The words you are searching are inside this book. To get more targeted content, please make full-text search by clicking here.

In the pages that follow, we’ll take you through the last fiscal year, month by month, highlighting the heroic efforts of our staff, participants, volunteers, and community. Without these fierce advocates – our “Y Family” – we simply would not have been able to meet the essential needs of the children, families, and individuals we serve. As we continue to work together, we have the opportunity to emerge from this period stronger than ever.

Discover the best professional documents and content resources in AnyFlip Document Base.
Search
Published by Old Colony YMCA, 2021-02-18 10:31:05

2020 Annual Report

In the pages that follow, we’ll take you through the last fiscal year, month by month, highlighting the heroic efforts of our staff, participants, volunteers, and community. Without these fierce advocates – our “Y Family” – we simply would not have been able to meet the essential needs of the children, families, and individuals we serve. As we continue to work together, we have the opportunity to emerge from this period stronger than ever.

Dear Friends, At the Y, these crises required self-reflection to ensure the
best advocacy for our staff and participants. The Y needed
The YMCA has always been a steady, dependable institution to be an organization that worked for everyone – a safety
upon which communities could lean. By meeting essential net for those experiencing hardship, or a convener during
needs and developing innovative solutions to fill critical times of division.
gaps in service, the YMCA strives to universally enhance
the well-being of everyone we serve. Through economic It was time to respond as only the Y could: Deliver the
recessions, world wars, and social injustices, Old Colony Y essential services we always have amidst chaos and
has continued in that vein since 1887. confusion. While easier said than done, we needed to
continue to be that steady, dependable institution our
Throughout this truly extraordinary fiscal year – a year community expected us to be. In many ways, as people
that demanded more from our Y than ever before – we struggle to rely on even the strongest of institutions,
relied heavily on each and every one of those 133 years the role of our YMCA has never been more essential
of experience to guide us. than it is today.

FY-20 began just like any other: Summer camps and city In the pages that follow, we’ll take you through the last
pools bustled with kids and families, fundraising events fiscal year, month by month, highlighting the heroic efforts
teed off without a hitch, new programs opened and of our staff, participants, volunteers, and community. Without
communities were served. these fierce advocates – our “Y Family” – we simply would not
have been able to meet the essential needs of the children,
By March, everything had changed. For weeks, we watched families, and individuals we serve. As we continue to work
as COVID-19 spread in other parts of the world. When it together, we have the opportunity to emerge from this
arrived to the United States, it paralyzed nearly every facet period stronger than ever.
of our society. Here at Old Colony Y, half our operations were
suspended while the other half continued to provide essential With gratitude,
social service programming.
Charles J. Dockendorff
Soon, what began as a public health crisis morphed into Chair, Board of Directors
an economic free fall. It’s impact led to one of the most
challenging days in our organization’s history, resulting in Vincent J. Marturano,
closed branches and child care centers, and more than half ACSW, MSW
a workforce furloughed. The greater community saw similar President & CEO
struggles, as we continued to respond to food insecurity and
mental health needs that were rising sharply.

It quickly became clear that the pandemic was affecting
some groups more than others, and inequities in our systems
of care began to emerge. Then, George Floyd’s murder in late
May propelled the largest racial justice movement in decades.
Locally, our communities rallied around powerful messages
and experiences of inequality, discrimination, and, in some
cases…hope.

2

Acts of Human Kindness

As our staff and participants faced the pandemic, generous and dedicated members of our Y family stepped forward to help
along the way. These steadfast community partners served as a lifeline during an increasingly difficult time.

SIGNATURE HEALTHCARE KEVIN AND ANN PAICOS FLORENCE ELECTRIC AND KAYDON
INTEGRATED TECHNOLOGIES

Early on during the pandemic, Even in the midst of a crisis, it State guidelines suspended
congregate care programs were is easy to be inspired by simple operations at our traditional Y
particularly susceptible to rampant gestures of goodwill and generosity. branches for nearly four months.
COVID-19 spread. After one of our Kevin Paicos, a Board Member, and While much of their work was also
staff tested positive, Kim Hollon, his wife Ann, went above and beyond halted, Florence Electric and Kaydon
CEO and President of Signature their role as Y supporters when we Integrated Technologies took a
Healthcare and long-time Old needed them most. Understanding negative situation and decided
Colony Y Board Member, set up a that there was a growing concern to turn it into positive action to
testing site on location at one of our around food insecurity in our help their community. Eli Florence,
emergency shelters in less than 48 community, they collected non the company’s President and CEO
hours. This act, carried out by an perishable food and essential and a long-time Old Colony Y
incredible staff team from Brockton supplies to be distributed to the Board Member, made 15 licensed
Hospital, helped us prevent any families that needed them most. electricians available to our Y
potential for additional spread and Kevin also rallied other community to perform in-kind lighting and
ensured the safety and well-being of members to get involved and electrical work at nine of our sites.
more than 60 families. support emerging community
needs, including back-to-school Photo: Eli and Donna Florence
Photo: Kim Hollon, CEO & President and remote learning supplies.

3

JULY 2019

OUR MENTAL HEALTH CLINIC LAUNCHED THEIR In July, Old Colony Y’s multi-year grant from DPH officially began,
ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORDS SYSTEM. and a coalition of community organizations, community members,
and public and private agencies began to converge. Taking
OUR WORK WITH OPPORTUNITY YOUTH WAS direction from people with lived experience, the coalition began
HIGHLIGHTED AT A NATIONAL YMCA EVENT. to implement a plan to address disparities in neighborhoods in
Brockton with higher rates of gun violence.
CAMP MASSASOIT, A FREE CLOSED REFERRAL FOUR
WEEK CAMP IN BROCKTON, SERVED 117 CHILDREN. After considerable research on root causes of gun violence,
Brockton’s Gun Violence Prevention Coalition has deployed a
WITH FUNDING FROM THE BROCKTON REDEVELOPMENT multi-faceted intervention model, focused on the following
AUTHORITY, WE OPERATED THE FREE COMMUNITY OPEN components: Street outreach, behavioral health, mentoring,
SWIM PROGRAM AT COSGROVE POOL IN BROCKTON, community collaboration, and workforce development.
SERVING MORE THAN 150 KIDS PER DAY.
During the summer, the Y asked several community organizations
WE SERVED MORE THAN 1,300 FREE DINNERS TO to help carry out services as formal partners via subcontracts.
BROCKTON YOUTH AS PART OF PROJECT BREAD’S These partner organizations include People Affecting Community
SUMMER EATS PROGRAM. Change (PACC), Cape Verdean Women’s Association, Life After
Death, Rezarec Church, Friends and Mentors, Inc., and the Y’s
WE SERVED MORE THAN 40,000 MEALS TO CAMPERS Street Outreach team.
THROUGHOUT THE SUMMER IN AN EFFORT TO COMBAT
FOOD INSECURITY. The Brockton Gun Violence Coalition is one of 15 grantees
throughout the Commonwealth funded by the MA Department of
OUR DIABETES PREVENTION PROGRAM ACHIEVED Public Health’s (DPH) Gun Violence Prevention Program. DPH also
FULL CDC RECOGNITION. funds the Y’s Photo Voice Gambling Prevention initiative through
the Office of Problem Gambling Services.
PREVENTING GUN VIOLENCE IN BROCKTON
(Data from the National Council on Family Relations)
Gun violence has long disproportionately affected young people
of color, with guns taking the lives of ten times more black
children than white children in the United States. With that in
mind, the Department of Public Health (DPH) awarded ten grants
in 2019 to agencies throughout the Commonwealth with the goal
of addressing many of these racial disparities as they related to
gun violence.

44

AUGUST 2019

THE SUMMER EXPERIENCE programs work hand in hand with local school districts to
make learning truly equitable, and stop the Summer Slide
Summer Camp never fails to encapsulate the wonder and before it starts.
excitement of childhood. Archery, the ropes course, swimming,
boating, horseback, sports, arts, and education have become Power Scholars and RiseUp target elementary school participants
staples of a summer at the Y for decades. Through those from Brockton, Canton, and Plymouth. The programs are
experiences, campers build character, develop relationships, and designed to provide youth from lower-income families with a fun
grow into leaders right before our eyes. Last summer, we had the summer experience that prepares them for the next school year
opportunity to extend our work with the Department of Mental academically, socially, and emotionally. Scholars spend mornings
Health (DMH) and provide additional behavioral support for our with a team of staff, including district teachers, to hone their
campers. We also continued with our food distribution efforts, math or literacy skills. To make learning fun, students wear crowns
serving more than 40,000 free meals to campers throughout at reading time or dance the day away during “brain breaks.”
the summer. Afternoons are filled with traditional camp experiences, guest
speakers, and field trips.
CLOSING THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP
Summer Leaders targets incoming high school participants from
It’s been nine years since we began efforts to prevent Summer Brockton and Plymouth. In coordination with local school districts,
Learning Loss, or the “Summer Slide.” Research continues to the program is designed to prepare incoming freshmen for high
prove that the loss of knowledge and educational skills during the school by engaging them in leadership development groups and
summer is cumulative over the course of a student’s career, and asking them to serve as role models at summer camp for younger
further widens the achievement gap between students in lower children. Leaders report significant gains in emotion management
and upper income environments. Students who attend and academic self-efficacy.
engaging summer programs can disrupt these losses and
ultimately perform better in school compared to peers who (Data from Old Colony Y and Building Educated Leaders for Life)
are unable to attend. Our free academic achievement gap

5

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019
6

A VISIT FROM THE YMCA D’HAITI A NEW AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM WAS LAUNCHED
In mid-September, General Secretary of the YMCA d’Haiti, Gwenael IN RANDOLPH, SERVING ABOUT 250 CHILDREN.
Apollon, visited the Brockton YMCA as a part of a multi-city tour
of American Ys. His visit in Brockton included a presentation with WE HOSTED A BACK TO SCHOOL DRIVE FOR KIDS
then Mayor Moises Rodrigues and Senator Michael Brady, along EXPERIENCING HOMELESSNESS, SO THEY COULD BE
with Y staff and other members of the community. He finished his EQUIPPED WITH THE SUPPLIES AND CLOTHES THEY
time in Brockton by spending the afternoon with Old Colony Y’s NEEDED TO BEGIN SCHOOL.
Board of Directors.
OUR ANNUAL CHAIRMAN’S ROUND TABLE (CRT)
Shortly after a devastating earthquake in Haiti in 2010, ten EVENT WAS HELD TO THANK DONORS
YMCAs from the United States and Canada banded together with FOR THEIR SUPPORT AND GENEROSITY.
the YMCA d’Haiti to organize relief efforts and ultimately rebuild
the country’s Ys. Apollon’s trip included visits with many of those OUR MASS IN MOTION INITIATIVE PARTNERED
partners. His trip also included local stops at the Greater Boston WITH BRISTOL ELDER SERVICES TO DISTRIBUTE 180
and Springfield YMCAs. The program center in Jacmel that was BOXES OF PRODUCE TO LOW-INCOME SENIORS IN
financed by Old Colony Y was completed in spring 2019. However, TAUNTON.
due to civil unrest in Haiti and the political and economic tensions
continuing to rise, the center has been unable to open to the EASTON WINGS OF HOPE, A SUBSTANCE USE
community. The YMCA d’Haiti and its 11 facilities are looking PREVENTION COALITION, PARTICIPATED IN DRUG
forward to opening their doors again soon, but a timetable has TAKE BACK DAY ALONG WITH THE EASTON POLICE
not been established. The building cost $35,000 to construct, with DEPARTMENT AND BOARD OF HEALTH. TOGETHER,
annual funding of $15,000 needed to operate the program center. WE COLLECTED 166 POUNDS OF MEDICATION AND
Once opened, the center will offer literacy programs, tutoring, 107 POUNDS OF “SHARPS.”
camp, and sports, among other activities.

More than 15,000 Haitians live in Brockton today, which is more than 15% of the city’s population. In 2013, the Old
Colony Y entered into a formal partnership with the Haitian Community Partners, which has resulted in job training,
youth leadership, civic engagement, and financial education initiatives.

3RD ANNUAL RISE UP GALA
Our 3rd Annual Rise Up Gala proved to be a record-setting event, as we raised more than $500,000 in a single
night for the first time in our history. The gala welcomed more than 400 guests and 80 sponsors. Proceeds
benefitted the Y’s Annual Campaign, which provides access to critical programs and services to children and
families regardless of financial circumstances. The night’s honorees were CEO and Director of Rockland Trust
Christopher Oddleifson, who took home the Leadership Award, and L. Knife and Son, who took home the Call to
Action Award. Vinnie Marturano, Old Colony Y’s President & CEO, recognized both honorees as “change-makers
and models of service and philanthropy.”

7

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2019

OUR FIRST MULTICULTURAL EXECUTIVE CAREER
ADVANCEMENT (MECA) COHORT LAUNCHED TO PREPARE
EMERGING LEADERS FOR THEIR FIRST EXECUTIVE POSITION
AT THE Y. MECA PROVIDED A UNIQUE LEARNING EXPERIENCE
FOR 25 OLD COLONY Y STAFF, FOCUSING ON PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT, LEADERSHIP SKILLS, AND STRETCH
ASSIGNMENTS DESIGNED TO STRENGTHEN CANDIDACY FOR
HIGH LEVEL POSITIONS AT THE Y.

WE HOSTED OUR ANNUAL HERITAGE CLUB EVENT A NEW RESOURCE FOR FAMILIES
TO THANK DONORS FOR INCLUDING THE Y IN THEIR On November 1, Old Colony Y opened a new Family
LONG-TERM GIVING PLANS. Resource Center in Taunton as part of a contract with the

Department of Children and Families (DCF). The center is

the first for the area amid a growing need for a “one stop

shop” for families. In an effort to provide preventative and

coordinated services to children and families before they become involved with the agency, DCF developed the Family

Resource Center system in 2009. The network of centers across the state serve families with children primarily

under age 12 with a mix of individual and group-based family support services and social activities geared toward

full family participation. The Family Resource Center in Taunton will help families access housing and employment

supports, mental health services, academic support, assistance with child care and transportation, basic needs,

and a variety of other programs, including: Parenting and grand-parenting workshops, self-help groups, financial

workshops, stress management workshops, education programs,

family events, play groups, arts, and cultural events.

8

A RARE DISTINCTION FOR RESIDENTIAL PROGRAMS
Four Old Colony Y residential programs received a three year accreditation from an independent, nonprofit surveyor
of health and human service providers, CARF International (Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities).
The three year accreditation – the longest available – distinguished Old Colony Y’s service delivery and continuous
quality improvement. Residential programs contracted through the Department of Children and Families (DCF)
underwent the process, and became some of the first residential programs in Massachusetts to complete the survey.
All four programs were analyzed based on more than a thousand internationally recognized standards relating to
program operations, staffing, safety, outcomes, and satisfaction of participants and partners. Organizational factors
relating to governance, strategic planning, financial compliance, and policy were also evaluated.

The accredited programs include the Y’s Fall River Group Home, two Fall River Pre-Transition to Independent Living
Programs, New Bedford STARR and Brockton STARR (short-term residential programs for youth transitioning
between living situations). These programs will be re-evaluated in three years and the Y will complete yearly reports
to maintain in good standing with CARF. The Y has been a partner with DCF since 1989, and continues to work
closely with the agency to meet the critical needs of our community’s underserved children and families.

9

YMCA BRANCH SERVICES

HEALTH and WELLNESS CAMP and SUMMER CHILD CARE and
Preventing Chronic Illness and Conditions PROGRAMS CHILD PROTECTION
LIVESTRONG® at the YMCA Camp Clark in Plymouth 45 child care sites
Enhance Fitness Camp Satucket in East Bridgewater Before School Care
Kids Exercise and Education Program (KEEP) Camp Yomechas in Middleboro After School Care
Diabetes Prevention Program Camp Christina in Stoughton Infants, Toddlers & Preschool
Brockton Knocks Down Diabetes Camp Massasoit in Brockton Darkness 2 Light Child Abuse-
Mass in Motion in Taunton EAST Camp (adaptive camp in a camp) Prevention Training
Blood Pressure - Self Monitoring Program Summer in the City (Brockton Teens)
Healthy Weight and Your Child FULL FACILITY
Healthy Living Center with Signature SPECIALTY PROGRAMS YMCA BRANCHES
Healthcare in E. Bridgewater Gymnastics and Dance Brockton Central Branch
Drug Free Communities Arts & Humanities Brockton Youth Branch
Music Instruction East Bridgewater Branch
LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT Aquatics and Water Safety Easton Branch
and EDUCATION Swim Team Middleboro Branch
Summer Leaders High School Readiness Program Brockton City Summer Pool Program Plymouth Branch
Education Gap Camperships Youth and Adult Sports Leagues Stoughton Branch
RiseUp! Stoughton Youth Sports Skill Development Taunton Branch
Power Scholars - Brockton (Summer Learning) Active Older Adult Programming
Power Scholars - Plymouth Y-Ability
Annual Youth Conference for High School students
Youth & Government (Civic Education for youth)
Youth Focus (4 Brockton Housing Developments)
Kidz Konnect

10

YMCA SOCIAL SERVICES

INFUSED IN
OUR WORK

POSITIVE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT
FAMILY CENTERED PRACTICE
TRAUMA INFORMED CARE
HEALTHY LIVING

COMMUNITY BASED SERVICES RESIDENTIAL PROGRAMS DEVELOPMENT
Street Outreach and Gang Diversion Staff secure programs for youth YouthBuild Brockton
Violence Prevention and Intervention Therapeutic approach to reunification YouthBuild Fall River
Adolescent Stabilization Program in Fall River Fall River Group Home HiSET Preparation (former GED)
Family Stabilization Program in Fall River Boys Detention Program Life Skills and Job Placement
Fall River Youth Center Boys Revocation Program Bridge to Secondary Education
Community Corrections C enter Programs Transition to Independent Living Occupational Training
Community Services Network Girls Secure Detention
Parenting with Love & Limits (DYS) New Bedford STARR FAMILY SERVICES
DMH Child and Adolescent Therapeutic- Brockton STARR (Transition House) Families experiencing homelessness
Services Programs Lowell STRIVE Transition Program Supportive Housing
Adolescent Support Program (SPARKS) Southeast Independent Living Program (SEIL) Wraparound Supports
Family Resource Center in Taunton Family Life Center
MENTAL HEALTH CLINIC and David Jon Louison Center
MENTORING SUBSTANCE ABUSE CLINIC Bolton Place
OCY Mentoring Individual, Family, Couples, and Group Therapy Community-Based Services
Community-Based Matches Assessments and Evaluations Services for graduated families
Site-Based Group Mentoring Substance Abuse Support Groups
Field Trips & Special Events Anger Management
Service in 29 communities Case Management
WORKFORCE Search Out Another Road (SOAR)
Child Requiring Assistance services for youth
Specialized services for: families experiencing
homelessness; youth served by juvenile justice system,
adults involved in justice system; children/youth/
families experiencing trauma, permanency planning

11

JANUARY 2020

CELEBRATING OUR MENTORS Over thirty individuals from across the City were
Celebrated during National Mentoring Month in honored as Exceptional Mentors. Of these individuals,
January, the Brockton’s Promise Caring Adults team 12 Old Colony Y mentors were recognized by youth
hosted the 12th Annual Mentor Recruitment Rally and and adults who value their work and volunteerism.
Celebration at the Teen Challenge Center in Brockton.
In collaboration with other youth-serving agencies These mentors take on various roles to contribute
across the City of Brockton, the Old Colony YMCA to our Y; they are made up of employees and
supports this event as a way to recognize and honor volunteers – from formal mentors and Branch
positive adult role models who support youth in the staff, to Camp Directors and social services staff.
city. The event is also an opportunity to inspire new The individuals were recognized for their consistency,
volunteers to become mentors through different patience, and dedication to our youth.
city programs.

We were pleased to hear a welcome address from “...OF THESE INDIVIDUALS,
John Twohig of the Y’s Board of Directors, along with 12 OLD COLONY Y MENTORS
remarks from Brockton Superintendent of Schools WERE RECOGNIZED BY
Michael Thomas, as well as Chief of Staff Kerry Richards YOUTH AND ADULTS WHO
on behalf of Mayor Robert Sullivan. We were fortunate VALUE THEIR WORK AND
to hear from our Keynote Speaker, Conrad Loprete, VOLUNTEERISM.”
of the Department of Children and Families, who
spoke about the positive adult relationships that he
had growing up.

TEENS FROM OUR KIDZ KONNECT LEADERSHIP PROGRAM VISITED NORTHEASTERN
UNIVERSITY AND UMASS AMHERST, AS WELL AS BRIDGEWATER STATE UNIVERSITY’S COLLEGE
CONNECT PROGRAM, TO LEARN ABOUTTHE COLLEGE EXPERIENCE.

A NEW SITE IS IDENTIFIED FOR OUR 7TH RE-ENTRY PROGRAM THROUGH THE OFFICE OF
COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS IN SPRINGFIELD.

BY THE END OF FEBRUARY, OUR BRANCHES WELCOMED MORE THAN 2,600 NEW MEMBERS TO
THE Y FAMILY.

12

FEBRUARY 2020

A NEW PUBLIC HEALTH PARTNERSHIP are high-risk, and their food insecurity coincides with
Through the MassHealth Flexible Services Pilot Program, other chronic health issues. Earlier in the year, we
Old Colony Y partnered with Signature Healthcare’s received funding from the Department of Public Health
Accountable Care Organization (ACO). MassHealth funds to build out capacity to work with ACOs. Key focus
across the state are aimed at addressing social needs in areas included HIPAA compliance, cultural competency,
relation to how they impact a person’s health, including racial equity, data management, and referrals and
nutrition and housing. Through this pilot, Old Colony Y reporting structures.
provides Nutritional Health Coaching to patients who
identify as experiencing food insecurity. Patients

Emma learns how to throw a jab
during an anti-bullying and boxing
workshop at our Taunton Branch.

13



MARCH / AMPRAIRLC2H0/2A0PRIL

REDEFINING ESSENTIAL IN SOCIAL SERVICES
On March 17, our traditional YMCA branches suspended
operations per Governor Baker’s orders. One week
later, our traditional child care programs were also
asked to close. Despite statewide shutdowns of most
industries, more than half our workforce continued to
care for vulnerable kids and families every day through
our residential and community-based social service
programs. During a crisis, the most underserved people
in our community are often affected disproportionately.
Our staff continued to serve the community despite
great personal risk. They are the living embodiment of
our mission.

“...DISTRIBUTED NEARLY
5,000 MEALS PER WEEK TO
THE FAMILIES WHO NEEDED
THEM MOST.”

Within our Family Services Branch, the Y is home to achievement gap. While it is impossible to replace
nearly 63 families experiencing homelessness – and in in-person classroom learning and social experiences,
the community, we are providing support and resources Y staff were committed to ensuring children in our care
to nearly 250 more. The pandemic exacerbated were able to exercise their right to an education.
challenges related to education and food insecurity,
but our staff were able to provide support for virtual Our Mental Health Clinic began conducting
learning and distributed nearly 5,000 meals per week to telehealth visits in March, and delivered about
the families who needed them most. 350 virtual sessions per month through the end
of June, totaling nearly 1,500 engagements.
As classroom learning moved online in the spring,
students without access to wireless internet and the
necessary devices to keep up with their peers suffered,
further highlighting the already widening academic

15

Essential Voices Initially, when our location was licensed as an essential
location, I did not think that was the right decision. However,
PATRICK, after seeing the amount of families that actually came in or
called to ask for childcare on a daily basis, or hearing the
Mental Health Clinic grateful parents say they ‘don’t know what they would have
done if we weren’t open’ because they could not provide for
“Being an essential worker their families if they didn’t have childcare, I realized that being
for me means recognizing the here was essential to the community.
importance of the services we
provide and being committed to Being an essential worker meant many things. It meant leaving
that task. the comfort and guaranteed safety of my home to put myself
and loved ones at risk. It meant analyzing my every move to
I knew the pandemic had be sure that I was being safe when I interacted with others.
the potential to exacerbate It meant going through the day asking myself, ‘why am I here
symptoms for our clients and that we needed to do whatever knowing that I am at an increased risk?’ However, coming into
we could to avoid disruption of services. Our main challenge work and seeing the faces of the children or watching the
was finding the best way to have clients complete paperwork brave frontline workers leave their own children to go take
remotely and obtain the necessary authorization to provide care of others shifted my lens of fear to a lens of
mental health care. hope. Whatever the reason, there was always at least
one that gave me delight in knowing that I was able to
When the Governor announced that the state was going to put myself aside and help a family in need. In the midst
enter several pandemic phases, it never occurred to me to of such a great unknown, as essential workers, we were
stop providing services to our clients. I knew we would have able to help give parents and children one sure
to do whatever it took to continue behavioral services and thing: community.”
I was actually excited to explore a new way of delivering
therapy. Our clients depend on us for these services and at
a time like this, would definitely need a sense of stability
in what had become a scary world.”

CYNTHIA, ALEX,

Child Care Pre-Independent Living Program

“Being an essential worker “When I first started working
was honestly an extremely in residential programs, I was
tough decision for me. Being told that every day would be
at increased risk for COVID ‘predictably unpredictable.’
and still going in to work This saying has always stuck
was something that weighed with me, but took on a whole
heavily on my mind every day. new meaning as a global
Often times I felt as though I pandemic set in. In some sense, it felt like the rest of the
was making the wrong decision. Having family members that world was taking on the feel of a residential program with
worked in the medical field and hearing the stories of how a focus on mental health, safety planning, implementing
people who had the same conditions as me were falling ill, routines, containment, and again, unpredictability becoming
I would often rethink my decision to go in every morning. the new norm. I began to prepare the Pre-Independent Living
(Pre-TIL) program for a two week shelter-in-place, much like
16

MARCH / APRIL 2020

everyone else, but the youth struggled to understand why EMERGENCY CHILD CARE
they could not continue about their daily lives. Many of the In child care, six Old Colony Y sites were chosen by
youth at the Pre-TIL have had Department and Children and Governor Baker and Department of Early Education and
Families involvement for much of their lives. Throughout that Care (EEC) to serve as emergency child care programs,
time, they have processed trauma, worked on mental health, where we served about 340 children each week. It was
learned to regulate behavioral impulses, reduced harmful our privilege to serve the children of first responders,
substance use, along with any number of other successes healthcare professionals, essential employees, and
in order to transition to the Pre-TIL, where they have fewer vulnerable populations through the end of June.
restrictions and
more freedom. MOBILIZING OUR BRANCHES
All our traditional branches pivoted from member
As the two week shelter-in-place became what felt like an activities to a mobilized effort to support our
endless quarantine, youth gained a better understanding that community. Each branch served as a donation drop-off
COVID-19 was here to stay, and everyone was experiencing site for food and essential items. Branches and social
restrictions in full force. At this point, it became clear how service programs worked in coordination with local
truly resilient these young people were. During a time where school districts to distribute the grocery equivalent of
they could have become unmotivated or struggled with their nearly 5,000 meals every week since mid-March. We
behavioral health, they adapted to the changes and continued also launched a virtual fitness program for our entire
to persevere. I was so proud to watch the youth engage in community, and staff made efforts to connect with
virtual learning, graduate from high school, or look for work vulnerable populations and seniors during
as essential employees. I was impressed by each youth’s the shutdown.
desire to continue to work toward goals to gain independence
despite the world feeling like it was coming to a halt. COVID CRISIS FUND
We launched the COVID Crisis Fund to support the
As an essential employee myself, it was the youth at the urgent needs of kids, families, and seniors throughout
Pre-TIL that helped subdue the panic and fear that so easily our community. Contributions were directed to three
could have creeped in. I certainly felt a sense of pride in key areas, enabling the Y to respond swiftly and
being ‘essential,’ but at times felt frustrated that residential appropriately to those in need. The fund focused on
program employees were not often mentioned when people meeting basic emergency needs, supporting families
praised essential employees, such as first responders, most impacted by the crisis, and providing educational
healthcare workers, and grocery store employees. Having resources during school closures.
said this, I did not feel forgotten by the Old Colony YMCA. I
could always find support within the Y, especially in regards
to the safety of the youth and employees. I feel a sense of
community within the agency that I am so happy to be a part
of, even while working through a global pandemic, which is
the last thing I could have ever predicted.”

17

MAY 2020

RESPONDING TO TRAGEDY

A FEW DAYS AFTER THE MURDER OF GEORGE FLOYD IN MINNESOTA, VINNIE MARTURANO,
OUR PRESIDENT & CEO, RELEASED THE FOLLOWING STATEMENT TO THE PUBLIC:

I’m writing to you today with a range of emotions. For decades, Old Colony Y has addressed the challenges faced
by our community by developing innovative programs in the
I’m saddened by the inexplicable loss of yet another human areas of juvenile justice, mental health, violence prevention,
life. I’m confused as to how after taking so many steps forward homelessness, and so much more. At the core of that work are
during my lifetime, we as a country seemingly always find a way thousands of individual relationships with the people we serve
to take steps back. I’m angered by a system that vilifies people every day. As we face a new challenge today, we will look to this
because of how they look or where they’re from. history for guidance, and then pivot to look forward with hope
and aspiration.
What happened to George Floyd on May 25th and Breonna
Taylor on March 13th and Ahmaud Arbery on February 23rd is While I will never be able to see the world through the eyes of
far too familiar to us all – especially to the Black community. a person of color or understand the pain of someone who is
These murders and others like them will leave an unrelenting, persecuted for simply being something other than white, I
everlasting stain on our country. To those of you experiencing will do everything I can to fight for change. Our Y must be
pain, frustration, and exhaustion from this never-ending fight… a leader in the way we treat people, the way we serve the
we hear you, we’re with you, and we support you. community, and the way we drive progress.

Protests and rallies in major cities across America and the I consider myself lucky to be a part of a mission-driven
world, including one I attended this week in the City of Brockton, organization along with colleagues from all backgrounds
continue to communicate simple and powerful messages to which and experiences. I wonder at times like these how those
we should all be listening: colleagues are feeling about the culture of our Y and
Black Lives Matter. We Want Justice. I Can’t Breathe. the state of their community – because before we can
look to the future, we must confront the emotions of
It’s hard to know where to start to properly address such a the present.
boundless issue. It will take empathy in every sense of the word
to foster the true collaboration we need in communities across With that in mind, we developed an anonymous feedback loop
America. I’m reminded of what Kevin Washington, President and with our staff to fight inequity both internally and externally. We
CEO of YMCA of the USA, said just a couple years ago: can’t do it without you – our staff, members, participants, and
“Young people can accomplish anything.” community. Here, staff can share questions, ideas, and concerns
surrounding racial equity so we can begin to develop solutions
At the Y, this has always been our focus, and this is where we’ll together. I hope to share some of that feedback with you soon.
start. Young people have always driven change in our community, In times like these, it’s important that we all take a moment to
and today is no different. We are committed to acknowledging, simply “check in” with our teams, our friends, and our families.
understanding, and breaking down the inequities that exist in These conversations may be uncomfortable, but they are
our organization and our society – and we’ll do this by following necessary as we attempt to move forward. On this page, you’ll
the lead of our young people. find links to resources you may find helpful this week and in the
weeks to come.

18

• WE WILL FIND NEW WAYS TO IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING THE MURDER OF
BOTH AMPLIFY YOUTH VOICE GEORGE FLOYD AND THE ENSUING PROTESTS,
AND MOBILIZE FOR CHANGE. OLD COLONY Y TOOK THE FOLLOWING ACTION:
• WE WILL REINFORCE OUR
COMMITMENT TO DIVERSITY OUR STREET OUTREACH TEAM ATTENDED LARGE PROTESTS
AND INCLUSION AT EVERY IN BROCKTON IN AN EFFORT TO MAINTAIN PEACE AND
LEVEL OF OUR Y.
• WE WILL ADVOCATE FOR PROMOTE A NON-VIOLENT DIALOG BETWEEN PROTESTORS
SOCIAL JUSTICE AT THE FEDERAL, AND POLICE.
STATE, AND LOCAL LEVEL.
• WE WILL WORK WITH SCHEDULED TWO TRAININGS ON ANTI-RACISM AND
PUBLIC OFFICIALS, SELF-CARE WITH AN ESTEEMED BOARD MEMBER AND
COMMUNITY LEADERS,
PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS, TRAINER, DR. LIZA TALUSAN.
AND PEOPLE WITH LIVED CREATED AN OPEN-RESPONSE, ANONYMOUS FORM
EXPERIENCE TO CREATE THROUGH WHICH STAFF COULD SHARE CONCERNS, IDEAS,
POSITIVE CHANGE.
OR REPORT EXPERIENCES OF DISCRIMINATION.
REVITALIZED STAFF AND VOLUNTEER DIVERSITY
AND INCLUSION COMMITTEES, WITH A FOCUS ON
BOARD MEMBER DIVERSIFICATION AND INTERNAL

STAFFING SYSTEMS.
BEGAN PLANS TO CREATE A VIDEO SERIES, BREAK THE
SILENCE, THROUGH WHICH STAFF COULD SHARE THEIR

EXPERIENCES WITH OTHERS.

19

JUNE 2020 REMOTE LEARNING

The ripple effect created by a lack of classroom time and virtual
learning inequities have widened already pervasive education gaps in
our community. To curb these trends, we began working with local
school districts to continue providing targeted virtual summer
learning programs like Power Scholars and Summer Leaders, which
collectively serve nearly 200 children at risk of falling behind.

After serving the children of frontline workers during the pandemic,
our child care centers prepared to reopen to all families in need of
care. Parents and caregivers needed places like the Y to deliver safe,
quality care as they made plans to return to work. We also began
to actively partner with dozens of local school districts to provide the
flexible, creative solutions families needed as our communities
ventured back to the classroom.

THANKING OUR MEMBERS

After working with our local Boards of Health to develop safety
plans for our staff and members, we made plans to officially reopen
our branches on July 6th. Social distancing, masks, intense cleaning,
and limited capacities throughout the facility would create a safe,
successful reactivation of member activities, programs, and classes.
Many of our members chose to stay with us while we were closed, a
commitment that went above and beyond the expectations of a typical
gym. We could not be more grateful for their support and patience,and
we are honored they continue to choose to be a part of our Y family.

PREPARING TO REOPEN OUR Y: ANNUAL CAMPAIGN:
SUMMER CAMP HUMBLING COMMUNITY SUPPORT
On June 29, our four traditional summer camps were able to
open with limited capacity. Without the daily engagement The Y is in a unique position to simultaneously survive this crisis
of school, sports, and other youth activities, kids were left and continue to fulfill our mission. Our organization is comprised of
isolated and unable to cultivate the relationships they need to a dynamic group of passionate staff who are experts in a variety
develop socially and emotionally. At the Y, we were able to get of converging fields, and a dedicated group of volunteers who are
back to the fundamentals of serving young people regardless unafraid to push boundaries to keep our YMCA relevant and engaged
of the program. Kids needed to be kids again - and what better in the community. For those reasons, we have an opportunity to come
(and safer) place than the Y? out of this crisis stronger than ever. Look no further than the success
of our Annual Campaign for evidence that the Y is in a position to
In light of limited capacities at camps throughout the region, thrive. Despite the toll COVID-19 took on our organization, we were
the Y and other providers were in search of programming able to raise a record-setting $2.47 million, which will be reinvested
for children experiencing homelessness. In partnership with in our community and help us ensure Y services and resources are
the Department of Housing and Community Development, accessible and equitable for all. We sincerely appreciate the ongoing
we developed Y Champions camp with the full support of support we receive every day from our Y family. We simply cannot
Brockton’s Mayor Sullivan on the grounds of Camp Avoda in do this work without the collective force of an entire community
Middleboro, which was generously offered to us this summer. behind us. We thank each and every person who has stood with
us through this difficult time, just as you have stood with us
20 throughout our history.

Number of branch visits 62% Number of campers 2,702
- 989,528 57% Number of camper weeks 11,958
62% of campers received financial assistance
Number of people served 141,301
73% who were served were age 17 or younger 4,157 childcare participants
Number of branch members - 70,530 57% of families received financial assistance

NUMBER OF VOLUNTEERS 1,000+ | 128 MEMBERSHIPS SUPPORTING FOSTER FAMILIES, TOTALING $97,419
AMOUNT RAISED FOR ANNUAL CAMPAIGN $2,470,000

EDUCATION AND LEADERSHIP
220 Achievement Gap scholarships provided
to local schools
184 Power Scholars and RiseUp participants
252 Mentoring, Kidz Konnect, Summer
Leaders participants
73 YouthBuild participants in Fall River and
Brockton (30 completed)

COMMUNITY-BASED SOCIAL SERVICES RESIDENTIAL SOCIAL SERVICES
742 women, men, and children experiencing
• 311 children and adults served in our licensed Mental Health Clinic, homelessness served by our Family Services Branch
totaling 3,686 individual services 492 at three sites + 250 community based
• 240 Family Support participants in Brockton, Taunton, and Plymouth 329 DYS residential participants
(Brockton 115, Taunton 45, Plymouth 80) 220 DCF residential participants,
• 37% of youth were in foster placement totaling 12,427 bed-nights
• 6% of youth were reunited with a family member
following temporary foster placement BRANCH PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES
• 5% of youth achieved permanency through adoption Arts 683
• 325 Street Outreach participants and 2,977 total contacts Enrichment, Education, and Leadership Classes 341
• 109 DYS community-based participants Competitive Swimming 107
• 262 families served through our Taunton/Attleboro Family Resource Swim Lessons 4,307
Center, totaling 1,815 supportive services Gymnastics 2,247
• 788 Community Connections (OCC) participants Personal Training 748
• 68 DCF and DMH community-based participants Sports Leagues 1,438 and Classes 138 = 1,576
Y-Ability 275
Water Safety 186 second graders (Easton, Avon)

213

SERVICE REVENUE BY SOURCE | 6.30.20

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION*

Cash and Cash Equivalents 2020 2019
Short Term Investments
Accounts Receivable, net $ 3,428 $ 4,671
Pledges Receivable, net 410 406
Prepaid Expenses
Investments 5,887 4,692
Beneficial Interest in Perpetual Trusts 350 377
Property, Plant and Equipment, net 377 379

Total Assets 10,927 10,721
814 833
MASS. DEPT. OF MASS DEPARTMENT OF MASS. DEPT. OF PRIVATE
CHILDREN 40% 39,260 40,435
& FAMILIES 9% 61,453 62,514

EARLY EDUCATION & CARE YOUTH SERVICES Liabilities and Net Assets $ 5,346
INCLUDING VOUCHERS 12% 16% 1,205
Accounts Payable & Accrued Expenses $ 5,440 848
OTHER FEDERAL, STATE MASS. DEPT. OF COMMUNITY JUSTICE
& LOCAL GOVERNMENT HOUSING & COMMUNITY SUPPORT CENTER 10% Deferred Revenue 509 18,107
8% DEVELOPMENT 5% 25,506
Conditional debt 900 37,008
62,514
Bonds/Notes/Mortgages Payable 16,961
Total Liabilities 23,810
Total Net Assets 37,643
Total Liabilities and Net Assets 61,453

FINANCIAL STATEMENT

SERVICE REVENUE BY ACTIVITY | 06.30.20

STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES*

Revenue from Operations 2020 2019 RESIDENTIAL MEMBERSHIP/ COMMUNITY BASED
Expenses from Operations SERVICES Y PROGRAMS PROGRAMS
Change in Net Assets $ 59,938 $ 59,871 30% 24% 15%
60,438 60,787
from Operations MENTAL HEALTH YOUTHBUILD CHILDCARE CAMP
Depreciation and Amortization (500) (916) 2% 2% 24% 3%
Change in Net Assets from 2,286 2,207

Non-Operating Activities 1,135 224
Change in Net Assets 635 (692)

18* in 000’s

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

GENERAL BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Shaynah Barnes Munro, District Representative, Peter Holden, Retired, Mission Contributor Taunton District Court
Congressman Stephen Lynch Kim Hollon, President & CEO, Signature Healthcare Mary Pritchard, Manager, Arbella Insurance Group
Stuart Benton, President & CEO, Bradford Soap Richard Hooke, Commercial Service Manager, Ryan Prophett, Prophett Law Office, LLC
Wayne Bloom, CEO, Commonwealth- Crescent Credit Union Donald Quinn, Esq., Retired, Mission Contributor
Financial Network Richard Hynes, President, Barbour Corporation D. Howard Randall, Jr., Marketing & Business
James Burke, Esq., Law Offices of James M. Burke Pamerson Ifill, Regional Supervisor, Office of the Development Consultant
Jane Callahan, Principal, HR Alternatives Jonathan, Richman, President, Health
Joseph Casey, President & COO, HarborOne Bank Commissioner of Probation Management Associates
Tiffony Cesero, Owner, K-9 Protection Jean Inman, Owner, NE Center for Moises Rodrigues, Child Protection Specialist,
Fred Clark, President , Bridgewater State University Nutrition Education Archdiocese of Boston
Taisha Crayton, Principal Project Consultant, Benjamin Kravitz, Retired, Mission Contributor Tom Rogers, Vice President, Farrell-Backlund
NOTYARC Management Group/Taisha Crayton, Inc. Hilary Lovell, Community Relations, Insurance Agency
John Creedon, Esq., Creedon and Creedon Signature Healthcare Wayne Smith, Treasurer, Suburban Enterprises
William Daisy, Managing Director, CBIZ Tofias Gary Maestas, EdD, Superintendent, Plymouth Robert Spencer, Esq., CPA, Professor, -
Peter Dello Russo, President & CEO, Public Schools Stonehill College
Bluestone Bank Frank Marandino, President, North East Scott Stikeleather, Executive Vice President,
Vandy Densmore, Chief Human Resources Officer, Electrical Distributors IBC Corporation
Community Intervention Services Russel Martorana, President, Farrell-Backlund Michael Sullivan, Esq., Partner, The Ashcroft
Charles Dockendorff, Retired, Mission Contributor Insurance Agency Group, LLC
Teresa Edington, External Communication and Keith McLaughlin, Director, D’Angelo Real Estate Liza Talusan, PhD, Owner, LT Coaching &
Community Relations Manager, Shaws Supermarket and David Mudd, MD, Steward Medical Group Consulting, LLC
Gerard Nadeau, President, Rockland Trust Scott Tirrell, Retired, Mission Contributor
Star Market Peter Neville, President, Concord Foods Daniel Trout, Senior Vice President, North Easton
Shaun Fitzgerald, Owner, Fitzgerald Appraisals John Noblin, Owner, Noblin Enterprises, Inc. Savings Bank
Eli Florence, President, Kaydon Group, LLC Brendan O’Neill, Senior Vice President, George Turner, Partner, Turner Brothers LLC
David Frenette Esq., Attorney, Frenette & Eastern Bank John Twohig, Esq., Executive Vice President, New
Associates, PC David Orloff, Retired, Mission Contributor England Development
Henry Frenette, Esq., Retired, Mission Contributor Kevin Paicos, Retired, Mission Contributor Francis Veale, Esq., Professor, Massachusetts
Gena Glickman, PhD, President, Massasoit Courtney Palm, Vice President & Marketing Officer, Maritime Academy
Community College North Easton Savings Bank Conor Yunits, Vice President, Solomon McCown &
Thomas Hardiman, DPM, Medical Director, Medical Randy Papadellis, Retired, Mission Contributor Co., Inc.
Monofilament Mfg., LLC William Payne, Principal, PRW Wealth Management Joseph Zaccheo, Chief Operating Officer, Sullivan
Barbara Hassan, Retired, Mission Contributor, Marie Peeler, Principal & Executive Coach, - Tire, Inc.
Michael Hogan, President & CEO, Agawam Peeler Associates
Development Company The Honorable Gregory Phillips, Judge, -

23

BOARD OF GOVERNORS

GENERAL BOARD OF GOVERNORS Dr. David Mudd, Steward Healthcare/Good FAMILY SERVICES BOARD
Samaritan Medical Center, Chair OF GOVERNORS
BROCKTON CENTRAL & YOUTH Jennifer Nosalek, Hahn Home Health Care
BOARD OF GOVERNORS Courtney Palm, North Easton Savings Bank, Chair Diane Bell, Bridgewater State University
Punit Patel, Red Oak Sourcing Kevin Brower, HarborOne Bank
Marline Amedee, Haitian Community Partners Crissy Pruitt, Easton Public Schools James Carden, Liberty Bay Credit Union
Conrod A. Boone, Esq., Attorney Linda Thomson-Clem, MicroVenture International Reva Castaline, Brockton Public Schools
Jeff Charnell, Mutual Bank Keri-Ann Wagner, Envision Counseling, LLC Vandy Densmore, South Bay Mental Health, Chair
John Creedon, Esq., Creedon & Creedon Thomas Wooster, North Easton Savings Bank Michael Ellen, Tatum LLC
John DiCicco, PhD, Curry College Judy Fishman, Nite Group
Richard Hooke, Crescent Credit Union, Chair EAST BRIDGEWATER BOARD Jack & Eileen Murphy, Mission Contributor
Thomas Kenney, Retired, Brockton Public Schools OF GOVERNORS Sabine Pietri, Mission Contributor
Marc Lane, Cushman Insurance, Inc. Kelly Silva, PhD, Brockton Public Schools
Brian McGuire, ARS Restoration Specialist Scott Allen, Chief, East Bridgewater Robert Ventura, Mission Contributor
Mozart Saint-Cyr, Mission Contributor Police Department
Melanie Shaw, Bristol-Plymouth Regional Noreen Cahill, South Shore Bank MIDDLEBORO BOARD OF GOVERNORS
Technical High School Kara Chapman, Prophett-Chapman, Cole & Gleason
John Snelgrove, Brockton Public Schools Funeral Home Judi Bonanno, FBinsure
Christopher J. Sulmonte, CPA, Sulmonte & William Clay, Walker-Clay Holly Camillo, Medtronic
Frenier, LLP Rachel Haines, South Shore Regional Vocational Hanwar Harnett, Rockland Trust Company
Technical High School Mitzi Hollenbeck, Citrin Cooperman
COMMUNITY BASED CHILD CARE Hilary Lovell, Signature Healthcare, Chair Justin Jeffrey, Bridgewater Savings Bank
BOARD OF GOVERNORS Bruce Marquis, Salon Espirit David Lamoureux, Lamoureux Properties
Charles Muise, Retired, NEAD Insurance Trust Sarah Person, Unitarian Universalist Society
Janet Fletcher, Beth Israel Deaconess - Plymouth Howard Randall, Marketing & Business Consultant of Middleboro
Lynn Mitchell, Mission Contributor Kristine Resendes, Retired, Bridgewater Debra Prescott, Mission Contributor
Savings Bank Mary Pritchard, Arbella Insurance Group
EASTON BOARD OF GOVERNORS Katie Riley, Heritage Homes Real Estate Thomas S. Rogers, FBinsure, Chair
Lynn Santiago-Calling, MA Association for Robert Sullivan, Retired, Mission Contributor
Irene Bock, Merrill Lynch Wealth Management Education of Young Children Kim Thomas, Realty One Group
Jean Bradley Derencourt, Councilor-at- David Sheedy, East Bridgewater Board of Selectmen Kira Watkins, T.M. Ryder Insurance Agency
Large, Brockton Julie Whitmore, Whitmore’s Yard Care
Thomas Brussard, Five Star Senior Living Gina Williams, East Bridgewater Public School
Lisha Cabral, EdD, Superintendent, Easton-
Public Schools
Benjamin Carroll, Kenney & Conley, P.C., Camp EAST
Christopher Conley, Kenney & Conley, P.C.
Jaime Faverty, Coastal Heritage Bank
Gary Fradin, HealthInsuranceCE
Ian Hobkirk, Founder/President, Commonwealth
Supply Chain Advisors
Jeremy Kay, Law Offices of Jeremy L. Kay, P.C.

24

BOARD OF GOVERNORS

PLYMOUTH BOARD OF GOVERNORS STOUGHTON BOARD OF GOVERNORS Kelly O’Connor, Mechanics Cooperative Bank
Diane Pereira, Bluestone Bank
Stacy Antonino, Mission Contributor Barry Crimmins, Law Offices of - Thomas Pontes, Esq., Wynn & Wynn PC
Kathryn Barnicle, AECOM Barry R. Crimmins, P.C. Ryan Prophett, Attorney, Prophett Law Office,
Laurie Caraher, Eastern Bank Kayla Florence, Kaydon Group, LLC
Tiffony Cesero, K-9 Protection, Chair Jean Inman, Owner, NE Center for Nutrition LLC, Chair
Julie King, Mutual Bank Education, Chair Jeanne Quinn, Esq., Silvia & Quinn PC
Shelby Maclary, Nautical Wellness Nadine Israel, Fred & Nadine Real Estate Bill Rosa, Attorney, Wynn & Wynn
Suzanne Miraglia, Mirbeau Inn Danielle Justo, Rich May Law Joseph Rucker, DCF
Suzanne Obin, Mission Contributor Frank Lyons, Sunguard Insurance Systems Stephen Sherman, Jr., Bristol County Savings Bank
Chris Pinto, The Hartford Susan Lyons, Member at Large Steve Turner, Taunton Police Department
Stephen Peck, Cape Cod 5 Chris Mills, Veterans Office – State of MA Richard Zusman, Mission Contributor
Scott Tirrell, Mission Contributor Gaelle Nelfise, College Student
Friend Weiler, Mission Contributor Jeff Perry, Mission Contributor, Real Estate
Cliff Westberg, With Integrity Wealth Management Carolan Sampson, Stoughton Schools
Shelley Weston, Optum Larry Sauer, COO League School
Marge Shepard, Mission Contributor
SOCIAL SERVICES BOARD Jeannette Travaline, Randolph Chamber-
OF GOVERNORS of Commerce
Lisa Wheeler, Triad Advertising Corp.
Joseph Abber, Brockton Juvenile Court Keith Wortzman, Independent Consultant
Craig Barger, Mission Contributor
James Burke, Esq., Law Offices of James M. Burke TAUNTON BOARD OF GOVERNORS
Kimberly Godfrey, PBS Learning Institute
Parmeson Ifill, Office of the Commissioner of A.J. Andrews, Realty-Network Associates
Probation Paul Arikian, City of Taunton
Benjamin Kravitz, Mission Contributor Rachel Bartolomeo, Taunton Federal Credit Union
Gerard Nadeau, Rockland Trust, Chair Alyssa (Gracia) Haggerty, City of Taunton,
The Honorable Gregory L. Phillips, Judge, Mayor’s Office
Taunton District Court Mark Karsner, Esq., Karsner & Meehan Attorneys
Thomas Thibeault, Brockton Housing Authority at Law, PC
Steve Turner, Taunton Police Department Jessica Katz, Esq., Attorney, Jessica Katz Law, LLC
Samson Kimani, EXIT Top Choice Realty
Danielle Lattimore, Brockton ARC
Russel Martorana, FBinsure
Julie Masci, Morton Hospital
Shaunna O’Connell, State Representative

25

26

Framingham OLD COLONY Y
SERVICE AREA
Springfield
Attleboro Barnstable

27

LEARN MORE ABOUT OLD COLONY YMCA
WWW.OLDCOLONYYMCA.ORG

@OLDCOLONYYMCA


Click to View FlipBook Version
Previous Book
YASIN
Next Book
Songs with Grace