolize their faith, remind them of
their vows, or otherwise help to keep them on their chosen paths. Even though such an item is
not imbued with divine power, it is vitally important to its owner because of what it represents.

Keepsakes

d6 Keepsake
1 The finger bone of a saint
2 A metal-bound book that tells how to hunt and destroy infernal creatures
3 A pig’s whistle that reminds you of your humble and beloved mentor
4 A braid of hair woven from the tail of a unicorn
5 A scroll that describes how best to rid the world of necromancers
6 A runestone said to be blessed by your god

Secret

No mortal soul is entirely free of second thoughts or doubt. Even a cleric must grapple with dark
desires or the forbidden attraction of turning against the teachings of one’s deity.

If you haven’t considered this aspect of your character yet, see the table entries for some
possibilities, or use them for inspiration. Your deep, dark secret might involve something you did

(or are doing), or it could be rooted in the way you feel about the world and your role in it.

Secrets

d6 Secret

1 An imp offers you counsel. You try to ignore the creature, but sometimes its advice is helpful.

2 You believe that, in the final analysis, the gods are nothing more than ultrapowerful mortal
creatures.

3 You acknowledge the power of the gods, but you think that most events are dictated by pure
chance.

4 Even though you can work divine magic, you have never truly felt the presence of a divine
essence within yourself.

5 You are plagued by nightmares that you believe are sent by your god as punishment for
some unknown transgression.

6 In times of despair, you feel that you are but a plaything of the gods, and you resent their
remoteness.

SERVING A PANTHEON, PHILOSOPHY, OR FORCE

The typical cleric is an ordained servant of a particular god and chooses a Divine Domain
associated with that deity. The cleric’s magic flows from the god or the god’s sacred realm, and
often the cleric bears a holy symbol that represents that divinity.

Some clerics, especially in a world like Eberron, serve a whole pantheon, rather than a single
deity. In certain campaigns, a cleric might instead serve a cosmic force, such as life or death, or a
philosophy or concept, such as love, peace, or one of the nine alignments. Chapter 1 of the
Dungeon Master’s Guide explores options like these, in the section “Gods of Your World.”

Talk with your DM about the divine options available in your campaign, whether they’re gods,
pantheons, philosophies, or cosmic forces. Whatever being or thing your cleric ends up serving,
choose a Divine Domain that is appropriate for it, and if it doesn’t have a holy symbol, work
with your DM to design one.

The cleric’s class features often refer to your deity. If you are devoted to a pantheon, cosmic
force, or philosophy, your cleric features still work for you as written. Think of the references to
a god as references to the divine thing you serve that gives you your magic.

Divine Domains

At 1st level, a cleric gains the Divine Domain feature. The following domain options are
available to a cleric, in addition to those offered in the Player’s Handbook: Forge and Grave.

Forge Domain

The gods of the forge are patrons of artisans who work with metal, from a humble blacksmith
who keeps a village in horseshoes and plow blades to the mighty elf artisan whose diamond-
tipped arrows of mithral have felled demon lords. The gods of the forge teach that, with patience
and hard work, even the most intractable metal can be transformed from a lump of ore to a
beautifully wrought object. Clerics of these deities search for objects lost to the forces of
darkness, liberate mines overrun by orcs, and uncover rare and wondrous materials necessary to
create potent magic items. Followers of these gods take great pride in their work, and they are
willing to craft and use heavy armor and powerful weapons to protect them. Deities of this
domain include Gond, Reorx, Onatar, Moradin, Hephaestus, and Goibhniu.

I’ve got a minion that forges things.
An ink-stained little twerp with excellent penmanship. So how do the hammers and fire help the
process? Wouldn’t the paper get burned? Oh, the fire must be for the wax seals!

Forge Domain Features

Cleric Level Feature

1st Domain Spells, Bonus Proficiencies, Blessing of the Forge

2nd Channel Divinity: Artisan’s Blessing

6th Soul of the Forge

8th Divine Strike (1d8)

14th Divine Strike (2d8)

17th Saint of Forge and Fire

Domain Spells

You gain domain spells at the cleric levels listed in the Forge Domain Spells table. See the
Divine Domain class feature for how domain spells work.

Forge Domain Spells

Cleric Level Spells

1st identify, searing smite

3rd heat metal, magic weapon

5th elemental weapon, protection from energy

7th fabricate, wall of fire

9th animate objects, creation

Bonus Proficiencies

When you choose this domain at 1st level, you gain proficiency with heavy armor and smith’s
tools.

Blessing of the Forge

At 1st level, you gain the ability to imbue magic into a weapon or armor. At the end of a long
rest, you can touch one nonmagical object that is a suit of armor or a simple or martial weapon.
Until the end of your next long rest or until you die, the object becomes a magic item, granting a
+1 bonus to AC if it’s armor or a +1 bonus to attack and damage rolls if it’s a weapon.

Once you use this feature, you can’t use it again until you finish a long rest.

Channel Divinity: Artisan’s Blessing

Starting at 2nd level, you can use your Channel Divinity to create simple items.

You conduct an hour-long ritual that crafts a nonmagical item that must include some metal: a
simple or martial weapon, a suit of armor, ten pieces of ammunition, a set of tools, or another
metal object (see chapter 5, “Equipment,” in the Player’s Handbook for examples of these
items). The creation is completed at the end of the hour, coalescing in an unoccupied space of
your choice on a surface within 5 feet of you.

The thing you create can be something that is worth no more than 100 gp. As part of this ritual,
you must lay out metal, which can include coins, with a value equal to the creation. The metal
irretrievably coalesces and transforms into the creation at the ritual’s end, magically forming
even nonmetal parts of the creation.
The ritual can create a duplicate of a nonmagical item that contains metal, such as a key, if you
possess the original during the ritual.

Soul of the Forge
Starting at 6th level, your mastery of the forge grants you special abilities:

 You gain resistance to fire damage.
 While wearing heavy armor, you gain a +1 bonus to AC.
Divine Strike
At 8th level, you gain the ability to infuse your weapon strikes with the fiery power of the forge.
Once on each of your turns when you hit a creature with a weapon attack, you can cause the
attack to deal an extra 1d8 fire damage to the target. When you reach 14th level, the extra
damage increases to 2d8.
Saint of Forge and Fire
At 17th level, your blessed affinity with fire and metal becomes more powerful:
 You gain immunity to fire damage.
 While wearing heavy armor, you have resistance to bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing

damage from nonmagical attacks.

Grave Domain

Gods of the grave watch over the line between life and death. To these deities, death and the
afterlife are a foundational part of the multiverse. To desecrate the peace of the dead is an
abomination. Deities of the grave include Kelemvor, Wee Jas, the ancestral spirits of the
Undying Court, Hades, Anubis, and Osiris. Followers of these deities seek to put wandering
spirits to rest, destroy the undead, and ease the suffering of the dying. Their magic also allows
them to stave off death for a time, particularly for a person who still has some great work to
accomplish in the world. This is a delay of death, not a denial of it, for death will eventually get
its due.

I guess if you can’t disintegrate them or eat them, burying dead bodies makes as much
sense as anything else.

Grave Domain Features

Cleric Level Feature

1st Domain Spells, Circle of Mortality, Eyes of the Grave

2nd Channel Divinity: Path to the Grave

6th Sentinel at Death’s Door

8th Potent Spellcasting

17th Keeper of Souls

Domain Spells

You gain domain spells at the cleric levels listed in the Grave Domain Spells table. See the
Divine Domain class feature for how domain spells work.

Grave Domain Spells

Cleric Level Spells

1st bane, false life

3rd gentle repose, ray of enfeeblement

5th revivify, vampiric touch

7th blight, death ward

9th antilife shell, raise dead

Circle of Mortality

At 1st level, you gain the ability to manipulate the line between life and death. When you would
normally roll one or more dice to restore hit points with a spell to a creature at 0 hit points, you
instead use the highest number possible for each die.

In addition, you learn the spare the dying cantrip, which doesn’t count against the number of
cleric cantrips you know. For you, it has a range of 30 feet, and you can cast it as a bonus action.

Eyes of the Grave

At 1st level, you gain the ability to occasionally sense the presence of the undead, whose
existence is an insult to the natural cycle of life. As an action, you can open your awareness to
magically detect undead. Until the end of your next turn, you know the location of any undead
within 60 feet of you that isn’t behind total cover and that isn’t protected from divination magic.
This sense doesn’t tell you anything about a creature’s capabilities or identity.

You can use this feature a number of times equal to your Wisdom modifier (minimum of once).
You regain all expended uses when you finish a long rest.

Channel Divinity: Path to the Grave
Starting at 2nd level, you can use your Channel Divinity to mark another creature’s life force for
termination.
As an action, you choose one creature you can see within 30 feet of you, cursing it until the end
of your next turn. The next time you or an ally of yours hits the cursed creature with an attack,
the creature has vulnerability to all of that attack’s damage, and then the curse ends.

Sentinel at Death’s Door
At 6th level, you gain the ability to impede death’s progress. As a reaction when you or a
creature you can see within 30 feet of you suffers a critical hit, you can turn that hit into a normal
hit. Any effects triggered by a critical hit are canceled.
You can use this feature a number of times equal to your Wisdom modifier (minimum of once).
You regain all expended uses when you finish a long rest.
Potent Spellcasting
Starting at 8th level, you add your Wisdom modifier to the damage you deal with any cleric
cantrip.

Keeper of Souls

Starting at 17th level, you can seize a trace of vitality from a parting soul and use it to heal the
living. When an enemy you can see dies within 60 feet of you, you or one creature of your
choice that is within 60 feet of you regains hit points equal to the enemy’s number of Hit Dice.
You can use this feature only if you aren’t incapacitated. Once you use it, you can’t do so again
until the start of your next turn.

Druid

Even in death, each creature plays its part in maintaining the Great Balance. But now an
imbalance grows, a force that seeks to hold sway over nature. This is the destructive behavior of
the mortal races. The farther away from nature their actions take them, the more corrupting
their influence becomes. As druids, we seek mainly to protect and educate, to preserve the Great
Balance, but there are times when we must rise up against danger and eradicate it.
— Safhran, archdruid

Druids are the caretakers of the natural world, and it is said that in time a druid becomes the
voice of nature, speaking the truth that is too subtle for the general populace to hear. Many who
become druids find that they naturally gravitate toward nature; its forces, cycles, and movements
fill their minds and spirits with wonder and insight. Many sages and wise folk have studied
nature, writing volumes about its mystery and power, but druids are a special kind of being: at
some point, they begin to embody these natural forces, producing magical phenomena that link
them to the spirit of nature and the flow of life. Because of their strange and mysterious power,
druids are often revered, shunned, or considered dangerous by the people around them.
Your druid character might be a true worshiper of nature, one who has always scorned
civilization and found solace in the wild. Or your character could be a child of the city who now
strives to bring the civilized world into harmony with the wilderness. You can use the sections
that follow to flesh out your druid, regardless of how your character came to the profession.
I’ve always liked druids, because they are made of natural ingredients. And I believe that
everyone should have such a healthy diet.

Treasured Item

Some druids carry one or more items that are sacred to them or have deep personal significance.
Such items are not necessarily magical, but every one is an object whose meaning connects the
druid’s mind and heart to a profound concept or spiritual outlook.

When you decide what your character’s treasured item is, think about giving it an origin story:
how did you come by the item, and why is it important to you?

Treasured Items

d6 Item
1 A twig from the meeting tree that stands in the center of your village
2 A vial of water from the source of a sacred river
3 Special herbs tied together in a bundle
4 A small bronze bowl engraved with animal images
5 A rattle made from a dried gourd and holly berries
6 A miniature golden sickle handed down to you by your mentor

Guiding Aspect

Many druids feel a strong link to a specific aspect of the natural world, such as a body of water,
an animal, a type of tree, or some other sort of plant. You identify with your chosen aspect; by its
behavior or its very nature, it sets an example that you seek to emulate.

Guiding Aspects

d6 Guiding Aspect

1 Yew trees remind you of renewing your mind and spirit, letting the old die and the new spring
forth.

2 Oak trees represent strength and vitality. Meditating under an oak fills your body and mind
with resolve and fortitude.

3 The river’s endless flow reminds you of the great span of the world. You seek to act with the
long-term interests of nature in mind.

4 The sea is a constant, churning cauldron of power and chaos. It reminds you that accepting
change is necessary to sustain yourself in the world.

5 The birds in the sky are evidence that even the smallest creatures can survive if they remain
above the fray.

6 As demonstrated by the actions of the wolf, an individual’s strength is nothing compared to
the power of the pack.

Mentor

It’s not unusual for would-be druids to seek out (or be sought out by) instructors or elders who
teach them the basics of their magical arts. Most druids who learn from a mentor begin their
training at a young age, and the mentor has a vital role in shaping a student’s attitudes and
beliefs.

If your character received training from someone else, who or what was that individual, and what
was the nature of your relationship? Did your mentor imbue you with a particular outlook or
otherwise influence your approach to achieving the goals of your chosen path?

Mentors

d6 Mentor

1 Your mentor was a wise treant who taught you to think in terms of years and decades rather
than days or months.

2 You were tutored by a dryad who watched over a slumbering portal to the Abyss. During
your training, you were tasked with watching for hidden threats to the world.

3 Your tutor always interacted with you in the form of a falcon. You never saw the tutor’s
humanoid form.

4 You were one of several youngsters who were mentored by an old druid, until one of your
fellow pupils betrayed your group and killed your master.

5 Your mentor has appeared to you only in visions. You have yet to meet this person, and you
are not sure such a person exists in mortal form.

6 Your mentor was a werebear who taught you to treat all living things with equal regard.

Druid Circles

At 2nd level, a druid gains the Druid Circle feature. The following options are available to a
druid, in addition to those offered in the Player’s Handbook: the Circle of Dreams and the Circle
of the Shepherd.

Circle of Dreams

Druids who are members of the Circle of Dreams hail from regions that have strong ties to the
Feywild and its dreamlike realms. The druids’ guardianship of the natural world makes for a
natural alliance between them and good-aligned fey. These druids seek to fill the world with
dreamy wonder. Their magic mends wounds and brings joy to downcast hearts, and the realms
they protect are gleaming, fruitful places, where dream and reality blur together and where the
weary can find rest.

I don’t dream because I don’t sleep. I’m always awake so no one can ever sneak up on me.
If I dreamed, they would be bigger dreams than yours, though, because my head is bigger.

Circle of Dreams Features

Druid Level Feature

2nd Balm of the Summer Court

6th Hearth of Moonlight and Shadow

10th Hidden Paths

14th Walker in Dreams

Balm of the Summer Court

At 2nd level, you become imbued with the blessings of the Summer Court. You are a font of
energy that offers respite from injuries. You have a pool of fey energy represented by a number
of d6s equal to your druid level.

As a bonus action, you can choose one creature you can see within 120 feet of you and spend a
number of those dice equal to half your druid level or less. Roll the spent dice and add them
together. The target regains a number of hit points equal to the total. The target also gains 1
temporary hit point per die spent.

You regain all expended dice when you finish a long rest.

Hearth of Moonlight and Shadow

At 6th level, home can be wherever you are. During a short or long rest, you can invoke the
shadowy power of the Gloaming Court to help guard your respite. At the start of the rest, you
touch a point in space, and an invisible, 30-foot-radius sphere of magic appears, centered on that
point. Total cover blocks the sphere.

While within the sphere, you and your allies gain a +5 bonus to Dexterity (Stealth) and Wisdom
(Perception) checks, and any light from open flames in the sphere (a campfire, torches, or the
like) isn’t visible outside it.

The sphere vanishes at the end of the rest or when you leave the sphere.

Hidden Paths

Starting at 10th level, you can use the hidden, magical pathways that some fey use to traverse
space in the blink of an eye. As a bonus action on your turn, you can teleport up to 60 feet to an
unoccupied space you can see. Alternatively, you can use your action to teleport one willing
creature you touch up to 30 feet to an unoccupied space you can see.

You can use this feature a number of times equal to your Wisdom modifier (minimum of once),
and you regain all expended uses of it when you finish a long rest.

Walker in Dreams

At 14th level, the magic of the Feywild grants you the ability to travel mentally or physically
through dreamlands.

When you finish a short rest, you can cast one of the following spells, without expending a spell
slot or requiring material components: dream (with you as the messenger), scrying, or
teleportation circle.

This use of teleportation circle is special. Rather than opening a portal to a permanent
teleportation circle, it opens a portal to the last location where you finished a long rest on your
current plane of existence. If you haven’t taken a long rest on your current plane, the spell fails
but isn’t wasted.

Once you use this feature, you can’t use it again until you finish a long rest.

Circle of the Shepherd

Druids of the Circle of the Shepherd commune with the spirits of nature, especially the spirits of
beasts and the fey, and call to those spirits for aid. These druids recognize that all living things
play a role in the natural world, yet they focus on protecting animals and fey creatures that have
difficulty defending themselves. Shepherds, as they are known, see such creatures as their
charges. They ward off monsters that threaten them, rebuke hunters who kill more prey than
necessary, and prevent civilization from encroaching on rare animal habitats and on sites sacred
to the fey. Many of these druids are happiest far from cities and towns, content to spend their
days in the company of animals and the fey creatures of the wilds.

Members of this circle become adventurers to oppose forces that threaten their charges or to seek
knowledge and power that will help them safeguard their charges better. Wherever these druids
go, the spirits of the wilderness are with them.

Circle of the Shepherd Features

Druid Level Feature

2nd Speech of the Woods, Spirit Totem

6th Mighty Summoner

10th Guardian Spirit

14th Faithful Summons

Speech of the Woods

At 2nd level, you gain the ability to converse with beasts and many fey.

You learn to speak, read, and write Sylvan. In addition, beasts can understand your speech, and
you gain the ability to decipher their noises and motions. Most beasts lack the intelligence to
convey or understand sophisticated concepts, but a friendly beast could relay what it has seen or
heard in the recent past. This ability doesn’t grant you friendship with beasts, though you can
combine this ability with gifts to curry favor with them as you would with any nonplayer
character.

Spirit Totem

Starting at 2nd level, you can call forth nature spirits to influence the world around you. As a
bonus action, you can magically summon an incorporeal spirit to a point you can see within 60
feet of you. The spirit creates an aura in a 30-foot radius around that point. It counts as neither a
creature nor an object, though it has the spectral appearance of the creature it represents.

As a bonus action, you can move the spirit up to 60 feet to a point you can see.

The spirit persists for 1 minute or until you’re incapacitated. Once you use this feature, you can’t
use it again until you finish a short or long rest.

The effect of the spirit’s aura depends on the type of spirit you summon from the options below.

Bear Spirit. The bear spirit grants you and your allies its might and endurance. Each creature of
your choice in the aura when the spirit appears gains temporary hit points equal to 5 + your druid
level. In addition, you and your allies gain advantage on Strength checks and Strength saving
throws while in the aura.

Hawk Spirit. The hawk spirit is a consummate hunter, aiding you and your allies with its keen
sight. When a creature makes an attack roll against a target in the spirit’s aura, you can use your
reaction to grant advantage to that attack roll. In addition, you and your allies have advantage on
Wisdom (Perception) checks while in the aura.

Unicorn Spirit. The unicorn spirit lends its protection to those nearby. You and your allies gain
advantage on all ability checks made to detect creatures in the spirit’s aura. In addition, if you
cast a spell using a spell slot that restores hit points to any creature inside or outside the aura,
each creature of your choice in the aura also regains hit points equal to your druid level.

Mighty Summoner

Starting at 6th level, beasts and fey that you conjure are more resilient than normal. Any beast or
fey summoned or created by a spell that you cast gains the following benefits:

 The creature appears with more hit points than normal: 2 extra hit points per Hit Die it
has.

 The damage from its natural weapons is considered magical for the purpose of
overcoming immunity and resistance to nonmagical attacks and damage.

Guardian Spirit
Beginning at 10th level, your Spirit Totem safeguards the beasts and fey that you call forth with
your magic. When a beast or fey that you summoned or created with a spell ends its turn in your
Spirit Totem aura, that creature regains a number of hit points equal to half your druid level.
Faithful Summons
Starting at 14th level, the nature spirits you commune with protect you when you are the most
defenseless. If you are reduced to 0 hit points or are incapacitated against your will, you can
immediately gain the benefits of conjure animals as if it were cast using a 9th-level spell slot. It
summons four beasts of your choice that are challenge rating 2 or lower. The conjured beasts
appear within 20 feet of you. If they receive no commands from you, they protect you from harm
and attack your foes. The spell lasts for 1 hour, requiring no concentration, or until you dismiss it
(no action required).
Once you use this feature, you can’t use it again until you finish a long rest.

Learning Beast Shapes

The Wild Shape feature in the Player’s Handbook lets you transform into a beast that you’ve
seen. That rule gives you a tremendous amount of flexibility, making it easy to amass an array of
beast form options for yourself, but you must abide by the limitations in the Beast Shapes table
in that book.

When you gain Wild Shape as a 2nd-level druid, you might wonder which beasts you’ve already
seen. The following tables organize beasts from the Monster Manual according to the beasts’
most likely environments. Consider the environment your druid grew up in, then consult the
appropriate table for a list of animals that your druid has probably seen by 2nd level.

If I could turn into something else, I wouldn’t. Because everything else is inferior to me.

These tables can also help you and your DM determine which animals you might see on your
travels. In addition, the tables include each beast’s challenge rating and note whether a beast has
a flying or swimming speed. This information will help you determine whether you qualify to
assume that beast’s form.

The tables include all the individual beasts that are eligible for Wild Shape (up to a challenge
rating of 1) or the Circle Forms feature of the Circle of the Moon (up to a challenge rating of 6).

Arctic

CR Beast Fly/Swim

0 Owl Fly

1/8 Blood hawk Fly

1/4 Giant owl Fly

1 Brown bear —

2 Polar bear Swim

2 Saber-toothed tiger —

6 Mammoth —

Coast

CR Beast Fly/Swim

0 Crab Swim

0 Eagle Fly

1/8 Blood hawk Fly

1/8 Giant crab Swim

1/8 Poisonous snake Swim

1/8 Stirge Fly

1/4 Giant lizard —

1/4 Giant wolf spider —

1/4 Pteranodon Fly

CR Beast Fly/Swim
1 Giant eagle Fly
1 Giant toad Swim
2 Plesiosaurus Swim

Desert

CR Beast Fly/Swim

0 Cat —

0 Hyena —

0 Jackal —

0 Scorpion —

0 Vulture Fly

1/8 Camel —

1/8 Flying snake Fly

1/8 Mule —

1/8 Poisonous snake Swim

1/8 Stirge Fly

1/4 Constrictor snake Swim

1/4 Giant lizard —

1/4 Giant poisonous snake Swim

1/4 Giant wolf spider —

1 Giant hyena —

1 Giant spider —

1 Giant toad Swim

1 Giant vulture Fly

1 Lion —

2 Giant constrictor snake Swim

3 Giant scorpion —

Forest Fly/Swim

CR Beast —
0 Baboon —
0 Badger —
0 Cat —
0 Deer
0 Hyena

CR Beast Fly/Swim

0 Owl Fly

1/8 Blood hawk Fly

1/8 Flying snake Fly

1/8 Giant rat —

1/8 Giant weasel —

1/8 Poisonous snake Swim

1/8 Mastiff —

1/8 Stirge Fly

1/4 Boar —

1/4 Constrictor snake Swim

1/4 Elk —

1/4 Giant badger —

1/4 Giant bat Fly

1/4 Giant frog Swim

1/4 Giant lizard —

1/4 Giant owl Fly

1/4 Giant poisonous snake Swim

1/4 Giant wolf spider —

1/4 Panther —

1/4 Wolf —

1/2 Ape —

1/2 Black bear —

1/2 Giant wasp Fly

1 Brown bear —

1 Dire wolf —

1 Giant hyena —

1 Giant spider —

1 Giant toad Swim

1 Tiger —

2 Giant boar —

2 Giant constrictor snake Swim

2 Giant elk —

Grassland Fly/Swim
CR Beast

CR Beast Fly/Swim

0 Cat —

0 Deer —

0 Eagle Fly

0 Goat —

0 Hyena —

0 Jackal —

0 Vulture Fly

1/8 Blood hawk Fly

1/8 Flying snake Fly

1/8 Giant weasel —

1/8 Poisonous snake Swim

1/8 Stirge Fly

1/4 Axe beak —

1/4 Boar —

1/4 Elk —

1/4 Giant poisonous snake Swim

1/4 Giant wolf spider —

1/4 Panther (leopard) —

1/4 Pteranodon Fly

1/4 Riding horse —

1/4 Wolf —

1/2 Giant goat —

1/2 Giant wasp Fly

1 Giant eagle Fly

1 Giant hyena —

1 Giant vulture Fly

1 Lion —

1 Tiger —

2 Allosaurus —

2 Giant boar —

2 Giant elk —

2 Rhinoceros —

3 Ankylosaurus —

4 Elephant —

5 Triceratops —

Hill

CR Beast Fly/Swim

0 Baboon —

0 Eagle Fly

0 Goat —

0 Hyena —

0 Raven Fly

0 Vulture Fly

1/8 Blood hawk Fly

1/8 Giant weasel —

1/8 Mastiff —

1/8 Mule —

1/8 Poisonous snake Swim

1/8 Stirge Fly

1/4 Axe beak —

1/4 Boar —

1/4 Elk —

1/4 Giant owl Fly

1/4 Giant wolf spider —

1/4 Panther (cougar) —

1/4 Wolf —

1/2 Giant goat —

1 Brown bear —

1 Dire wolf —

1 Giant eagle Fly

1 Giant hyena —

1 Lion —

2 Giant boar —

2 Giant elk —

Mountain Fly/Swim
Fly
CR Beast —
0 Eagle Fly
0 Goat Fly
1/8 Blood hawk
1/8 Stirge

CR Beast Fly/Swim

1/4 Pteranodon Fly

1/2 Giant goat —

1 Giant eagle Fly

1 Lion —

2 Giant elk —

2 Saber-toothed tiger —

Swamp

CR Beast Fly/Swim

0 Rat —

0 Raven Fly

1/8 Giant rat —

1/8 Poisonous snake Swim

1/8 Stirge Fly

1/4 Constrictor snake Swim

1/4 Giant frog Swim

1/4 Giant lizard —

1/4 Giant poisonous snake Swim

1/2 Crocodile Swim

1 Giant spider —

1 Giant toad Swim

2 Giant constrictor snake Swim

5 Giant crocodile Swim

Underdark

CR Beast Fly/Swim

0 Giant fire beetle —

1/8 Giant rat —

1/8 Stirge Fly

1/4 Giant bat Fly

1/4 Giant centipede —

1/4 Giant lizard —

1/4 Giant poisonous snake Swim

1 Giant spider —

1 Giant toad Swim

CR Beast Fly/Swim
2 Giant constrictor snake Swim
2 Polar bear (cave bear) Swim

Underwater

CR Beast Fly/Swim

0 Quipper Swim

1/4 Constrictor snake Swim

1/2 Giant sea horse Swim

1/2 Reef shark Swim

1 Giant octopus Swim

2 Giant constrictor snake Swim

2 Hunter shark Swim

2 Plesiosaurus Swim

3 Killer whale Swim

5 Giant shark Swim


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