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Published by chef_mylo, 2021-12-28 00:19:13

2.0 Curing & Pickling 3.0 Forcemeat

2.0 Curing & Pickling 3.0 Forcemeat

SKU 20073
COLD FRUIT PREPARATION

2.0 CURING

& PICKLING

MOHD YUSOF YAAKOB
UNIT KULINARI
KOLEJ KOMUNITI BEAUFORT

Food Preservation

The process of treating and handling food in such a way
as to stop or greatly slow down spoilage and prevent
foodborne illness while maintaining nutritional value,
texture and flavour.

1. Curing 3. Pickling
2. Brining

Food Preservation

2.1 Curing

important methods for preserving foods, especially protein
foods, since prehistoric times.
preservation techniques such as canning, freezing, and
refrigeration, curing and smoking, as well as drying, enabled
people to store food
contribution to flavor perhaps even more than for their
preservative qualities - smoking .
to understand how curing works to preserve foods so we
can avoid spoilage and food-borne disease that can result
from improper curing or improper handling of cured foods.

Food Preservation

2.1.1. Ingridients

a. Salt
b. Nitrites & Nitrates
c. Sugar
d. Herbs, Spices & Other Falvoring

Food Preservation - Curing - Ingridients

a. Salt

The most important food preservatives
When a food comes in direct contact with salt, a two-
way process takes place
1. Moisture from inside the cell walls of the food is

drawn out and dilutes the salt used for the cure.
2. Absorbed into the cells to increase the salt

concentration = less moisture and are saltier.
Both the moisture reduction and the increased salt
content
Make the food less hospitable to bacteria that cause
spoilage and disease.
Change the flavor and texture of the food.

Food Preservation - Curing - Ingridients

b. Nitrites & Nitrates

Some foods, especially meats, are
susceptible to contamination by the
bacteria that cause botulism
Added to the cures for these foods
to make them safe from botulism
infection

Food Preservation - Curing - Ingridients

c. Sugar

ORDINARY WHITE SUGAR (SUCROSE) AND OTHER FORMS OF
SUGAR, INCLUDING CORN SYRUP, HONEY, AND MAPLE
SYRUP, ARE USED IN SOME CURES.
Sugars modify the flavor of the food and counteract
some of the harsh flavor of the highly concentrated
salt in the cure.
Because salt extracts so much moisture, sugar adds to
the perception of moistness in the cured product.
Using less sweet forms of sugar, such as corn syrup and
dextrose, provides the advantages of sugar without
adding too much sweetness.

Food Preservation - Curing - Ingridients

d.Herbs, Spices &
Other Falvoring

Spice or flavoring that can be used in
cooking can be used in curing.
Most of our most familiar cured sausages,
for example, are of European origin
and use such seasonings as garlic, pepper,
coriander, caraway, nutmeg, and dry
mustard.

Food Preservation - Curing - Method

2.1.2. Curing Method

a. Dry Cures
b. Brine Cures

With both of these methods, the food item
remains in contact with the curing mixture,
which contains salt plus any of the other
ingredients, until the curing medium has
penetrated the food uniformly.
The difference between the methods is that in
brines, the salt is dissolved in water, whereas in
dry cures, it is not

Food Preservation - Curing - Method

a. Dry Cures

In a sedarsyonciunrge
s,antdhe, cure ingredients (salt,
plus in many cases, sugar and
Prague Powder) are mixed together and
packed or rubbed over the food product to
coat it completely.
The length of time required to dry-cure
meats depends on their thickness.
During a long cure, the food is repeatedly
turned and rubbed with the cure mixture in
order to maintain uniform contact.

Food Preservation - Curing - Method

a. Dry Cures

It is i
mportant that the entire surface
area be coated.
The curing procedure for sausages could
be considered a dry cure.
However, in this case, the cure is mixed
directly with the meat. Because no time
is required for the cure to penetrate to
the center of the meat, the curing
process takes place quickly, although the
products may be air-dried or smoked for
a longer period before being consumed

Can you give some
example of local
food product

using this kind of
preservation
method?

Food Preservation - Curing - Method

b. Brine Cures

A brine is a solution of salt and other curing
ingredients in water.
The simplest way to use a brine is to immerse the meat
in the brine and let it soak until the cure is complete.
Compared with dry cures, brines are especially useful
for poultry items, which are difficult to coat evenly
with a dry cure because of their shape.
Items that float, such as poultry, must be held down
with a weight so they are completely submerged in the
brine.
Simple brine soaking is used for small meat items, but
because the brine takes time to penetrate to the
center of large items such as hams, another method is
used to speed the process.

Food Preservation - Curing - Method

b. Brine Cures

Brine is pumped or injected into the meat to make sure
it penetrates evenly. After injection, the meat may be
soaked in brine as well. Commercial operations use a
variety of high-speed equipment for injecting brine. In
addition, small pumps are available for brining by hand.
The length of time required for brining depends on the
size and thickness of the item.
Of course, meats injected with brine need less time in the
brine soak.
Fresh brine should be made for each batch of cured
meats.
Do not reuse brines because they are diluted and
contaminated with juices from the first batch of meats.



Food Preservation

2.Pickling

Process of preserving or extending the shelf life of food
by either anaerobic fermentation in brine or immersion in
vinegar.
The pickling procedure typically affects the food's
texture and flavor.
The resulting food is called a pickle, or, to prevent
ambiguity, prefaced with pickled.
Foods that are pickled include vegetables, fruits, meats,
fish, dairy and eggs.
A distinguishing characteristic is a pH of 4.5 or lower,

a. which is sufficient to kill most bacteria.
b. Pickling can preserve perishable foods for months.
Antimicrobial herbs and spices, such as mustard seed,
garlic, cinnamon or cloves, are often added.

Food Preservation

2.Pickling

If the food contains sufficient moisture, a pickling brine
may be produced simply by adding dry salt. For example,
sauerkraut and Korean kimchi are produced by salting the
vegetables to draw out excess water.
Natural fermentation at room temperature, by lactic acid
bacteria, produces the required acidity.
Other pickles are made by placing vegetables in vinegar.
Like the canning process, pickling (which includes
fermentation) does not require that the food be
completely sterile before it is sealed.

Korean kimchi Sauerkraut

Food Preservation

2.Pickling

Factos affecting the flavor of the end
product

The acidity or salinity of the
solution,
the temperature of fermentation,
the exclusion of oxygen determine
which microorganisms dominate,

Can you give some
example of local
food product

using this kind of
preservation
method?

Food Preservation

3. Brining

Brine: A water-based solution of salt and other
ingredients, used to cure meats and other foods.

Brine Cure : A curing method in which the food is
immersed in a solution (brine) made of the curing
ingredients dissolved in water.

Dry Cure : A curing method in which the curing
ingredients are packed or rubbed over the food.

SKU 20073
COLD FRUIT PREPARATION

3.0 FORCEMEAT

MOHD YUSOF YAAKOB
UNIT KULINARI
KOLEJ KOMUNITI BEAUFORT

3.0 FORCEMEAT

A seasoned mixture of ground
meats and other foods used as a
filling or stuffing or as a base
for terrines and pates

Farce : Forcemeat stuffing; a
mixture of ground ingredients
(meat, , herbs, vegetables) used to
fill poultry, fish, vegetable rtc.

3.1 Types of Forcemeat 3. Gratin
4. Mousselin
1.Straight Method
2. Country style

Types of Forcemeat

1.Straight Method

A mixture of seasoned ground meats.
As such, it is basically a form of sausage
meat, except the grind is generally, but
not always, finer.
Straight forcemeats are the basis of
most traditional pâtés and terrines

Types of Forcemeat

2.Country style

Acountry-style forcemeat is made the
same way, except the grind is coarser.
Made from pork and pork fat and
contain some liver.

Types of Forcemeat

3. Gratin

a portion of the meat is seared,
and thus partially cooked, and
cooled before it is ground.
Because the partial cooking
eliminates some of the binding
power of the meat protein, gratin
forcemeats usually contain a
starch binder called a panada (also
called panade).

Types of Forcemeat

4. Mousseline forcemeat

consists of white meat (usually poultry or
veal) or seafood processed to a purée and
combined with heavy cream and egg

Do you have any question?


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