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Grade 6 Comprehensive Science 1 Regular and Advanced

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Published by gianrpark, 2017-07-13 13:47:54

Grade 6 Comprehensive Science 1 Regular and Advanced

Grade 6 Comprehensive Science 1 Regular and Advanced

2016 - 2017 Volusia County Schools

Created For Teachers By Teachers
Curriculum Mapping Committee:

Laura French
Jeff Krob

Johnson Kung
PJ Maccio

Carey Potter-Whiting
Stephanie Robinson
Marie Sylvester

Comprehensive Science I

Curriculum Map

Regular and Advanced

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

Parts of the Curriculum Map

The curriculum map defines the curriculum for each course taught in Volusia County. They have been created by teachers from Volusia County Schools on
curriculum mapping and assessment committees. The following list describes the various parts of each curriculum map:

• Units: the broadest organizational structure used to group content and concepts within the curriculum map created by teachercommittees.
• Topics: a grouping of standards and skills that form a subset of a unit created by teacher committees.
• Learning Targets and Skills: the content knowledge, processes, and skills that will ensure successful mastery of the NGSSS as unpacked by

teacher committees according to appropriate cognitive complexities.
• Standards: the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS) required by course descriptions posted on CPALMS by FLDOE.
• Pacing: recommended time frames created by teacher committees and teacher survey data within which the course should be taught in preparation for the

EOC.
• Vocabulary: the content-specific vocabulary or phrases both teachers and students should be familiar with and use during instruction and assessment.

Maps may also contain other helpful information, such as:
• Resources: a listing of available, high quality and appropriate materials (strategies, lessons, textbooks, videos and other media sources) that are aligned to
the standards. These resources may be found at www.edmodo.com within the group folders. Contact the District Science Office for assistance in joining
groups.
• Teacher Hints: a listing of considerations when planning instruction, including guidelines to content that is inside and outside the realm of the course
descriptions on CPALMS in terms of state assessments.
• Sample FOCUS Questions: sample questions aligned to the standards and in accordance with EOC style, rigor, and complexity guidelines; they do
NOT represent all the content that should be taught, but merely a sampling of it.
• Labs: The NSTA and the District Science Office recommend that all students experience and participate in at least one hands-on, inquiry-based, lab or
activity per week where students are collecting data and drawing conclusions. The district also requires that at least one (1) lab per grading period
should have a written lab report with analysis and conclusion.
• Common Labs (CL): Each grade level has one Common Lab (CL) for each nine week period. These common labs have been designed by teachers to

allow common science experiences that align to the curriculum across the district.
• Science Literacy Connections (SLC): Each grade level has one common Science Literacy Connection (Common SLC) for each nine week period. These

literacy experiences have been designed by teachers to provide complex text analysis that aligns to the curriculum across the district. Additional SLCs are
provided to supplement district textbooks and can be found on the Edmodo page.
• DIA: (District Interim Assessments: Science) are content-specific tests developed by the district and teacher committees to assist in student progress
monitoring. The goal is to prepare students for the 8th grade Statewide Science Assessment (SSA) or Biology End of Course (EOC) using rigorous items

developed using the FLDOE Item Specifications Documents.

The opening pages of the map include information about the SSA content breakdown, the Volusia County Science 5E Instructional Model, cognitive
complexity information for developing various levels of questions for classroom use, and the Florida ELA and Math Standard that may be in the course
descriptions.

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 2

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

2016-2017 Instructional Calendar

Week Dates Days Quarter Week Dates Days Quarter
1 15 August - 19 August 5 Start 1st Start 3rd
2 22 August - 26 August 5 20 4 January - 6 January 3
3 29 August - 2 September 5 ↑ ↑
4 6 September - 9 September 4 10 21 9 January - 13 January 5 10
5 12 September - 16 September 5 Weeks Weeks
6 20 September - 23 September 4 ↓ 22 17 January - 20 January 4 ↓
7 26 September - 30 September 5
8 3 October - 7 October 5 End 1st 23 23 January - 27 January 5 End 3rd
9 10 October - 14 October 5 Start 2nd Start 4th
10 17 October - 20 October 4 24 30 January - 3 February 5
11 24 October - 28 October 5 ↑ ↑
12 31 October - 4 November 5 9 25 6 February - 10 February 5 10
13 7 November - 10 November 4 Weeks Weeks
14 14 November - 18 November 5 ↓ 26 13 February - 17 February 5 ↓
15 21 November - 22 November 2
16 28 November - 2 December 5 End 2nd 27 21 February - 24 February 4 End 4th
17 5 December - 9 December 5
18 12 Deceber - 16 December 5 28 27 February - 3 March 5
19 19 December - 20 December 2
29 6 March - 9 March 4

30 20 March – 24 March 5

31 27 March - 31 March 5

32 3 April - 7 April 5

33 10 April - 14 April 5

34 17 April - 21 April 5

35 24 April - 28 April 5

36 1 May - 5 May 5

37 8 May - 12 May 5

Start Review and Administer EOC*

38 15 May - 19 May 5

* See school-based testing schedule for the course EOC administration time 39 22 May - 26 May 5

Expectations: Lab Information
Safety Contract:

The National Science Teacher Association, NSTA, and the district science office http://www.nsta.org/docs/SafetyInTheScienceClassroom.pdf
recommend that all students experience and participate in at least one hands-on-based
lab per week. At least one (1) lab per grading period should have a written lab report Safety, Cleanup, and Laws:
with analysis and conclusion. http://labsafety.flinnsci.com/Chapter.aspx?ChapterId=88&UnitId=1
http://labsafety.flinnsci.com/CertificateCourseSelection.aspx?CourseCode=MS

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 3

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

Volusia County Science 5E Instructional Model

Engage Description Implementation

Learners engage with an activity that captures their attention, The diagram below shows how the elements of the 5E model are
stimulates their thinking, and helps them access prior knowledge. A interrelated. Although the 5E model can be used in linear order (engage,
successful engagement activity will reveal existing misconceptions to explore, explain, elaborate and evaluate), the model is most effective whenit
the teacher and leave the learner wanting to know more about how is used as a cycle of learning.
the problem or issue relates to his/her own world. (e.g. ISN-preview,
Explore Probe, Teacher Demonstration…) Engage Explore

Learners explore common, hands-on experiences that help them
begin constructing concepts and developing skills related to the
learning target. The learner will gather, organize, interpret, analyze
and evaluate data. (e.g. investigations, labs…)

Explain Learners explain through analysis of their exploration so that their Discuss
understanding is clarified and modified with reflective activities. and
Learners use science terminology to connect their explanations to
the experiences they had in the engage and explore phases. (e.g. Evaluate
Lecture, ISN-notes, Research, Close-reading, reading to learn, videos,

websites…)

Elaborate Learners elaborate and solidify their understanding of the concept Elaborate Explain
and/or apply it to a real world situation resulting in a deeper
understanding. Teachers facilitate activities that help the learner
correct remaining misconceptions and generalize concepts in a
broader context. (e.g. labs, web-quest, presentations, debate,

discussion, ISN-reflection…)

Teachers and Learners evaluate proficiency of learning targets,
concepts and skills throughout the learning process. Evaluations
Evaluate should occur before activities, to assess prior knowledge, after Each lesson begins with an engagement activity, but evaluation occurs
activities, to assess progress, and after the completion of a unit to throughout the learning cycle. Teachers should adjust their instruction
assess comprehension. (i.e. formatives and summatives) based on the outcome of the evaluation. In addition, teachers are
encouraged to differentiate at each state to meet the needs of individual
students.

*Adapted from The BSCS 5E Instructional Model: Origins, Effectiveness, and Applications, July 2006, Bybee, et.al, pp. 33-34.

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 4

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

Cognitive Complexity

The benchmarks in the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS) identify knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire at each grade level,
with the underlying expectation that students also demonstrate criticalthinking.

The categories—low complexity, moderate complexity, high complexity—form an ordered description of the demands a test item may make on a student.
Instruction in the classroom should match, at a minimum, the complexity level of the learning target in the curriculum map.

Low Moderate High

This category relies heavily on the recall and This category involves more flexible thinking and This category makes heavy demands on student
recognition of previously learned concepts and choice among alternatives than low complexity thinking. Students must engage in more abstract
principles. Items typically specify what the student items. They require a response that goes beyond reasoning, planning, analysis, judgment, and
is to do, which is often to carry out some the habitual, is not specified, and ordinarily has creative thought. The items require that the
procedure that can be performed mechanically. It more than a single step or thought process. The student think in an abstract and sophisticated way
is not left to the student to come up with an student is expected to decide what to do—using often involving multiple steps.
original method or solution. formal methods of reasoning and problem-solving
strategies—and to bring together skill and
knowledge from various domains.

Students will: Students will: Students will:

• retrieve information from a chart, table, • interpret data from a chart, table, or simple • analyze data from an investigation or
diagram, or graph graph experiment and formulate a conclusion
• determine the best way to organize or present • develop a generalization from multiple data
• recognize a standard scientific representation data from observations, an investigation, or sources
of a simple phenomenon experiment • analyze and evaluate an experiment with
• describe examples and non-examples of multiple variables
• complete a familiar single-step procedure or scientific processes or concepts • analyze an investigation or experiment to
equation using a reference sheet

• specify or explain relationships among different identify a flaw and propose a method for
groups, facts, properties, or variables correcting it
• differentiate structure and functions of different • analyze a problem, situation, or system and
organisms or systems make long-term predictions
• interpret, explain, or solve a problem involving
• predict or determine the logical next step or complex spatial relationships
outcome
• apply and use concepts from a standard
scientific model or theory

*Adapted from Webb’s Depth of Knowledge and FLDOE Specification Documentation, Version 2. Page 5

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced)

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

2016 – 2017 Middle Grades Weekly Curriculum Trace

2016 Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10
6th
Grade Energy DIA Force and Motion DIA
7th DIA
Grade Energy DIA Heat and Light DIA
8th Week 19
Grade Introduction to SMT Atomic Theory and Periodic Table DIA Compounds and Mixtures
Science 1 Week 16
2016
Week 11 Week 12 Week 13 Week 14 Week 15 Week 17 Week 18
6th
Grade Weather and Climate DIA Earth’s Structures and Changes DIA

7th Plate Tectonics DIA Geology DIA
Grade Matter Cycles DIA
Properties of Matter DIA Optional Matter Cycles Week 29
8th Week25 SMT 2 Week 28 DIA
Grade
Week 20 Week 21 Week 22 Week 23 Week 24 Week 26 Week 27
2017
Earth’s Systems and Patterns DIA Cells
6th
Grade Genetics DIA Evolution

7th The Universe DIA Solar System
Grade
Week 30 Week 31 Week 32 Week 33 Week 34 Week 35 Week 36 Week 37 Week 38
8th DIA EOC Review
Grade Human Body Systems Classification during Standardized DIA EOC Review
2017 Testing

6th Evolution DIA Ecology during Standardized Testing DIA
Grade
Solar System DIA SSA Review SSA Transition to High School
7th Administration
Grade

8th
Grade

*DIA (District Interim Assessments for Science) are content-specific tests developed by the district and teacher committees to aid in student progress monitoring.
**Weeks 38-39 are set aside for course review and EOC administration.

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 6

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

Comprehensive Science 1 (Regular and Advanced Curricula)

Week Date Topic(s) Unit DIA

1–4 15 August – 9 September Science Processes Energy
(19 days) Energy

5 – 10 12 September – 20 October Forces Force and Motion
(28 days)
Motion of Objects

End of 1st Grading Period

11 – 16 24 October – 2 December The Sun’s Energy Weather and Climate
(26 days) Weather and Climate Earth’s Structures and
17 – 19
(12 days) 5 December – 20 December Earth’s Structures and Changes Changes

20 – 23 End of 2nd Grading Period – Winter Break Earth’s Systems and
(17 days) Patterns
4 January – 27 January Earth’s Systems and Patterns

24 – 29 30 January – 9 March Cell Theory and Organization of Life Cells
(28 days) Cell Structure and Function

End of 3rd Grading Period – Spring Break

30 – 34 20 March – 21 April Human Body Systems Human Body Systems
(25 days) 24 April – 12 May
35 – 37 15 May – 26 May Classification Classification
(15 days) Review, Prepare, and Administer EOC
38 – 39
(10 days)

End of 4th Grading Period – Summer Break

Expectations: Safety Contract:
The National Science Teacher Association, NSTA, and the district science http://www.nsta.org/docs/SafetyInTheScienceClassroom.pdf
office recommend that all students experience and participate in at least Safety, Cleanup, and Laws:
one hands-on-based lab per week. At least one (1) lab per grading period http://labsafety.flinnsci.com/Chapter.aspx?ChapterId=88&UnitId=1
should have a written lab report with analysis and conclusion. http://labsafety.flinnsci.com/CertificateCourseSelection.aspx?CourseCode=MS

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 7

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

The Nature of Science Weeks 1 – 39
*Nature of Science Standards, NOS focus, are explicitly applied in content throughout the year.

Topics Students will: Learning Targets and Skills Standards Vocabulary
SC.6.N.2.1 non-science
• describe science as the study of the natural world SC.6.N.2.2 pseudoscience
• give examples and non-examples of science SC.6.N.2.3 science

• describe science as both long lasting and strongly supported by data through
experimentation, yet open to change

• understand scientists can have varied backgrounds, talents, interests, and goals analyze
Students will: differentiate
• plan and carry out various types of scientific investigations SC.6.N.1.1 interpret
• differentiate between an experiment (control group and variables) and other types conclusion
of scientific investigations also control group
The Nature of Science SC.6.N.1.2 data
• discuss the importance of repeating experiments and multiple trials SC.6.N.1.3 experiment
SC.6.N.1.4 investigation
• differentiate the benefits and limitations of different types of science investigations SC.6.N.1.5 hypothesis
• make predictions or form a hypothesis SC.6.N.3.2 prediction
• identify and distinguish between test variables and outcome variables in an observation
experiment outcome variable

• identify control groups for each experiment (dependent)
• take measurements test variable

• collect and organize data (independent)
• interpret and analyze data
• draw and defend conclusions

Students will:
• recognize and explain that laws only predict an outcome and theories explain why
the outcome happens

• recognize and explain that a scientific law is a description of a specific relationship
under given conditions in the natural world

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 8

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

The Nature of Science Resources

Textbook and Untamed Science Videos – www.pearsonsuccessnet.com Edmodo VCS Science Fair Packet Link
NOS Focus
Safari

Montage/Videos
Websites

Keeley Probes

*** This year we celebrate the 50th Annual Tomoka Regional Science Fair! Time has been given throughout the first semester to allow and encourage students
to participate in this annual event. ***
• All 6th grade resources can be found begin science fair preparation and research in the first 9
on Edmodo Contact the • Teachers should
weeks during Science Process unit.
District Science Office for the code to join the 6th grade group.
• Develop a science notebook that will be used all year by students.
• An interactive science notebook (ISN) is a compilation of • Develop a class list of lab safety procedures in the lab.
student learning that provides a partial record of the • Identify the various tools used by scientists in various disciplines as they are
Teacher Hints & instructional experiences for a student. Some teachers use
Instruction spiral-bound notebooks, some use composition notebooks, relevant.

Focus while others use 3-ring binder to organize. Pages should notbe • Vocabulary is used to assist students with understanding of terminology that
taken out of the ISN so careful consideration should be given to may be assessed or used on assessments. These terms should be primarily
used regularly throughout instruction.
the type of notebook that is used.
• Scientists learn from doing investigations AND from reading non-fiction
reference materials, such as, journals, newspapers, etc.

Labs and Activities Sample FOCUS Question

The following labs and activities can be found on Edmodo in the 6th grade Dan tests the number of paperclips a small refrigerator magnet can pick up, using paperclips
Nature of Science folder: that are all the same size and material. He tests the refrigerator magnet four times and
Activity Developing Hypotheses Powerpoint records his results. He then repeats this process for two other magnets, which are different
Activity Observations WS sizes. His results are shown in the table below.
Activity Inferences WS
Activity Inferences Mystery Footprints Powerpoint Magnet Size Trial 1 Trial 2 Trial 3 Trial 4 Mean Number of Paper Clips Picked
Activity Inferences Mystery Footprints Student Sheet Up
DL Excel Scavenger Hunt WS
DL Excel Scavenger Hunt Spreadsheet Small 4 3 54 4
SLC What Separates Science from Non-Science Online Article
SLC What Separates Science from Non-Science Printable Article Medium 15 14 14 13 14
SLC What Separates Science from Non-Science Student Questions
SLC What Separates Science from Non-Science Text Analysis Large 30 29 30 31 30

What do the four trials with each magnet allow Dan to do, which he could not do with only a single trial?
A. draw conclusions B. prove whether a magnet's strength can change

B. obtain more reliable data D. choose the data that best supports his hypothesis

Prefix / Suffix No/Non – not Sciencia- wisdom Pre- before Dici- to say

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 9

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools
Topics
Unit 1: Science Processes Weeks 1 – 2
Standards Vocabulary
Learning Targets and Skills lab safety
Get Ready Students will: science notebook
scientist
• get to know YOU as a scientist and WHY you LOVE science
• set up a science notebook to be used all year long
• develop a class list of lab safety procedures in the lab
• practice classroom and laboratory routines and procedures

Get Set Students will: SC.6.N.2.1 science
• describe science as the study of the natural world SC.6.N.1.3 pseudoscience
• cite examples of science and pseudoscience (can it be tested?) non-science
• understand the need for a common system of measurement, metric system, among SC.6.N.1.1 metric system
scientists mass
GO DO SCIENCE! • practice using measurement techniques volume
• discuss the VARIOUS methods used by scientists to answer questions or solve length
problems (controlled experiments, observational studies, engineering by design, trial gram (g)
and error, simulations, modeling, etc.) liter (l)
meter (m)
***Work to break the misconception that there is only 1 method used byscientists*** degrees Celsius (0C)
NOS Focus: Making observations. prediction
inference
Students will: repetition
• engage in 1 OR MORE labs where students: data
 make a prediction/inference evidence
 use proper measuring techniques conclusion
 design a procedure using repeated trials
 control variables
 collect data
 draw a conclusion based on evidence
 conduct research before or after experimentation

NOS Focus: Predicting outcomes, controlling variables, collecting data, and analyzingdata.

* Students complete CL 1 in the 1st 9 weeks during the Science Processes Unit.

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 10

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

Science Processes Resources

Textbook and Text book – Chapter 2.1, 1.1
NOS Focus NOS Focus: Making observations. Predicting outcomes, controlling variables, collecting data, and analyzing data.
Safari
Safari Montage - “Science as Inquiry in Action” Schlessinger Media Paper Football Optional Video
Montage/Videos
Websites Untamed Science Videos – www.pearsonsuccessnet.com Edmodo https://everfi.com/k12/hockeyscholar/ VCS Science Fair Packet Link

Keeley Probes Volume 3 #5 (Hot and Cold Balloons) Volume 3 #13(Hypothesis)

*** This year we celebrate the 50th Annual Tomoka Regional Science Fair! Time has been given throughout the first semester to allow and encourage students
to participate in this annual event. ***
• All 6th grade resources can be found begin science fair preparation and research in the first 9
on Edmodo Contact the • Teachers should
weeks during Science Process unit.
District Science Office for the code to join the 6th grade group.
• Develop a science notebook that will be used all year by students.
• An interactive science notebook (ISN) is a compilation of • Develop a class list of lab safety procedures in the lab.
student learning that provides a partial record of the • Identify the various tools used by scientists in various disciplines as they are
Teacher Hints & instructional experiences for a student. Some teachers use
Instruction spiral-bound notebooks, some use composition notebooks, relevant.

Focus while others use 3-ring binder to organize. Pages should notbe • Vocabulary is used to assist students with understanding of terminology that
taken out of the ISN so careful consideration should be givento may be assessed or used on assessments. These terms should be primarily
used regularly throughout instruction.
the type of notebook that is used.
• Scientists learn from doing investigations AND from reading non-fiction
reference materials, such as, journals, newspapers, etc.
Common Labs Common Lab (CL) CL 1 – Newton’s Wild Ride
(CL) This Lab provides an opportunity for students to design and build the fastest roller coaster ride they can that delivers a marble safely to
the end. All resources can be found in the 6th grade CL folder on Edmodo.

Labs and Activities Sample FOCUS Question

The following labs and activities can be found on Edmodo in the 6th grade Dan tests the number of paperclips a small refrigerator magnet can pick up, using paperclips
Science Processes folder: that are all the same size and material. He tests the refrigerator magnet four times and
Lab Paper Helicopter records his results. He then repeats this process for two other magnets, which are different
Lab M and M sizes. His results are shown in the table below.
SLC Dogs Watch Humans Online Article
SLC Dogs Watch Humans Printable Article Magnet Size Trial 1 Trial 2 Trial 3 Trial 4 Mean Number of Paper Clips Picked
SLC Dogs Watch Humans Student Questions Up
SLC Dogs Watch Humans Text Analysis
Small 4 3 54 4

Medium 15 14 14 13 14

Large 30 29 30 31 30

What do the four trials with each magnet allow Dan to do, which he could not do with only a single trial?
C. draw conclusions B. prove whether a magnet's strength can change

D. obtain more reliable data D. choose the data that best supports his hypothesis

Prefix / Suffix No/Non – not Sciencia- wisdom Pre- before Dici- to say

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 11

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

Unit 1: Energy Weeks 3 – 4
Topics Standards Vocabulary
Learning Targets and Skills scientific laws
Students will: SC.6.N.3.2 societal laws
scientific theory
• describe a scientific law as a description of a specific relationship under given
conditions in the natural world or a prediction of an outcome to some phenomenon

• describe laws as a prediction to an outcome and a theory as an explanation as to
why the outcome happens

• recognize and explain what a theory is and how a theory is used in science versus SC.6.N.3.3
how theory is used differently in everyday life

NOS Focus: differentiate and cite examples of scientific laws, societal laws, andtheories. SC.6.N.3.1
SC.6.P.11.1
Energy Students will: energy transformation
• describe and cite examples of the Law of Conservation of Energy SC.6.N.1.1 kinetic energy
SC.6.N.3.4 Law of Conservation
• differentiate between kinetic and potential energy
of Energy
• identify and demonstrate energy transformation from kinetic to potential energy potential energy
and vice versa work

DIA 1: Energy 8 September – 9 September

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 12

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

Energy Resources

Textbook and Energy Chapter 8.1, 8.2 Lab book, pg. 186 and 196 Forces Chapter 9.1Lab book, pg. 186 and 196
NOS Focus NOS Focus: differentiate and cite examples of scientific laws, societal laws, and theories.

Safari Safari Montage - “Science of Disney Imagine” Disney Educational Productions
Montage/Videos Science of the Olympic Summer games
The science of Speed videos with emphasis on racing and NASCAR
PBS Kids Puck Chuck Online Game Energy Skate Park PhET lab - http://phet.colorado.edu/
Websites https://everfi.com/k12/hockeyscholar/
Study Jams – Acceleration Study Jams – Force and Motion

Keeley Probes Volume 3 #8 (Apple on a Desk) Volume 3 #10 (DroppingBalls)

• Students may design a roller coaster or machine todemonstrate energy transformation from kinetic to potential energy.

Teacher Hints & • A pendulum can be used as well.
Instruction • Items will not assess transformations involving nuclear energyor energy in living systems.
Focus • Students need to understand that a theory is a well-supported and widely accepted explanation of nature and is NOT simply a claimposed by an

individual.

• Items may assess student’s ability to recognize up to fiveenergy transformations in one system.

• The NBC Science of Summer Olympic Games Videos may be timely this year.

Labs and Activities Sample FOCUS Question

The following labs and activities can be found on Edmodo in the 6th grade Energy folder: Amber likes riding her bicycle through her neighborhood where thereare
lots of hills. She rides down a very steep hill, and then goes up a small hill.
Lab Ball Bounce Lab She doesn't need to pedal as her bicycle carries her up the small hill. How
Lab Get The Ball Rolling (Student and Teacher Notes) do Amber's kinetic energy and potential energy change as she goes uphill?
Activity Rube Goldberg CreativeMasterpiece
Online Simulation Lab PhET Energy Skate Park A. Her kinetic energy and her potential energy both increase.
NBC Science Of Summer Olympics Videos B. Her kinetic energy and her potential energy both decrease.
PBS Kids Puck Chuck Online Game C. Her kinetic energy increases and her potential energy decreases.
Stuck at The Top SBI D. Her kinetic energy decreases and her potential energy increases.
Introducing The types of Energy MSP Lesson

Prefix / Suffix Kine- to move Potens- ability Trans- through Forma- shape Con- with Tact- touch Electro- amber Magne-lodestone Gravis- heavy

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 13

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools
Topics
Unit 2: Forces and Motion Weeks 5 – 10
Standards Vocabulary
Learning Targets and Skills applied force
Students will: SC.6.P.13.1 contact force
electrical force
• investigate and describe types of forces, including: forces
Forces friction
o Forces at a distance: electrical, magnetic, and gravitational

o Contact forces: normal, applied, friction

Students will: gravitational force
• explore the Law of Gravity by recognizing that every object exerts gravitational force SC.6.P.13.2 Law of Gravity
on every other object and that force depends on how much mass the objects have magnetic force
and how far apart they are mass
normal force
*Students complete Common SLC 1 during the 1st 9 weeks during the Forces Unit.
Students will: SC.6.P.13.3 balanced force
SC.6.P.12.1 motion
• investigate and explain how an unbalanced force acting on an object changes its negative acceleration
speed or direction of motion (or both) positive acceleration
unbalanced force
Students will:
• measure and graph distance versus time for an object moving at a constant speed

Motion of Objects • analyze and interpret graphs and data tables of distance and time for an object SC.6.N.1.1 Test (independent)
moving at a constant speed variable
Outcome (dependent)
Students will: variable
• design an investigation to test the effect a variable (mass, tire size, ramp incline, Control variable
etc.) has on the speed of an object using a minimum of 10 trials

o collect data and organize it in a table SC.6.N.1.4
o analyze the data through graphing
o draw conclusions from the analysis about the speed and position of the SC.6.N.1.2

object as well as the forces acting on it 18 October – 19 October
• discuss and compare methods used, results obtained, and proposed explanations
Page 14
among groups of students conducting the same investigation
• explain why scientific investigation should be replicable
NOS Focus: Differentiate between replication and repetition.
NOS Focus: Build an experiment to identify, test, and control variables.

DIA 2: Forces and Motion

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced)

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

Forces and Motion of Objects Resources

Textbook and Graphing Chapter 8.3, 8.4 Lab book, pg. 202-204 Motion Chapter 9.2, 9.3
NOS Focus NOS Focus: Differentiate between replication and repetition. Build an experiment to identify, test, and control variables.
Safari
NBC Science of the Summer Olympics
Montage/Videos
Websites https://everfi.com/k12/hockeyscholar/ www.edmodo.com

Keeley Probes Volume 3 #9 (Rolling Marbles)

Teacher Hints & • This is the only time this concept is taught in middle school.
Instruction • Items will not require the calculations of acceleration ornonparallel vectors.
Focus • The formula required to be used is speed = distance / time, allothers are conceptual only.

• Items will not require knowledge of coefficient of friction.
• Items may assess understanding of friction as a force in both sliding and stationary situations.
• The NBC Science of Summer Olympic Games Videos may be timely this year.

Common Science Common Science Literacy Connections (Common SLC)
Literacy Common SLC 1 – Why Don’t I Fall Out of A Roller Coaster
The article (online or printable version) and Student Questions can be found in the 6th grade Common SLC folder on Edmodo.
Connections
(Common SLC)

Labs and Activities Sample FOCUS Question

The following labs and activities can be found on Edmodo in the 6th grade Forces and Motion An object travels at constant speed, and its distance and time are shown in
folder: the graph. What is the average constant speed of the object between 2 and
5 seconds?
Activity Puck Chuck – this activity is used to teach forces using an interactive game on
pbskids.org (see website above) A. 25 m/s
Lab New Speed Challenge – Students will find the speed as they walk, skip, run, etc. B. 50 m/s
Activity Design a Disney Ride C. 150 m/s
Lab Please Drop In SBI D. 300 m/s
SLC From Pitch to Hits Online Article
SLC From Pitch to Hits Printable Article
SLC From Pitch to Hits Student Questions
SLC From Pitch to Hits Text Analysis

Prefix / Suffix Ac/ad- to/toward Celera- fast

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 15

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools
Topics
Unit 3: Weather and Climate Weeks 11 – 12

Students will: Learning Targets and Skills Standards Vocabulary
SC.6.E.7.5 energy
• explain how energy provided by the sun influences global patterns, including: scientific model
temperature
o atmospheric movement (wind) thermometer
wind
o temperature differences between air (atmosphere,) land (geosphere,) and

water (hydrosphere)

The Sun’s Energy • create a model to investigate how the sun’s energy causes changes in temperature SC.6.N.3.4 conduction
of air, land, and water, such as: SC.6.E.7.1 convection
o a diagram showing how different surfaces reflect or absorb heat (i.e. snow vs. convection currents
ocean) SC.6.N.1.1 energy transfer
o a 3D representation of uneven heating because of the Earth’s tilt (i.e. using a Advanced heat
globe) SC.912.P.10.4 radiation
thermal energy
Students will:
• differentiate the three mechanisms by which thermal energy is transferred through
the Earth’s systems:
o Radiation
o Conduction
o Convection

• investigate radiation, conduction, and convection in terms of their influence on
Earth’s systems (geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere)
o thermal energy is transferred on Earth from a warmer substance to a cooler
substance from direct contact through conduction
o thermal energy is transferred in the Earth’s atmosphere and hydrosphere through
convection currents
o the transfer of energy in the form of radiation from the Sun to the Earth through
the atmosphere

NOS Focus: Benefits and limitations of models.
*Students complete CL 2 during the 2nd 9 weeks with The Sun’s Energy Unit.
Advanced:

1. describe heat as the energy transferred by convection, conduction, and radiation,
and explain the connection of heat to change in temperature or states of matter

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 16

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

Textbook and The Sun’s Energy Resources
NOS Focus
NOS Focus: Benefits and limitations of models. Chapter 5.3, 5.4, 5.5
Safari Montage Cloud In a Jar Demonstration Land and Sea Breeze Earth: Climate and Weather
and Videos
Websites The difference between weather and climate -http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/noaa-n/climate/climate_weather.html

Keeley Probes Volume 3 #21 (Where did water come from?) Volume 4 #19 (Camping)
• Temperature will be shown in degrees Celsius with Fahrenheit in parenthesis.
Teacher Hints & • Items assessing radiation, conduction and convection should be done in the context of the atmosphere, geosphere and hydrosphere on Earth.
Instruction
Focus Students need to identify convection, radiation and conduction on a diagram or picture.

Common Labs Common Lab (CL)
(CL) CL 2 – Things Are Starting To Heat Up
This lab allows students to create a model of how the sun’s energy causes changes in temperature of land and water.
All resources can be found in the 6th grade CL folder on Edmodo.

Labs and Activities Sample FOCUS Question

The following labs and activities can be found at Edmodo in the 6thgrade The sun’s energy causes water to evaporate from Earth’s surface and become water
The Sun’s Energy folder: vapor. What is the most likely result when water vapor condenses into clouds?

Lab Observing Convection A. Heat from the water is released, causing the clouds to produce snow.
Lab Where Is TheBattery SBI B. Heat from the water retained, causing the surrounding air to deflate.
Lab Conduction with Washers C. Heat from the water is released, causing the surrounding air to expand.
E. Heat from the water is retained, causing the clouds to move higher in the

atmosphere.

Prefix / Suffix Radi- to shine Duct- to lead Trans- across Page 17
Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced)

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools
Topics
Unit 3: Weather and Climate Weeks 13 – 16
Standards Vocabulary
Learning Targets and Skills air pressure
Students will: SC.6.E.7.6 climate
moisture
• differentiate between weather and climate

• describe the four atmospheric factors that make up weather, including: thermal energy
o thermal energy, air pressure, winds, and moisture weather

**Students complete the STEM Lab during Week 15** SC.6.E.7.2 condensation
Students will: SC.6.N.1.1 evaporation
SC.6.E.7.3 precipitation
• explain how the cycling of water between the atmosphere and hydrosphere affects transpiration
weather patterns and climate SC.6.N.1.1 water cycle
SC.6.E.7.7 front
Weather and Climate • Investigate how the water cycle affects local climate and weather SC.6.E.7.8 Gulf stream
Students will: humidityjet
stream
• explain how global patterns such as the jet stream and ocean currents influence ocean currents
local weather in measureable terms, such as: temperature
wind
o air temperature and pressure wind direction
o wind direction and speed wind speed

o humidity and precipitation

o fronts
• investigate how natural disasters have affected human life in Florida
NOS Focus: Differentiate the benefits and limitations of different types of science
investigations.

• describe ways human beings protect themselves from hazardous weather and sun
exposure

*Students complete Common SLC 2 during the Weather and Climate Unit* Advanced
Advanced: SC.912.E.7.5

1. use models, weather maps and other tools to predict weather conditions and SC.912.E.7.6
differentiate between accuracy of short-range and long-range weather forecasts
1 December – 2 December
2. differentiate the physical factors that affect the formation of severe weather events
(e.g. hurricanes, tornados, flash floods, thunderstorms, and drought) Page 18

DIA 3: Weather and Climate

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced)

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

Textbook and Weather and Climate Resources
NOS Focus
Chapter 7.3
Safari Montage NOS Focus: Differentiate the benefits and limitations of different types of science investigations.
and Videos
Websites Safari Montage - “The Weather Channel” “Global Warming” Schlessinger Media Weather vs Climate – YouTube Weather and Climate Analogies
Weather vs Climate Earth: Climate and Weather Cloud In a Jar Demonstration Land and Sea Breeze
Keeley Probes
Teacher Hints & The Weather Channel Website Study Jams – Weather and Climate
NASA- What’s the Difference Between Weather andClimate?
Instruction
Focus Volume 1 #21 (Wet Jeans) Volume 3 #20 (What areClouds)

Common SLC • The water cycle shouldn’t be taught or assessed in isolation but • The climate of an area is determined by a minimum of 30 yearsof
and STEM Lab through application. average weather data.

• Students will describe and or explain how the cycling of waterand • Students will be assessed on atmospheric conditions and their resulting
global patterns influence local weather and climate. weather phenomena such as hurricanes, tornadoes, lightning, fronts
and precipitation.

Common Science Literacy Connections (Common SLC) STEM Lab during Week 15
Common SLC 2 – Silent Hurricane Season STEM Lab – Building With Weather and Climate In Mind
The article (online or printable version) and Student Questions can Students will analyze climate and weather data to determine
be found in the 6th grade Common SLC folder on Edmodo. what building materials to use to build microhouses.

Labs and Activities Sample FOCUS Question

The following labs and activities can be found on Edmodo in the 6th grade Weather and El Niño is a weather pattern in which the normally cool ocean currents ofthe
Climate folder: tropical Pacific Ocean become warmer. How does this most likely affect
weather along the West Coast of the United States?
Activity Predicting Weather Is NoSport SBI
Activity Climate Webquest A. It does not affect weather in West Coast states
SLC Weather and Climate Student Questions B. It makes summers colder
SLC Weather and Climate Online Article C. It makes winters warmer
SLC Weather and Climate Printable Article D. It makes storms more predictable
SLC Weather and Climate Text Analysis

Quick Lab Investigating Florida’s Disasters (from textbook)

Prefix / Suffix Cyclus- a circle Precipit- to fall Trans- across Spirare- to breath

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 19

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools
Topics
Unit 4: Earth Structures and Changes Standards Weeks 17 – 19
Vocabulary
Learning Targets and Skills aquifer
Students will: SC.6.E.6.2 coastlines
deltas
• identify there are different types of landforms found on Earth’s surface, including: dunes

o Coastlines, Dunes, Rivers, Mountains, Glaciers, Deltas, Lakes

glaciers
lakes
• differentiate landforms found in Florida (such as aquifers, caverns, and sinkholes, landforms
etc.) from those found outside Florida (such as mountains, glaciers, etc.) model

mountains
rivers
Earth Structures and Changes sinkhole
surface

Students will: agents
• describe and cite examples of ways in which Earth’s surface is built up and torn SC.6.E.6.1 chemical weathering
down by physical and chemical weathering, erosion, and deposition deposition
• explain and differentiate the processes of physical weathering, chemical erosion
weathering, erosion, and deposition physical weathering
• create a model to investigate ways to prevent the erosion of Florida’s landforms weathering

NOS Focus: Benefits and limitations of models. SC.6.N.3.4
Students will:
SC.6.N.1.1 control group
• investigate the effects of physical weathering on the Earth’s Surface
• investigate the effects of chemical weathering on the Earth’s Surface 19 December – 20 December
• investigate the effects of erosion and deposition on the Earth’s surface
NOS Focus: Identify and understand the purpose of a control group in an experiment.

DIA 4: Earth Structures and Changes

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 20

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

Earth’s Structures and Changes Resources

Textbook and Chapter 3.2, 4.5
NOS Focus NOS Focus: Benefits and limitations of models. Identify and understand the purpose of a control group in an experiment.

Safari Montage Safari Montage - “Weathering and Erosion” Schlessinger Media; “Land Formations” Schlessinger Media Study Jams – Weathering and Erosion
and Videos Safari Montage - The Magic School Bus Rocks and Rolls
Websites Shape It Up Virtual Game Here Today Gone Tomorrow Virtual Game Erosion Virtual Lab Weathering Virtual Lab
Volume 1 #22 (Where Sand Comes From) Volume 4 #10 (Is it aModel)
Keeley Probes • Focus on the building up and tearing down of landforms.
• Plate tectonics is NOT taught in sixth grade.
Teacher Hints & • Physical and chemical weathering were covered in fifth grade. Review these topics to ensure mastery.
Instruction • Scientific laws predict an outcome – theories explain the process to the outcome.
Focus

Labs and Activities Sample FOCUS Question

The following labs and activities can be found on Edmodo in the 6th grade Earth Many people often confuse the terms “weathering” and “erosion.” Which of the
Structures and Changes folder: following events is the best example of erosion?

Activity – RAFT on Weathering, Erosion, and Deposition – Writing activity (possible A. The rolling of a pebble along the bottom of a streambed
assessment) to better understand weathering, erosion, and deposition. B. The splitting of sedimentary rock because water has frozen in a crack
Lab Sinkhole Florida C. The dissolving of rock by rainwater
Picture Erosion Bottle Model with link to lab setup D. The crumbling of bedrock to form soil
Activity Chalk it Up to Weathering
Activity Erosion Book
Activity Weathering Cards
Activity Weathering Book
Lab Picture Erosion Bottle Models
Lab Sinkhole
Lab Dunwich is Done SBI
Lab In Memory of Winifred SBI
Powerpoint Earth’s Structures Review
SLC Weathering and Erosion Writing Prompt
SLC Weathering and Erosion Printable Article
SLC Ice On The Move Printable Article
SLC Ice On The Move Questions
Let’s Get Moving MSP Lesson
How To Prevent Erosion Lab

Prefix / Suffix Forma- shape Deposit- leave e/ex- away rodere – to gnaw

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 21

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

Unit 5: Earth Systems and Patterns Weeks 20 – 23

Topics Learning Targets and Skills Standards Vocabulary
Students will: SC.6.E.7.4 atmosphere
biosphere
• differentiate among the Earth’s cryosphere
o Geosphere geosphere
o Hydrosphere hydrosphere
o Cryosphere interactions
o Atmosphere
o Biosphere

Earth’s Systems and Patterns • describe the interactions between the geosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, Advanced
atmosphere, and biosphere SC.912.E.7.3

Advanced: SC.6.E.7.9 climate change
1. interactions include transfer of energy (biogeochemical cycles, water cycle, ground composition
and surface waters, photosynthesis, radiation, plate tectonics, conduction, and mesosphere
convection), storms, winds, waves, erosion, currents, deforestation and wildfires, ozone layer
hurricanes, tsunamis, volcanoes stratosphere
thermosphere
Students will: troposphere
• describe the composition and structure of the Earth’s atmosphere

• describe the functions of the four main layers of Earth’s atmosphere:
o Thermosphere, Mesosphere, Stratosphere, Troposphere

• explain how Earth’s atmosphere protects life and insulates the planet including the
ozone layer

• discuss the impacts to life if Earth’s atmosphere is compromised, such as: HE.6.C.1.3
o climate change and ozone depletion
26 January – 27 January
NOS Focus: Reading and analyzing charts and graphs.
Students will: Page 22

• identify how air and water quality (and other environmental factors) affect personal
health

DIA 5: Earth Systems and Patterns

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced)

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

Earth’s Systems and Patterns Resources

Textbook and NOS Focus: Reading and analyzing charts and graphs. Chapter 7.1
NOS Focus
Learn About Planet Earth - Earth's Atmosphere - https://youtu.be/fyfN9t_E0w8
Safari Montage Four Spheres Part 2: Crash Course Kids – YouTube Four Spheres Part 1: Crash Course Kids -YouTube
and Videos
Websites Volume 3 #22 (Rainfall)

Keeley Probes • Students should know the layers of the atmosphere and their functions.
• Focus on the effects if the atmosphere were compromised, not the causes.
Teacher Hints & • Climate change may include global warming; it is a long-term change in the Earth’s climate, or of a region on Earth.
Instruction
Focus Global warming: the increase in Earth’s average surface temperature due to rising levels of greenhouse gases.

Labs and Activities Sample FOCUS Question

The following labs and activities can be found on Edmodo in the 6th grade Earth The interaction between the cryosphere and the hydrosphere has the ability to
Systems and Patterns folder: dramatically change our global climate. Which of the following events shows an
Activity Earth’s Systems Vocabulary Crossword interaction between the cryosphere and thehydrosphere?
Picture Atmosphere
Picture Atmospheric Temperatures A. A large iceberg melting in the ocean.
Picture Earth Atmosphere B. Evaporated water condensing to form clouds.
WebQuest Earth Spheres C. Trees releasing oxygen into the environment.
Activity Graphing The Layers of The Atmosphere (Teacher Page, with data points, D. The Himalayan Mountains being pushed upward.
Graph Paper, and Student Page)
Powerpoint Earth’s Systems Review
Webquest Oceans
Carbon and Climate MSP Lesson

Prefix / Suffix Inter- between Atmos- vapor Bio- life Cryo- cold Geo- earth Hydro- water Tropo- change Strato- spreading Meso- middle
Thermo- heat

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 23

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools
Topics
Unit 6: Cells Week 24

Students will: Learning Targets and Skills Standards Vocabulary
SC.6.L.14.2 Cell Theory
• describe cell theory as: Homeostasis
Nutrients
o all organisms are composed of one or more cells Reproduction

o all cells come from pre-existing cells

o cells are the basic unit of life

Cell Theory, Processes, and Organization of Life • explain how cell theory is applied to all living organisms

• explain why cell theory is a theory SC.6.N.3.1
SC.6.L.14.3
Students will:
• describe homeostasis as a constant internal condition within cells and organisms
• explore how cells of all organisms undergo similar processes to maintain
homeostasis, including:
o getting energy
o removing waste
o reproducing

Advanced: Advanced
1. describe the cell cycle, including the process of mitosis. Explain the role of mitosis in SC.912.L.16.14
the formation of new cells and its importance in maintaining chromosome number
during asexual reproduction

Students will: SC.6.L.14.1 atoms
• describe and identify patterns in the hierarchical organization of organisms from cells
atoms to molecules and cells to tissues to organs to organ systems to organisms, for molecules
example: organ systems
atom → molecule → cell → tissue → organ → organ system → organism organisms
organization
organs
tissues

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 24

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

Textbook and Cells Theory, Processes, and Organization of Life Resources
NOS Focus
Cell Theory Chapter 10.2
Homeostasis Chapter 10.3 Advanced, Chapter10.5

Organization of Life Chapter 10.1

Safari The Wacky History of Cell Theory Bill Nye Cells
Montage/Videos
Volume 1 #18 (Is it Made of Cells?) Volume 1 #19 (Human Body Basics)
Websites • Items on FCAT may use terms like cellular respiration and photosynthesis in the context of homeostasis but will not assess knowledge of these
Keeley Probes
processes.
Teacher Hints & • Time should not be spent teaching the parts of an atom.
Instruction • Items will not assess the scientists who contributed to the cell theory or the historical development of the cell theory.
Focus • Mitosis and Meiosis will not be assessed at the 6th grade level.

Labs and Activities Sample FOCUS Question

The following labs and activities can be found on Edmodo in the The nervous system is the body's switchboard, sending signals between
6th grade Cell Theory and Organization of Life folder: different parts of the body. The central hub of the nervous system is the
brain. The brain is an example of which level of hierarchical organization
Activity Cell Theory Instagram Post Teacher Notes within the body?
Activity Cell Theory Instagram Post Template
Activity Cell Theory Instagram Post Examples A. cell
SLC Surprise! Fossils in a Flash Printable Article B. tissue
SLC Surprise! Fossils in a Flash Online Article C. organ
SLC Surprise! Fossils in a Flash Student Questions D. organ system
SLC Surprise! Fossils in a Flash Text Analysis
Activity Hierarchical Organization Mobile Slips
Activity Hierarchical Organization Station Sheets
Powerpoint Cell Theory

Prefix / Suffix Atomo- can’t cut -archy- to rule Uni- one Multi- man Homeo- same -stasis- no change

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 25

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools
Topics
Students will: Unit 6: Cells Weeks 25 – 29
Standards Vocabulary
Learning Targets and Skills SC.6.L.14.4 animal cells
plant cells
Cell Structure and Function • compare and contrast the structure and function of major organelles found in plant SC.6.N.3.4 organelles
and animal cells, including: structures
o cell wall functions
o cell membrane cell membrane
o nucleus cell wall
o cytoplasm chloroplast
o chloroplast cytoplasm
o mitochondria mitochondria
o vacuoles nucleus
vacuoles

• create models of plant and animal cells to illustrate and identify the similarities and
differences in the structures found in each cell

NOS Focus: Benefits and limitations of models.

*Students complete Common SLC 3 in the 3rd 9 weeks during the Cells Unit*

*Students complete Common CL 3 in the 3rd 9 weeks during the Cells Unit*

Advanced: Advanced
SC.912.L.14.2
1. relate structure to function for the components of plant and animal cells
2. explain the role of cell membranes as a highly selective barrier (passive and active SC.912.L.14.3

transport)
3. compare and contrast the general structures of plant and animal cells
4. compare and contrast the general structures of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells

DIA 6: Cells 8 March – 9 March

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 26

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

Textbook and Cell Structure and Function Resources
NOS Focus
Safari Chapter 10.4 Text book, pg. 287E (Teacher Edition) – CellCity
NOS Focus: Benefits and limitations of models.
Montage/Videos
Websites Cell Rap Video Interactive Cell Model
Keeley Probes http://www.cellsalive.com/cells/3dcell.htm - Interactive Diagram of A Plant and Animal Cell

Teacher Hints & Volume 3 #16 (Sam’s Puppies)
Instruction
Focus • This is the only time this concept is taught in middle school.
• See page 386, “electronic store” in text.
• Make sure students have shown mastery of the organelles in the learning targets before adding organelles that will not appearon FCAT.
• The cell wall, cell membrane, nucleus, cytoplasm,chloroplast, mitochondria, and vacuole are the only structures required.
• Testing scenarios will require a differentiation of the structuresand functions of organelles in plant and/or animal cells.

Common SLC Common Science Literacy Connections (Common SLC) Common Lab (CL)
and Common SLC 3 – From Stem Cells to Any Cells CL 3 – Microscope Lab

Common Lab The article (online or printable version) and Student Questions This lab allows students to view cells under microscopes. All
can be found in the 6th grade Common SLC folder on Edmodo. resources can be found in the 6th grade CL folder on Edmodo.

Labs and Activities Sample FOCUS Question

The following labs and activities can be found on Edmodo in the In an animal, a muscle cell requires more energy than other cells. Because of
6th grade Cell Structure and Function folder: this, you would expect to find more of which type of organelles in muscle
cells than in other cells?
Activity Cell City This activity allows students to create a graphic analogy of a typical cell to
objects in the real world. Students will also be able to relate and describe their functions to a A. vacuoles
city. B. chloroplasts
Activity Cell City Gallery Walk C. cell walls
Webquest Cell Organelles D. mitochondria
Activity Cell Song – This project allows students to creatively differentiate the structure and
functions between plant and animal cells.
Activity Cell Review Game
Activity Cell Organelle Card Sort

Prefix / Suffix Nuc- center Cyto- hollow -plasm- to form Chloro- green -plast- form Mitos- thread Khondros –grain Vacuo- space
Trans- across Port- gateway

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 27

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools
Topics
Unit 7: Human Body Systems Week 30 – 34
Standards Vocabulary
Learning Targets and Skills SC.6.L.14.5 circulatory
Students will: digestive
excretory
• identify the major systems of the human body, including: homeostasis
o Digestive immune
o Respiratory musculoskeletal
o Circulatory nervous
o Reproductive reproductive
o Excretory respiratory
o Immune
o Nervous
o Musculoskeletal (NOT muscular and skeletal separately)

Human Body Systems • describe the general functions of the major systems of the human body SC.6.N.1.1
• describe ways that the major systems of the human body interact to maintain

homeostasis, such as:
o maintain constant temperature – i.e. sweating while running
o response to stimuli – i.e. pull back after touching a hot surface

NOS Focus: Collecting and analyzing data.

Students will: SC.6.L.14.6 bacteria
• recognize different types of infectious agents that may affect the human body, such fungi
as: infectious agent
o virus - cold parasite
o bacteria - strep throat virus
o Fungi - athlete’s foot
o Parasite - cholera HE.6.C.1.5
• Compare and contrast treatments for viruses versus bacterial infections
• explain how body systems are impacted by hereditary factors and infectious agents, 20 April – April 21
such as:
o cystic fibrosis affects respiratory and digestive systems Page 28
o sickle cell anemia affects the circulatory system
o influenza affects the respiratory system

*Students complete CL 4 in the 4th 9 weeks during The Human Body Systems Unit.

DIA 7: Human Body Systems

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced)

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

Human Body Systems Resources

Textbook and NOS Focus: Collecting and analyzing data. Chapters 11 – 14
NOS Focus

Safari Safari Montage - “Interrelationship of the Body Systems” Schlessinger Media https://human.biodigital.com/index.html Nervous System Circulatory
Montage/Videos System How A Virus Works How To Prevent Athlete’s Foot

Websites Human Body Webquest - http://zunal.com/webquest.php?w=138408 Ben’s Bad Day- http://ats.doit.wisc.edu/biology/ap/ho/t1.htm
Keeley Probes
Code Fred - https://www.brainpop.com/games/codefredsurvivalmode/ www.kidsbiology.com
Teacher Hints &
Instruction Volume 4 #17 (Catching a Cold) Volume 4 #18(Digestion)
Focus
• This is the only time this concept is taught in middle school. • Items assessing interactions of systems to maintain homeostasis should
• Items are limited to the human digestive, respiratory,circulatory, include a reference to homeostasis and are limited to the organismal
level.
reproductive, excretory, immune, nervous, and musculoskeletal
systems. • Items will not require specific knowledge of diseases that affect the
• Items will not assess individual structures or functions of individual human body or the causal agents.
organs in isolation BUT their interaction with each other.
• Items will not assess the interactions of more than three systems.

• Diagrams of the human reproductive system will not be used.

Common Labs Common Lab (CL)
(CL)
CL 4 - Muscle Fatigue Lab 6fotrhsgtruaddeenCtsLtfooledxepreornieEndcme moduos.cle
This Lab provides an opportunity fatigue.
All resources can be found in the

Labs and Activities Sample FOCUS Question

The following labs and activities can be found on Edmodo in the 6th grade Human Body
Systems folder:
Lab Respiration and Homeostasis
Project The Organ Trail
Lab Fizz Virus Student Sheet
Lab Fizz Virus Teacher Notes
Lab Cruise Ship Sickness
Lab Sweating Alcohol Homeostasis
Online Activity Ben’s Bad Day
Online Activity Code Fred
Lab Working Together Is Key SBI
Activity Body systems Interactions Chart
SLC A Big Discovery about Little People Printable Article
SLC A Big Discovery about Little People Student Questions
SLC A Big Discovery about Little People Online Article and Text Analysis

Prefix / Suffix Digest- pull apart Respire- breathe Circ- cycle Ex- out/from Page 29
Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced)

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools
Topics
Unit 8: Classification Week 35 – 37
Standards Vocabulary
Learning Targets and Skills SC.6.L.15.1 binomial
Students will:
nomenclature
• analyze the classification of organisms in terms of shared characteristics in the Linnaean System
Linnaean system classification
common name
• explain why organisms are organized into a hierarchy of classification: scientific name
o Domain, Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus., Species domain
Archaea
• classify organisms into the three domains: Bacteria
o Bacteria Eukarya
o Archaea kingdom
o Eukarya phylum
class
Classification • classify living organisms into kingdoms based on shared characteristics: order
o Protist family
o Fungus genus
o Plant species
o Animal heterotroph
autotroph
• classify living organisms into specific domains and kingdoms using: unicellular
o Energy needs: Heterotroph versus autotroph multicellular
o Organisms structure: unicellular versus multicellular prokaryotic
o Cell structure: Cell wall versus cell membrane eukaryotic
o Environment: Extreme conditions versus surface conditions

*Students complete Common SLC 4 in the 4th 9 weeks at the end of the Classification Unit.

NOS Focus: Draw and defend conclusions. Understand that scientists use a variety of
methods to solve problems.

DIA 8: Classification 11 May – 12 May

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 30

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

Classification Resources

Textbook and Classification Chapter 15.1-3
NOS Focus NOS Focus: Draw and defend conclusions. Understand that scientists use a variety of methods to solve problems.
Safari
Safari Montage - “Animal Classification” Schlessenger Media Learn Classification Video
Montage/Videos
Websites Volume 1 #16 (Is it an Animal?)
• This is the one and only time this concept is taught in middle school.
Keeley Probes • Items assessing the classification of organisms into domains are limited to Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya.
• Items assessing the classification of organisms into kingdoms are limited to Protist, Fungus, Plant, and Animal.
Teacher Hints &
Instruction Focus

Common Common Science Literacy Connection (Common SLC)
Science Literacy Common SLC 4 – Could CommonEarthly Organisms ThriveOn Mars?
The article (online or printable version) and Student Questions can be found in the 6th grade Common SLC folder on Edmodo.
Connection
(Common SLC)

Labs and Activities Sample FOCUS Question

The following labs and activities can be found on Edmodo in the 6th grade Classification folder: According to the modern classification system, which list is written correctly
from least specific to most specific?
Activity Salamander Dichotomous Key
Activity Classify Me A. species, genus, family, order
Lab Fantasy Zoo SBI B. phylum, class, genus, order
Writing Prompt Classification C. class, order, genus, species
Lab Candy Classification D. phylum, order, species, family
SLC Modern Peanut Printable Article
SLC Modern Peanut Article Quiz/answer key
Activity Kingdom WS
Classification of Living Things MSP Lesson

Prefix / Suffix Bi- two Nomen- name Auto- self Hetero- different Trophos- feeder Page 31
Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced)

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

Florida Statewide Science Assessment (SSA) Information

Nature of Science Content Breakdown by Benchmark Life Science
Earth and Space Science Physical Science

19% of SSA 27% of SSA 27% of SSA 27% of SSA

8.N.1.1 6.N.1.1 7.N.1.5 7.N.3.2 8.E.5.3 8.E.5.1 7.E.6.4 7.E.6.3 8.N.1.1 6.N.1.1 7.N.1.5 7.N.3.2 8.E.5.3 8.E.5.1 7.E.6.4 7.E.6.3

6.N.1.3 8.N.1.5 8.E.5.5 8.E.5.2 7.E.6.5 7.E.6.1 6.N.1.3 8.N.1.5 8.E.5.5 8.E.5.2 7.E.6.5 7.E.6.1
7.N.1.1 E.5.10 7.N.1.1 E.5.10
7.N.1.3 6.N.2.2 8.E.5.6 7.E.6.7 7.N.1.3 6.N.2.2 8.E.5.6 7.E.6.7
7.N.1.4 7.N.1.6 8.E.5.7 6.E.7.4 7.N.1.4 7.N.1.6 8.E.5.7 6.E.7.4
8.N.1.3 7.N.1.7 8.E.5.4 6.E.7.2 8.N.1.3 7.N.1.7 8.E.5.4 6.E.7.2
8.N.1.4 7.N.2.1 8.3.5.8 6.E.7.3 8.N.1.4 7.N.2.1 8.3.5.8 6.E.7.3
7.N.1.2 8.N.1.6 8.E.5.9 6.E.7.6 7.N.1.2 8.N.1.6 8.E.5.9 6.E.7.6
6.N.1.2 7.N.3.1 7.E.6.2 6.E.7.9 6.N.1.2 7.N.3.1 7.E.6.2 6.E.7.9
6.N.1.4 6.N3.1 6.E.6.1 6.E.7.5 6.N.1.4 6.N3.1 6.E.6.1 6.E.7.5
8.N.1.2 8.N.3.2 6.E.6.2 6.E.7.1 8.N.1.2 8.N.3.2 6.E.6.2 6.E.7.1
7.E.6.6 7.E.6.6

Low Item Cognitive Complexity High
10-20% Moderate 10-20%
60-80% Total Items
60-66
Sessions Duration and Length
2 Total Time
160 minutes

Recommendations for success on the Statewide Science Assessment:
1. Use frequent formative assessment of measurement topics.
2. Students should have access to and use digital tools to work on Excel.
3. Instruction should be at the same level of rigor as the learning targets in the curriculum map.

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 32

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

Middle Grades ELA Florida Standards

*English/Language Arts Florida Standards integrated during science labs and activities: *During Volusia Literacy Tasks (VLT) or ISN activities:

LAFS.68.RST.1.3 – Follow precisely a multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking LAFS.68.WHST.1.2 – Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical
measurement or performing technical tasks. events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.
LAFS.68.RST.3.7 – Integrate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text
with a version of that information expressed visually (e.g., in a flow chart, diagram, model, a) Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts,and
graph, or table.) information into broader categories as appropriate to achieving purpose; include
*During class discussion and debates (ADI): formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful
LAFS.68.SL.1.1 – Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in to aiding comprehension.
groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 8 topics, texts, and issues, building on
others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly. b) Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concretedetails,
a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly quotations, or other information and examples.
draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probeand
reflect on ideas under discussion. c) Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships
b. Follow rules for collegial discussions and decision-making, track progress towardspecific among ideas and concepts.
goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed.
c. Pose questions that connect the ideas of several speakers and respond to others’questions d) Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explainthe
and comments with relevant evidence, observations, and ideas. topic.
d. Acknowledge new information expressed by others, and, when warranted, qualify orjustify
their own views in light of the evidence presented. e) Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone.
f) Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supportsthe

information or explanation presented.
*During reading in the content area (CLOSE reading, SLAM, ISN,etc.):
LAFS.68.WHST.3.9 – Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis reflection, and
research.
LAFS.68.RST.2.4 – Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain specific
words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades
6 – 8 text and topics.

LAFS.68.RST.4.10 – By the end of grade 8, read and comprehend science / technical text in grades
6 – 8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

Middle Grades Math Florida Standards

*All Math Florida Standards integrated during science labs andactivities: MAFS.6.SP.2.5 – Summarize numerical data sets in relation to their context, such as by:
MAFS.6.EE.3.9 – Use variables to represent two quantities in a real-world problem that change a) Reporting the number of observations.
in relationship to one another; write an equation to express one quantity, thought of asthe b) Describing the nature of the attribute under investigation, including how itwas
dependent variable, in terms of the other quantity, thought of as the independentvariable. measured and its units of measurement.
Analyze the relationship between the dependent and independent variables using graphs and c) Giving quantitative measures of center (median and/or mean) and variability
tables, and relate these to the equation. For example, in a problem involving motion at constant (interquartile range and/or mean absolute deviation), as well as describing anyoverall
speed, list and graph ordered pairs of distances and times, and write the equation d = 65tto pattern and any striking deviations from the overall pattern with reference to the
represent the relationship between distance andtime. context in which the data were gathered.
MAFS.6.SP.1.3 – Recognize that a measure of center for a numerical data set summarizes allof d) Relating the choice of measures of center and variability to the shape of thedata
its values with a single number, while a measure of variation describes how its values vary with distribution and the context in which the data were gathered.
a single number.
MAFS.8.G.3.9 – Know the formulas for the volumes of cones, cylinders, and spheres anduse MAFS.8.F.2.5 – Describe qualitatively the functional relationship between two quantities by
them to solve real-world and mathematical problems. analyzing a graph (e.g. where a function is increasing or decreasing, linear or nonlinear.) Sketch a
graph that exhibits the qualitative features of a function that have been described verbally.

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 33

2016 – 2017 Volusia County Schools

Comprehensive Science I (Regular and Advanced) Page 34


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