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October issue of Jiujiteira Magazine

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Published by jiujiteiramagazine, 2020-11-23 13:43:49

Jiujiteira Magazine October 2020

October issue of Jiujiteira Magazine

Keywords: BJJ,Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu,Martial Arts,Women,Women in BJJ,Jiujiteira

interview: getting up close & personal with brittany allison
issue one | OCTOBER 2020
beauty is a beast
BJJ moves
for women
fall for
under
cuts
hair that makes a statement
must-know
Fight
like a
GIRL
how women are changing the game in jiu-jitsu
page 6
DEBUT NoISSUE 1
defying expectations
JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | 1


cover story
Fight Like a Girl 6
sections:
every issue:
COACH TALK
Must-Know BJJ Moves for Women 12 BY DAVID SUTTON
BEAUTY IS A BEAST
Fall for Undercuts 16 BY VHILENA NELSON
YOGA FOR JIU-JITSU
It's All in the Hips 22 BY EVELYN SUTTON
PUBLISHER'S CORNER
4 Interview with Brittany Allison Haage 24
You Never Forget Your First Time
CLOSE CHOKE
2 | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM
october 2020


Dr. Strangles page 22
JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | 3


Iremember experiencing a mixture of excitement laced with fear at my first Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu class. Even though
my whole family was on the mat and I had nothing to worry about with my husband as the instructor, there was still a level of anxiety I hadn't felt before in a class.
Could I handle the physical demands
of training? Was I strong enough? Fast enough? Smart enough? Jiu-Jitsu is hard. Mentally and physically. Yet, it is for ev- erybody. Could I learn all of these escapes and positions? Could I actually submit someone? How close is too close?
And what if I get injured?
Everyone begins more or so like this, with lots of questions. Between wearing a gi, learning positions, getting comfortable being uncomfortable, and the amount of physical contact with strangers, Jiu-Jitsu is a foreign activity for most people. It’s especially daunting for women, particu- larly when you are the only one in your gym. The national average shows women outnumbered 10 to 1 in classes (read our cover story, Fight Like a Girl, on page 6).
As Jiujiteiras, we know Jiu-Jitsu can save lives and statistically, women are 10 times more likely than men to be the victim of a violent crime. So why aren't there more women training BJJ?
Maybe it's because there aren't enough out- lets to promote the existing thriving com- munity of women in this sport. Jiujiteira Magazine is a supporter of that movement and wants to give it a voice.
I'm on a quest to learn as much as I can and to find out who we are — mothers, daugh- ters, wives, warriors — what are some
of the challenges we face in Jiu-Jitsu, and how are we influencing the sport, from the self-defense practitioner to the professional fighter. How is BJJ impacting our lives and how do we share it with more women?
Tell us what you think of our very first is- sue and let us know what stories you want to read , questions you have and what are you curious about. Send your comments to: [email protected]
Welcome to our first issue! Oss.
EVELYN SUTTON is on a mission
to uncover and promote the universe of women in one of the deadliest martial arts in the world.
PUBLISHER’s corner
You never forget your first time.
let’s keep rolling... Follow us online and keep the conversation going! jiujiteiramagazine.com
jiujiteirausa jiujiteirausa [email protected] 4 | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM
october 2020
PUBLISHER
Creative Director & CEO
Evelyn Sutton
writers
David Sutton Vhilena Nelson David C. Sutton Evelyn Sutton
proofreading
Edgard Esperança
photography
Evelyn Sutton
880 Mc Clendon Street, Melbourne, FL 32935 jiujiteiramagazine.com U 321.917-1599
Subscribe online at JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM. Please al- low 4-6 weeks for subscription to start. Jiujiteira Magazine is a registered trademark of LuxDei Studio. The contents of Jiu- jiteira Magazine, associated websites, advertisements, articles, graphics, photographs and any other published content are protected by copyright law and may not be reproduced, dis- tributed or modified without prior written consent of Jiujiteira Magazine. Jiujiteira Magazine does not necessarily endorse, verify, or agree with the content, and makes no guarantees as to the accuracy, completeness, timeliness, or usefulness of any content. Jiujiteira Magazine shall not be held liable for any er- rors or omissions in the content. ©2020 All rights reserved. Any reproduction, in whole or in part, is prohibited without written permission from the publisher.
ISSUE No 1
Evelyn Sutton


BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU | MUAY THAI | MMA
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cover story
fight like a
GIRL
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The Future of BJJ is Fierce & Female
how women are changing the game in jiu-jitsu
BY EVELYN SUTTON
iujiteiras are cut from a different cloth than your average woman. Nothing wrong with average. We just like to be on top, preferably firmly mounted on our opponent and in
control of our own well-being.
Anyone who trains will tell you that Jiu-Jitsu is hard. And it can be even harder for wom- en. Harder because it's still a male dominated sport. Being a female in the Y chromosome world of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu can get tough at times with women in BJJ classes outnum- bered ten to one. Not because it's not accessi- ble to us, but because there aren't enough of us actively training to even the odds.
The truth is, Jiu-Jitsu saves lives. Particular- ly the lives of women. Statistically, women are 10 times more likely than men to be the victim of a violent crime that can result in death. This poses the question: why aren't then women flocking to gyms everywhere to learn BJJ? As a Jiujiteira myself, I want to do something to change that.
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Perhaps it's a case of not knowing. Not knowing the benefits of this practice, the growing number
of gyms that offer women-only classes, the many competitive op- portunities available and the very exciting movement that is cur- rently happening in BJJ. There's a strong, vibrant, beautiful and thriv- ing community of women who are kicking ass, re-inventing the world of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and making a name for themselves in this sport. Flaunting their shining crowns in pure audacity, these queens are taking over the tatami and destroy- ing stereotypes in an orchestrated display of talent, passion, athleti- cism, ferocity and grace that only we can pull off. Little caterpillars transforming into gorgeous—and lethal— butterflies.
On the mats there is no gender. Jiu-Jitsu is for anyone and every- one — gender makes absolutely no difference in someone’s ability to learn and effectively use BJJ.
Designed for weaker and smaller opponents to dominate larger ones using technique over strength, BJJ is the great equalizer. It creates
an even foundation for anybody
to beat anybody. A 120lb woman who is a blue belt can easily submit a 200lb athletic man who is un- trained or new to BJJ.
A practice that challenges mental and physical limits, triggers fears, traumas, and repressed memories while forcing you completely out of your comfort zone. Jiu-Jitsu can take you from being a potential victim to the one in control. BJJ's most important lesson is that it teaches us to take back our power. And women are fast learners.
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Reasons We Train
Women train Jiu-Jitsu for sport, for fitness, for stress-relief, for the mental and physical challenge, for self-defense, for confidence and sometimes just because there's nothing quite as fun as submitting someone bigger and stronger than you, over and over again.
Regardless of the reasons we train, most of us find Jiu-Jitsu because of someone in our lives; a friend, spouse, partner, father, coach or even child, encourages us to give it a try. Men have often played a huge part in helping the growth of females in BJJ, recognizing the value this art has in keeping us healthy and safe and we are grateful for our male supporters.
“Over the past few years, the amount of high- level female competitors in the sport has increased. Many of who I’m sure could give most men a run for their money.”
VALERIE WORTHINGTON
BJJ BLACK BELT + COACH
NO VICTIMS HERE: AT CARLSON GRACIE JIU-JITSU TEAM IN MELBOURNE, FL,
WOMEN ARE DEFYING ODDS AND EXPECTATIONS EVERY WEEK, PACKING UP THE MATS FOR WOMEN'S-ONLY CLASSES AND REGULAR CO-ED JIU-JITSU CLASSES, CHANGING THE FACE OF THE SPORT AND FIGHTING BACK THE VICTIMIZATION OF WOMEN.
Women Enter the Arena
The queens of the tatami haven't been around for long. It was only 32 years ago, in 1985, that women were allowed to compete in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu — for the first time ever — at the Rio de Janeiro federation thanks to Yvone Duarte, our first female black belt.
JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | 9
the threat is real
VIOLENCE
against women
Despite the fact that advocacy groups all over the U.S. have worked for decades to stop the rise of gender-based violence and sexual assault, the numbers are still shocking.
According to the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, women experience about 4.8 million intimate partner-related physical assaults and rapes every year.
To put it in perspective,
that breaks down to 1 in 5 women vs 1 in 71 men,
in the United States, have been raped in their lifetime.
Statistically, women are
10 times more likely than men to be the victim of a violent crime. The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports that between the years of 2015 and 2019, nationwide, 67,424 men were victims of a violent crime vs 627,635 women.
REFERENCES:
NOW.ORG/RESOURCE/ VIOLENCE-AGAINST- WOMEN-IN-THE-UNITED- STATES-STATISTIC
NCADV.ORG
4.8 MILLION
10 TIMES +
YVONNE DUARTE FACEBOOK


A decade later, women get
to compete at tournaments, when IBJJF (International Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Federa- tion) adds two female weight divisions, which combined all belt levels. There simply weren't enough female com- petitors at the time to fill out a weight division. This
is a major win and opens
the door for more women to compete in the sport.
According to IBJJF, adding two additional weight classes — rooster and super heavy weight — in 2015 also con- tributed to the growth of fe- male competitors. Other pos- sible reasons for the boost were changes to training environments, making them more female-friendly, and rules that emphasized safety on the mat. Today with the
consistent increase of female competitors (up to 10% a year), more weight and belt divisions are available with blue and white belts making up the largest divisions.
Organizations like Fight 2 Win, have also been doing their part to support women in Jiu-Jitsu. In 2016, F2W
Pro made history by putting together the first ever female main event in professional Jiu-Jitsu, featuring Macken- zie Dern vs Rossie Snow. Dern defeats Snow in less than 14 seconds with an armlock, and proves to the world that BJJ girls can put on a show just as exciting as the boys can.
F2W Pro is currently the only organization offering women the opportunity to headline a BJJ event.
You have a tribe
Most co-ed classes will be dominated by men who are bigger, stronger and heavier than you. Do yourself a favor and find women's only-classes and open-mats in your area, especially if this is your first time. Carlson Gracie Jiu-Jitsu Team in Melbourne, Florida, hosts weekly women's only classes with an average of 15 women per class motivating and encour- aging each other to learn. Attending female BJJ classes can be beneficial whether it’s your first time training or you’re a seasoned Jiujiteira who rolls with the big guys all the time.
Don't get me wrong, co-ed classes are extremely important. Statistically, you're more likely to be physically assaulted
by a man rather than a woman. With that being said, when it comes to training, whenever you have an opportunity to train in an environment with more women, take it. With better balance in weight and strength, there are many more techniques you can attempt. You'll learn more and have tons of fun.
BJJ is such an intense and intimate sport on its own but consistently being the only woman in the room can make it even more challenging. There's a shared understanding of that and community among the women in Jiu-Jitsu to sup- port one another through the wins and losses, and to help navigate training when female specific questions come up about hair, nails, bruises, makeup, periods and motherhood on the mat, just to mention a few.
Female Inclusion in Jiu-Jitsu
The face of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is quickly changing as more women participate in the sport and prove that we can be badass competitors, coaches, and ambassadors. Every year, more females are reaching black belt rank in Jiu-Jitsu all over the world. In international competitions such as World Championships, there are women-only instructional camps and other special events with non-profit organizations that help bring awareness to the topic of violence against women and what we can do about it.
Much like anything else in life, to succeed in BJJ, you have to be committed, regardless of who you are. If you want to gain rank in this sport, you have to be dedicated and passion-
ate about reaching your goals. You have to showcase the
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techniques and strategies you are learning, and be able to execute them within your gym's curriculum and standards. If you want to compete, then compete, but this should not be your only goal or means of evaluation for promotion.
If you are growing your fam- ily and expecting a child, most coaches are happy
to tailor your training to accommodate the pregnan- cy and allow you to sit in classes so you can still watch the drills and learn the tech- niques in a way that is safe for you and your baby. You're allowed to be a Jiujiteira and a mother. Jiu-Jitsu will always be there to support you, no matter what phase of life you are in and will be there for you when you are ready to return to the mats.
The Future of BJJ is Female
Jiujiteiras are here to stay. It's up to us to continue to promote, facilitate and en- courage more women to try out the gentle art.
Much of what is needed is for the BJJ community — gyms, practitioners and coaches — to think more about inclusion, consider all members of the team and the greater good of the
sport. As a community, we need to create an environ- ment that supports both men and women and the unique challenges for each. Women don't need special treatment or different drills from the men but we do need a safe environment
to train with coaches and leaders that advocate for women and will not turn a blind eye to issues that may be happening at a gym.
Many women who train at gyms where they are the only female often feel they aren't challenged to learn and
rank up because the men
are being too careful in fear of hurting them or worse, they are being relentlessly smashed class after class and eventually injured because the professor in charge is turning a blind eye, not looking out for abusive behavior, and not training the students properly.
Consider the reasons why people choose to learn Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. Now consider this, for many women in larger numbers than men, the reason they have specifically chosen BJJ is the self-defense aspect. Either because they fear something could happen or because something trau- matic has already happened in their past, they are recovering victims of some
type of physical abuse. They come to BJJ in hopes they will move past that and learn to effectively protect them- selves and never be a victim again. When their triggers come up during class (and they will due to the intimate nature of the sport) or awk- ward questions are asked, these people do not deserve to be abused or ridiculed
in any way. Everyone needs to feel safe enough to trust their coach and teammates. As a community, we need to make sure of that.
Women at your gym want to compete? Encourage it. Suggest a competition class for women. More women competing means more opportunities for all of us and a bright future for the sport. Provide the training, support, gear, resources, contacts — whatever they need to succeed — and watch your team grow.
If you see a problem at your gym that can be solved, be a part of the solution to solve
it. Problem-solving is what we do in Jiu-Jitsu. If you are on a team that does not advocate for you, then you need to find your own voice and advocate for yourself.
Ten years from now, I am going to be part of the move- ment that helped ensure that women in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu are respected and included. Inclusion creates better learning environ- ments and better tolerances for all students.
Next time you put on your gi and get on the mat — even if you are the only woman in the room — consider this: we are inspiring the next generation of strong, confident and no victim- ized women. The little girls watching us today are the BJJ practitioners, coaches and competitors of tomor- row. Our example matters and impacts lives. We have a responsibility to carry
the torch and keep it lit, for them and for us. And I'm proud to be part of that. Y
A 120lb woman who is a blue belt can easily submit a 200lb athletic man who is untrained or new to BJJ.
JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | 11
cover story
fight like a girl


coach talk
1
The cross collar choke, is one of the most reliable BJJ chokes, regardless of skill level.
D AV I D S U T T O N is the lead coach and owner of Carlson Gracie Jiu-Jitsu Team in Melbourne, FL. With over 18 years in martial arts and currently a brown belt in Jiu-Jitsu, David is responsible for a sucessful kids, adults and womens' program at his gym. You can contact him at: [email protected] or bjjmelbournefl.com
must-know
BJJ
moves
Whether you are a
beginner or a seasoned Jiujiteira, these moves are guaranteed to improve your game on and off the mats.
for women cross collar choke
One of the first chokes you will learn, the cross collar choke is a powerful weapon to have in your self-defense arsenal. Fairly simple to execute, with practice, anyone can do it. Regardless of the position, this choke constricts the blood supply to the head. It also stimulates the vagal nerve, which slows down the heart and creates a double effect of cutting oxygen supply to the brain.
BREAKING IT DOWN:
1. From closed guard, sink your right hand deep into the opponent's left collar and firmly grab it
2. Slide your left hand under your right arm, deep into opponent's collar and grab the right collar
3. Tuck your elbows in and slowly pull down LEVEL: Beginner
12 | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM


The Kimura works by isolating the elbow and shoulder joints through the use of a figure-four grip.
2
kimura
Named after Masahiko Kimura, who used the move to defeat Helio Gracie, a Kimura is a double joint armlock with painful pressure applied to the oppo- nent's shoulder. Failing to submit can result in a broken arm, torn rotator cuff, or dislocated shoulder.
BREAKING IT DOWN:
1. Control the opponent's arm, mirror hand 2. Grab wrist firmly, come over the shoulder
to grab your own wrist
3. Maintain control and twist your body as
you rotate opponent's arm by the shoulder LEVEL: Intermediate
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3
mount escape
Both in BJJ and in real life, mount is one of the most dangerous positions you can find yourself trapped in. For that reason, you need to know how to escape it. With good mount escape techniques you can survive and turn the table.
BREAKING IT DOWN:
1
2
1. Get on your side and push opponent's leg through yours 2. Shrimp out to opposite side
3. Get up on your elbow and climb up to opponent's back 4. Escape mount and take opponent's back
LEVEL: Beginner
3
4
success!
Escape & take the back!
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5


4 shrimp
THANK YOU TO OUR LOVELY JIUJITEIRA, MAGGIE SUTTON, FOR HELPING US DEMONSTRATE THESE FUNDAMENTAL MUST-KNOW BJJ MOVES FOR WOMEN! SEE YOU NEXT TIME!
A fundamental movement that you must learn how to execute properly is to "shrimp” or "hip escape". It is called “shrimp” because of the shape the body makes during the move. The objective
is simple: create space with and for the hips to improve your position. And if you want to learn BJJ, you will find yourself shrimping ad nauseam. Just ask the higher belts, during their years of training, it's likely their shrimping has covered thousands of miles.
BREAKING IT DOWN:
1. Lie on your back with one leg bent, foot close to your butt and elbows in
2. Push off the bent leg, propelling your hips out and chest toward knees, shifting your weight to the side, specifically to your shoulder and your foot
3. Straighten your body out again and resume lying on your back
LEVEL: Beginner
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Beauty is a Beast
fall for
undercuts
BY VHILENA NELSON
When participating in sports a lot of hair can be a burden. Especially finding the proper way to style your hair
to help keep it out of your face and out of the way.
In sports like Jiu-Jitsu this can be even more of a challenge. Luckily, there are alternatives. Meet your locks' new best friend, the unapologetic — undefeated — undercut.
razilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) is a grappling-based
martial art whose cen- tral theme is the skill of controlling a resisting
opponent in ways that force him to submit.
Due to the fact that control is generally easier on the
ground than in a standing position, much of the technique of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) is centered around the skill of taking an opponent down to the ground and wrestling for domi- nant control positions from where the opponent can be rendered harmless (source: renzogracie.com/jiu-jitsu).
This means the athlete will wrestle and roll around on the mat quite a bit, which causes the hair to become loose or caught by the opponent.
IN BJJ, LADIES WITH LONG HAIR WILL STRUGGLE TO KEEP THEIR HAIR FROM BEING YANKED OR RIPPED OUT, IN A PONYTAIL, AND OUT OF THEIR FACE. UNDERCUTS OFFER A
STYLISH SOLUTION.
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Luckily, there are alternatives to styling hair which can help with some of the hassles of long hair and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. A popular trend is the undercut. The undercut hairstyle is when a portion of the underneath section of hair is shaved off. The undercut typically is sectioned below the occipital bone and angled behind the ears. Someone with very long hair would find this to be an especially accommodating style. For starters, the undercut removes a significant amount of hair which would immediately make the hair much lighter. An undercut would also allow for the hair from the sides and back to meet in a ponytail much more securely. Less hair is easier to manage and feels cooler during work outs. Another bonus to the undercut is that it's not noticeable when the hair is worn down, so you can easily change up your style.
The undercut has become extremely popu- lar due to the many ways it makes life easier when it comes to workouts. Another trendy way to wear an undercut is with shaved designs. Some of the designs are breath taking works of art shaved directly into the hair. This gives the undercut a unique look and a way for you to express your person- ality. These designs can range from stars, logos, beautiful flowers, as well as free styled designs. Some undercuts are so intricate they look like a tattoo in the hair. Unlike a tattoo, an undercut is not permanent which allows for new designs every time.
The undercut helps turn a would-be basic hairstyle into a stylish eye grabbing look. The undercut adds flare while allowing for a more practical way to keep hair out of your way and your opponents. It creates a more tamable look without having to sacrifice the length
of your hair. Many women fear the idea of having to cut all their hair off when practic- ing Jiu-Jitsu. With fashionable trends like an undercut, you will be able to have the best of both worlds. Keep your lovely locks and enjoy a fashion forward trendy hairstyle. Y
REFERENCE:
RENZO GRACIE WHAT IS JIU-JITSU (BJJ)? (2020). RENZOGRACIE.COM/JIU-JITSU
Undercuts are a fashionable solution for women who are active on and off the mats.
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VHILENA NELSON is a professional hair stylist and owner of
His & Her Mobile Hair Salon in Melbourne, FL. A blue belt in Jiu-Jitsu, Vhilena competes in BJJ and is a local advocate for women in the sport. You can contact her at: [email protected] or hisandhermobilehaircare.com


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jiu-jitsu fashion
Submission Shark has some of the
best BJJ hoodies to keep you warm
and stylish before and after training. Check out this cropped hoodie and all the others available on their website.
Lots of colors and design choices, the hardest part will be picking your favorites.
SUBMISSIONSHARK.COM
We love this super cute and comfortable crop top from Choke Republic! Awaken your inner tigress and keep her happy on and off the mats. For fall, our choice is the mustard yellow, but you can also get it in black.
FIGHTERSMARKET.COM
Jiujiteiras are always on the lookout for better (and cute) ways to manage their hair on the mat. Kitsch Spiral Hair Ties are a good option. Strong yet gentle, only two loops are enough to keep hair secure enough for the most challenge of training sessions. Unlike regular elastic bands, these spiral ties don’t break and pull on the hair and don't cause any headaches.
MYKITSCH.COM
20 | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM
Fierce & Proud


Trick or Treat
Dia de los Muertos Nogi Collection
JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | 21
BJJ Horror Medusa
SPOOKY
Nogi
With Halloween just around the corner, we are bringing the best spooky nogi gear to the mat. Our favorite brand this issue is Raven with their monsters and day of the dead collection, you'll be ready to trick or treat your opponent's all month long!
Visit RAVENFIGHTWEAR.COM for more.
BJJ Horror Headless Horseman


yoga for jiu jitsu
it 's all in the
HIPS
BY EVELYN SUTTON
There is a love affair between the ancient practices of jiu-jitsu & yoga. With so many similarities and mirrored truths between them, it almost seems as if these arts were intentionally designed to complement each other. Besides proven
to alleviate anxiety, depression, lower high blood pressure and provide many other physical, mental and spiritual benefits, yoga will also help improve your BJJ. Without proper hip mobility, performing even the basic Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu techniques and warm up will be difficult. But don't despair. Yoga, is here to save the day. Check out the following hip care yoga poses for BJJ practitioners.
Lotus
(Padmasana)
Sit on the floor with your legs extended and spine straight. Bend your right knee and hug it to your chest. Then, bring your right ankle to the crease of your left hip so the sole of your right foot faces the sky. The top of your foot should rest on your hip crease.
Bend your left knee. Cross your left ankle over the top of your right shin. Draw your knees as close together as possible and sit up.
Hold for at least one minute.
Stretches the feet, ankles, knees, and hips. Level: Beginner
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Pigeon Pose
(Eka Pada Rajakapotasana)
Starting from Downward Facing Dog, bring the right leg up into a Down Dog Split. Bend your right knee and bring that knee to the floor in between your thumbs. The right shin may angle back towards the left hip or be parallel to the front of your mat.
Your left leg should be flat on the floor. Take a look backward and make sure that your left foot is pointing straight back. Square your hips towards the front of your mat. If you feel stable, bring your torso down into a forward bend over your right leg.
Keep hips square and weight balanced equally on both sides. If this feels too intense, place a blanket or block or under the hip or back knee. Reach your forehead toward the floor. Hold for 5 breaths.
Come back up. To release, curl
your left toes under and step into Downward Dog. Repeat the pose on the other side. Hold for 5 breaths.
Stretches hip flexors and rotators. Level: Intermediate
Garland Pose
(Malasana)
From a seated position, place your feet wider than shoulder- width apart, feet flat on the floor, toes facing out. Your torso should be upright with the belly button pointing straight ahead.
Place your hands in prayer position in front of your chest, elbows pointed out to the sides. Use your elbows to press your knees open.
Hold for at 5 breaths.
Stretches the inner thigh muscles (hip adductors).
Level: Intermediate
EVELYN SUTTON is a E-RYT200 yoga teacher and owner of
LuxDei Studio in Melbourne, FL. A white belt in Jiu-Jitsu, Evelyn applies her personal practice and knowledge of yoga to BJJ while helping others do the same. You can contact her at: [email protected] or luxdeistudio.com
JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | 23


close choke
Doctor Strangles
JM: Tell us about yourself. Where are you from and what does a typical day in your life look like?
BA: I'm 28 years old and a current graduate student in the doctoral program for clinical psychology at Florida Institute of Technology. I'm a year away from obtaining my doc- torate. I'm interested in working in integrated healthcare settings, such
as medical hospitals and clinics. This setting allows patients to receive both their medical and mental health needs all in one location, which benefits the connection of mind and body. Exercise has always been part of my life and in February 2020, I decided to give martial arts, specifically Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, a try.
I just started my residency at Henry Ford Hospital in Michigan where my work days consist of meeting with medical professionals about patients’ mental health, and working with
to have her on their corner.
STORY & PHOTOS BY EVELYN SUTTON
patients themselves. It's a fast-paced environment and not what typically comes to mind when you think about what psychologists do in their careers. I love the medical field so path was
the perfect fusion of my passion for psychology and medicine. You have to be able to adapt to various situations quickly and you don't always know who will walk through the hospital doors.
I think that adaptability also applies to Jiu-Jitsu because you have to play off of the actions of your opponent. You have to be able to react and think on the spot. After my typical work day is when I usually get time to exercise.
JM: Have you trained martial arts be- fore and what attracted you to BJJ? BA: Before I started I had zero experi- ence in martial arts. As a kid, I wanted to try but my mom was too worried about injuries. As an adult, I took it in
my own hands, and decided to give it
a try and fell in love with it. I actually came to Carlson Gracie – Melbourne, to begin training kickboxing. Coach David made the observation that he thought and somehow knew, I would end up preferring Jiu-Jitsu. I was skeptical but I have to admit, he was right. I took sev- eral classes of kickboxing and Jiu-Jitsu right after. I found myself drawn more to the techniques and sport of Jiu-Jitsu. It fits my need of being technical and analytical. Initially, I was attracted to the exercise aspect, however, I was also interested in it as a means of self-de- fense. I'm a small woman and while I can't speak for all women, I know many have experienced situations in their lives when they felt physically unsafe and unable to protect themselves. I wanted to do something about that fear. I needed to build the confidence that I can get myself out of a potentially dan- gerous situation, should it ever arise.
24 | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM
Brittany Allison Haage is a young woman with a big dream.
A dream of helping people. She's a graduate student in the doctoral program for clinical psychology at Florida Institute
of Technology. When she's not attending to patient's mental health needs, she's on the mat learning how to choke people. A trained killer with the mind of a doctor. What could the world of therapy and the world of Jiu-Jitsu possibly have in common? Well, for starters, they have Brittany. And both are lucky


JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | 25


JM: I remember my first Jiu- Jitsu class as having no clue what was going on. How was your first class? BA: In my first class of Jiu-Jitsu, I was terrified and felt so awkward because
I had no idea what I was doing. I did not think I would ever understand the sport or know what to do in various positions. I was worried I wouldn't do well and thought maybe I should just stick with kickboxing. However, I'm not a quitter, so I want- ed to give BJJ the proper chance. I asked other team- mates how they felt when they first started, and many admitted to feeling similarly as I did at the time. That gave me comfort and interest in continuing to try it.
JM: What impact has Jiu-Jitsu made in your life, as a woman and individual? BA: Personally, Jiu-Jitsu
has not only increased my confidence in my ability
to use the techniques as physical defense, but it also increased my confidence
in general. I'm in the best shape that I probably ever have been in, my entire life and I am not above admit- ting that I want to look and feel good about my appear- eance. As for self-defense,
it has made me feel safer. I find myself walking with a level of comfort in the know- ing that I train and can defend myself. As a woman, it can be easy to feel intimat- ed by another person based on their size and strength.
In fact, certain men will
use their size and strength to intimidate us and make us feel unsafe. We may feel coerced into certain situa- tions because we fear the repercussions if we don't comply. We often submit rather than resist because of fear. To me, it's a sickening feeling that a woman might be put in situations where she will do something she does not want to do, because she is scared of the reaction if she protests. Even if it is not a situation where some- one has direct control over you, it can still be very scary and many of us think the worst of what could happen. As women, we understand that not all men are bad people. However, all women,
at some point, worry about a potentially violent and dangerous situation involv- ing the opposite sex since typically women are at a physical disadvantage.
BJJ levels the playfield.
Jiu-Jitsu has been an abso- lutely invaluable experience and I wish I would've begun my training sooner. Howev- er, now is better than never.
JM: How long have you
been training?
BA: I have been training for roughly 6 months. I am cur- rently a white belt with two stripes. I have already no- ticed many positive changes in myself. I have also had others come up to me and tell me they have noticed
26 | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM
HOME SWEET HOME > BRITTANY AT HER FLORIDA HOME GYM, CARLSON GRACIE JIU-JITSU MELBOURNE, WHERE SHE FIRST GAVE BJJ A TRY AND FELL IN LOVE WITH THE PRACTICE.


positive changes too. That is an amazing, heart-warming feeling. When you train con- sistently, time seems to fly by. I do my best to train at least 3 days a week. Training consistently truly makes
a difference, keeps muscle memory in check and allows me to hone my technique.
JM: Do you prefer gi or nogi? BA: I have recently been considering this question. At least right now in my train- ing, I find it hard to say. There are benefits of both. Nogi is crucial because it allows you to learn movements that could be executed in regular clothing. I also find it easier to maneuver my smaller
body with my longer limbs
in no-gi. However, it can be more challenging without the gi, since you don't have that extra material to grab onto for leverage. Training
in gi provides many different variations of places and fabric you can hold or manipulate to your advantage. I find this especially important for a smaller fighter like myself who may rely more on those things, at least as a beginner. I find wrist control and chokes easier in gi for that reason.
JM: Favorite position and favorite submission?
My favorite position is
S mount. My long limbs provide me some advantage to get my legs in the proper position. I have the ability to swing my legs over the other person fairly easily with proper technique. My current favorite submission
is the Darce Choke from
the position of holding the opponent in my guard. I like how if I can thrust my hips to break their balance and posture, while also getting arm control quickly, I can get to the submission fairly successfully. Here is another position where I feel I can use my long limbs to my advantage to keep guard and hold for the choke.
JM: What things do you
find hard in training?
One of the most difficult aspects of Jiu-Jitsu for me is maintaining and applying pressure. I really need to continue to fine-tune my technique because of my small size. I easily get swept when I'm on top. I need to be
more aware of my arms and legs and keep them tighter on the opponent to block those moves and maintain my position. As coach David always tells me, “You do not want to be in a bottom posi- tion because of your smaller size.” I want to get better
at utilizing the body type I have, to my advantage.
JM: And what do you
find easy, what comes natural to you?
While I don't think I can accurately say any partic- ular technique is easy for me as a beginner, I can say that I have considerable flexibility that allows me to get into certain positions readily. I think once I get the techniques down, positions
and submissions involving my legs will be a force to be reckoned with. These will hopefully include certain arm bars, triangle chokes, and omoplatas. My flexibility also allows me to withstand and sometimes even nar- rowly escape out of compro- mising positions that would otherwise lead to submis- sions. There have been times where an opponent will
even abandon a move early because they are not getting the submission as quickly as they would on someone who is not as flexible.
JM: You recently had your very first BJJ competition. What was the greatest lesson you took from it and will you compete again? One of the most import-
ant lessons I learned from competing was that it takes an incredible amount of courage to compete at all and to fight off the nervous- ness enough to be able to concentrate and execute what you know. There were definitely moments of panic where I felt like my nerves interfered with my ability to perform. It was also very different competing against strangers from other gyms because unlike with my teammates, the competitors are not as concerned with injuring you. That does not mean they intend to in-
jure anyone. There is just a different type of aggression in a competition setting. I definitely learned a lesson in needing to channel that type of competitive aggression.
"As women, we understand that not all men are bad people. However, all women,
at some point, worry about a potentially violent and dangerous situation involving
the opposite sex since typically women
are at a physical disadvantage. BJJ levels the playfield."
JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | 27


I noticed several times when I stopped myself from executing moves that I thought could possibly really hurt the other person. After- wards I realized that's just part of the sport and the opponent probably would have done the same thing
to me. The moves do not have to be “dirty” or unsportsmanlike, but it is the degree of force and discomfort you have to be willing to implement if you want to win.
A positive thing I definitely noticed was the conditioning our gym has us do because I barely broke a sweat while other competitors from other gyms were drenched. This is an area I did feel confident about and was thankful for that part of training. Overall, I learned I still have a signif- icant amount of courage and confi- dence to build, especially in the case of potential future competitions.
JM: What does it feel like to be a woman on the mat in what is still
a male dominated sport, with women in Jiu-Jitsu classes often outnumbered ten to one?
At first, it was definitely a little intimidating. I have never really had any issues with playing sports with men so I think that has greatly worked in my favor. However, I had zero experience in participating in a full-on contact sport with men, which is very different. There are many times where I feel like I need to prove myself or push myself harder to be perceived as being as good as a man of similar rank. This is pressure I place on myself though, because I am lucky that my gym has never made me feel like that was the case. I often think as women,
we feel the need to overcompensate just to be appreciated in a positive manner, whether it be physically or intellectually. Anytime you are in
the minority, I think it is normal to feel that pressure or intimidated by being outnumbered. Nevertheless, I think there are several things we can do to change that. First, we need to build
and maintain that confidence in our abilities and challenge those feelings of being intimidated by the ratio of men to women in the sport. Second, we can strive to change that ratio, decreasing the discrepancy between the number
of men and women in the sport. We can and should encourage more women try Jiu-Jitsu. It may never be a one to one ratio, but that does not mean we cannot strive for it and recruit as many women as we can. Personally, I have seen many more women join our gym and that makes me really happy and proud that our gym encourages it. It is very com- forting to witness that we can challenge the notion that this sport is just for boys and men. We are part of that change and I think that in itself is inspiring.
JM: How important is having a “female squad” you can lean on for encourage- ment and support at your home gym? Having other women to train with is great because it encourages solidarity when participating in a sport that, as we discussed, is dominated by men. It helps build up the confidence that we as wom- en can practice this sport and we can
do it well as long as we train just like the
men do. Therefore, I think it is crucial
to have that support from other women while also being a part of the team, phys- ical sex and/or gender aside. That means performing the same warm-ups, drills, techniques, and rolling as the men. I love to see women building each other up to feel comfortable with training with men and training with women. We cannot expect special treatment if we want to be taken seriously in this sport. The team needs to be able to function as one unit. That being said, it may take some wom- en more time to become comfortable with training with all the other men and I think that is okay too. Everyone will have different speeds at which they can develop that comfort and oftentimes,
it may be due to prior life experiences.
I think it is everyone’s job in the gym
to support that process and allow for
the positive exposure to training work its magic. The women who have more experience can act as gatekeepers for the newer women and model what it's like to work safely and comfortably with men, while also being there to listen to specific concerns they may have. Validation and patience are incredibly important in this situation because you never know what someone else may be working through or trying to overcome. Other women will have similar experiences and/or perspec- tives and look to each other for support, encouragement, and comfort.
28 | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM


JM: What do you consider the greatest challenges for women in Jiu-Jitsu?
I think confidence, the need of being proficient in technique, and physical limitations. Women on average, are typically smaller in size than most men. This puts some of us at a signifi- cant disadvantage. Great technique in Jiu-Jitsu allows for size not to matter as much. We need to rely heavily on technique because we often cannot muscle our way out of positions like many guys may be able to do. We really have to fine-tune all of the technical aspects, especially if we are talking about a self-defense situation.
JM: Do you have role models?
I do not have a role model that is currently in the sport, but I do have the most important role model in my life, my father. My dad has provided me his unwavering support in everything
I do in life since the moment I was born. He taught me how to be a good person that cares about others. He has inspired me to be a better person and a positive force in the world. I have always been a tomboy and he has never encouraged me to be anything other than myself. He has always supported my education and my passion for phys- ical fitness, no matter which form. His love and support throughout the years, have made me want to never stop improving. Because of him, I feel like there is little that I could not do if I set my mind to it. I often remind myself how lucky I am to have had such an amazing person in my life as my dad.
JM: What are your future plans for BJJ? Due to having to move to Michigan
to complete my residency, I plan on finding a new gym that can continue to help me become better in the sport and foster a similar environment for growth. While I will definitely be bus- ier, it is very important to me to still make time to train.
JM: What is your best advice for women in BJJ?
There will always be many reasons you can find to not do something, but you need to think about the reasons you can find to do something. Eventually, you may even find that the reasons to continue or begin training in this sport outweigh the reasons not to. Also, do not be afraid to look to other women for guidance as it is very possible those women were once in a similar position. When it comes to performing a certain move or technique during training, make it a point to ask questions and practice. You will feel more embar- rassed getting caught performing it incorrectly than you will admitting you need extra work on something.
JM: What can you expect when you first start training jiu jitsu? Something that can be very intimi- dating for people is the risk of injury and discomfort. Getting scraped up, mat burn, bruises, etc. is part of the process so yeah, it does hurt some- times. Eventually, you get used to most of it (within reason) and wear those wounds as badges of honor. At the
very least, your body becomes better
at tolerating some of the scrapes and bruises and your skin becomes tough- er with more exposure. Sometimes your limbs or joints may get tweaked, so it is important to listen to your body and recognize your limits. That being said, understand that the mild ones are normal, and it should not scare you away from the sport. Also, the chokes often look much scarier than the real- ity of how it feels. That doesn't mean chokes don't hurt because they defi- nitely are unpleasant. However, that is why tapping was invented as a signal before you pass out or get injured. It is best to keep an open mind and not to let your fears get in the way because you will be surprised what your body can withstand and overcome.
JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | 29


JM: Do you have to be incredibly muscular or bulky to be good?
No! Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu was described by my coach to me as utilizing your entire body against the other person’s body part. It is all in the technique, which I personally found comfort in. Muscle defi- nition is nice to have but not a requirement. You will also find yourself getting in better shape by training regularly.
JM: How long will I
need to train to get really good or progress onto higher ranks?
Honestly, the highest ranks in the sport will tell you
that the process never
ends. There will always be techniques to fine-tune
and new things to learn. If
it was something that you can just simply master and be finished, what is the real challenge or respect in that? As someone in higher educa- tion, we are always learning and learning how to contin- ue learning. It is important to stay up to date and con- sume as much knowledge and information we can to
improve. As for ranking up, it will all depend on the gym at which you train. However, this is a sport where patience and dedication is a virtue. You cannot get too wrapped up in the next belt and when you will earn it. That can definitely be easier said than done. Instead, try to focus
on the changes you notice in yourself and celebrate those small strides in progress.
It would be a disservice for your coach to simply hand out new belts before you are truly ready just because you feel it is time. Remember, there is a reason the coach is at their rank where they can teach you. You do not know more than your instructor so it is important to respect the process. I personally like to ask if there are specific things, I can focus on in training. Ask questions with the intention of improving, not showing off your belt. And when you do increase in rank, celebrate that tangible representation of your hard work, just do not let it get in the way of the reasons why you are training. Y
IN THE LION'S DEN > BRITTANY TALKS STRATEGY WITH COACH, DAVID SUTTON, PRIOR TO COMPETING. HIGHLIGHTS OF HER FIGHTS AT NAGA 2020 IN ORLANDO, FLORIDA
"...as women we can practice this sport and we can do it well as long as we train just like the men do. That means performing the same warm-ups, drills, techniques, and rolling as the men. We cannot expect special treatment if we want to be taken seriously in this sport."
30 | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM


Class Schedule*
monday
11am Jiu-Jitsu
noon Open mat
5:30pm Beginners Kids Jiu-Jitsu
5:30pm Vinyasa Flow Yoga 6:30pm Beginner Muay Thai 7:30pm Beginner Jiu-Jitsu
thursday
tuesday
9:45am Restorative Yoga 11am Jiu-Jitsu
noon Open mat 5:30pm Kids Jiu-Jitsu 5:30pm Women's Only BJJ 6:30pm Muay Thai 7:30pm Jiu-Jitsu
october 2020
wednesday
11am Jiu-Jitsu noon Open mat 5:30pm Kids Jiu-Jitsu 5:30pm Power Yoga 6:30pm Muay Thai 7:30pm NOGI
saturday
10am Open mat
9:45am Restorative Yoga 11am 11am Jiu-Jitsu noon noon Open mat 6pm 5:30pm Kids Jiu-Jitsu 7pm 5:30pm Women's Only BJJ
6:30pm Muay Thai 7:30pm Jiu-Jitsu
Jiu-Jitsu
Open mat Sparring
NOGI open mat
*Schedule is subject to changes.
friday
carlson gracie jiu-jitsu team melbourne & luxdei studio 880 mc clendon st., melbourne fl 32935 321-890-8037 bjj | 321-917-1599 yoga
bjjmelbournefl.com | luxdeistudio.com
JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | 31


LET LIGHT BE.
STUDIO
ART & YOGA CLASSES ⌘ POWER YOGA ⌘ VINYASA FLOW ⌘ RESTORATIVE
880 MC CLENDON ST, MELBOURNE, FL | 321.917.1599 | LUXDEISTUDIO.COM 32 | JIUJITEIRA MAGAZINE | JIUJITEIRAMAGAZINE.COM


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