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Published by Port of Stockton, 2019-07-05 18:40:21

2013_ARPOS_Neat

2013


Annual Report 80 YEARS OF CONNECTING
OUR COMMUNITY TO THE WORLD




















































PORT OF STOCKTON CREDITS
P.O. Box 2089, Stockton, CA 95201-2089 Photography: Adrienne Moore
2201 West Washington Street, Stockton, CA 95203 Supporting Photography: Steve Bender
www.portofstockton.com • E-mail: [email protected] Photo of Community Fuels (p. 13): Captivating Photo
(209) 946-0246 • (800) 344-3213 • Fax: (209) 465-7244 Working Man Photo (p. 26): Phil DiMarino



WHO WE ARE







The Port of Stockton (Port) has played an important role in Interstate 5, connecting Mexico to Canada, and the two largest
California’s goods movement for 80 years, providing an freight railroads in the U.S.—Union Paci c and Burlington
invaluable link between the northern California region and Northern Sante Fe. This direct access to international and
economies across the globe. As a goods movement proponent trans-continental transportation systems has allowed our
since its opening day on February 2, 1933, the Port has import/export business to ourish.

prospered to become the second busiest inland Port on the
Western Coast of the United States—handling approximately The Port of Stockton is the third largest port in California with
three million metric tons of cargo per year. over 4,000 acres and seven million square feet of covered
storage area. It is home to 131 business partners ranging from
Location plays a key role in our success. Nestled within the major distribution centers to local artists who lease of ce space
Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta approximately 75 nautical miles and boasts 60 miles of railroad tracks and more than 12,000
from the San Francisco Bay, we are conveniently located lineal feet of dock space.

adjacent to multiple major transportation corridors including


























80 YEARS CONNECTING OUR COMMUNITY TO THE WORLD 1

BACK ROW: Chair Stephen Griffen, Commissioner Michael Patrick Duffy, Commissioner Gary Christopherson, Commissioner R. Jay Allen
FRONT ROW: Commissioner Elizabeth Blanchard, Port Director Richard Aschieris, Vice Chair Victor Mow, Commissioner Sam L. “Butch” Toccoli

MESSAGE FROM THE COMMISSION



AND DIRECTOR OF THE PORT OF STOCKTON



We are very pleased to report that the Port of Stockton’s steady increase in nearby Stockton Ship Channel to expand the Antioch Dunes National
maritime activity, diverse business expansion, focus on numerous Wildlife Refuge, the only home for the Metalmark Butterfly. The second
environmental initiatives, and increased visibility within our community have project focuses on cleaning up the Delta. The Port is leading the way in
resulted in significant achievements in 2013. Waterborne tonnages increased tackling a 100 year-old hyacinth infestation of our local waterways. We have
six percent, with an impressive 75 percent increase in imported steel products dedicated both people and resources towards this effort rather than rely on
over the previous year; an indication of a recovery of construction activity in chemical spraying. Hyacinth prevents nighttime ship travel, and impacts
Northern California. Investment in rail improvements doubled our train recreational boater safety and access to Downtown Stockton’s marina and
activity from three to six unit trains per week leading to an increased export restaurants.
of American raw materials like iron ore and low-sulfur coal. The Marine
Highway Demonstration Project which began in June has steadily increased The Port’s focus on connecting with our community created a unique
in volume and demonstrates the environmental advantages of moving opportunity to implement public boat tours. These extremely popular and
container traffic by barge rather than truck. successful tours showcased Port facilities and activities while highlighting the
region’s maritime history. The Port also launched an advertising campaign
Our private sector investments exceeded $266 million through the addition called “Port Proud, Stockton Proud” featuring people who work in the Port
of twelve new business partners creating more than 80 full-time family-wage and their personal activities that contribute to the community.
jobs in the greater Stockton area. Wilmar Oils and Fats, LLC, which imports
edible oils from Asia began operation in July and Detroit Energy finished a In conclusion, the Port continues to play a key role in the region’s economy
$200 million conversion of an old power plant into a biomass energy plant. and over the past five years attracted more than $2.27 billion in private sector
The first “green electricity” is scheduled to be produced in early 2014. investments which created 2,365 new family-wage jobs for the City of
Stockton and San Joaquin County. The Port trades with more than 55
The Board’s established policy to improve the region’s environmental quality countries while it operates in an environmentally responsible manner
of life has resulted in two new projects. The first is a partnership with the U.S. continuing our leadership role in improving our region’s quality of life. All this
Fish and Wildlife Service and the Army Corps of Engineers on a ten-year has been accomplished without taxing the citizens of the Stockton Port
project aimed at growing the habitat of 78 protected and endangered District. We hope you enjoy our 2013 Annual Report,”80 Years of Connecting
Lange’s Metalmark Butterflies. The project uses dredge material taken from our Community to the World”.





Stephen Griffen Victor Mow R. Jay Allen Elizabeth Blanchard Gary Christopherson Michael Duffy Sam L. “Butch” Toccoli Richard Aschieris
Chair Vice Chair Commissioner Commissioner Commissioner Commissioner Commissioner Port Director



80 YEARS CONNECTING OUR COMMUNITY TO THE WORLD 3

THE TEAM







RICHARD ASCHIERIS
Port Director


Executive Environmental, STEVE ESCOBAR

YVONNE ISHIMOTO Government & Deputy Port Director, Real Estate & Port Development
Assistant to the Director/ Public Affairs
Secretary to the Board Property Management Facilities, Maintenance Facilities, Maintenance
JEFF WINGFIELD
BARBARA SNYDER Director of Environmental, DEBBIE CALLI & Construction (cont.) & Construction (cont.)
Government & Public Affairs Assistant Manager,
Accounting/Finance JAZOE GREEN JOE LUKE
JASON CASHMAN Properties
DIANNA BAKER Environmental Manager SCOTT BALLARD ERIC OSTERLIE
Director of Finance ELISE HERMESKY BOB BELMONT ALEX PEREZ
RITA KOEHNEN
MICHELLE BOWLING Facilities, Maintenance GREG BURCHAM CHARLES PIGGEE
Controller VICTORIA LUCERO & Construction MIKE ELROD PETE RAMIREZ
JEANNINE MELISSA WHITENER TIM LOVELAND
ANCHARTECHAHAR * Human Resources/ Director of Facilities, DAVID GENTRY NESTOR ROSILES
ESMERALDA CORREA Administrative Services Maintenance & Construction EDUARDO GOMEZ STEVE TRINDADE
LESLI GRITTS KATIE MILLER STEVE COOKERLY DEAN HARR DAVID ZENDEJAS

KRISTY EMERSON Human Resources Manager Assistant Superintendent RANDALL HAWLEY JOE VETTER
MARIA PEREZ JUDY BAUMANN RICARDO NAVARRO KAZUO HIGASHI
Assistant Superintendent
RICARDO TOLEDO MELANIE RODRIGUEZ RUSS NICHOLAS GARY JOHNSTON
MICHELLE ZEPEDA MELISSA SANCHEZ BOB MYERS



* 2013 Employee of the Year





4 80 YEARS CONNECTING OUR COMMUNITY TO THE WORLD

MARK TOLLINI
Senior Deputy Port Director, Trade & Operations


Grants Administration Operations (cont.) Operations (cont.) Port Police (cont.) Information
STEVE LARSON MIKE MILLER EVERARDO MENDOZA KRAIG HIGASHI Technology Manager
Grants Administration Assistant Superintendent
Manager RAUL MONTANEZ BILL HUTTON JIM COOPER
JILL MCAULIFFE
Operations Accounts Manager SAM MONTANEZ TIMOTHY IVEY Projects & Contract
MIKE TYLER LINDA CHRISTISON ZACHARY TYLER RICK LECHUGA Administration
Director of Operations Port Police TYLER MOUA JUAN VILLANUEVA
LARRY LOCKMILLER
CHRIS MOUNTJOY GEORGE LERNER KERRY NICHOLAS Projects & Contract
Operations Manager KYLE MOUTRAY Director of Homeland ALLEN STANDLEY Administration Manager
JEFF VINE REBECCA BARRON Security JANICE DIAS
Superintendent/Safety LACY EDWARDS STEVE NICHOLS NATALIE CRAIG
Of cer Lieutenant FRITZ ENCLUNA
JOSE ARMENTA
BODIE GONSALES MIKE ARCHIBEQUE CURTISS MCCONNELL
Assistant Superintendent DANIEL BAUTISTA JIM MAY DARREL WADE
RANDY JERWA ARTURO GAMBOA
Assistant Superintendent CECILIO GOMEZ JIM MITCHELL WALLY WALLICK

JASON KATINDOY MICHAEL LOPEZ NOEL AVILES MISTY ESCOBAR
Assistant Superintendent SUZANNE CRAIG
ALFREDO MAYA

TABLE OF CONTENTS








THE PORT – AT A GLANCE ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY

Who We Are................................................. Page 1 Water Hyacinth Removal........................................ Page 25

Message from the Commission and Owl Nest Box Program........................................... Page 25
Director of the Port of Stockton................... Page 3 Fish Screen & Monitoring....................................... Page 25

The Team....................................................... Page 4
CONNECTING OUR COMMUNITY
OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE Public Boat Tours.................................................... Page 26

Shipping Activities........................................ Page 9 Port Proud, Stockton Proud.................................... Page 26

Waterborne Tonnage.................................... Page 11 Boggs Tract Turkey Drive........................................ Page 26

The Marine Highway..................................... Page 12 State of the City...................................................... Page 26

Investments & Development......................... Page 13 Marine Highway Dedication.................................... Page 29
Trading Partners........................................... Page 15

Our Maritime History.................................... Page 16 ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Our Business Partners................................... Page 18 Awards.................................................................... Page 30

Port Statistics................................................ Page 21 Special Visits & Delegations................................... Page 30
In the News............................................................. Page 30
HABITAT RESTORATION
The Port Goes Social.............................................. Page 32
Antioch Dunes National Wildlife Refuge..... Page 22






6 80 YEARS CONNECTING OUR COMMUNITY TO THE WORLD

The Port contributes more than


$5 million
annually in taxes to help support
important city & county services

of the chemical fertilizer 90%
The Port imports over






used by the agricultural industry in the Central Valley

SHIPPING ACTIVITIES







The Port nished 2013 with increases in overall waterborne and bulk corn for the Paci c Ethanol facility located on Port
tonnages when compared to the previous year. Combined property as well as carbon products. A total of 72,000 railcar

tonnages for 2013 were 3,052,563 metric tons compared to moves were completed by the Central California Traction
2,878,336 metric tons for 2012 – an overall increase of six Company, the operating company and wholly owned subsidiary
percent. The commodity mix and tonnages involved speak to a of the Union Paci c and Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroads.
continuing, steady improvement in the U.S. economy. Indicators
favoring improved economics within the construction industry Core commodities such as nitrogen fertilizers, both liquid and
(such as an increase in imported steel products utilized in new dry bulk, sustained their historical levels and exceeded 900,000
construction) rose 75 percent from the previous year (96,985 metric tons on the import side. Bulk molasses, another historical

metric tons vs. 55,499 metric tons). core commodity, sustained normal import levels at 279,523
metric tons. The Port’s newest tenant – Wilmar Fats and Oils,
Domestic shipments by rail into the three bulk cement terminals LLC – celebrated their rst vessel call to their liquid bulk
located on Port property have rebounded and imports of bulk terminal with the arrival of the M/T Bow Hector delivering
cement are expected to return as early as 2015. We also gained 13,497 metric tons of food grade edible oils. 2014 is shaping up
export tonnage on the bulk materials side having completed a to be a promising year for the Port with the improving economy
rail infrastructure project increasing unit train velocity through and recovery taking place in the United States.
the Port. Commodities handled by unit train included iron ore


















OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE 9

#1 bulk and break bulk









port in California

WATERBORNE TONNAGE



PRIMARY CALIFORNIA BULK AND BREAK BULK PORTS

CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF PORT AUTHORITIES FISCAL YEAR JULY 2012 - JUNE 2013







STOCKTON 2,094,769



SAN DIEGO 1,736,989




HUENEME 1,438,594



REDWOOD CITY 1,376,991



SAN FRANCISCO 1,242,048



HUMBOLDT 451,078



WEST SACRAMENTO 296,998



RICHMOND 254,909




(IN METRIC TONS)





OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE 11

THE MARINE HIGHWAY



DEMONSTRATION PROJECT




The Port is a partner of the newly opened Marine Highway Demonstration
Project, known as M-580. The marine highway allows containers to be kept on
the water, all the way to the Central Valley before transferring cargo to trucks or
rail, thereby reducing truck traf c within Northern California. The M-580
project, a collaborative effort between the U.S. Maritime Administration
(MARAD) and the Ports of Stockton and Oakland, was successfully launched in

June 2013 to address truck traf c and air pollution as well as help grow
business and increase revenue.


Transporting goods by way of a marine highway is a much cleaner solution for
our environment, reducing emissions by 80 percent when compared to truck
transport. Transporting cargo by barge helps to not only reduce air pollution,
but also fuel consumption. In addition, marine transport increases highway

safety by reducing truck traf c on congested Interstate 580.

MARINE HWY
M-580

INVESTMENTS & DEVELOPMENT







The Port continued to expand in 2013 with the addition of 12 commercially in the rst quarter of 2014. These two projects
new business partners and projects, adding 80 new full-time alone generated $266 million in private capital investment and
jobs and $1.1 million in revenue. Lease renewals retained 68 created 70 full-time positions. Targa Resources is also in the
full-time jobs and $1.9 million in revenue. The Port is now home process of developing a 33-acre petroleum terminal and storage
to 131 business partners and supports more than 4,500 jobs. facility on the Port’s East Complex. The project, approved by the
State in 2011, includes 20 storage tanks with a total storage

Major projects that were approved in 2011 came to fruition in capacity of 850,000 barrels. This capital investment totals more
2013. Wilmar Oils and Fats, LLC, which handles edible oils, than $320 million and creates 30 full-time positions.
completed their rst phase of development in June and
received two vessels by year end. DTE Energy completed Furthermore, several major projects were under negotiation and
construction of their biomass energy plant at the end of the year are anticipated to go to the Port’s Board of Commissioners for
and began their commissioning process. The plant is the consideration in early 2014. Projects currently under negotiation
cleanest power plant in California and the nation producing have a capital investment value of more than $400 million and

electricity and is expected to produce electric power the potential to create more than 300 full-time positions.
























OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE 13

P O R T O F S T O C K T O N
The Port has strong trade
relationships with more then 55
countries exporting nearly 1.4 million
tons of American products annually

and importing nearly 1.7 million tons
of products with a total cargo value T O T HE WOR L D
over $1 billion each year.





IMPORT im NETHERLANDS -
(UNITS OF MEASUREMENT
EXPORT ex IN METRIC TONS)


IMPORT/EXPORT HAWAII - 58,915 TH E PO RT O F
STOCKTON
im M ex C USA - 357 ex Pc
A ANHYDROUS AMMONIA Cs COTTONSEED

F BAGGED FERTILIZER Fo FOOD GRADE OIL MEXICO - 552,347
EL SALVADOR - 44,752 im M
R BAGGED RICE G GRAIN im B ex C S
NICARAGUA - 9,805 im M
B BARITE Lf LIQUID FERTILIZER GUATEMALA - 229,590
TRINIDAD - 336,179 im
Bp BEET PELLETS M MOLASSES im M ex C Pc

Sl BULK CEMENT/SLAG O OTHER COLUMBIA - 42,622


C BULK COAL Pr PADDY RICE im M ex W

Bf BULK FERTILIZER Pc PROJECT CARGO BRAZIL -

I BULK IRON ORE St STEEL PRODUCTS

CHILE - 57,554
Br BULK RICE T TIRE CHIPS
im Bf F ex C
S BULK SULFUR W WHEAT
ARGENTINA - 60,755

P O R T O F S T O C K T O N











T O T HE WOR L D
NORWAY - 250,316 im F Bf Lf
ESTONIA - 31,622 im Lf

LITHUANIA - 49,034 im Lf

NETHERLANDS - 52,635 im F Bf Pc St JAPAN - 295,846
GERMANY - 24,270 im Lf Pc St
im Sl St

KOREA - 79,878 im St ex R Bp
TURKEY - 66,300 ex Pr






QATAR - 18,691 im Bf CHINA - 199,800 TAIWAN - 5,800 im M

im Bf St ex I S
VIETNAM - 42,141 im M

THAILAND - 31,137 im M Pc
im A Lf
MALAYSIA - 74,758 im Bf Fo





INDONESIA - 89,750

im A Bf ex S
BRAZIL - 74,852 ex S



AUSTRALIA - 266,078 im Cs M Br




60,755 im G

mid 1800s late 1800s early 1900s 1930 1932 1933 1934 late 1930s 1940s 1946 1950s 1956 1960s 1970s 1980 1982 1987 1990s 2000s 2013 today

FIRST SHIP SHIP CHANNEL CO. DEEP WATER CHANNEL DREDGING BEGINS REVENUE BOND S/S DAISY GRAY RAIL ACCESS APPLICATION CALL TO DUTY DEVELOPMENT EVOLUTION EFFICIENCY FACILITIES NEW CARGO DREDGING BEGINS TECHNOLOGY DEEP WATER CHANNEL ZONING & ACCESS ROUGH & READY INVESTMENTS EIGHTY YEARS
The first ship with cargo The Stockton Ship The Stockton Chamber of The very first dredging The revenue bond is Port officially opens on Train access to docks 3 Development of Port During WWII, the Port Third stage of The Port begins to actively Improvements are made The Port creates modern J.C. Penney locates its United States Army Corps The Port implements COMPLETION The Port is designated as DEEP PROGRAM Since aquisition of Rough Eighty years after
of hides travels the San Channel Company is Commerce suggests contracts are awarded and approved. California Feb. 2 with arrival of its and 4 make the Port one facilities continues including answers America’s call to development begins with import, warehouse and to the Port’s offloading maritime facilities for distribution center at the of Engineers begins main frame technology in The Port completes the part of the “Stockton The Federal government and Ready Island, the Port beginning operations, the
Joaquin River. The first established and the river is deep-water channel work on the deep-water Governor, Frank Merriam, first ocean going vessel, of the first on the west a grain terminal expansion duty bringing a new wave the construction of an oil distribute manufactured facilities making cargo cargo not suited for Port. Seventy percent of dredging activities to order to electronically Deep Water Channel Enterprise Zone.” This transfers 1400 acres of the has approved $2.27 billion in Port handles more than
ferry station is established surveyed for dredging to concept to the Federal shipping channel begins. participates in the official the lumber schooner coast to have on-dock rail and a cotton compress. The of development, creating terminal and the goods. Larger ships are transfers more efficient. container shipment. the Port’s staff is deepen the ship channel track payroll, financials Project and is dredged to a new designation offers the Rough and Ready Island to private sector investments three million tons of cargo
and the freight vessel make way for larger government, Deep Water ground breaking of S/S Daisy Gray. access. Port submits an application the Stockton Ordinance beginning of the bulk attracted to the Port, new dedicated to providing to 35 feet. and logistics. The Port minimum of 37 ft. at low Port state income tax the Port of Stockton. with 16 new business annually and is the second
“Maria” visits. vessels. Several shipping Bond election raises Stockton’s new port. to increase the ship channel Depot. cargo business. warehouses and a transit them with full service. installs its first track tide. Now, panamax and advantages. The Port launches the new partners. busiest inland port on the
companies merge to $1,307,500 and Bill 5062 The year ends with the depth to 35 ft. shed are built and a New customers and mounted crane capable handymax vessels can Caltrans completes the comprehensive Delta West Coast. The Port of
become the River Lines. passes congress for river appointment of the first terminal is constructed to cargos such as molasses, of handling bulk and access the Port of Stockton Crosstown Freeway, Environmental Enhancement Stockton is one of our
improvement. five-member Board of Port handle iron ore. Another coal and sulfur are a direct containerized cargo. increasing efficiency. allowing direct access for Program (DEEP) that aims to region’s strongest
Commissioners. berth is redesigned to result of the Port’s truck traffic between the enhance air quality, water economic assets, doing
handle bulk cargo. desirable new facilities. Port, I-5 and SR-99. quality, and wildlife habitats business with more than 55
16 OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE in the Delta and surrounding countries and employing
communities. roughly 4,500 people.

mid 1800s late 1800s early 1900s 1930 1932 1933 1934 late 1930s 1940s 1946 1950s 1956 1960s 1970s 1980 1982 1987 1990s 2000s 2013 today

FIRST SHIP SHIP CHANNEL CO. DEEP WATER CHANNEL DREDGING BEGINS REVENUE BOND S/S DAISY GRAY RAIL ACCESS APPLICATION CALL TO DUTY DEVELOPMENT EVOLUTION EFFICIENCY FACILITIES NEW CARGO DREDGING BEGINS TECHNOLOGY DEEP WATER CHANNEL ZONING & ACCESS ROUGH & READY INVESTMENTS EIGHTY YEARS
The first ship with cargo The Stockton Ship The Stockton Chamber of The very first dredging The revenue bond is Port officially opens on Train access to docks 3 Development of Port During WWII, the Port Third stage of The Port begins to actively Improvements are made The Port creates modern J.C. Penney locates its United States Army Corps The Port implements COMPLETION The Port is designated as DEEP PROGRAM Since aquisition of Rough Eighty years after
of hides travels the San Channel Company is Commerce suggests contracts are awarded and approved. California Feb. 2 with arrival of its and 4 make the Port one facilities continues including answers America’s call to development begins with import, warehouse and to the Port’s offloading maritime facilities for distribution center at the of Engineers begins main frame technology in The Port completes the part of the “Stockton The Federal government and Ready Island, the Port beginning operations, the
Joaquin River. The first established and the river is deep-water channel work on the deep-water Governor, Frank Merriam, first ocean going vessel, of the first on the west a grain terminal expansion duty bringing a new wave the construction of an oil distribute manufactured facilities making cargo cargo not suited for Port. Seventy percent of dredging activities to order to electronically Deep Water Channel Enterprise Zone.” This transfers 1400 acres of the has approved $2.27 billion in Port handles more than
ferry station is established surveyed for dredging to concept to the Federal shipping channel begins. participates in the official the lumber schooner coast to have on-dock rail and a cotton compress. The of development, creating terminal and the goods. Larger ships are transfers more efficient. container shipment. the Port’s staff is deepen the ship channel track payroll, financials Project and is dredged to a new designation offers the Rough and Ready Island to private sector investments three million tons of cargo
and the freight vessel make way for larger government, Deep Water ground breaking of S/S Daisy Gray. access. Port submits an application the Stockton Ordinance beginning of the bulk attracted to the Port, new dedicated to providing to 35 feet. and logistics. The Port minimum of 37 ft. at low Port state income tax the Port of Stockton. with 16 new business annually and is the second
“Maria” visits. vessels. Several shipping Bond election raises Stockton’s new port. to increase the ship channel Depot. cargo business. warehouses and a transit them with full service. installs its first track tide. Now, panamax and advantages. The Port launches the new partners. busiest inland port on the
companies merge to $1,307,500 and Bill 5062 The year ends with the depth to 35 ft. shed are built and a New customers and mounted crane capable handymax vessels can Caltrans completes the comprehensive Delta West Coast. The Port of
become the River Lines. passes congress for river appointment of the first terminal is constructed to cargos such as molasses, of handling bulk and access the Port of Stockton Crosstown Freeway, Environmental Enhancement Stockton is one of our
improvement. five-member Board of Port handle iron ore. Another coal and sulfur are a direct containerized cargo. increasing efficiency. allowing direct access for Program (DEEP) that aims to region’s strongest
Commissioners. berth is redesigned to result of the Port’s truck traffic between the enhance air quality, water economic assets, doing
handle bulk cargo. desirable new facilities. Port, I-5 and SR-99. quality, and wildlife habitats business with more than 55
16 OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE in the Delta and surrounding countries and employing
communities. roughly 4,500 people.

OUR BUSINESS PARTNERS









Academy of Truck Driving Buckeye Terminals LLC Chemstation of
ACX Paci c Northwest Inc. C Trans Inc. Northern California
Child Abuse
ADA Inc. Calaveras Cement Prevention Council
Ah-Tye, Denny Company City of Stockton
Alfalfa Supply Inc. California Agri
Inspection Co. Ltd. Clearwire LLC
All Fire Protection
Service Inc. California Ammonia Co. Club Stockton Volleyball
Allen, Pitner, California Portland Comgen Construction Inc.
Quirino & Landry Cement Custom Spraying
American Biodiesel Inc. Capital Feed D.B. Western
American Containers Inc. Carry Transit - East Delroy's Deli

American River Ag Inc. Carry Transit - West Delta Yacht Club
Anderson, Ricky and Catch All Baseball Dement Farms
Jennifer CEC Hard Hat Grilling Dement, Rod
Antonini Freight Cellar, Raymond & Department of Water
Express Inc. Patricia Resources
Bazaz, Gurmeet S. Cencal Recycling LLC Door Fabrication
Best Logistics Inc. - East Central California Services Inc.
Blair Grain Company Railcar Repair DTE Stockton LLC

BlueLinx Corp. Central California Education Across
Traction Company Africa Inc.







6

OUR BUSINESS PARTNERS









Chemstation of Ferguson Enterprises Inc. Keep on Trucking Onions Etc. Russell, Sandee Tradco Inc.
Northern California Ferguson Enterprises Inc. - Kloeckner Metals, US Online Logistics San Joaquin County Sheriff Transhold Inc.
Child Abuse Distribution Kustom Materials Paci c Ethanol SFPP, L.P. Transload Solutions LLC
Prevention Council French Oils LLC Laminators, Corp. Pelton-Shepherd Industries Sheedy Drayage Co. Transmarine Navigation
City of Stockton Gilton Resources L-1 Enrollment Services Penberthy, Norman Soli-Bond Turner Photography
Clearwire LLC Giovannoni Farms LDA Partners LLP Pereira Studios SSA Marine Inc. UDB Enterprises

Club Stockton Volleyball GPT Properties Trust Lovotti Air University of the Paci c
Comgen Construction Inc. Green Man Materials Lowe's HIW Pitbull Truck Lines Inc. ST Services/NuStar Energy VicNRG LLC
PUENTES-Boggs Tract
Stockton Civic Theatre
Custom Spraying Grogan, Edward M & L Commodities Quality Of ce Liquidations Stockton Harbor Bulk Victory Blue LLC
D.B. Western H.J. Baker & Bros. Inc. MacSpecialties Ramsey Express Transload LLC Weber Point Yacht Club
Delroy's Deli Haas Graphics Martin Operating Rarin Federal Credit Union Stockton Police Westway Terminal
Delta Yacht Club Hammer Head Partnership Recology Stockton Department Westway Trading
Dement Farms Protection Inc. METROPCS Revel, Cynthia Stockton Police Of cers Corporation
Dement, Rod Hendrix Forklift Service Metropolitan Stevedore Association Weyerhaeuser Company
Rice Terminals
Department of Water Holt Repair & MT Railcars Inc. Stockton Professional Wilmar Oils & Fats Inc.
Resources Manufacturing Inc. My Power Books Riverside Cement Fire ghters Yara North America Inc. -

Door Fabrication International Raw North American Roof Rangers Tamarii Matairea East
Services Inc. Materials LTD Composites Ross Island Sand & Gravel Targa Terminals LLC Yara North America Inc. -

DTE Stockton LLC Junior Aid of Stockton Northern California College Royal White Cement Inc. TBM Sand & Storage West
Education Across Karl Ross Post of Construction RubyNova Inc. Logistics LLC
Africa Inc. Tesoro Logistics Operation







OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE 19

The Port supports more than 4,500 jobs in the San Joaquin County area,
benefits totaling over$180 Million
with annual salaries and

PORT STATISTICS







PROPERTY LEASING & CARGO TYPES REVENUE CENTERS
Total Revenues: $44,513,879 Total Revenues: $44,513,879



































Property Management Dry Bulk Cargo Property Management Terminal
$20,125,942 $8,980,419 $20,125,942 $17,430,126

General Cargo Other Grant Revenue Warehouse
$5,664,740 $5,325,502 $4,299,943 $1,632,309
Liquid Bulk Cargo Containers Other Interest
$3,916,601 $500,675 $974,705 $50,854





OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE 21

HABITAT RESTORATION







ANTIOCH DUNES NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE
Antioch Dunes is the only place on the planet home to the endangered Lange’s
metalmark butterfly. The dune habitat has been severely impacted by human

development over the past 100 years including the use of sand from the dunes to
rebuild San Francisco after the devastating 1906 earthquake and fire. Now, an effort is
underway to restore the sand dune habitat to allow for the continued survival of the
endangered butterfly. The Port took the lead to acquire the permits to place dredged
material at the site, prepped the site to accept the material and coordinated with the
other partners to implement the project. In October 2013, the Port and its partners,
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, began preparing the
Antioch Dunes National Wildlife Refuge site to receive sandy dredge material as part of
their unique restoration project. This season 40,000 cubic yards of clean sand was

placed at the site that will be shaped into dunes. “This project has been in the works for
several years and is really a win-win for all the agencies involved,” said Louis Terrazas, a
wildlife refuge specialist for the USFWS. The sand will recreate the natural dunes which
support three plants; the naked stemmed buckwheat needed by the butterfly and also
the endangered evening primrose and Contra Costa wallflower. The project is
anticipated to continue annually over the next 10 years. “The Port is responsible for
locating placement sites for dredged material and the Corps is responsible for keeping

the channels at the authorized depth,” said Gary Kamei project manager for the Corps.
“To their credit, the Port of Stockton coordinated with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife for
sand placement and made this happen—it was their idea!”






22 HABITAT RESTORATION

Transporting goods via ship



or barge can reduce 80%


emissions by up to

550,000




The Port removed pounds


of water hyacinth from the Stockton Deep Water



Channel and downtown Stockton

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY







OWL NEST BOX PROGRAM
WATER HYACINTH REMOVAL The success of the Port’s Owl Nest Box Program continues as
Introduced to the California Delta over 100 years ago, an community interest grows. In 2013, the Port installed cameras
invasive plant species Eichhornia Crassipes also known as within several of the owl nest boxes to capture unique and

water hyacinth, has become a significant threat within the real-time images of the owls within their Port-manufactured and
Delta waterways. This free-floating perennial aquatic adopted homes. To continue our focus on education, the Port is
plant can grow up to three feet above and below the working diligently to develop a program that allows the owl

surface of water creating a solid carpet-like mass. The images and camera recordings to be viewed in classrooms via
hyacinth prevents nighttime ship travel, impacts our website. Positive responses about this effort have been
recreational boater safety and negatively affects water received from several area teachers who partner with the Port to
quality. It thrives as temperatures rise and though several educate students about the local owl population. A thriving owl
attempts have been made to manage its prolific growth, population helps protect levees in our community from being

eradication is not currently possible. In 2013, the Port undermined by rodents. It is anticipated this program will
took aggressive actions by hiring a company to expand in the future.
mechanically remove hundreds of thousands of pounds of FISH SCREEN & MONITORING

water hyacinth from the Stockton deep water channel and Each year the Port conducts standard fish monitoring during
downtown Stockton in order to facilitate goods dredging activities to monitor endangered species and minimize
movement and benefit our community. This ongoing impacts. In 2013, the Port expanded their data monitoring efforts
effort is an indication of the Port’s commitment to by working with fish biologist Jordan Gold, to design and build a
improving the greater community while keeping the state-of-the-art fish screen. This new, efficient and effective

waterway clear to support shipping activities. screen has received high praise from the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers.





ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY 25

CONNECTING OUR COMMUNITY







PUBLIC BOAT TOURS BOGGS TRACT TURKEY DRIVE
During the summer of 2013, the Port offered a total of 39 free The Port’s Business Partner Association has been organizing

public boat tours. The two-hour tours educated the public and distributing gifts for our neighbors in Boggs Tract for 14
about the Port’s business and facilities as well as provided years. Each year, they assemble 100 baskets with a turkey and
invaluable insights into Stockton area history. Each month, trimmings for delivery to the Boggs Tract Community Center.
tour reservations were booked within 15 minutes of opening
and as a result, the Port extended tours into September. STATE OF THE CITY
This May marked the 8th year the Port has hosted the Greater
PORT PROUD, STOCKTON PROUD Stockton Chamber of Commerce’s Annual State of the City

In our continued efforts to connect to our community, the Port luncheon. The high-profile event showcased the City of
created and launched the advertising campaign “Port Proud, Stockton’s economic, educational plans for upcoming
Stockton Proud.” The advertising series highlights specific projects. City of Stockton Mayor Anthony Silva delivered his
Port employees, their role at the Port and their contribution to first State of the City Address and laid out his plans for the
the betterment of the Stockton community. The ads can be future of Stockton and Port Chairperson Stephen Griffen
found on the Port’s website as well as in several area provided attendees with an update of Port activities of the
magazines. previous year. In addition, more than 45 exhibitors from local
and state programs provided useful information.


















26 CONNECTING OUR COMMUNITY

Over thirteen consecutive Saturdays this summer,


the Port conducted thirty-nine educational boat tours
2,340
for the public. Total attendance:



MARINE HIGHWAY DEDICATION






The United States Maritime Administration, Stockton and The program consisted of welcome remarks and introductions of

Oakland Port of cials formally dedicated the Marine Highway special guests by our Port Director followed by the pledge of
Demonstration Project on November 1, 2013 at the Port of allegiance and national anthem prior to dedication remarks.
Stockton. This project demonstrates that barging cargo between Event speakers included Paul Jaenichen Sr., Acting
the Central Valley and the Bay Area by water is a viable, Administrator of the U.S. Maritime Administration, Victor Mow,
environmentally friendly mode of moving containers by barge, Stockton Port Commission Vice Chairman and Congressman
reducing truck traf c on congested highways. Jerry McNerney.

More than 200 dignitaries and invited guests attended the The event concluded with a ceremonial christening by Paul
dedication event to celebrate the launch of this ef cient and Jaenichen Sr. followed by the of cial opening of the Maritime

innovative transportation system. The day was perfect with Highway as the Arthur Brusco tugboat directed the barge away
unseasonably beautiful weather and a container barge as the from the Port and headed towards the San Francisco Bay.
backdrop for the dedication. As attendees arrived, they enjoyed
ceremonial music played by the Association of the United States
Army Military band conducted by Monte C. Gmur.























CONNECTING OUR COMMUNITY 29

MARINE HIGHWAY
Redwood Times, 11.26.13
The Record, 01.24.13
Daily Republic, 11.26.13
The Record, 02.05.13
San Diego Tribune, 11.26.13
Port Technology, 05.15.13
The Record, 05.15.13
San Jose Mercury News, 11.26.13
The Record, 06.04.13
Times Standard, 11.26.13
The Record, 06.07.13
KCRA Channel 3, 11.27.13
Manteca Bulletin, 11.27.13
The Record, 06.10.13
DREDGING/ANTIOCH DUNES
The Record, 07.02.13
Contra Costa Times, 10.17.13
The Record, 09.06.13
Contra Costa Times, 10.19.13
Professional Mariner, 11.01.13
The Record, 10.26.13
The Record, 11.02.13
US Army Corps of Engineers,
Journal of Commerce, 11.08.13
11.20.13
WATER HYACINTH REMOVAL
Dredging Today, USA, 11.21.13
Telegram.com, 01.28.13
Bay Nature, 12.02.13
The Record, 05.10.13
Post News Group. 12.02.13
Tracy Press, 05.29.13
The Record, 11.25.13
ACCOMPLISHMENTS WATER HYACINTH REMOVAL (Cont.)
AWARDS
Security Division K-9 Competitions IN THE NEWS
The Port of Stockton Police received 24
awards at various K-9 competitions held JANUARY The Record (Recordnet.com), Port JUNE
in 2013 The Record (Recordnet.com), panel draws lots of interest: City has The Record (Recordnet.com),
“Marine Highway control assumed: 11 people applying for two vacant “Barge hits ‘road’: And with that,
Certificate of Achievement for Port takes over management to positions” Marine Highway is open to traffic”
Excellence in Financial Reporting 2012 speed progress”
The Port of Stockton Finance Division The Record (Recordnet.com), “Port The Record (Recordnet.com), “A
earned this award, presented by the Manteca Bulletin, “Exports pump signs contract for Marine Highway chance worth taking: Marine
Government Finance Officers Association life into SJ economy” operator: Barge shipments may Highway ready to dip a toe in the
of the United States and Canada FEBRUARY begin in spring” waters of shipping commerce”
Central Valley Business Journal, APRIL The Record (Recordnet.com),
“Marine Highway getting under
SPECIAL VISITS & “Economic powerhouse celebrates Central Valley Business Journal, way: Operation will begin this week,
80th year”
“Port protection: High tech security
DELEGATIONS keeps businesses safe” port board told”
The Record (Recordnet.com), “Port
CONGRESSMAN JERRY MCNERNEY will replace bridge to island: MAY Central Valley Business Journal,
“New port commissioner ‘Here to
CONGRESSMAN JEFF DENHAM Successor estimated to cost $10M” The Record (Recordnet.com), create jobs’”
GENERAL C. DAVID TURNER MARCH “Officials warn of potential damage The Record (Recordnet.com),
United States Army Corps of Engineers The Record (Recordnet.com), caused by water hyacinth" “Crosstown Freeway extention
“Diesel plant opens today at Port of American Journal of Transportation,
PAUL N. JAENICHEN closer”
Senior Acting Administrator Stockton: Victory Blue will produce ”Port of Stockton and the Marine
United States Maritime Administration fluid to cut pollution” highway”
REAR ADMIRAL KARL L. SCHULTZ
United States Coast Guard, District 11

WATER HYACINTH REMOVAL (Cont.)
MARINE HIGHWAY
Redwood Times, 11.26.13
The Record, 01.24.13
The Record, 02.05.13
Daily Republic, 11.26.13
Port Technology, 05.15.13
San Diego Tribune, 11.26.13
The Record, 05.15.13
San Jose Mercury News, 11.26.13
Times Standard, 11.26.13
The Record, 06.04.13
KCRA Channel 3, 11.27.13
The Record, 06.07.13
The Record, 06.10.13
Manteca Bulletin, 11.27.13
The Record, 07.02.13
DREDGING/ANTIOCH DUNES
Contra Costa Times, 10.17.13
The Record, 09.06.13
Contra Costa Times, 10.19.13
Professional Mariner, 11.01.13
The Record, 10.26.13
The Record, 11.02.13
US Army Corps of Engineers,
Journal of Commerce, 11.08.13
11.20.13
WATER HYACINTH REMOVAL
Dredging Today, USA, 11.21.13
Telegram.com, 01.28.13
Bay Nature, 12.02.13
The Record, 05.10.13
Post News Group. 12.02.13
Tracy Press, 05.29.13
The Record, 11.25.13
JULY OCTOBER Journal of Commerce, “MARAD The Record (Recordnet.com),
The Record (Recordnet.com), “Big Bay Area News Group, “Dredging Marks Opening of California Green “Boggs Tract feeling love from the
rig goes green: Hydrogen-fueled for wildlife: Endangered species: Trade Corridor” port: Annual turkey drive provides
truck offers emissions-free solution Sand deposited ashore to improve US Army Corps of Engineers, “Ship food baskets for the
in S.J.” habitat” channel dredging helps economy, neighborhood”
The Record (Recordnet.com), “Free Contra Costa Times, “San Joaquin endangered butter ies” The Record (Recordnet.com),
port tours every Saturday in July, River Dredging may bene t The Record (Recordnet.com), “Stockton plant upgrade advances:
August” endangered Antioch butter ies” “Hyacinth gone, thanks to the Port” State grant could provide $4.9
The Record (Recordnet.com), “Port The Record (Recordnet.com), “Port The Record (Recordnet.com), “Port million”
extends popular free boat tours: shifts gears to ensure dredging is of Stockton of cials celebrate at
Two-hour harbor rides celebrate done on time” dedication of Marine Highway”
80th year of storied port”
The Record (Recordnet.com), “Port The Record (Recordnet.com),
Central Valley Business Journal, of cials approve $600K for “Commander’s House celebrates
“Marine highway launches rst dredging” 100 years”
barge shipments”
NOVEMBER DECEMBER
AUGUST Daily Republic, “Port of Stockton Bay Nature, “Restoring Antioch
The Record (Recordnet.com), goes after water hyacinth” Dunes National Wildlife Refuge”
“Upgrade of port facility is
proposed” Post News Group, “Port of
Stockton Eco Friendly Projects”









ACCOMPLISHMENTS 31

THE PORT GOES SOCIAL









GET CONNECTED STAY UP-TO-DATE WITH THE LATEST
PORT ACTIVITIES AND INFORMATION

In August 2013, the Port took a proactive step to further
FOLLOW US ON TWITTER engage and connect to our community by launching several

@PortofStockton social media sites. We are now able to provide immediate and
real-time updates, interesting photos and information about
the Port’s history.


LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

facebook.com/portofstockton





PIN US ON PINTEREST

pinterest.com/portofstockton




SCAN OUR QR

to visit our website at
www.portofstockton.com










32 ACCOMPLISHMENTS



2013


Annual Report 80 YEARS OF CONNECTING
OUR COMMUNITY TO THE WORLD




















































PORT OF STOCKTON CREDITS
P.O. Box 2089, Stockton, CA 95201-2089 Photography: Adrienne Moore
2201 West Washington Street, Stockton, CA 95203 Supporting Photography: Steve Bender
www.portofstockton.com • E-mail: [email protected] Photo of Community Fuels (p. 13): Captivating Photo
(209) 946-0246 • (800) 344-3213 • Fax: (209) 465-7244 Working Man Photo (p. 26): Phil DiMarino


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