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November issue of Jiujiteira Magazine

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Published by jiujiteiramagazine, 2020-11-23 13:54:46

Jiujiteira Magazine November 2020

November issue of Jiujiteira Magazine

Keywords: BJJ,Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu,Women in BJJ,Jiujiteira

spotlight: mia mendoza, the future is bright for the bjj star
issue TWO | NOVEMBER 2020
Submission Hunter
event coverage
BJJ FOR YOGA
Strong
&
flexible
Shoulders
beauty is a beast
smudge
less
PRO
jiujiteiras take houston by storm
page 6
JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | 1


cover story
Submission Hunter 6
SPOTLIGHT
Mia Mendoza 34
sections:
every issue:
PUBLISHER'S CORNER 4 A Grateful Heart
COACH TALK
Easy & Efficient Guard Passes 18 BY DAVID SUTTON
BEAUTY IS A BEAST
Smudge Less 22 BY VHILENA NELSON
BJJ & BEYOND
Training Beyond Your Practice 26 BY AUDREY HALL
YOGA FOR JIU-JITSU
Strong and Flexible Shoulders 32 BY EVELYN SUTTON
38 JIUJITEIRAS AROUND THE WORLD 44
CLOSE CHOKE
Interview with Micaela Robinson
2 | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM
NOVEMBER 2020


Submission Hunter Pro page 6
JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | 3


Our first issue was received by our community with overwhelming praise and support that has been
pouring in the form of emails, phone calls, and reader's subscriptions, not only from the United States, but the world.
That's right, our magazine has gone international with subscriptions from Germany, Australia, New Zealand, Finland, and Brazil, to name a few. In honor of our diversified audience, we've created a new section called Jiujiteiras Around the World (page 44) that showcases our sisterhood all over the globe. You are part of this commu- nity. Send us photos of yourself and your Jiu-Jitsu sisters sharing the love for the gentle art, and you will be featured: [email protected]
I have YOU to thank for this huge success.
Recently, Submission Hunter Pro 60 in Houston, TX was the stage for a magnifi- cent array of performances by some of the best Jiujiteiras and female grapplers in the country. The event not only featured an all women's super fights grappling card, and was aired on UFC Fight Pass, but also sup- ports a great cause — breast cancer aware- ness. Having lost my own mother to the disease seven years ago, this is a cause close to my heart. Congratulations to the ladies who competed and to Garcia Promotions
for taking a stand to help save women's lives and elevate females in BJJ. Read the coverage by Lorena Balli on page 6.
At 13 years old, Mia Mendoza is our prodigy star this month. Having mom and dad on the mats, she says, motivates her to keep training hard, competing and surpassing her own victories. A statement that proves, once and for all, that BJJ brings families closer together. Story on page 34.
2020 has been a year of extraordinary challenges and New Zealand Submission Sisters' Annual Camp wasn't immune to them. Because of COVID, the event that has been running without a hitch for a decade, almost didn't happen. Yet, the show must go on, and once the number of infections dropped in NZ, the sisters were able to camp as planned (page 14).
In the month of Thanksgiving, my heart is full of gratitude. THANK YOU for the love, for the support, for spreading the word about our new Jiujiteira Magazine and for helping us give our community a voice.
May you and your loved ones enjoy the beginning of this Holiday Season with health and good cheer. Oss!
EVELYN SUTTON is on a mission
to uncover and promote the universe of women in one of the deadliest martial arts in the world.
PUBLISHER’s corner
A Grateful Heart.
let’s keep rolling... Follow us online and keep the conversation going! jiujiteiramagazine.com
jiujiteirausa jiujiteirausa [email protected] 4 | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM
november 2020
PUBLISHER
Creative Director & CEO
Evelyn Sutton
writers
Audrey Hall David Sutton Evelyn Sutton Lorena Balli Vhilena Nelson
proofreading
Edgard Esperança
photography
Evelyn Sutton Garcia Promotions Lorena Balli
880 Mc Clendon Street, Melbourne, FL 32935 jiujiteiramagazine.com U 321.917-1599
Subscribe online at JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM. Please al- low 4-6 weeks for subscription to start. Jiujiteira Magazine is a registered trademark of LuxDei Studio. The contents of Jiu- jiteira Magazine, associated websites, advertisements, articles, graphics, photographs and any other published content are protected by copyright law and may not be reproduced, dis- tributed or modified without prior written consent of Jiujiteira Magazine. Jiujiteira Magazine does not necessarily endorse, verify, or agree with the content, and makes no guarantees as to the accuracy, completeness, timeliness, or usefulness of any content. Jiujiteira Magazine shall not be held liable for any er- rors or omissions in the content. ©2020 All rights reserved. Any reproduction, in whole or in part, is prohibited without written permission from the publisher.
ISSUE No 2
Evelyn Sutton


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cover story
PRO
Featuring Danielle Kelly vs. Roxanne Modaferri
in the first ever all women’s super fights grappling card
Submission
HUNTER
he Submission Hunter Pro 60 card was a uniquely empowering event. As the first ever all women’s super fights grappling card (Submission Hunter,) women and
girls from across the country were given the opportunity to put on a show while growing unit- ed in a male dominated sport. The card featured
an exciting 130 pound no gi match between Dan-
ielle Kelly and Roxanne Modaferri as the main event. It was a fast paced match with a long string of leg attacks and takedowns ultimately ending in the last eight seconds with a toe hold by Kelly. Additionally, this was the first ever Submission Hunter event to be aired on UFC Fight Pass which generated both MMA and BJJ viewers worldwide.
60
BY LORENA BALLI
PHOTOS COURTESY OF SUBMISSION HUNTER PRO AND LORENA BALLI
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JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | 7


EIGHT SECONDS > DANIELLE KELLY WINS THE MAIN FIGHT OF THE NIGHT IN THE LAST EIGHT SECONDS WITH A TOE HOLD
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Kelly is a skilled grappler with roughly thirteen years of training and less than one year as a black belt. She has notable wins in her grappling record such as her 17 second ankle lock submission win over UFC fighter Cynthia Calvil- lo at December’s Quintet Ultra. She is definitely a rising star. While Roxanne Modaferri is recognized
as the UFC’s number eight flyweight women’s ranking she is also known as the “Happy Warrior” of the MMA world which could also be seen in the Jiu-Jit- su arena. At the event Modaferri was nothing short of charming; radiat- ing positivity and happily stopping to take a photo with every fan.
Fight night in Houston drew light to the ever evolving style of Jiu-Jitsu. The women showcased their individual styles of the sport where even some Judo and Wrestling came out to play. But besides great takedowns, thunder- ing slams and even some mouth covering back takes (legal in submission hunter super fights,) intricate games of leg entanglements and guard playing in the gi were also on display. Every fight was an example of high level strategic Jiu-Jitsu with a treat for every viewer.
“I’ve never seen anything like this in my life. Watch- ing girls come out and fight
like this was incredible! I don’t know much about the sport. I’ve seen some Karate and Tae Kwon Do matches before but never Jiu-Jitsu and especially women’s Jiu-Jitsu. This was very interesting and I love seeing the confidence of these women” explained Juana “Juanita” Tafolla, audience member and family sup- porter in the crowd.
Submission Hunter 60 was an example of hope for more women’s events to come and the growth
of women's Jiu-Jitsu as a whole. It was an event that made a statement: women can dominate the main stage and put on just as great a show as male grap- plers. Furthermore, since the sport is still evolving, limited weight classes can be hard to work around as an athlete. Some women have expressed frustration with being one of few to none in their respective weight categories but this event showcased over
six adult weight classes which many of the women expressed gratitude for.
As one of the competitors on this card, I can say it was a very special moment in my life. A dream of mine for some years now was to become an MMA fighter and one day make it to the UFC but this event allowed me to be content in the idea of knowing that even if I never make it to the
JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | 9
octagon, I could share this moment with my friends and family via UFC Fight Pass. I managed to pull through a tumultuous mo- ment I was experiencing that weekend and get the W with a triangle arm- bar finish against a game opponent. It would mark my last super fight event at the blue belt ranking. Being recently promoted to the rank of purple belt, I can only hope to main- tain my health and keep training hard to continue to do what I love - grapple on the big stage. I hope to
keep fighting with Garcia Promotions, Submission Hunter as well as the other well known organizations like Fight 2 Win and Third Coast Grappling.
To share the stage with other beautiful and talent- ed women was an honor in itself and the opportunity could not have come with- out the motivation and support of Eric Garcia who ignited a different kind of athletic spark in me. He made me realize I could become a pro athlete at any age or any belt level.
“...the event was definitely successful in regards to the competitors and how it ran... Seeing the competitors get on planes and fly in for this event was awesome.” GARCIA OF SUBMISSION HUNTER
cover story
Sub-Hunter pro-60


Submission Hunter Pro is a super fight promotion company run by Eric Garcia out of Houston, Texas. It is a traveling grappling spectacle featuring exciting kids and teen matches to adults from blue to black belt.
“I think the event was definitely success- ful in regards to the competitors and how it ran. I loved meeting new people and seeing everyone post about the card and how excited they were to be a part of the event. Seeing the competitors get on planes and fly in for this event was awe- some,” Garcia of Submission Hunter.”
Beyond this event being a beacon of hope for many young Jiujiteiras, it also raises awareness of breast cancer with proceeds benefiting “The Rose,” a non profit Breast Imaging Center whose mission is “sav- ing lives through quality breast health services, advocacy and access to care for all.'' The Submission Hunter organization donated 25% of proceeds from the event to The Rose foundation. Y
10 | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM
LORENA BALLI is a purple belt with a passion for martial arts, fine arts, health and fitness. She keeps a busy schedule as one of the coaches for the kids classes at Champion Academy in Mission, Texas as well as being a graduate student, mother, a marketing service manager and personal trainer. You can contact her by DM via Instagram: Jellyfish_jiujitsu


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main card
RESULTS
DANIELLE KELLY defeats Roxanne Modafferi via Toehold. Kelly becomes the SHP 130lbs nogi Champion
ALANA HOLY defeats Andreza Morais via Advantage in Overtime. Holy becomes SHP brown belt 125lbs
nogi Champion
LAURAH HALLOCK defeats Erin Johnson via Lapel Choke
YANI REYES vs. LIZ EXELL Draw
REBECCA TOMADA vs. ARIANA AZEVEDO Draw
MARISOL FUENTES vs. LINDSEY BOSTON Draw
LESLIE MCLEA defeats Naomi Villa via Armbar
ALEXA YANES defeats Priscilla Eckhardt via Kneebar
STEFANIE KOPACZ vs. TEARA LEWIS Draw
DANIELLE GUEVARA vs. ANGELICA ARRAMBIDE Draw
SAMANTHA PRIDDY defeats Alyssa Cantu via Armbar
MELISSA LOZANO vs. CASSIDY WELCH Draw
MONA BAILEY defeats Savannah Valle via Armbar
For full card results, scan the QR code below with your phone camera:


Lessons from
the Master
Carlson Gracie Jr. Seminar in Melbourne, FL
jiujiteiras learn old school jiu-jitsu from a living legend
BEAUTY & STRENGTH: PROFESSOR CARLSON GRACIE JR. POSING WITH THE LADIES THAT ATTENDED THE SEMINAR.
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xcellence in training and staying sharp is top priority at Carlson Gracie Jiu-Jitsu Team in Melbourne, FL. Once again, the gym's owner and head coach, David Sutton, hosted a seminar with the legend him- self, Professor Carlson Gracie.
Our Jiujiteiras took full advantage of the opportunity to learn from the 6th-degree black belt master of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.
Professor Carlson taught simple
to understand, yet highly efficient escapes and submissions from half- guard that deepened the attendees understanding of the gentle art, and added to their arsenal.
At the end of the event, Professor Carlson gracefully took the time to meet with all the students, answer questions and even pose for photos with the Jiujiteiras.
Thank you David Sutton and Professor Carlson Gracie for a fantastic seminar! Y
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SUBMITTING A PANDEMIC > 60 FEARLESS NZ JIUJITEIRAS ATTENDED CAMP AND MADE IT A GREAT SUCCESS
BJJ Sisters
New
Zealand
NZ Submission Sisters annual camp is a success despite unique challenges of 2020
n the midst of a global pandemic, Melodie McDonald, co-Founder of NZ Submission Sisters, wasn't sure that her annual National Women's Jiu-Jitsu Camp in New Zealand was going to happen this
year. With the country on lockdown since March, Melodie waited patiently for the numbers of Covid related cases in her local commu- nity to drop. Luckily, and with a sigh of relief, on July 10th the num- ber of cases went all the way down to zero and the camp was able to
happen as scheduled with over sixty Jiujiteiras attending.
PHOTOS BY YOON YOUNG LEE & MELODIE MCDONALD
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The camp ran without a hitch. The only set back being that their Australian Jiu-Jitsu sisters and other international attendees were not able to partici- pate, since New Zealand's borders were closed to international travelers due to the lockdown.
Camp Mum
Affectionately known as "Camp Mum", Melodie makes sure every detail of the camp runs smoothly. From cooking the food, making sure workshops are on schedule, t-shirts being distributed and, even adding a little dry humor with a joke or two, Melodie is passionate about the camp. She has been an integral part of the New Zealand Brazil- ian Jiu-Jitsu community for the last 16 years. Occasionally, she can
be seen training out of Oliver MMA but most of the time, she's organizing things behind the scenes.
Since 2011
The Annual NZ Girls Grappling Camp has been running since 2011.
This year's camp was
held at Waikato Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Academy in Ham- ilton. For the last two years, Craig and Amanda Nicholls have opened their gym to the sisters. An amazing
facility with plenty of showers and mat space, they were able to accom- modate all 60 women in the gym for 32 hrs. The women arrived at 8pm on a Friday night and departed Sunday afternoon. They left sore and tired with smiles on their faces, heads full of new techniques, and
new friendships.
Keitha Bannan and
Kate Aroa, New Zealand's first female Black Belts, were in attendance. They joined NZ Submission Sisters' co-founders Shena Christian (BJJ Black Belt), Ana Moceyawa (Judo Black Belt and Wrestling Specialist), Inger Craven (BJJ Black Belt) and Paula Te Kawa (BJJ Brown Belt) to form the coaching
team this year.
Each coach had their own training sessions with workshops that showcased their individual styles developed through years of dedication. Often trained by male instructors, the coaches learned to adapt the BJJ techniques to suit the female body, psychol- ogy and movement. This year's coaches shared
all the secrets that have helped them succesfully roll with stronger and heavier men. With gi
and nogi workshops, this was an intense weekend with very little down time between training, rolling, eating and sleeping.
The camp fully catered to the women's dietary needs to keep them well-nour- ished, from complete meals, and snack protein bars to rehydration fluid.
A champion's breakfast of bacon and eggs as well as vegan sausages was served. On Saturday night, a festive BBQ dinner was prepared (even though it’s the middle of winter in New Zealand) and the ladies had time to relax and chat.
The camp is a great way for female BJJ practi- tioners to come together without politics, roll and train with ladies closer to
their weight and strength. Designed to elevate the fe- male BJJ community, the first camp had 24 attend- ees and now, they have
to limit the number of registrations due to over- whelming demand. For the future, camp directors plan on securing a larg-
er venue to accomodate more women who want
to attend. Over the years, many friendships have formed between the ladies who met at camp. The best part of the weekend for many of the attendees is meeting other ladies who love BJJ as much
as they do. Y
16 | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM
The talented videographer Yoon Young Lee was also in attendance at the NZ Submission Sisters' Annual Camp this year. Lee is currently in the process
of putting together a documentary about women in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. She created a video promo of the camp
that you can watch by scanning this QR code below or visiting NZ Submission Sisters' Facebook Page.


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coach talk
1
Even the most stubborn guard can be defeated with the right amount of pressure, good technique and patience.
easy & efficient
GUARD
passes
elbows in
Passing guard is tricky.
If you are not careful, you can end up caught in a submission. But guard can be defeated. By applying good technique and our simple tips,
you can pass guard with
efficiency and zero anxiety.
18 | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM
Any type of guard pass, you want to start by getting your elbows in.
BREAKING IT DOWN:
1. Tuck your elbows in tight, as if they were glued to your body and place your hands on your opponents' hips, pinning them down and restricting their ability to move.
2. Place your knee in the middle area of your opponent's pelvis.
3. Slightly move back and drop down low. Get your double-unders by sliding your elbows under your opponent's legs and swinging your arms around their upper thighs in a firm embrace.
4. Come up, and at the same time, slide your opponent's body towards you until their thighs and hips are off the ground and resting on your knees and thighs.
5. While keeping constant pressure on your opponent, and staying low, sprawl
then push their bent knees towards their face.
6. Grip their right collar, thumb in, with your left hand. Use the upper blade of your left arm to apply pressure to your opponent's neck, then further immobilize them by blocking their right hip with your right hand as you walk around to take side control.
7. Drop your left shoulder on the opponent's chest and take side control.
LEVEL: Intermediate


1. elbows in
6. hand on hip
2. come down low
7. walk around
8. keep the pressure
3. move back
4. embrace
9. almost there...
5. sprawl
10. drop the shoulder


4
2
pASS TO KNEE MOUNT
Passing your opponent's guard quickly and taking knee mount can be a simple way to turn the game around in your favor.
BREAKING IT DOWN:
1. Grab the inside of your opponent's gi pants
by the knees.
2. Come up, feet behind your hips and push their knees into their chest.
3. Bring your right leg in and around as you shift their legs slightly to the right
4. Take knee mount
LEVEL: Beginner
1
20 | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM
2
3
D AV I D S U T T O N is the lead coach and owner of Carlson Gracie Jiu-Jitsu Team in Melbourne, FL. With over 18 years in martial arts and currently a brown belt in Jiu-Jitsu, David is responsible for a sucessful kids, adults and womens' program at his gym. You can contact him at: [email protected] or bjjmelbournefl.com


JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | 21
SLIDE TO MOUNT
Another easy and fun way to pass guard
and obtain a position of power, goes back to childhood memories of sliding down the slide in the playground.
BREAKING IT DOWN:
1. Grab the inside of your opponent's gi
pants by the knees.
2. Step back so your feel are at a safe distance away from your opponent's reach
3. Pinch their knees together
4. Hop forward, hips first, clear your opponent's knees and slide down their legs
5. Arrive to high mount
LEVEL: Beginner
THANK YOU TO THE BJJ WOMEN'S CLASS AT
CARLSON GRACIE JIU-JITSU MELBOURNE, FL
FOR DEMONSTRATING THESE GUARD PASSES.
3


Beauty is a Beast
smudge
BY VHILENA NELSON
less
As women, most of us enjoy wearing makeup. Some use it as an artistic form of self-expression, while others wear it to feel more confident, sociable, assertive and to enhance their natural beauty. While to some Jiujiteiras, applying makeup before a sweaty workout seems a bit silly, it is still a legitimate question for others.
he rugged sport of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is a total body workout that has you sweating the
moment you step onto the mats. The gi alone can weigh
anywhere from 2-5 pounds which only causes the body to sweat even more. The sport
has been fairly male dominat- ed for a long time and sweaty men are normal in the MMA world. As the sport becomes more popular, more women find themselves alongside their sweaty male counterparts. Many women in the sport still want to look nice despite the inevitable outcome of looking like a sweaty mess by the end of practice.
While to some applying makeup before a workout seems a bit silly, it is a legiti- mate question for others. Some women feel more together when their hair and makeup are done. It gives them a sense
MANY WOMEN WHO PRACTICE BRAZILIAN
JIU-JITSU STILL WANT TO LOOK NICE DESPITE THE INEVITABLE OUTCOME OF LOOKING LIKE A
SWEATY
MESS BY THE END OF PRACTICE.
22 | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM


JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | 23


of confidence and readiness. To others,' makeup is part of their daily routine and they feel naked without it. Another reason may be more of an insecurity or personal preference, but whatever the reason is, it is
still a personal choice.
THE CONS
One of the cons of wearing makeup to Jiu-Jitsu is the likeliness it will smudge or smear on to your training partner’s gi. Many gis are white; mascaras, eyeliners, and brow pencils
tend to be black or brown while lipsticks are red or pink therefore the gi will be stained with your makeup. The makeup is likely not a permanent stain, however some still find this to be bothersome.
Another con to wearing makeup during Jiu-Jitsu practice can be sweat causing the makeup to run and irritate the eyes. Some makeup when mixed with sweat, can physically burn once it drips into your eyes.
Many may argue that makeup for Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is impractical due to the smudging, running, and smearing. However the choice of wearing it, is ultimately up to the individual.
smudge proof
For those who opt to wear makeup to BJJ there are some things you could do to prevent making a mess of other’s gis and your face while participating in this very sweaty sport. For anyone who is pro make- up for workouts, regardless of the sport, it is a good idea to look for smudge proof and waterproof makeups. This is especially true in a close contact sport like BJJ.
Makeup has come a long way over the years. Smudge proof eyeliners, shadows, lipsticks, and brow pencils are now available in stores such as Dollar General, CVS, Walgreens as well as other personal care and beauty products retailers like Ulta, Sephora, and Sally’s Beauty Sup- ply. Using smudge proof makeup will keep your makeup on your face and off your training partner’s gi.
24 | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM
VHILENA NELSON is a professional hair stylist and owner of
His & Her Mobile Hair Salon in Melbourne, FL. A blue belt in Jiu-Jitsu, Vhilena competes in BJJ and is a local advocate for women in the sport. You can contact her at: [email protected] or hisandhermobilehaircare.com


Permanent option
Lastly, the final option for ladies who prefer to come to Jiu-Jitsu made up is permanent makeup.
It certainly is a pricier option but definitely an effective method to ensuring the makeup stays put. Permanent makeup is a cosmetic technique which involves tattooing permanent pigment to the surface layer of skin. The goal is to produce the same look as applying non-per- manent makeup without the hassle of having to do it daily. Permanent makeup will enhance the brows, lips, and eyes the same way non-per- manent makeup will, however it won't come off at all once it is done.
The prices for permanent makeup typically range from $400-$500 per service chosen ie; lips, brows, eyeliner. If you are committed to
Jiu-Jitsu as much as you are to wear- ing makeup, this may be worth the investment on and off the mats.
Whatever the decision, it is import- ant that we respect the choice to wear makeup or not wear makeup. It may seem ludicrous to some that anyone would even consider wear- ing makeup while working out. The flip side to that is someone who wears makeup may feel it is strange not to wear makeup to train.
When wearing makeup the main thing is making choices that will not stain someone else’s gi. Lipsticks are especially difficult to get out
of the material and could ruin a white gi. Always be mindful of this and avoid choosing makeup that will make a mess. If you can live without it and come to practice straight from work, perhaps have a pack of makeup wipes in your gym bag. The decision to wear makeup to Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is supported and certainly the choice is up to the participant. Make small adjust- ments to smudge proof, waterproof, or permanent makeup to keep away from messes and prevent acciden- tal transfer to teammates clothing while training. Finally, train hard and look great; how you choose to do this is entirely up to you. Y
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BJJ & BEYOND
Training your practice.
Being well-rounded gives you the ability to see the advantages of each art and an arsenal of practical- for-you moves to use. It was that idea that convinced me to try
A woman's experience
as a mixed martial artist
f you have already experienced a variety of martial arts then you will understand that they are not created equally. Personally, I have dab- bled in quite a few: Karate, Judo, BJJ, Kickboxing, and Muay Thai.
My highest ranking martial art is Karate where I became a blue belt before relocating to Florida 2 years ago. My first martial art was Judo. I believe I will always have a special place in my heart for Judo as it's a truly beautiful practice. Most of Judo involves throw- ing your opponent, sometimes resulting in sweeps that cartwheel a person in the air before landing on their back almost gracefully. The focus is often in redirecting your opponent's momentum. See where they are going, off balance them and throw. Karate taught me how to strike. There's no striking in Judo and I must say it was quite the adjustment. You begin to think of your limbs more con- sciously and seek weakness in openings. You also grow to appre- ciate forms and techniques through a practice called kata. I think kata taught me how to practice power and control, but it's a rigid practice. No partner and no flow most times. Even in competition, my personal practice was point based and I never experienced continuous sparring with an opponent.
I didn't gain any continuous sparring experience until I joined Carlson Gracie Jiu-Jitsu Melbourne, FL. It was the first time I had experienced having so much offense and defense in stand up. I must say I found I was terrible at moving my head out of the way! I still enjoy the grit and grind of it uniquely to any of my other prac- tices. Sparring has the potential to train you not just for fitness sake, but in life experience as well.
BJJ.
A U D R E Y H A L L is passionate about helping others become the best version of themselves through exercise, nutrition & wellness. A personal trainer and nutrition coach, Audrey holds a Bachelor's in Exercise Science and is currently a white belt in Jiu-Jitsu. You can contact her at: [email protected]
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beyond


It is very important to be confident in your ability
to use your practice in real life should you ever have to. Functional use and practicality have always been a driving force of my desire to do martial arts. The same is true for why I want to do multiple arts. Being well-rounded gives you the ability to see the advantages of each art
and an arsenal of practi- cal-for-you moves to use. It was that idea that con- vinced me to try BJJ. I have to admit that there are few things as intimidating as rolling around and being submitted by someone half your age. Yes, this hap- pened to me on my second day of class. One of our very own, and my personal 12 year old role model, sub- mitted me about five times in all of three minutes.
I didn't leave that night discouraged, rather I was inspired. If she can do it, surely I can! I was hooked.
Having someone so much smaller in age and stat- ure successfully submit me showed me that BJJ doesn't discriminate the way other arts can. The playing field becomes much more leveled when mental and physical agil- ity meet solid technique. Man or woman, adult or child, it's use isn't only practical but important. In my experience I have learned just as much about getting out of the
NO STRANGER TO THE ARTS > AUDREY AT HER KARATE DOJO (TOP) AND WITH HER BJJ FAMILY (BOTTOM)
way as I have about attacking. Often
there is a steady flow of both, the
person who reads the game farther
out has a good chance of submission
by what seems to be an innumerable amount of ways. When you see skilled practitioners of the art it's hard to even follow the constant and somehow steady flow of moves before it's over.
Before moving to Florida I completed my Bachelor's in Exercise Science. I was always in sports and loved to help others. Being that I believe fitness is a lifelong journey it was important to me that my life match my fitness goals instead of letting my health be a sidebar. This mentality is true in every art I have come practice thus far. I often ask myself, "Is this supporting the lifestyle I want, allow- ing me to stay in shape and learn something new." Again, BJJ comes out on top (for me personally). I can add, I ha- ven't practiced a more useful martial art than Brazillian Jiu-Jitsu for personal safety. As a woman I appreciate this for my peace of mind and confidence. Mental discipline and physical exercise are staples of my career and shape my lifestyle. The physical requirements in both strength and stamina constantly push me to be better. The mental chess game of rolling with an opponent has improved my ability to act and react. The impossibly long list of com- binations and positions to use mean I never know what's coming next. Because of all of these things I have grown to look forward to all I can learn from BJJ.
The only thing greater than bettering yourself is having a group of people to do it with. When the women of our gym come together it's a great thing. As easy as it may sound, there aren't as many women represented in mar- tial arts and oftentimes there can be a dog-eat-dog men- tality among clubs and organizations. It's not enough to be among the few women but we are often pushed to be the best of them. Friendships and camaraderie are hard
to come by and it makes me all the more thankful for the open environment of Carlson Gracie. We want to encourage the curious and support those around and among us to progress. Having a wom- en's only class also pro- vides a unique perspective to the usual competition style of practice. This be- comes a safe place to learn techniques and practice among peers just like us.
Continuing to reach out to women and teaching them about both the physical and mental power of mar- tial arts & fitness has been my favorite part of growing in MMA. I have a personal goal of using my education in Exercise Science and MMA experience to share techniques for maintain- ing your fitness outside the gym, as well as using specific training/nutrition to improve your BJJ perfor- mance in the gym. Y
JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | 27


Pretty
Dangerous
n Sunday, November 8, Evelyn Sutton and Lindsay Conley of
Jiujiteira Magazine joined the ladies of Pretty Dangerous Women Jiu-Jitsu at Gracie Tampa South Martial Arts
for an all-women seminar and open mat.
A friendly and talented group of ladies from the Central Florida area attended the event. The high level instruction was given by professor Melissa Lohsen, professor Lisa Lyon and coach Maria Beatriz Zamo- ra-Levesque. All the instructors were ex- tremely knowledgeable and gave the wom- en one-on-one attention, helping everyone understand the techniques presented
and execute the drills with precision.
After the seminar, the women had the opportunity to roll and there was no holding back, the ladies gave their all and the energy on the mat was electric.
Founded by BJJ black belt professor and competitor, Melissa Lohsen in partnership with her husband also a BJJ black belt, professor David C. Lohsen of Dark Wolf MMA in Orange City, FL, Pretty Dangerous Women Jiu-Jitsu is about the support and promotion of womens' Jiu-Jitsu and women in leadership. Calling themselves the "badass ladies of Jiu-Jitsu", Pretty Dangerous has been unapologetically breaking stereotypes since 2006.
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During their seminars, women of all ranks and experience are encouraged to ask questions, share their knowledge of BJJ and even teach. "You don't have to wait until you have a black belt to share what you know about Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu", says Lohsen, who believes in creating an environment where female practicioners feel comfortable to take on more of a leadership role in the education and promotion of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu for women.
There was a raffle and prizes from
No Judges Needed, a Jiu-Jitsu brand created by Troy Ragano, were given to the attendees. Troy has always been a great supporter of Pretty Dangerous and women in Jiu-Jitsu.
True pioneers of womens' BJJ, Pretty Dangerous travels to different gyms hosting free seminars and open mats for girls and women of all levels. To find out where they will be hosting their next seminar, follow their page on
Facebook @prettydangerousjiujitsu. Y


JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | 29


jiu-jitsu fashion
Created by Jiujiteiras Emmanuelle Ethier and Tanya Nesi, Earned company started out
as a joke but people loved the idea and the brand was born. Check out their online store which offers a variety of products from fitness workout videos and dog tags to this must- have badass everyday raceback hoodie.
EARNEDCOMPANY.COM/STORE
Must Haves
Sophie Aaron & Madisson Larson,
met at a competition and bonded over the fact that BJJ women struggle with their hair. They realized nobody was really talking about it, so the Jiujiteiras took it upon themselves to start a fun Instagram page to inspire women and brainstorm solutions - jitsuhairprobs was born. The ladies worked with a local artist, Cameron Craig to create a mascot for their brand - Medusa - with her crazy wide eyed and fierce snakes wrestling each other on the warrior’s head. You can get Medusa on a sticker, patches, rashguard and more. Check out the
Check out the sisterhood(ie) made by our BJJ sisters, Submission Sisters, in New Zealand (read about their annual women's camp that almost didn't happen this year due to Covid on page 14, and see what a success it was!) Show your sisterly love and order:
RB.GY/L5O4HP
We at Jiujiteira Magazine love to smell good after
a hard trainning session. These soaps from Jiu-Jitsu Soap Company are out top pick to get the job done and they come in pretty colors and creative names like "Punk Rock Peppermint" and "Rear Naked Spice Red Tea".
JIUJITSUSOAPCO.COM
gear at: JIUJITSUHAIRPROBS.COM
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Be it a new color belt
or a stripe, each time you rank up deserves a celebration! Show your accomplishment off mat with these finds:
Zenko Fightwear makes these belt rank keychains out of real Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu belts and you can add stripes as you earn them!
ZENKOFIGHTWEAR.COM
Rank up!
What if you could just wear your BJJ belt to work, shopping, restaurants and everywhere in between? You can! Well, not exactly, but this might be even better. Made with 100% cotton, this belt is ready to wear with your favorite non-BJJ attire to fashionably incorporate your rank in your daily life.
GISTORE.ROCKS
Back in 2018, Jiujiteira Kristie had the idea to create a Jiu-Jitsu specific decal to display rank and add stripes as you earn them. We love her idea and we think it's a perfect way to celebrate and show off your progress by decorating your car, laptop, waterbottles and everything else you feel inspired to. Support a fellow Jiujiteira and get your BJJ rank decals at:
Accessorize your outfits with this super cute BJJ paracord bracelet. A fun way of displaying your achievements outside of the mat and a great conversation starter.
GISTORE.ROCKS
GRAPPLEGRAPHIX.COM
JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | 31


yoga for jiu jitsu
strong and flexible
SHOULDERS
BY EVELYN SUTTON
A frequent request I get during yoga class is for poses that help relieve pain and soreness in the shoulders. Shoulders are a common area of injury for athletes and a natural place to carry stress in the body. In the iconic Jiu-Jitsu grappler position, our shoulders are constantly rounding forward. It's very important to protect the shoulders by stretching, lengthening and strengthening the muscles all around them. With regular practice, the following yoga poses can help us effectively prepare our shoulders for BJJ.
Bow Pose
(Dhanurasana)
Start by lying on your belly with arms extended next to the body, palms up and fingers pointing towards your feet. Take a deep breath in and squeeze the shoulder blades toward each other, pinching the space between them on your back, behind the heart. Then lift your chest and head, off the floor. Exhale.
On your next inhalation, lift your legs off the floor as high as you can. Bend the knees and reach out with your arms to try and grab either the ankles, tops of your feet or your shins. Hold for five breaths.
Opens shoulders, strengthens the back and stabilizes the hip-flexors.
Level: Intermediate
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Eagle Arms
(garudasana)
Extend both arms in front of your body. Bend the left elbow, place
it on the inside crease of the right elbow and twist the arms around each other as if you are trying to bring palms of the hands together. Keep fingers pointing straight up.
Notice the stretch on your left shoulder. If it feels really tight, stay here. If you want to go deeper,
on the next inhale, slide the
arms straight up. You'll feel your shoulders, upper back and neck opening up.
Encourage the shoulder blades
to slide down the back while holding the pose. Hold for at least 5 breaths. When you're ready to come out, slide the arms back down, unwind them and start over, this time bending the right elbow and placing it on the inside crease of the left elbow.
Stretches the shoulders, rhomboids, lower trapezius and teres major muscles.
Level: Beginner
Side Plank
(Vasisthasana)
Begin in plank pose. With shoulders aligned over the wrists, press firmly through your hands as if trying to push the floor away from you. Start rotating to the right side, bringing the left hip up and stacking the left foot over the right foot.
Press down through the right hand and raise your left hand. Don't drop your hips and keep the lower abs actively engaged. You can look up towards your hand or keep your gaze neutral, ahead of you.
Hold for 5 breaths.
Rotate back to regular plank and start over, this time turning to the left side and stacking the right foot over the left.
A powerful shoulder, arm and wrist strengthener. Also improves core strength, concentration and balance.
Level: Advanced
JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | 33
EVELYN SUTTON is a E-RYT200 yoga teacher and owner of
LuxDei Studio in Melbourne, FL. A white belt in Jiu-Jitsu, Evelyn applies her personal practice and knowledge of yoga to BJJ while helping others do the same. You can contact her at: [email protected] or luxdeistudio.com


SPOTLIGHT
MIA
Mendoza
At 13 years old, she's a force to be reckoned with and proof that bjj is more fun when it's a family affair
BY EVELYN SUTTON
PHOTOS BY IBJJF & DIELLE PIKE PHOTOGRAPHY
Talent, youth, dedication and passion are some
of the traits that all succesful athletes have. Mia Mendoza has this and more, in abudance. The wonder girl who trains at Carlson Gracie Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Headquarters in Chicago is paving her way as a rising star into the ranks of the new generation of female Brazilian Jiu- Jitsu Champions.
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JUST A GIRL: WHEN SHE'S NOT COMPETING, MIA IS WORKING HARD AT SCHOOL AND TRAINING. SHE LIKES TO HANG OUT
WITH HER FRIENDS AND LOVES SPENDING TIME WITH HER FAMILY.
At 13 years old, Mia is not your typical teenager. Her days revolve around a rigorous training schedule of Jiu-Jitsu and Judo, a new prac- tice she added to her training with hopes of advancing her stand-up skills. An avid competitor, Mia is
on the mats at least 4 times a week. With such a demanding training schedule, it can be a challenge bal- ancing school and homework, yet Mia feels she’s got a good grip on it.
“I get my school work done in be- tween training sessions and I spend time with my friends, when I can. My school friends don’t train but they know how important Jiu-Jitsu
is for me. They encourage me to keep going and they are proud of me when I do well in competitions.”
One of the main reasons for her suc- cess as a young female athlete is the support of her family and her dad’s persistence of keeping her in BJJ. Both her parents train and share her love of Jiu-Jitsu. That alone has a huge impact on Mia.
“I started doing Jiu-Jitsu when I was around six or seven years old. But back then, I didn’t really like it, so I tried out other sports. I played bas- ketball and soccer but they weren’t for me. That’s when my dad decided
to put me back into Jiu-Jitsu. This time, I enjoyed it. And ever since then I’ve been training consistently and competing as often as I can.”
“My family actually does Jiu-Jitsu with me. They’re very supportive and it’s so nice to have my mom and dad by my side on the mats, which is really fun and great.”
Mia’s family is from the Philippines. Mom is Filipino, and dad is Mexican. Mia was born in the Philippines, and grew up in the United States.


Her passion for the sport is awe-inspiring, “I really like how martial arts works. It takes a lot of effort and time to learn, but it makes me feel accomplished and that I’m doing something I really want to do.”
As inspiration, Mia looks up to the women who have made a name for themselves in this sport. The 24 year old, Nathiely de Jesus, is one of her BJJ idols. “I’ve met her once before. It wasn’t really a long conversation, but I’ve seen a bunch of her videos, and she’s very inspirational.” She also men- tions MacKenzie Dern as an athlete she admires.
When asked about favorite positions and sub- missions, Mia keeps her cool and shares that she really feels her strength is in guard. “My favorite submission is probably the triangle. But what I
really like is open guard. I especially love doing De La Riva. I can get a lot done from there, like sweeps, triangles and arm bars. It’s a great position.”
“I have really good move- ment, which makes it
a lot easier for me. I’m able to follow the person around if they try to pass. I can move with them and block them.”
Competitions are part of her life and she’s comfort- able in the arena. “Com- peting is something I train for a lot. In the beginning, I used to get nervous about it but now I get excited. You know you’re going against other people that are also skillful, so no matter the outcome, you still learn. Other than just going against someone good, you also get to hang out with your teammates and coaches. It’s a great experience and so fun.”
She’s looking forward to competing in all the big tournaments and also teaching. “I think most people just think about competing, but I really look forward to teaching as well.”
Mia likes to travel and the Pan Kids Jiu-Jitsu IBJJF Championship in Califor- nia is her favorite compe- tition. This year, she took second place in the Teen 1, Feather division.
Her advice for young girls who practice Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and want to com- pete is to be consistent, always show up for class, have a lot of patience, perseverance, dedication and “believe in yourself ”, she says.
Mia agrees that female athletes are now starting to get more respect and attention in Jiu-Jitsu. “A woman can do anything
a man can do. And it’s not about being better than them. It’s just about show- ing that we can be equal to them. I love seeing women training, teaching and competiting."
“I think a lot of people
are still confused about women practicing martial arts. They don’t think this is something a woman should do, they might think Jiu-Jitsu is a sport just for men and boys. So when in competitions I
go against boys and I beat them, it feels really good to prove them wrong. It shows that women can
do Jiu-Jitsu just as well as men. And that is an amaz- ing feeling.”
Mia, we will be following your career as you pursue your Jiu-Jitsu dreams, we wish you an incredible Y and succesful journey!
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“I think a lot of people are still confused about women practicing martial arts. They don’t think this is something a woman should do, they might think Jiu-Jitsu is a sport just for men and boys. So when in competitions I go against boys and I beat them, it feels really good to prove them wrong."


close choke
The Girl Next-Door
JM: Tell us about
yourself. How old are you? How long have you been training? MR:Iama41yearold mother of 3 and I work for them full time! My family and I moved to Melbourne, Florida 4 years ago from Utah, where I enjoyed mountain biking and rock climbing. I had never even heard of BJJ until about a year and a half ago when I was on the computer trying to find a boxing/kickboxing gym. It did not take me long to find the 5 Rounds gym (now called Carlson Gracie Jiu-Jitsu Team Melbourne). I initially just wanted to learn how not to punch like a girl and get a good work out.
JM: Have you trained mar- tial arts before and what attracted you to BJJ?
MR: I had never trained in any martial arts outside of karate, but I remember lov- ing it. I was not interested in BJJ at first. When I first joined the gym I was taking the kickboxing and boxing classes. David Sutton, the owner and headcoach, told me I should try a BJJ class. He said that kickboxing was great but that I would most likely never be able to outmuscle a larger, stron- ger attacker. He told me that BJJ was meant for a smaller and weaker per- son to dominate a larger stronger opponent. So,
I tried a class and never went back to kickboxing.
JM: How was your first BJJ class?
MR: Awkward. I have a very large personal space bubble, so to be that close to other sweaty people was very hard (not to mention most of the positions seem intimate to the untrained eye). It didn’t take long
for my personal space bubble to disappear. It does come back outside of training BJJ, though. With all of that said, I loved it! I stopped going to kickbox- ing so I could focus all of my attention on BJJ.
JM: What impact Jiu-Jitsu has in your life, as a wom- an, and individual?
MR: Lots of ways. It keeps my mental health in check.
It’s my happy place. It keeps me mentally engaged, working my mind. It keeps my eating habits healthy. It is very hard to perform well when I don’t eat well. It gives me confidence to know that if I were in a bad situation, I’d have the tools to get me out of it.
JM: You were always athletic and you played sports in High School. Tell us about that.
MR: I was very athletic growing up. I was very good at any sport that involved
a ball, but my favorite was soccer. I played competi- tively most of my childhood and teenage years and then played for my highschool team. I was injured my
38 | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM
Anyone who has met or trained with Micaela Robinson agrees she's an all-American sweetheart. Her friendly demeanor and warm smile match her personality, which is sweet as apple pie. But don't let her charming allure make you underestimate her. An example of strength and sheer determination, every day she's training, she's pushing herself physically and mentally, overcoming a chronic pain issue, result of an injury from high school. This modest beauty can turn it up on the mat and leave you — literally — breathless.
STORY & PHOTOS BY EVELYN SUTTON


JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | 39


ALWAYS LEARNING >
MICAELA ATTENDING A SEMINAR WITH CARLSON GRACIE JR. AT CARLSON GRACIE JIU-JITSU MELBOURNE, FL, HER HOME GYM.
sophomore year of high school which turned into a chronic pain issue (CRPS - Complex Regional Pain Syndrome). This syndrome affects my lower right leg (knee down). The pain
is so intense that I have had a spinal stimulator placed on my spine to help control some of the pain. This, coupled with the demands of children at home, had kept me from continuing to be as athlet- ic as I had been. BJJ helps keep my leg active without impact, like most other sports, and it helps with the pain, which allows me to train 4-5 days a week. Overall, I don’t feel like be- ing athletic is in any way a prerequisite to start BJJ.
JM: Your whole family trains. What are some of the benefits of sharing this practice with your kids and your husband? What does it look like to be a BJJ family?
MR: My whole family does train now and it's wonderful to share something that I love so much with my family. My three children started right before the quarantine, and my husband started last month. It is wonderful
to know that my children are learning how to defend themselves and others. I love seeing the kids gain confidence. I love knowing they’re learning a valuable
skill that will help them throughout their lives.
I like the confidence it gives me and my kids when we are able to work ourselves out of a difficult and tight situation. It’s also great to be able to roll together for fun at home and on the mats.
JM: What’s your favorite position and favorite submission?
MR: My favorite position is to have someone’s back. I feel most comfortable in this position, however, I don't always get a submission. My favorite submission is Kimura from closed guard and Gogoplata from mount.
JIU-JITSU FAMILY > MICAELA, HER HUSBAND AND KIDS, TRAIN TOGETHER & SHARE THE LOVE FOR BJJ
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"Jiu-Jitsu keeps my mental health in check. It’s my happy place.
It keeps me mentally engaged, working my mind. It keeps my eating habits healthy.
It is very hard to perform well when I don’t eat well. It gives me confidence to know thatifIwereinabad situation, I’d have the tools to get me out of it."
JM: What things do you find hard in training? MR: The thing that I find the hardest in training is not comparing myself to others. I have really struggled with this especially since receiving my blue belt. I see others who just pick up on the moves a lot faster than I do and that I rarely tap others when I roll. Thank- fully, I have a very good coach who has incredible patience with me.
JM: And what do you
find easy, what comes natural to you?
MR: Questions come naturally. My coach definitely let me know, haha! I’m not allowed to ask any questions past the demonstration anymore. Actually, since that point my Jiu-Jitsu has improved quite a bit. My coach does a very good job instruct- ing the individual and
he knew that I know the technique, I just need to trust myself.
JM: Not too long ago, you earned your very first sig- nificant rank in Jiu-Jitsu. What did it feel like to earn your blue belt?
MR: Honestly, it felt amazing! Such an accom- plishment, even though
I almost died from (heat) exhaustion at the local produce stand on my way home after rolling for my belt! Don’t worry, they stuck me in their cold
storage until I recovered.
I was so proud of myself because I stuck with it! I love Jiu jitsu but it is not easy for me. I don’t learn it as fast as some of the other students, so this was a big deal for me.
JM: Do you feel that becoming a blue belt
has changed the perception or expec- tations of others when you’re on the mat?
MR: Yes, absolutely. I have really struggled with this since earning my blue belt. I feel like people look at me like I’m a blue belt and I should be able to tap all white belts now and that I should pick
up on technique quickly. I know this is just my perception, but it still puts pressure on me. Despite this, I still show up every day for training. I’ve been learning slowly what belts actually mean, though. Just because I’m in a handful of other blue belts, it's my journey, not theirs. It's not how fast they progress compared to me, it's how I’m pro- gressing compared to my- self yesterday. This is still hard for me to accept, but I work on it every day.
JM: What does it feel like to be a woman in what is still a male dominated sport?
MR: It really doesn’t both- er me. At first I felt more secure when I had a fe- male training partner to lean on. But now I’m very comfortable and consider most of the men as my friends. But that could also be because our gym is the best. I do wish more women trained because BJJ is such an amazing life skill.
JM: How important is having a “female squad” you can lean on for encouragement and support at your
home gym?
MR: Pretty important.
I’ve come to realize there are some things only females can offer other females: certain points of view, certain types of en- couragement, and sharing BJJ insecurities are some examples of that.
JM: What do you
consider the greatest challenges for women
in Jiu-Jitsu?
MR: Barrier to entry.
Most women are intimidated by the tes- tosterone levels at most gyms. I was intimidated by this as well, which is why I was drawn to kick- boxing at first because I felt there would be more women in the classes. However, the men I train with are very easy to work with, incredibly kind, and respectful of the women in our gym.
JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | 41


JM: What do you consider the greatest accomplishments of
women in Jiu-Jitsu?
MR: There is something to be said about jumping into a sport dominated by men. I think this is something all women can be proud of.
JM: Do you have any role models
in the sport?
MR: I consider most people I train
with at my gym to be role models. There are a couple of people specifically that I look up to. Outside of being good demonstrators of technique, they inspire several other qualities that I have come to realize are an important part of training in jiu jitsu: kindness, instilling confidence in others, non- judgemental with my insecurities,
and always willing to listen. I try to emulate these qualities as well as learn technically from them.
JM: What are your future plans
for Jiu-Jitsu?
MR: I plan to just keep training,
keep progressing, and getting better. I want to be the best I can be. I don’t have any intention of competing. I do this mostly for satisfaction and to build confidence.
JM: What is your best advice for women in BJJ and those looking
to start?
MR: I would tell them to just start. You will fall in love with it. I wish that I would have found BJJ when I was
a lot younger. It is very addicting. The awkwardness lasted one class for me, so don’t let it stop you. Also, start rolling as soon as your coach will let you. Do not shy away from it. Identify your weaknesses and give them the most attention instead of trying to avoid them. Y
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"I plan to just keep training, keep progressing, and getting better. I want to
be the best I can be."


Class Schedule*
monday
11am Jiu-Jitsu
noon Open mat
5:30pm Beginners Kids Jiu-Jitsu
5:30pm Vinyasa Flow Yoga 6:30pm Beginner Muay Thai 7:30pm Beginner Jiu-Jitsu
thursday
tuesday
9:45am Restorative Yoga 11am Jiu-Jitsu
noon Open mat 5:30pm Kids Jiu-Jitsu 5:30pm Women's Only BJJ 6:30pm Muay Thai 7:30pm Jiu-Jitsu
november 2020
wednesday
11am Jiu-Jitsu noon Open mat 5:30pm Kids Jiu-Jitsu 5:30pm Power Yoga 6:30pm Boxing 7:30pm NOGI
saturday
10am Open mat
JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | 43
carlson gracie jiu-jitsu team melbourne & luxdei studio 880 mc clendon st., melbourne fl 32935 321-890-8037 bjj | 321-917-1599 yoga
bjjmelbournefl.com | luxdeistudio.com
9:45am 11am noon 5:30pm 5:30pm 6:30pm 7:30pm
Restorative Yoga 11am Jiu-Jitsu noon Open mat 6pm Kids Jiu-Jitsu 7pm Women's Only BJJ
MMA Jiu-Jitsu
Jiu-Jitsu
Open mat Sparring
NOGI open mat
*Schedule is subject to changes.
friday


ALL HAIL
THE QUEEN OF JIU-JITSU.
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around the world
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1. COTO DE CAZA CALIFORNIA:
Keolah Pham and Emi Miller love BJJ even underwater
2. BRONX JIU JITSU, BRONX, NY:
Jezebella Chiquito & Bia Mesquita
3. HURON BJJ, CANADA:
Nancy Hamelin and Amanda Scarlett
4. SYNERGY BJJ, ROCKLIN, CA:
Joy Gewerth and Katrina Roxas
5. VISION FITNESS AND MMA, CINCINNATI, OH:
Marissa Pender and Joelle Jackson
6. GUSTAVO MACHADO BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU IN WILSON, NC: Professor Scott Bass & Jiujiteiras
7. CARLSON GRACIE JIU-JITSU MELBOURNE, FL: Professor Carlson Gracie Jr. with the Sutton girls; Maggie, Evelyn and 'Jiujiteira in Training', Milena. 8. COMBAT CLUB, JACKSONVILLE, NC:
Coach Mel (center) and her fierce Jiujiteiras
9. MOMENTUM MIXED MOVEMENT ARTS KOH PHANGAN, THAILAND: Sawasdee Ka (hello) from
our sisters in Thailand!
10. PREMIER COMBAT CENTER, OMAHA, NEBRASKA: Lots of love from Omaha!
11. CARLSON GRACIE WINTER HAVEN, FL:
Kassandra Lopez and Savana Pitts, smiles at Girls in Gis
46 | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM
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JIUJITEIRAS AROUND THE WORLD SUBMISSION:
To be featured in this section, e-mail a photo (high res images with 300dpi print better) of yourself and your BJJ sisters training, include names and gym location to: [email protected]
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LET LIGHT BE.
STUDIO
ART & YOGA CLASSES ⌘ POWER YOGA ⌘ VINYASA FLOW ⌘ RESTORATIVE
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