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2018/2019 IN THE PRESS

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Published by Gregory+Vine, 2019-07-12 13:47:34

Bodegas LAN

2018/2019 IN THE PRESS

2018/2019

July 5, 2018
Circulation 1,580,000

Bodegas Lan Rioja Crianza 2014, Rioja, Spain

Edward Deitch

Who doesn’t like a good $10 or $12 bottle of wine?

Finding them is the holy grail of the wine world. And although there are tons of them out there, buying
inexpensive wines that rise above vin ordinaire status is one of the great challenges that wine lovers (and
critics) face.

But there’s nothing particularly complicated about it. It’s essentially a hit-or-miss exercise. With that in mind,
I stopped by one of my local wine stores the other night in need of a mid-week bottle of red for a roast
chicken dinner — and came away with a winner.

In the process, I ruled out California (usually fruity, one-dimensional wines at this price point); I passed on
Bordeaux (some good wines to be found but broad distribution of any particular bottle will often be limited);
I skipped Italy (I love Italian wines but usually enjoy them with Italian dishes).

And then there was Spain, whose wines still offer some of the best price-to-quality values. In a choice
between a couple of bottles from Rioja, Spain’s most famous wine region, I went with the $12 Bodegas
LAN Rioja Crianza 2014. One thing that swayed me was the fact that this wine was “estate bottled,” a sign
of quality you often don’t find at this price.

At home, I gave the bottle a 10-minute chill in the freezer on a warm summer evening. (Warning: do not do
this with more than one bottle at a time, as forgetting the second bottle while drinking the first is easy and
can lead to really messy consequences in your freezer.)

The interesting thing about wines from Rioja is that they come with at least a couple of years of age – the
“crianza” level requires at least one year of aging in oak and one year in bottle. The 2014 Bodegas LAN
had four years of aging when I opened it, and it showed.

The wine is made from 95 percent Tempranillo and 5 percent Mazuelo and has good complexity for the
price. There’s lots of ripe berry fruit on the nose and palate, mainly red but also some dark undertones,
punctuated by spice and herbal notes. There’s a good deal of oak in the mix (perhaps a bit too much for
some), which gives the wine a layer of vanilla sweetness. Soft tannins make it effortless to drink.

All in all, it was a perfect bottle to enjoy on the fly. In the hit-or-miss world of wine on the cheap, this one hit
the spot.

July 31, 2018
Circulation 388,150

August 2, 2018
Circulation: 16,000

Bodegas LAN Expands US Distribution and Portfolio to Meet Market Demand, Offering Full Range
of Classic and Single Vineyard Wines

August 1, 2018 (New York, NY) – Bodegas LAN, a benchmark
producer in the Rioja region, is expanding its distribution reach and
portfolio within the U.S. market to support growing consumer demand.
Fueled by distribution gains on the East and West Coasts, the
renowned Spanish winery will now offer the full range of LAN classic
and estate wines to consumers in the Midwest, including Idaho, Iowa,
Ohio and Wisconsin, while also building presence in Arizona. The
winery is committed to making these regions a focal point moving
forward.

“At the end of the 1990s and the beginning of the 2000s, Bodegas LAN began to build our current
distribution network in the U.S. Our option was a direct import and regional distribution system, which initially
concentrated on the East and West Coast markets,” explains LAN Export Manager Trinidad Villegas. “For
the past decade, our network has expanded with new opportunities to grow in the Midwest market and
beyond. After making some changes and adjustments over the years, we are proud to see that we are
approaching 2020 with LAN wines available in 40 states, including a full range of single vineyard wines to
complement our Classic wines.”

The Classic range includes the most popular LAN wines in the winery’s portfolio. Proven wines that are true
to their origin, LAN classics are produced with grapes sourced from close to 1000 acres managed by long-
standing supplier contracts in the Rioja Alta and Rioja Alavesa. Wines include:

The Estate range wines are the essence of the wholly owned Viña Lanciano, born on the winery’s estate
and reflecting the unique identity of its emblematic terroir. The selections include:

Select press samples are available for review. For additional information please contact Stefanie
Schwalb, [email protected] Learn more about Bodegas LAN at http://www.bodegaslan.com/.

August 2, 2018
Circulation: 25,000

News Briefs for August 2, 2018

• Diageo’s Captain Morgan rum is launching a new shot-focused Apple Smash expression. Retailing
at $16 a 750-ml., the 60 proof entry has packaging reminiscent of an apple, which emanates a tart
green apple aroma when you scratch the bottle. Captain Morgan has had success with its shot-
geared extensions in recent years, including Loco Nut, a coconut-flavored rum that depleted over
100,000 cases last year, according to Impact Databank.

• Heaven Hill has announced the fall 2018 edition of its Old Fitzgerald Bottled-In-Bond Kentucky
Straight Bourbon. Distilled in October 2008 and bottled this year, the label meets the stringent
bottled-in-bond guidelines, which require a whiskey to be the product of a single distillery from a
single season, aged a minimum of four years, and bottled at 100 proof. The latest iteration of Old
Fitzgerald Bottled-In-Bond is retail priced at $90 a 750-ml. It marks the second release from the
brand’s new biannual, limited edition bottled-in-bond series, which launched with a spring edition
in April.

• Molson Coors is partnering with Quebec-based cannabis producer Hexo on a new joint venture
that will develop non-alcoholic cannabis drinks for the Canadian market. Molson Coors Canada will
have a 57.5% controlling interest in the joint venture, with Hexo having the remaining ownership
interest. While recreational cannabis will officially become legal in Canada on October 17, edible
and beverage formats are not expected to be permitted until sometime next year. Constellation
Brands is also developing cannabis drinks for the Canadian market through its minority stake in
producer Canopy Growth. Southern Glazer’s is likewise gearing up to enter the market, recently
agreeing to become the exclusive distributor for cannabis producer Aphria.

• California-based Francis Ford Coppola Winery has launched its Diamond Collection Pinot Noir in
cans. The release marks the winery’s first foray into canned red wine, after more than a decade of
canning white and rosé wines. Retail priced at $24 a 4-pack of 250-ml. cans, the Coppola Diamond
Collection Pinot Noir is now available at the winery’s tasting room, as well as at select restaurants
and retailers. Overall, the Diamond Collection depletes around 1 million cases in the U.S. each
year.

• Spanish winery Bodegas LAN—owned by Sogrape, Portugal’s largest wine company—has
expanded its U.S. distribution to include four new Midwestern markets. Long a presence on the
East and West Coasts, the Rioja-based producer will now bring its full portfolio to Idaho, Iowa,
Ohio, and Wisconsin. Bodegas LAN’s entry range includes Crianza ($14 a 750-ml.), Reserva ($20),
Gran Reserva ($25), and D-12 ($20)—a blend of 98% Tempranillo and 2% Mazuelo taken from a
single tank—while a higher-end lineup features three red blends sourced entirely from the winery’s
Viña Lanciano estate: LAN Edicion Limitada ($50), Viña Lanciano Reserva ($30), and Culmen
Reserva ($65).

• Southern Glazer’s Wine & Spirits has appointed Anthony Capparelli as general manager of the
South Florida region. Capparelli has been with the company for over a decade, most recently as
vice president, on-premise, for South Florida. In his new role he will report to Patrick Cassidy, the
previous GM of South Florida, who was recently promoted to executive vice president and general
manager for the entire state.

August 15, 2018
Circulation: 680,000

Bodegas LAN | Scores

Thomas Matthews

Ribera del Duero Marqués de Burgos 2014

Score: 88
Release Price $15
Country Spain
Region Spain
Issue Web Only - 2018

Sanguine and earthy notes frame black cherry, licorice and blood orange flavors in this solid red.
Muscular tannins are prominent, but lively acidity keeps this balanced. A bit sauvage. Distinctive. Best
from 2020 through 2030. 200 cases imported.

Ribera del Duero Marqués de Burgos Crianza 2013

Score: 88
Release Price $20
Country Spain
Region Spain
Issue Web Only - 2018

A plush texture carries plum and coffee flavors, accented by floral, spice and licorice notes in this round
red. Light, firm tannins and crisp acidity keep this focused. Drink now through 2021. 100 cases imported.

Verdejo Rueda Duquesa de Valladolid 2017

Score: 86
Release Price $12
Country Spain
Region Spain
Issue Web Only - 2018

This firm white offers a lively mix of pear, blanched almond and ginger flavors, with briny acidity that
gives this a savory character. Energetic and focused. Drink now. 9,000 cases made.

August 22, 2018
Circulation: 80,000
Bodegas LAN Expands US Distribution and Portfolio to Meet Market Demand
Bodegas LAN, a benchmark producer in the Rioja region, is expanding its distribution reach and portfolio within the U.S.
market to support growing consumer demand. Fueled by distribution gains on the East and West Coasts, the renowned
Spanish winery will now offer the full range of LAN classic and estate wines to consumers in the Midwest, including
Idaho, Iowa, Ohio and Wisconsin, while also building presence in Arizona. The winery is committed to making these regions
a focal point moving forward.

“At the end of the 1990s and the beginning of the 2000s, Bodegas LAN began to build our current distribution network in
the U.S. Our option was a direct import and regional distribution system, which initially concentrated on the East and West
Coast markets,” explains LAN Export Manager Trinidad Villegas. “For the past decade, our network has expanded with new
opportunities to grow in the Midwest market and beyond. After making some changes and adjustments over the years, we
are proud to see that we are approaching 2020 with LAN wines available in 40 states, including a full range of single vineyard
wines to complement our Classic wines.”
The Classic range includes the most popular LAN wines in the winery’s portfolio. Proven wines that are true to their origin,
LAN classics are produced with grapes sourced from close to 1000 acres managed by long-standing supplier contracts in
the Rioja Alta and Rioja Alavesa. Wines include:

The Estate range wines are the essence of the wholly owned Viña Lanciano, born on the winery’s estate and reflecting the
unique identity of its emblematic terroir. The selections include:

August 28, 2018
Circulation 73,720

Modern Joins Classic
Kristen Bieler

In the heart of the Rioja Alta, surrounded by the meandering Ebro River, the stunning 178-acre Viña Lanciano vineyard is
among the most coveted locations in all of Rioja, and is responsible for the beauty and singularity of Bodegas LAN’s premium
wines.

Named for the three provinces that form Rioja—Logroño (now La Rioja), Alavesa and Navarra—Bodegas LAN is a relative
newcomer, founded in 1972. Since that time, the winery has been committed to perfecting the consistent high quality of its
classic range and an increased focus on boutique winemaking (hand picking, sorting). Additionally, LAN has introduced
modern practices in the vineyards and the cellar including sustainable viticulture, the elimination of chemical fertilizers, and
creating a highly innovative barrel storage and maintenance system.

Bodegas LAN crafts traditional Rioja (Crianza, Reserva, Gran Reserva) as well as a range of modern bottlings. While many
of the region’s wineries produce these two styles, few are as successful at mastering both, which has earned the estate a

reputation as one of the most dynamic producers in the region.

“Within LAN’s traditional range, you really see the terroir coming through, and the modern-styled wines showcase the other

side of what Rioja has to offer,” said Yannick Benjamin, Head Sommelier, University Club; Co-founder, Wine on Wheels.

Benjamin was joined by Brooke Sabel, Wine Director at New Jersey’s Gary’s Wine & Marketplace, at the Beverage Media
headquarters to taste and discuss the wines of Bodegas LAN.
“When I visited the estate, I was blown away by the high-tech winery,” shared Benjamin. “It’s like Willy Wonka with
mechanical innovations I’ve never seen in any other facility. Barrels are stacked with spaces between them to allow for
complete air circulation.”
Bodegas LAN has embraced innovation from the beginning, and winemaker María Barúa is leading experimentation on the
influence of oak, including testing the Spanish species roble pirenaico. She relies on a mix of American and French oak as
well as hybrids; the staves are composed of American oak, while the heads are French.

Rioja & The American Palate
The American interest in Rioja has been steadily increasing, both Sabel and Benjamin reported. But the Rioja consumer is
as diverse as the styles of wines being made in the region. “I have serious Rioja drinkers that follow aged Reservas and
Gran Reservas, and then consumers who will chose a Crianza because it is a well-made wine for $10, not necessarily
because it’s a Spanish Rioja,” Sabel explained. “I like introducing Tempranillo to Sangiovese drinkers—those who enjoy
Rosso and Chianti will like Crianza; it’s the same bright fruit, high-acid, food-friendly experience.”
Older expressions, like Reservas and Gran Reservas, remain some of the best values on the market. “Rioja used to be this
great secret and you could find older vintages for practically nothing,” said Benjamin. “Prices have increased along with
Rioja’s popularity, but these wines are still phenomenal values.” Even the full-bodied, modern-style wines, which as in the
case of Bodegas LAN, are made with the estate’s finest fruit and employ expensive oak regimes, still offer terrific value: “It
would be impossible to find Super Tuscans or Napa Cabernets of similar quality for well under $30,” said Benjamin. “It’s just
one of reasons that Rioja is incredibly unique.”

August 28, 2018
Circulation:5,000

Bodegas LAN Brings the Best of Rioja Stateside to Meet US Demand

As a renowned benchmark producer within the Rioja region of Spain, Bodegas LAN is committed to meticulous
vineyard management and winemaking. The winery’s signature character is featured throughout its portfolio, which
showcases both classic and single vineyard wines that are continuing to please consumer palates all across the US.
As distribution has increased on the East and West Coasts, the momentum has driven the winery to provide more of
its wines to customers in the Midwest and elsewhere. States including Idaho, Iowa, Ohio and Wisconsin are becoming
a focal point for LAN, and they are also dedicated to building a presence in Arizona. With a pioneering approach to
aging their wines in the highest-quality oak barrels crafted by the best coopers in the world, Bodegas LAN uniquely
combines Rioja tradition and modern winemaking.

True to their origin, LAN’s Classic range of wines are produced with grapes sourced from an estimated 1000 acres
that are managed by supplier contracts in the Rioja Alta and Rioja Alavesa, which have long-standing partnerships
with the winery. Selections include LAN Crianza 2014, LAN Reserva 2011, LAN Grand Reserva 2010 and LAN D-12
2014. The Estate range wines are sourced from LAN’s celebrated Viña Lanciano vineyard, the winery’s bedrock and
a symbol of its identity since its inception in the 1970s. Vines planted in this breathtaking scenery are nestled on 175
acres that feature the remains of the Mantible bridge. Selections include, LAN Edicion Limitada 2013/2014, Viña
Lanciano Reserva 2011 and Culmen Reserva 2011.

August 31, 2018
Circulation: 90,000

Bodegas Lan Brings the Best of Rioja Stateside to Meet US Demands

As a renowned benchmark producer within the Rioja region of Spain, Bodegas LAN is committed to meticulous
vineyard management and winemaking. The winery’s signature character is featured throughout its portfolio,
which showcases both classic and single vineyard wines that are continuing to please consumer palates all
across the US. As distribution has increased on the East and West Coasts, the momentum has driven the
winery to provide more of its wines to customers in the Midwest and elsewhere. States including Idaho, Iowa,
Ohio and Wisconsin are becoming a focal point for LAN, and they are also dedicated to building a presence in
Arizona. With a pioneering approach to aging their wines in the highest-quality oak barrels crafted by the best
coopers in the world, Bodegas LAN uniquely combines Rioja tradition and modern winemaking.
True to their origin, LAN’s Classic range of wines are produced with grapes sourced from an estimated 1000
acres that are managed by supplier contracts in the Rioja Alta and Rioja Alavesa, which have long-standing
partnerships with the winery. Selections include LAN Crianza 2014, LAN Reserva 2011, LAN Grand Reserva
2010 and LAN D-12 2014. The Estate range wines are sourced from LAN’s celebrated Viña Lanciano vineyard,
the winery’s bedrock and a symbol of its identity since its inception in the 1970s. Vines planted in this
breathtaking scenery are nestled on 175 acres that feature the remains of the Mantible bridge. Selections
include, LAN Edicion Limitada 2013/2014, Viña Lanciano Reserva 2011 and Culmen Reserva 2011.

August 31, 2018
Circulation: 680,000

Bodegas LAN | Scores

Thomas Matthews

Rioja Edición Limitada 2015

Score: 90
Release Price $50
Country Spain
Region Spain
Issue Aug 31, 2018

This bold red shows blackberry, boysenberry and plum flavors, backed by licorice, cocoa and
sandalwood notes. Firm tannins and citrusy acidity keep this balanced. In the modern style. Drink now
through 2030. 2,780 cases made.

Rioja Crianza D-12 Ninth Edition 2015

Score: 88
Release Price $20
Country Spain
Region Spain
Issue Aug 31, 2018

This plush red shows cola, clove and tobacco notes framing a core of plum and boysenberry fruit. Sweet-
tart acidity keeps this lively, while well-integrated tannins lend focus. Drink now through 2025. 5,000
cases made.













September 30, 2018
Circulation: 680,000

Bodegas LAN | Scores

Thomas Matthews

Rioja Crianza D-12 Ninth Edition 2015

Score: 88
Release Price $30
Country Spain
Region Spain
Issue Sept 30, 2018

This firm red offers red plum, dried cherry, tobacco, woodsy and mineral flavors. Harmonious, in a
savory style. Dense and focused, with an appealing rustic note. Drink now through 2022. 4,800 cases
made.

October 20, 2018
Circulation: 11,000

Wine Reviews: International Round-up

Isaac Baker

This week, I’m tackling another group of wines from all over the globe.

Starting off with the newest vintage of Trivento’s flagship Malbec, Eolo, the 2014 again delivers a mouthful
of delicious, complex, cellar-worthy Mendoza goodness.

A few Spanish wines make an appearance in this week’s report, including two inexpensive but solid Riojas
from renowned producer Bodegeas Lan. Carpenè Malvolti brings a pair of Italian bubbles into the mix. And
South African stalwart Mulderbosch delivers four wines that bring serious quality at their respective price
points.

There’s a new red blend from Virginia winery Early Mountain that I really want to highlight. The inaugural
2015 vintage of their Rise red (a Merlot-based blend), really shines. It should, considering the price point,
but this is a serious, delicious, Virginia red blend that will stand the test of time.

I also received three wines from the Firstleaf wine club. Consumers can fill out a quick quiz to generate
their first three-pack of wines for $15, plus shipping. The wines each come with story cards that provide

technical and more general information about the wine or region. Members can rate their wines on the

club’s website, and those ratings are used to generate more personalized wine selections for future

shipments. I tasted three wines from an introductory shipment.

All of these wines were received as trade samples and tasted sighted.

2015 Bodegas LAN Rioja Crianza D-12 Eighth Edition- Spain, La Rioja, Rioja

SRP: $20

Light purple color. Aromas of tangy black cherries mixed with spice rub, tobacco, leather, vanilla and cedar.

Full-bodied, smooth tannins, with tangy acidity, and it mixes well with the crunchy, tart black cherry and
currant fruit. Notes of scorched earth, tobacco, leather, some black olive, topped with vanilla and coffee.

Delicious, early-drinking Rioja. (87 points)

2010 Bodegas LAN Rioja Gran Reserva- Spain, La Rioja, La Rioja Alta, Rioja
SRP: $25
Deep purple color. Smells of tart black cherries and currants, tangy plums (just smelling it makes my mouth
water), with mint, tobacco, coffee, loamy soil and graphite notes. Fresh acidity frames the wine nicely,
solidly-gripping tannins mix with tart black cherries and currants, backed up with violets, black pepper, mint,
black tea, coffee, lots of complex elements. Underlying earthy, mineral notes, this is a vibrant and fresh
wine but also structured and ageworthy. Tempranillo from Rioja Alta and 10% Mazuelo. (89 points)

October 23, 2018
Circulation: 5,000

Episode 17 | At The Heart Of Upsidedown Wine

Sandy and Dave Everingham

A young duo is carving out vineyards and spectacularly crafted wines from Candy Mountain. If you haven’t heard
of Candy Mountain, it’s not the place where Halloween sweets are churned out. This unique terroir in Richland,
WA is the birthplace for the Seth and Audrey Kitzke’s family vines and will soon be granted AVA status.

In this episode, Seth opens up about his dream of being a professional snowboarder and his call to become a

winemaker. He and his wife Audrey talk about the history of their label, Upsidedown Wine, giving back, their tasting
room in Hood River, OR, and how they’ve built an engaging social media presence.

Join the Movement and Drink Upsidedown
Upsidedown Wine gives back 20% of their net proceeds with every bottle sold. That’s generous for a boutique
winery, but Seth and Audrey’s giving spirit is at the heart of this passion project. Become a member, and they are
able to give back double. Sounds like a good deal—you get great wine from an emerging, talented winemaker and
you can support organizations that fight human trafficking, help youth fight cancer, and animal rescue.

2018 Wine Bloggers Conference, Walla Walla, WA
The Wine Bloggers Conference gathered citizen bloggers, industry writers, new media innovators, and wine
industry members and has been going strong for 11 years. This year’s event was held at the iconic, Marcus
Whitman Hotel and Conference Center located in Walla Walla’s historic downtown. Attendees dove deep into what
makes the Walla Walla AVA one of the most desired growing areas in the world, dined with winemakers and chose
from numerous learning sessions. In this packed episode, we share our experiences, tips for pairing food with
bubbly, and recommendations of wines to try.

Wines we loved from the 2018 Wine Bloggers Conference

• Cà Maiol Lugana DOC ITALY
100% Trebbiano | Carefully selected grapes from the oldest vines of the Molino vineyard. The
crushed grapes are then held in stainless steel tanks at a low temperature, a process called
cryomaceration, to develop its flavor.

• 2016 Bodegas As Laxas, Rias Baixas SPAIN
100% Albariño | Clear straw yellow color with green nuances. Fruity and floral aromas of apple,
stone fruits, and apricot.

• Paco & Lola Albariño, SPAIN
Crisp with peach and nectarine flavors.

• 2010 Gloria Ferrer Anniversary Cuvee
Blend | Rich and creamy with crème brûlée and stone fruit with a touch of ginger.

• 2010 Bodegas LAN Gran Reserva, SPAIN
100% Tempranillo | Dark fruit, leather, spearmint with medium tannins that lead to a medium
finish.

• 2016 Bodegas LAN Edicion Limitada, SPAIN
100% Tempranillo | Black cherry, leather, rich earth, deep and satisfying with medium tannins and
a long finish.

• Gard Cellars 2015 Grand Klasse Reserve Roussanne
Inspired by the French Grand Cru wine, this is full-bodied and complex with a beautiful use of oak.

• L’Ecole No. 41 2017 Semillon
Flavors of apple and lemon and wonderfully balanced.

• Peter Yealands 2018 Sauvignon Blanc, Marlborough, NEW ZEALAND
Tropical fruit, crisp minerality

October 24, 2018
Circulation: 10,111

Wine Reviews: International Grab Bag

Isaac Baker

This week, I’m tackling another group of wines from all over the globe.
Starting off with the newest vintage of Trivento’s flagship Malbec, Eolo, the 2014 again delivers a mouthful
of delicious, complex, cellar-worthy Mendoza goodness.

A few Spanish wines make an appearance in this week’s report, including two inexpensive but solid Riojas
from renowned producer Bodegeas Lan. Carpenè Malvolti brings a pair of Italian bubbles into the mix. And
South African stalwart Mulderbosch delivers four wines that bring serious quality at their respective price
points.

There’s a new red blend from Virginia winery Early Mountain that I really want to highlight. The inaugural
2015 vintage of their Rise red (a Merlot-based blend), really shines. It should, considering the price point,
but this is a serious, delicious, Virginia red blend that will stand the test of time.

I also received three wines from the Firstleaf wine club. Consumers can fill out a quick quiz to generate
their first three-pack of wines for $15, plus shipping. The wines each come with story cards that provide
technical and more general information about the wine or region. Members can rate their wines on the
club’s website, and those ratings are used to generate more personalized wine selections for future
shipments. I tasted three wines from an introductory shipment.

All of these wines were received as trade samples and tasted sighted.

2015 Bodegas LAN Rioja Crianza D-12 Eighth Edition- Spain, La Rioja, Rioja
SRP: $20
Light purple color. Aromas of tangy black cherries mixed with spice rub, tobacco, leather, vanilla and cedar.
Full-bodied, smooth tannins, with tangy acidity, and it mixes well with the crunchy, tart black cherry and
currant fruit. Notes of scorched earth, tobacco, leather, some black olive, topped with vanilla and coffee.
Delicious, early-drinking Rioja. (87 points)

2010 Bodegas LAN Rioja Gran Reserva- Spain, La Rioja, La Rioja Alta, Rioja
SRP: $25
Deep purple color. Smells of tart black cherries and currants, tangy plums (just smelling it makes my mouth
water), with mint, tobacco, coffee, loamy soil and graphite notes. Fresh acidity frames the wine nicely,
solidly-gripping tannins mix with tart black cherries and currants, backed up with violets, black pepper, mint,
black tea, coffee, lots of complex elements. Underlying earthy, mineral notes, this is a vibrant and fresh
wine but also structured and ageworthy. Tempranillo from Rioja Alta and 10% Mazuelo. (89 points)

October 27, 2018
Circulation: 10,000

LAN: Rioja Wine You Need To Try

LAN: Growing grapes and making wine with ecological conscience.

LAN wines are estate grown and bottled in Rioja, famous for their vino
tinto (red wine) using Tempranillo grapes. La Rioja is in Northern Spain,

about a five hour drive or train ride from Barcelona. Bodegas LAN has

been making wine in this region since 1972, where grapes are harvested

by hand and respectful care of the grapes and land are supported by

sustainable viticulture practices.

“Ecological conscience has been at the heart of our project since its
inception, in the understanding that we are all dependent on nature and
responsible for its conservation, a philosophy that has led us to take
extreme care in looking after our raw material and its natural
environment.” ~Bodegas LAN

I was in Spain earlier this month, but sadly did not make it to Rioja. So,
thanks to Stefanie at Gregory + Vine, I get to travel there vicariously
through LAN’s 2011 Reserva and 2014 Crianza!

LAN CRIANZA 2014
Crianza literally means the
wine is aged in oak. In Rioja,
“vino con crianza” a wine matured in oak, also means it has been aged for
at least 2 years. Reserva is aged 3 years, and Gran Reserva spends 5 years
in the barrel before being released.
The 2014 Crianza is made with 95% Tempranillo, and 5% Mazuelo from 10
to 20 year-old vines—aged for 14 months in hybrid barrels (American and
French oak), followed by 9 months in the bottle.
Tasting Notes: Brick red in the glass, with black cherry, dark fruits, and that
familiar leather note often found in Tempranillo. Although, it’s not rough,
dusty leather with heavy tannins. It has a softer feel to it, with more of a
medium-full bodied suede mouthfeel and nice long finish. Loved the touch
of tart acidity as well.
We’ve all heard about Spanish wines being an “excellent value”. Well, it’s
true! The 2014 Crianza retails in the $12.00 range, which is beyond humbly
priced. To be honest, I wasn’t expecting much from this bottle. I’ve tried not
so great Crianza in the past around this price point, so I truly was pleasantly
surprised at how drinkable this was. So, stock up!

2011 RESERVA
LAN’s 2011 Reserva is 92% Tempranillo and 8% Graciano, made with
selected grapes from 20+ year old vines.
It is also aged in hybrid barrels containing both French and American oak,
but longer than the Crianza—16 months, and 24 months in the bottle before
being released.
Tasting Notes: Deep garnet in the glass, dried dark fruit, mild tannins, and
smooth mouthfeel. I felt the Reserva was actually quite similar to the
Crianza, just a little fuller body and overall richer flavor—again, excellent for
the ~$15 range. Both wines are easy drinkers and can be paired with most
dishes, as they aren’t over powering, big red wines.
Pinot Noir gets a lot of love around Thanksgiving time, so save some money
and place either of these bottles on the table (or in beautiful decanters) and
your guests will be perfectly happy.
“Bodegas LAN is full of meaning. The name itself is an acronym based on
the initials of each of the three provinces that form the D.O.Ca.
Rioja: Logroño (currently part of La Rioja), Alava and Navarra. LAN is Rioja
in three letters. Each of our wines shows respect for the land it comes from.”
Just be sure to drink it at the proper temperature (~65°F). In the past I’ve opened Spanish wine at Arizona’s “room
temperature” and trust me, any red wine close to 80°F will taste flat and harsh. Bleh.
According to Miquel Hudin (you can find him on Instagram @mhudin, he also wrote a fantastic book on the Priorat
wine region of Spain), I need to try LAN’s “A Mano”, which I read is a Limited Edition, luxury artisan bottle made
with 80% Tempranillo, 8% Mazuelo, and 12% Graciano grapes—all hand-harvested from 35-40 year-old vines in their
Viña Lanciano estate. One can dream…

Highly recommend LAN! Both the Crianza and Reserva were very good for the price! Although both bottles were
samples, all opinions are my own. Cheers!

October 29, 2018
Circulation: 10,000

Top 10 Wines of the 2018 Wine Bloggers Conference

Nancy Crisier

There was a lot of wine poured during last month’s Wine Bloggers Conference in Walla Walla
(understatement of the year, I’m sure!). Much of it was tasted at a rapid pace. Therefore, when I find
myself still thinking of certain wines days after such an experience, I know they’re something special.
These are the wines I will seek out again.

Many thanks to the sponsors of the conference, without whom we would not have been able to
experience these wines.

Avennia 2016 Arnaut Syrah
Ever since this world class winery opened its doors in Woodinville, I’ve had some of its wine in my cellar.

The stunning Arnaut Syrah crafted with fruit from the legendary Boushey Vineyards in the Yakima Valley

speaks to the source by offering savory notes of Mediterranean herbs.

Ca’ Lojera Annata Storica 1999 Lugana DOC
The Trebbiano based wines poured by Italy’s Lugana DOC were lovely. However, this golden hued aged
white wine was a showstopper.

Force Majeure 2016 SJR Vineyard Syrah
Truly, all of the Force Majeure wines I was fortunate to taste were stellar. This Syrah, however, stood out
because of its distinctive flinty and smoky notes.

g. Cuneo Cellars Ripasso
This is a labor intensive wine crafted in the traditional Italian method of drying out grapes to concentrate
flavors. Gino Cuneo says it’s the only wine in Washington made in this style.

LAN Rioja Gran Reserva

I sidestepped into the room where LAN Rioja was being poured on my way to the Cheeses of Europe
seminar. It turns out that the LAN Rioja Gran Reserva pairs incredibly well with Mimolette cheese.

Laxas Sensum Brut 2016
Sparkling Albarino is extremely limited in production. As such, this wine from Rias Baixas is rarely
experienced. Lucky for me the seat next to me was vacant, so I was able to taste twice as much of this
refreshing quaffer.

Mullan Road Cellars 2015 Red Blend
This wine crafted with fruit from Washington State’s Columbia Valley oozes chocolate notes. Need I say
more?

Robert Weil 2016 Kiedrich Grafenberg Riesling Spatlese
I’ve always adored German Riesling and wines like this make me love it even more. With sustainable
farming, Asian pear notes, and a honeyed finish what’s not to love?’

Otis Kenyon 2017 Rousanne
This Washington wine was poured during the speed tasting rounds, and my tweet says, “a more crisp
version of Roussanne from @otiskenyonwine! I’m thinking scallops and vanilla risotto for a pairing.” To
which Otis Kenyon replied, “Yes please! You cook, we’ll bring the wine!” I can’t wait.

October 30, 2018
Circulation: 30,000

International Tempranillo Day 11.18.18!

Jim Van Bergen

Did you know November 8th is International Tempranillo Day?
Well, NOW YOU DO!

Bodegas Lan Rioja Gran Reserva 2010; Fuenmayor, Spain. 13.5%ABV, SRP $23/bottle.
Color is ruby with magenta edging. The nose is vast and expressive with red cassis and plum, tobacco leaf,
eucalyptus, cigar box, and forest floor. On the palate is a lively series of dark red fruit with so much spice:
mocha, vanilla, oak, licorice, leather, and spice box. Medium bodied, full-flavored, and so much fun to drink!

This lusty, vibrant red is a blend of primarily (94%) Tempranillo with 4% Mazuelo(aka carignan), spending
24 months in oak barrels before maturing 36 months in the bottle. The time spent aging this shows quite
nicely, and is well worth the effort -especially at this price point.

I poured a glass, thinking it would pair well with my grilled meat & vegetables. Oh, it did, but one taste and
immediately I felt like I was in Barcelona again. I just wanted to put my nose in the glass to inhale the
luxurious and lengthy nose, then relax and take sip after sip to enjoy the sunset. Delicious, and a lovely
value!

And did I mention, it also pairs beautifully with grilled meats, savory dishes and cheeses. Where can you
find a decent aged red blend for under $25? #Rioja !

PRESS-TRIUNEIdaho Date: Thursday, November 01, 2018
Location: NAMPA, ID
Circulation (OMA): 15,216 (118)
Type (Frequency): Newspaper (D)
Page:
Section: cs
Keyword:
Arts & Entertainment
Bodegas LAN

WINESIPPEB and medium-bodied,
the palate of this wine is
ROLLING WITH RIOJA marked by dark plum and
bright cherry, along with
Arguably the best-known wine region of nuanced smoke, earth
Spain, the indigenous Tempranillo is Rioja's and spice.
primary red grape, though it is often blended
with Garnacha and Graciano. In the past, the -David Kirkpatrick
wine was aged for years in large wooden casks,
resulting in a rustic style. Modern methods and
a more relaxed aging regimen prevail today.
To be labeled a Crianza requires a year in oak
and a year in bottle, while a Reserva is aged
for three years, of which at least one is in oak.

Here are the panel's top
Rioja picks:

20111.Ati RESERVA, $20

A blend of 92 percent
Tempranillo with the
remainder Graciano, this
wine spends 16 months
in hybrid barrels with
American oak staves and
French heads.•lt opens
with aromas of blueberry,
dark chocolate and creme
brulee. A nice bit of cedar
on the palate colors the
creamy red fruit flavors,
while ripe tannins come
through on the long finish.

2011 MARQUES DE

CACERES RESERVA,

$20

Tempranillo dominates
this blend, along with 10
percent Garnacha and 5
percent Graciano, all aged
for 20 months in French
oak. The nose is filled with
deep, dark cherry and
berry fruit backed by va­
nilla, tea, toast and spice.
This is an elegantly struc­
tured wine with a rich core
of blackberry fruit flavors
balanced by hints of olive,
coffee and leather.

2014SIERRA

CANTABRIA CRIANZA,

$20

This 100 percent
Tempranillo varietal
spends just over a. year
in a mix of American and
French oak barrels. Lightly
toasted oak, vanilla
and spice color the tart
cherry aromas. Excep­
tionally well-balanced

November 4, 2018
Circulation: 5,000

Day 684 Toasting Tempranillo!

Penny Weiss

With International Tempranillo Day arriving on November 8th, I can’t think of a better way to
celebrate than with Bodegas LAN wines.

The last time I opened a bottle of Bodegas LAN was this past spring. It was a Crianza
2010, a very juicy and expressive wine. So, I was quite happy when I received samples of
LAN Crianza 2014 and LAN Reserva 2011.

Tempranillo is a black grape variety indigenous to Spain. It is also Spain’s signature wine
grape. The two major regions that grow Tempranillo in Spain are Rioja and Ribera del
Duero.

To recap from a previous story, Rioja wine region is located in North Central Spain, in a
valley along the Ebro River. It is divided into three sub-regions: Rioja Baja, Rioja Alta and
Rioja Alavesa.

Bodegas LAN was founded in 1972 and is located in the town of Fuenmayor, bordering the
Ebro River in the sub-region of Rioja Alta.

The name “LAN” is an acronym using the initials of each of the three provinces that form the D.O.Ca in
Rioja: Logroño, Alava and Navarra. To quote the winery, “LAN means respect for the history of this land”.
The Viña Lanciano vineyard is comprised of 72 hectares in Rioja Alta and is protected from the wind and cold weather
by the Sierra Cantabria Mountains which in turn generates a microclimate. The vineyard is divided into 24 plots of
Tempranillo, Mazuelo, Graciano and Garnacha vines, with many of the vines averaging sixty years of age. The soil is
diverse and made up of mostly limestone, clay and is very stony. Having deep respect for the earth and balance of
nature, Bodegas LAN practices sustainable viticulture and refrains from the use of chemical fertilizers. Grapes are
hand-harvested and individually selected by hand once they reach the winery to make sure that only the best clusters
are chosen.

Crianza is a Spanish wine classification indicating the wine is aged for at least two years, with a minimum of one year
in oak barrels and one year in bottle. Reserva classification indicates the wine is aged for a minimum of three years,
of which at least one year must be in oak and the rest in bottle. Reserva is made from the best grapes of the harvest
and is only made if the growing season was a good one.

Bodegas LAN Rioja Crianza 2014 is a blend of 95% Tempranillo and 5% Mazuelo
grapes selected from 10 to 20-year-old vines. The wine is aged for 14 months in
hybrid barrels of American and French oak that have been incorporated into one
barrel. The wine rests in the bottle for an additional nine months before
release. The color is dark ruby with aromas of ripe fruit, red cherry, cranberry and
hints of vanilla. The palate is layered with dark cherry, pomegranate, spice and
toffee. It is well balanced and smooth. Pair with appetizers, grilled meat, poultry
and pizza.
Alcohol: 13.5%
SRP: $12

Bodegas LAN Rioja Reserva 2011 is a blend of 92% Tempranillo and 8% Graciano
grapes selected from 20 to 25-year old vines. The wine is aged in hybrid barrels
of American oak staves and French oak heads for a minimum of 16 months,
followed by 24 months in bottle. The color is dark ruby bordering on garnet. The
nose offers red fruit, dark cherry, plum and sweet spice. The palate is juicy with
red fruit, cranberry, spice, licorice, dried fruit and smoke. Hints of vanilla and spice
linger on a long and silky finish. Serve with spicy cuisine, stews, hearty soups and
hard cheese.
Alcohol: 13.5%
SRP: $15

Join me in the celebration on November 8th and pour yourself a glass of Rioja wine!
Until next time…

Cheers!
Penina

November 6, 2018
Circulation: 1,500

Celebrate Tempranillo Day on November 8th as well as the Holidays with LAN
Rioja Crianza and Reserva

Lisa Mays

I am happily writing about Rioja samples that were sent to me and have reviewed them in my own words and thoughts!

Celebrate #TempranilloDay
Just in time for the upcoming holidays, the most famous red wine from Spain has
its own day set aside to showcase and celebrate some of the best wines from the
Rioja regions of Rioja Alavesa and Rioja Alta.

During this time of the year we seek out wines that are food-friendly and will be
enjoyed by family and friends from small gatherings with small bites to large sit-
down feasts!

There isn’t a party that goes by that I haven’t included Spanish wines for my
gatherings because they are so approachable, food-friendly, elegant yet earthy and
please even the pickiest of wine-drinkers. I happen to be a paella chef and
specialize in cooking Spanish and Mediterranean cuisine and have known for years
that these gorgeous red wines are a perfect match with whatever culinary
masterpiece that I am serving. Riojas will hold their own up against all the spices,
big and savory flavors and cooking techniques I use.

Tempranillo, the main Rioja grape, produces wines that are reminiscent of red
cherries, black fruit, ripe plums, considerably big tannins and refreshing acidity
especially noticeable in the younger or Crianza wines. Layers of flavors and spices
become front and center as the wines are aged longer in American and French oak
which are called Reserva wines. Notable flavors such as vanilla, dried dill, dried figs,
leather, tobacco and clove fill your nose and palate while the tannins become
smoother and rounder.

Bodegas LAN is steeped in history, tradition and quality. LAN is an acronym
referring to the prestigious North Central wine growing regions of the three
provinces in the DOCa Rioja: Logroño, Álava and Navarra.
A blend of old world tradition and new world winemaking comes together to produce
the best wines from this region since 1972. The best quality oak barrels and wine
making techniques is what has created these classic wines for many years.

Pairings: Italian, Spanish, Mexican, BBQ

LAN D-12 2014 Rioja Crianza and LAN Rioja Reserva 2011 can be paired with your traditional American holiday
dinner table or if your celebrating your family’s heritage pair with tomato-laden Italian dishes such as spaghetti and
meatballs, rigatoni and sausage, pizza or just about any spicy Italian dish you can think of.

Now that I live in Texas, I get to enjoy the best smoky brisket and grilled meats ever and LAN Rioja wines, especially
the Reserva, is the perfect go-to wine. Tacos rule in Austin and so will these Rioja pairings, especially the Crianza!

And, don’t forget about paella! Rioja IS the wine for my paellas!
***Be sure to open a few hours before serving and let the wine breath!

November 6, 2018
Circulation: 10,000

Tips for Celebrating International Tempranillo Day

Nancy Crisier

Wine holidays are a thing, and the second Thursday of November is International Tempranillo Day. If you’re not
experienced with Tempranillo, don’t worry. Read on to learn more about the celebration, the wine, and mouthwatering
food pairing suggestions.

Tempranillo Day Explained
The first annual International Tempranillo Day was organized in 2011 by the Tempranillo Advocates Producers and
Amigos Society (TAPAS) to celebrate the Tempranillo grape. It’s an opportunity for wine lovers to open a bottle of
Tempranillo and share the experience online via social media with the hashtag #TempranilloDay or #Tempranillo.

About Tempranillo
Tempranillo, Spain’s top variety, is a full bodied red wine that often has a tobacco like flavor. What I love about
Tempranillo is that a great bottle can be procured without breaking the bank. Or, for a bigger spend, a truly stellar wine
can be had.

The Tempranillo based wines of Rioja have different tiers providing clues as to how long the wine has been aged.
“Crianza” level wine has been aged for at least two years, at least one of which was in oak. A “reserva” has been aged
at least three years, with at least one of those in barrel. “Gran reserva” means the wine was aged at least five years,
with a minimum of two years in oak.
Recommended Tempranillos

Vivanco Crianza Tempranillo
The smoky nose of this Tempranillo hints at its 16 months of age in French and American oak barrels. This is a wine
that offers a taste of red berries, as well as depth and a long finish.

LAN Rioja Reserva
This wine made my list of Top 10 Wines of the 2018 Wine Bloggers Conference.

Force Majeure Estate Tempranillo
There is not a lot of Tempranillo grown in Washington State. Not to mention, the care that goes into the vines and wine
by artisan winery, Force Majeure, is staggering. Consequently, this limited production wine carries a higher price tag
and may be harder to find. It’s worth it, though. What strikes me most about this wine is that the fruit shines through
unmasked by oak. It’s absolutely lovely.

Pairing Tempranillo with Food
Super Grains Tabbouleh Salad - Believe it or not, tabbouleh salad makes a fantastic pairing for Tempranillo.
Entertaining doesn’t get much easier than a cheese and charcuterie platter. The mantra, “what grows together goes
together” rings true. So, to complement Tempranillo from Spain look for Manchego, a Spanish cheese made with
sheep’s milk. Majon, a cow’s milk cheese originating in Majorca is another winning pairing. Include some chorizo, and
perhaps some Marcona almonds and you’re all set!
Paella - In keeping with the Spanish theme, try a Paella Recipe from The Spanish Table.
A great option for vegetarians is the Zucchini Chickpea Tagine recipe from Herbivoracious.
A dish like Arroz con Pollo makes it easy to feed a group. Here’s a recipe from the humorous David Lebovitz, whose
site is a treasure trove of recipes and stories.

Now, choose how you’d like to celebrate. Then, go purchase some Tempranillo or pull a bottle (or more) from the
cellar. To maximize the fun, invite friends over for some delectable food and wine. Be sure to photograph it all, and
share your experience on social media using the hashtag #TempranilloDay. Tag me, too, so I can see what you come
up with!

November 7, 2018
Circulation: 9,941

#TempranilloDay and Discovering Rioja in Three Letters with Bodegas LAN

"Rioja is a privileged region for growing grapes and making top-quality wines, with a unique personality and an
exceptional aptitude for ageing. The Rioja wine region is located in northern Spain, on both sides of the River Ebro.
The local terrain perfectly delimits the region and sets it apart from surrounding territories. From an administrative point
of view, however, its 63,593 hectares of vineyards are divided between three provinces on the Upper Ebro - La Rioja
(43,885 ha), Alava (12,934 ha) and Navarre (6,774 ha)."....... DOCa Rioja

In 1972 Bodegas LAN was founded and named after the first initials of these
three provinces of DOCa Rioja, but with the L representing Logroño - part of
the larger La Rioja. Their estate, Viña Lanciano Vineyard, is set on 72 hectares
that are nearly surrounded by a meander of the Ebro River. The river also acts
as a natural frontier between Rioja Alta and Rioja Alavesa. According to DOCa
Rioja, "in Rioja Alavesa there is a significant influence of the Atlantic climate
and the soils are chalky-clay situated in terraces and small plots. In Rioja Alta
the climate is also mainly Atlantic, while the soils are chalky-clay, ferrous-clay
or alluvial. Rioja Baja has a drier, warmer climate, thanks to the Mediterranean
influence and the soils are alluvial and ferrous-clay." And as their name
suggests, Bodegas LAN either directly controls or sources from vineyards in
each of these three regions.

We recently received two samples to illustrate Bodegas LAN's winemaking
process in time for #TempranilloDay. On Thursday November 8th celebrate
with a bottle of Tempranillo and follow Twitter #BodegasLAN and
#RiojainThreeLetters conversations to learn more about LAN and Rioja.
Cheers.

LAN 2015 D-12 ($20)
This wine is a blend of 98% Tempranillo and 2% Mazuelo hand harvested from two plots in the town of Haro (Rioja
Alta) and two plots in Laguardia (Rioja Alavesa). D-12 is intended to pay homage to the workers of LAN and the name
is a reference to “DEPOSIT 12”, the stainless steel tank that each vintage holds those wines that according to LAN
winery personnel have the most outstanding attributes each year. The juice is fermented in stainless steel tanks at a
controlled temperature of 25º C in order to maintain aromatic potential and maximize color extraction. Micro-
oxygenation and maceration in contact with the lees prior to malolactic fermentation in order to balance the tannins
and display a silky mouthfeel. The fermented wine is then rests twelve months in new American and French oak
barrels followed by twelve months of rounding in the bottle prior to release. Even after all the oak treatment this is a
juicy fruity wine with patches of black pepper and cocoa. It has a fullness that rounds the finish into a lasting statement.

LAN Gran Reserva 2010 ($25)
This wine is 90% Tempranillo and made from a selection of the best grapes coming from 30 year-old, low yielding bush
vines in the Rioja Alta and 10% Mazuelo from their Viña Lanciano vineyard. The grapes were de-stemmed and
fermented in stainless steel tanks at a controlled temperature of 30º C. The fermented wine was then aged 24 months
in American oak and French oak barrels, followed by a minimum of 36 months in the bottle. This is one full bodied and
luscious wine, commanding intense fruit with baking spices and tobacco-leather. A completely balanced and delicious
wine.

November 7, 2018
Circulation: 88,070

#TempranilloDay and Discovering Rioja in Three Letters with Bodegas LAN

"Rioja is a privileged region for growing grapes and making top-quality wines, with a unique personality and an
exceptional aptitude for aging. The Rioja wine region is located in northern Spain, on both sides of the River Ebro. The
local terrain perfectly delimits the region and sets it apart from surrounding territories. From an administrative point of
view, however, its 63,593 hectares of vineyards are divided between three provinces on the Upper Ebro - La Rioja
(43,885 ha), Alava (12,934 ha) and Navarre (6,774 ha)."....... DOCa Rioja

In 1972 Bodegas LAN was founded and named after the first initials of these three provinces of DOCa Rioja, but
with the L representing Logroño - part of the larger La Rioja. Their estate, Viña Lanciano Vineyard, is set on 72
hectares that are nearly surrounded by a meander of the Ebro River. The river also acts as a natural frontier between
Rioja Alta and Rioja Alavesa. According to DOCa Rioja, "in Rioja Alavesa there is a significant influence of the
Atlantic climate and the soils are chalky-clay situated in terraces and small plots. In Rioja Alta the climate is also
mainly Atlantic, while the soils are chalky-clay, ferrous-clay or alluvial. Rioja Baja has a drier, warmer climate, thanks
to the Mediterranean influence and the soils are alluvial and ferrous-clay." And as their name suggests, Bodegas
LAN either directly controls or sources from vineyards in each of these three regions.
The winery is also known for their pioneering approach to vinification and oak treatment using the highest-quality oak
barrels. These casks are crafted by the world’s best coopers – including French, American, Russian and hybrids. LAN
manages each tank individually - based on the destination it has been assigned. Malolactic fermentation is undertaken
in new barrels and in the aging process, LAN "re-instills our identity onto each wine separately with the use of different
kinds of oak as well as with hybrid barrels, a type of cask pioneered by the winery".
French Oak
Sourced from various forests in central France (Allier, Tronçais, Jupille…) its characteristic aromas are soft vanilla,
clove and chocolate.
American Oak
Coming from Ohio and Missouri, its aromas remind of cocoa and aromatic herbs.
Russian Oak
From the Caucasus and the Adyghe Republic, this type of oak has less fragrance and is more respectful to the wine.

Hybrid Barrels
As pioneers in the use of hybrid barrels, made with American oak staves and French oak heads, their use lend our
wines a unique personality.

We recently received two samples to illustrate Bodegas LAN's winemaking process in time for #TempranilloDay. On
Thursday November 8th celebrate with a bottle of Tempranillo and follow Twitter #BodegasLAN and
#RiojainThreeLetters conversations to learn more about LAN and Rioja. Cheers.

LAN 2015 D-12 ($20)
This wine is a blend of 98% Tempranillo and 2% Mazuelo hand harvested from two plots in the town of Haro (Rioja
Alta) and two plots in Laguardia (Rioja Alavesa). D-12 is intended to pay homage to the workers of LAN and the name
is a reference to “DEPOSIT 12”, the stainless steel tank that each vintage holds those wines that according to LAN
winery personnel have the most outstanding attributes each year. The juice is fermented in stainless steel tanks at a
controlled temperature of 25º C in order to maintain aromatic potential and maximize color extraction. Micro-
oxygenation and maceration in contact with the lees prior to malolactic fermentation in order to balance the tannins
and display a silky mouthfeel. The fermented wine is then rests twelve months in new American and French oak
barrels followed by twelve months of rounding in the bottle prior to release. Even after all the oak treatment this is a
juicy fruity wine with patches of black pepper and cocoa. It has a fullness that rounds the finish into a lasting statement.

LAN Gran Reserva 2010 ($25)
This wine is 90% Tempranillo and made from a selection of the best grapes coming from 30 year-old, low yielding bush
vines in the Rioja Alta and 10% Mazuelo from their Viña Lanciano vineyard. The grapes were de-stemmed and
fermented in stainless steel tanks at a controlled temperature of 30º C. The fermented wine was then aged 24 months
in American oak and French oak barrels, followed by a minimum of 36 months in the bottle. This is one full bodied and
luscious wine, commanding intense fruit with baking spices and tobacco-leather. A completely balanced and delicious
wine.

November 7, 2018
Circulation: 6,000

Ep 140 – Rioja and Bodegas LAN

Betty Notto

This week we are talking about Rioja and Bodegas LAN. We talked about Rioja way back in episode 26 of the
podcast. We were recently sent some wine from LAN and Thursday, November 8, 2018 just happens to
be International Tempranillo Day so we thought it was a great time to revisit Rioja and learn more about Bodegas
LAN and talk about their wines.

Wine Recommendations – These were sent to us by the good people at Bodegas LAN
LAN Crianza 2014 – priced around $14.

• Nose: red cherries, raspberries, spice and dust
• Dry with medium acidity and tannins with flavors similar to aromas with a hint of cedar on the finish
• We thought this wine was a great balance of tannins and acid.
• The Fruit and acid makes this wine very lively but has other complex aromas and flavors going on like the

cedar and spice.
• Very tasty, approachable wine, this is solid traditional Crianza
• You can purchase this wine here

LAN Viña Lanciano Reserva 2011 – priced around $30.
• Nose: black cherries, blueberries, vanilla and baking spice
• It’s dry with medium acidity and medium plus tannins with flavors of cherries, blueberries, and wood – the
oak is definitely there but fruity and the tannins are smooth
• This wine has deep/intense aromas and flavors with a beautiful long finish
• Even with its age there is still some fresh fruit flavors and could continue to improve with age
• There is definitely a finesse to this wine
• You can purchase this wine here

LAN Edición Limitada 2015 – priced around $50.
• Nose: black cherries, blueberries, dusty earth and a hint of spice
• It’s dry with medium plus acidity, medium tannins and flavors of black cherries, blueberries, and a hint of
bitterness on the finish like cedar or wood
• All the care taken to make this wine really shows
• The texture created from the lees and the fermentation is incredible – the tannins and silky smooth
• Also wonderful, fresh fruit flavors
• This wine could probably age until at least 2025 where it will continue to develop its complexity
• You can purchase this wine here

HONEST COOKING November 7, 2018
Perfect Food and Wine Pairings for Tempranillo Day Circulation: 395,440

November 8th has been dubbed “International Tempranillo Day.” Being the main grape of Rioja, check out a few
food and Rioja wine pairings, featuring Tempranillo, to celebrate with.

To kick off our Tempranillo Day celebration, we connected with Bodegas LAN, a winery named after the first letters
of the three provinces in the DOCa Rioja: Logroño, Álava and Navarra. With a longstanding history in the region and
high quality, oak-aged wines, LAN has quickly become one of our favorites.
LAN will be celebrating too!

“We toast with Tempranillo wines coming from the tank (under fermentation) from
this harvest ,” explains Amaya Cebrián, Head of Marketing and Communications,
on behalf of the Bodegas LAN winery team, “which will become the future of LAN.
It is a great way to celebrate the new harvest and Tempranillo Day.”

To kick off your very own celebration, check out these two wines featuring the
Tempranillo grape and delicious foods to match the bottles.

LAN Crianza 2014
Made from 97% Tempranillo grapes, this oak-aged red wine is bursting with juicy
red fruit aromas. We love how food-friendly it is and how pleasant it is to drink
even without food. Each sip is long, smooth and elegant with hints of acidity that
are perfectly balanced. An easy-to-pair wine, this Rioja is ideal with rich bean
dishes, grilled chicken, a cold cut sandwich decked out with all the toppings and
even pizza.

Viña Lanciano Reserva 2011
At 87% Tempranillo, this Reserva wine is laden with deeper aromas of ripe fruit
and some baking spices. As elegant as the last, this bottle comes with earthier
notes and more tannins than the last bottle. You will be able to pick out herbs such
as mint and hints of aged balsamic vinegars on your tongue. Because of its darker
notes, this wine is great with braised dishes of short ribs or lamb, rich stews and
even spicy dishes from a variety of cuisines.

November 7, 2018
Circulation: 1,090,000

Uncorked: It's time for Beaujolais Nouveau — the holiday hype of all holiday
hype

Ed Williams

This month brings with it that Third-Thursday-release of Beaujolais Nouveau, hailed as the holiday quaff of all holiday
quaffs....

Or as I like to say: the holiday hype of all holiday hype.

If you’re hunting lighter-bodied reds for the Thanksgiving and Christmas table, pay a few bucks more for Beaujolais
Cru — Chiroubles, Regnie and Brouilly are a good start to delicate fruit profiles.

Feeling frisky? A Spanish Grenache or Austrian Zweigelt or German Dornfelder offer lighter, fruitier profiles in lieu of
pricier Pinot Noir.

At our holiday table, there is such a riotous mix of flavors and textures that no single pairing works across the board.
Here are some recent bottles I’ve opened worth considering.

2016 Casa Sant Orsola Barbera D’ Asti ($8). This Italian red is crafted from the Barbera grape. It offers decent acids
and abundant dried cherry.

2014 Ruffino Il Ducale Toscana ($13). Another Italian red, this is a Sangiovese, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot
blend. Ripe cherry, plum, and currant.

2017 Raimat Rosada ($14). A Spanish rose crafted from Cabernet Sauvignon and Tempranillo. Crisp strawberry,
raspberry and red grapefruit.

2015 Louis Jadot Bourgogne Pinot Noir ($18). French Pinots seem earthier than their California counterparts. This
is bursting with ripe cherry with hints of slate and herbs.

2017 Paul Jaboulet Aine Cotes du Rhone Rose Parallele 45 ($14). This French pink explodes with strawberry,
raspberry and spice. Crafted from Grenache, Cinsault and Syrah
.
2016 Altovinum Evodia ($10). A Spanish Grenache that offers forward black cherry and plum fruit with a licorice hint.

2014 Bodegas LAN Rioja Crianza ($15). A light, early-drinking style from Spain’s Tempranillo grape. Dried cherry,
cranberry, with hints of herb and cedar.

2016 D. Kourtakis Agiorgitiko Nemea ($13). Also known as the St. George’s grape, this widely planted red in the
Peloponnese region of Greece showcases medium-bodied raspberry, pomegranate, anise and pencil lead.

November 8, 2018
Circulation: 5,000

Bodegas LAN: Viña Lanciano Reserva Rioja 2011 & Gran Reserva Rioja 2010

Cara Rutherford

Estate: Founded in 1972, Bodegas LAN is named after the first letters of the three provinces in the DOC of Rioja:
Logroño, Álava and Navarra. LAN’s innovative character is forged in each of the wines they make, based on
conscientious vineyard management and precision winemaking. “LAN means respect for the history of this land.”
Sustainable viticulture practices are used with zero chemicals. Grapes for both wines are hand harvested from the 72
hectare Viña Lanciano estate vineyard located on the border of Rioja Alta and Alavesa. Surrounded by the Ebro River,
the vineyards overlook a 2nd Century BC Roman bridge. The vineyard is divided into 24 plots consisting of Tempranillo,
Mazuelo, Graciano and Garnacha vines, ranging in age from 20-60 years old. The Gran Reserva has additional grapes
from select vineyards in Rioja Alta.

Bodegas LAN ‘Viña Lanciano’ Reserva RIOJA 2011

Winemaking: Fermented in stainless steel, aged for 16 months in American and
French oak barrels, followed by 24 months in the bottle.
Tasting Notes: Inky red violet in colour. Very aromatic, with cherry, blackberry, plum,
baking spice, raisin bread toast, fresh herbs, caramel, vanilla, crushed black
peppercorn and woodsy oak. Silky layers of black cherry, black currant, cherry,
blackberry, cranberry and vanilla wrap around a spicy core. Firm tannins and fresh
acidity harmonize and support. Ripe fruit, peppery spice and a trace of smoky cedar
linger between each silky sip. Sleek and refined, lovely on its own or with a wide
variety of dishes.
85% Tempranillo, 10% Mazuelo, 5% Graciano
13.5% Alcohol
$20 [average price]

Bodegas LAN Gran Reserva Rioja 2010

Winemaking: Fermented in stainless steel, aged for 24 months in
American and French oak barrels, followed by 36 months in the bottle.
Tasting Notes: Transparent red violet in colour with engaging aromas of vanilla,
crushed black peppercorn, baking spice, berry pie filling, roasted sage and toasted
oak. Vanilla and oak envelop black cherry, blackberry, plum and black pepper. Good
acidity and firm tannins compliment toasted oak, baked berries and cigar box spice
on the lengthy, plush finish. Big and bold, fantastic by the fire or with hearty winter
dishes.
94% Tempranillo, 6% Mazuelo
13.5% Alcohol
$22 [average price]

Samples submitted for editorial consideration.

November 12, 2018
Circulation: 4,310,000

Modern Cooperage is Barreling Along

Kathleen Willcox

After several thousands years of stasis, the careful art of barrel-making is modernizing.
Of all of the potentially soporific topics surrounding the business of making wine – oxidation, maceration, even pectin
issues for Lord's sake – there's nothing that will more quickly cause a listener's eyes to glaze over and cross than a
discussion about the benefits and challenges winemakers face when aging their grapes in wooden vessels.

And yet, here we are. Because as hollow a topic (don't worry folks, I'm here all week) as wood barrels may appear
to be at first glance, there's little that approaches it in terms of the impact it can have on the taste, texture and aroma
of

"We are just getting to the point as an industry where we understand just how much of an impact different types of
wood, treated in different ways, can have on the taste of wine," says Christopher Hansen, general manager of
the Napa Valley branch of cooperage Seguin Moreau. Worldwide, the cooperage works with 5000 wineries. "While
barrel-aging has been around for centuries, the approach to barrel-aging only really began to change significantly in
the past 50 years."

Like many other inventions that have had an outsize impact on human culture (plastic, chocolate chip cookies,
penicillin), using barrels to shape, accentuate, deepen or drastically change the aroma, texture and flavor of wine
wasn't the result of a lightning stroke of genius but, instead, an accident born from a fumbling attempt to solve a
completely different problem.

It all started with a transportation issue about two millennia ago. In the midst of all its looting and plundering, the
Roman empire had a habit of absconding with a conquered region's best and brightest tech tools. The Gauls, they
noticed, hauled their beer around in wooden barrels and, as the Romans continued to expand northward, they
adopted barrels as their vessel of choice for wine transportation purposes, because as any playa knows, thirsty,
sober soldiers do not good plunderers make. Wooden barrels were much lighter and less fragile than the amphorae
(wax-lined ceramic containers first created in the Neolithic era) they previously used.

Between 50 BC and the first century AD, the wooden barrel became the go-to option for wine storage and portage.
Any wood would do, the clueless vintners thought at first.

But after repeated tastes, it became clear that certain woods (primarily oak) suited wine better than others. Over the

centuries, a slow, snail-like acquisition of wine barrel basics was absorbed and accepted by the industry's collective
unconscious. (I.e. oak-aged barrels add flavors, from vanilla to coconut; they allow wine to breathe, smoothing out

flavors, especially astringent notes; they provide an ideal environment for malolactic fermentation, which adds a

creamy texture.) Then, about 50 years ago, a renaissance in our understanding of barrel capabilities commenced.

Scientists are able, they claim, to provide a precise, increasingly detailed data on the aroma/texture/flavors
that will result when winemakers pair certain varietals with certain types of wood. However, unlike the oversight the
AOC, DOCG, DO, etc. provide in terms of where and how grapes can be grown and wine can be produced, there's
really no one entity looking over the shoulders of the cooperage industry.

"There's no formal regulation or overseeing body that defines what medium toast, or medium plus, what fine grain

or medium grain is," Hansen admits. Not to mention, he adds, the differences in wood harvested from a forest in
Appalachia (they produce notes of ripe fruit and toastiness) versus France(they contribute subtle, yet structured

tannins that respect the fruit).

We surveyed the latest barrel technology and talked to several winemakers to get a sense of how they're using the
latest innovations (or not) in their quest to use wood for better wine.

Scientific revolution
Winemakers, even the ones who are most willing to submit the final taste of their product to Mother Nature and
terroir's capricious whims, crave some level of predictability and control. As weather-linked vine-destroying events
happen with increasing regularity, winemakers seek out certainty where they can find it.
"We've found that winemakers, especially in the US, are increasingly trying to take the guesswork out of barrel-
aging," Hansen says. "We have developed a chemical analysis that identifies the enological potential of different
oaks."

While winemakers and cooperages have long been observing interactions, until recently, they depended largely
upon their palates and olfactory perceptions for their verdicts. Scientists at Seguin Moreau's ICÔNE program take
samples from their oak tree forests and studies them on the molecular level to determine precisely which flavors,
textures and aromas certain woods will extract from different varietals of wine.

(Barrel nerds: see Seguin R&D chief Andrei Prida's article on the "Impact of Oak-Derived Compounds on the
Olfactory Perception of Barrel-Aged Wines". For those of us who begin to sing JT's latest in our heads when phrases
like "furanic compounds," "4-methylguaiacol" or "trans-whisky lactones" are issued in excited tones, simply know
that Seguin is on it.)

Seguin isn't the only cooperage striding forth into the new millennium of course. Vicard has also developed a
patented barrel bending and toasting system to eliminate variability found with open-pot toasting. These days,
Vicard's R&D team is focusing on how specific oak compounds impact tannin levels, lactones, toasted notes and
oxidative stability of wine aged in oak.

Hansen admits that despite the developments, there are many traditionalists who choose to eschew data for their
palate, tradition and experience.

"A lot of winemakers, especially Old World winemakers, do what their grandfather and great-grandfather did, and
don't want to adjust their technique, because they know it worked for them," Hansen says.
So, can hardcore traditionalists be swayed?

Science, tempered with tradition
It would be hard to think of a region with more rigid barrel-aging strictures in place than Rioja. Denominación de
Origen Calificada Rioja recently introduced new DOC legislation, tightening the screws around already strict
classifications. One of the primary ways Rioja gets officially classified, of course, has always been the manner in
which it is aged in oak.

And yet even Rioja has its share of science-forward renegades. María Barúa, the technical director at Bodegas Lan,
says she focuses on blending the best of Rioja's winemaking traditions with the innovations technology affords her.

After graduating from college with a degree in chemistry and enology, Barúa studied the evolution of wine color
through the aging process at the Government of Rioja's Research Center. While she was there, she says she
became fascinated by the "effects of different types of oak on the wine", noting that French, American, Hungarian,
Russian, Spanish and other oaks from different forests, aged and toasted differently can coax "completely different"
layers of aroma and flavor.

After joining Lan in 2002, Barúa has pioneered a signature approach to aging Rioja, in a variety of barrels (French,
American, Russian and hybrid Oak woods barrels) from several coopers around the world. Barúa's favorite barrel
features American Oak staves with French Oak tops and bottoms, Russian Oak bodies.
Still, she says that, unlike what some barrel-sellers may lead you to believe, there's no "secret formula."

"Above all, we find knowing your raw materials intimately, from the grapes to the wood, is the best way to achieve
the wine you want," Barúa says.

Stags' Leap's senior winemaker Christophe Paubert agrees that barrels play an important role in winemaking, but
issues a note of caution about relying on them too heavily.

"In order to let the fruit and terroir shine, the oak always needs to be in a supporting role," Paubert says. "We only
work with coopers who are focused on enhancing the character of our wines, not overshadowing it with additional
aromas or flavors."

Terroir on tech
Ashley Heisey, the vice president of winemaking at Napa's Long Meadow Ranch, says barrels can make or break
the subtleties of a wine.

"Barrel flavors can enhance, offend or mask underlying terroir-driven flavors of wine," Heisey says. "We exclusively
utilize barrels that will enhance a wine's texture and mouthfeel. For example, we may pick Cabernet Sauvignon early
to capture sweet fruit notes to capture the terroir we want to express; but this can result in wine that lacks mid-to-
late palate phenolic and texture development. A low toast, long-toasted barrel may enhance the wine by providing
structure and length."

Larkmead, one of the oldest vineyards in Napa Valley dating back to 1884, aggressively tinkers with its barrel-aging
process. The winemaker, Dan Petroski, likens his approach to that of a chef's use of salt and pepper. A building
block of flavor, but never something that should dominate.

"When you're trying to be true to your vineyard and its inherent aroma, flavor and textural profile, adding a fourth
dimension from a barrel is not what I'm looking for," he explains. "We have spent many years experimenting with
different barrels sourced for a variety of forests, several different coopers and toast levels for each vintage."

Larkmead has also compared different ages of wood, production methods (steam bent vs. fire bent barrels) and
stave variations (width, wood type). Larkmead has become so invested in barrel experimentation, they now have an
in-house cooper. But in the end, despite their dizzying round of experiments, Petroski doesn't have a magic bullet to
offer for even one particular type of barrel for one type of grape.

"The barrel we love for our Cabernet doesn't have the same influence on Cabernet from other vineyards in Napa,"
Petroski says. "I've tasted friends' wines who have aged Cabernets in barrels made from the same material by the
same people, and the result is different. Terroir matters."

Winemakers, like chefs, depend on their ingredients as much as their recipe. Producers are building flavors from the
varietals they select, the terroir they're grown in, the techniques they deploy and the barrels they're aged in. As with
cooking, winemakers have increasingly complex and pricey tools at their disposal to create memorable wines that
will stand out on the crowded shelves.

Can a fancy barrel make a bad wine good? Nope. But cooperages employing teams of scientists to analyze the
molecules of wood for its enological potential can do more to help winemakers mask off flavors, smooth out jagged
edges and coax out those shy layers of covetable terroir hiding in the back, now more than ever.

Industry pros share top grape-barrel picks:

As documented above, barrel and wine pairing options are as arguably boundless and perhaps ultimately as
subjective as cheese and wine pairing options. I mean, you could age your Cabernet with meteorite bits, electrocute
it or sink in a harbor just to see what happens (or pair Cheez Wiz with some Screaming Eagle, for that matter). Or
you could see what some of the industry's most successful wine-barrel enthusiasts are up to.

Bodegas Lan: For their Crianza, Reserva and Gran Reserva, featuring Tempranillo grapes with a touch of Graciano
and Mazuelo, they are aged in mixed American and French oak. For Lan D12, 100 percent Tempranillo in new
American and French casts. For Lan's estate wines, they use blends of Tempranillo, Graciano and Mazuelo aged in
French and Russian barrels.

Stags' Leap: French oak for most wines, except Petite Sirah, where American Oak is used. "American oak's
spiciness, which could overwhelm a delicate wine, is easily handled by our Napa Valley Petite Sirah, as well as our
estate-grown Ne Cede Malis Petite Sirah, sourced from vines dating back to 1929," says winemaker Christophe
Paubert. The Petite Sirah spends 16 months in American oak, 28 percent of which are new.

Long Meadow: The Chardonnay spends a few days in stainless steel for primary fermentation, then 25 percent gets
moved to new French Oak for 12-18 months. Same with the Pinot Noir and Cabernet.

Vina Robles: Paso Robles' Vina Robles Cabernet Sauvignon is put in stainless steel, pressed and racked in barrels
to complete fermentation. The majority is aged in French oak, with a smattering of American and Hungarian oak for
added nuances. For the 2013 vintage, Petit Verdot was added after 8 months to enhance the wine’s structure. From
there, it was aged an additional 12 months in mixed barrels. The Petite Sirah Estate was also aged for a total of 20
months in a mixture of primarily French, but some American and Hungarian oak barrels.

Pedroncelli: Sonoma County's Pedroncelli ages its Courage Zinfandel in American oak barrels for 16 months; its
Red Blend gets 10 months in new and seasoned American oak (25 percent new), and its Petite Sirah gets stores in
small American oak barrels (one-third new) for 15.

Biale Vineyards: The Party Line North Coast Zinfandel is aged in 100 percent Burgundy oak barrels, 25 percent of
which are new, for 11 months. The 2015 E.B.A. Petite Sirah is aged in Burgundian oak, 20 percent of which is new
for 30 months.

Theopolis Vineyards: The Yorkville Highlands Pinot Noir is aged in French oak for 11 months; the Petite Sirah
spends 22 months aging in 25 percent new and 75 percent neutral French oak.

Stemmari: Winemaker Lucio Matricardi says he smooths the edges of the jagged tannins in his Riserva Nero d'Avola
with a blend of French and American Oak; the Grillo gets aged in staineless steel and the Voignier is aged in three-
year-old lightly toasted barriques for Stemmari's Dalila. The Nero d'Avola and Cabernet are matured in French Oak
separately and then blended together and aged for an additional four months in barriques for Stemmari's Cantodoro.

Seguin Moreau: Of the 80,000 barrels produced annually, the most popular by far is tight-grained French Oak.

On barrel alternatives: All of the pros Wine-Searcher spoke to agreed that at this point, using oak chips or even
larger staves sans barrel to impart oak flavors like toast, smoke and caramel still can't compete with barrels. The
surface area isn't there, and even with techniques like micro-oxygenation, which adds specific amounts of oxygen to
wine over a period of time, the results aren't quite the same. Still, the difference is minimal enough to push budget-
minded winemakers (a single barrel can run $900) to consider cheaper alternatives.

November 20, 2018
Circulation:704,130

The Feast: Dale Talde Does Friendsgiving

Hilary Sims

Need a last-minute dish idea for your Thanksgiving potluck? The star chef has your back with spicy sweet
potatoes and minced pork. Plus, 10 juicy value reds and whites

10 Recommended Value Wines
Note: The following list is a selection of outstanding and very good red and white wines from recently rated
releases. More options can be fHilound in our Wine Ratings Search.
Fruity Spanish Riojas

BODEGAS ONTAÑON Tempranillo-Garnacha Rioja Crianza 2015 Score: 90 | $18

This red is fresh and firm, with dusty cocoa, underbrush and licorice notes framing the black cherry and red
currant fruit. Keen acidity and well-integrated tannins give this focus. Drink now through 2027. 10,000

cases made.—T.M.

BODEGAS VIVANCO Rioja Crianza 2014 Score: 90 | $18
This plump red has a sweet core of ripe cherry and plum fruit, with leafy, cedar, toast and vanilla accents.
Bright, juicy acidity and light tannins give this focus. Lively and harmonious. Tempranillo. Drink now through
2024. 60,000 cases made.—T.M.

EL COTO DE RIOJA Rioja Coto de Imaz Reserva 2014 Score: 89 | $20
Light and crisp, this graceful red delivers cherry, berry, leafy and loamy earth flavors in a supple texture,
with light tannins and orange peel acidity that give way to a spicy finish. Drink now through 2024. 100,000
cases made.—T.M.

CUNE Rioja Viña Real Crianza 2015 Score: 89 | $15
Cherry and orange peel flavors show a bright, sweet-tart character in this red. Firm underlying tannins and
lively acidity give this structure, while vanilla and spice notes linger on the finish. Drink now through 2025.
5,000 cases imported.—T.M.

BODEGAS LAN Rioja Crianza 2014 Score: 88 | $14
This juicy red offers bright cherry, berry and sweet vanilla flavors, with spice and leafy accents. Citrusy
acidity focuses the plush, gentle texture. Graceful and gentle. Drink now through 2020. 96,000 cases
made.—T.M.

November 26, 2018
Circulation: 241,920

Plenty of wine options to keep spirits bright

John McDonald

Hope all had a Thanksgiving to be thankful. Are you now frantically exercising, running and walking, or did
temperance and dashing about shopping prevail? I’m typing for a pre-TDay deadline, so I can’t inform you
of my status other than to say I am thankful for all who read here and take the time to correspond. All your
queries and comments are responded to, good, bad or factual. Although this isn’t about wine, it is worthwhile
for those who like old-time Memphis rock ‘n’ roll. The following site is worth looking into for an upcoming
event at 8 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 29 at the Ocean City Performing Arts Center.

The release of Domaine Bousquet 2017 Tupungato from Uco Valley, Argentina, is up to expectations.
These folks consistently rate high 80s. You may remember this name as Domaine Jean Bousquet. Don’t
know what happened to Jean. I was fortunate to sample three of their products recently. The Chardonnay
reserve is a good QPR findable under $16, 87 McD. Green-tinged golden, opens to light oak, melon, trop
fruit with citrus back notes. Peach and green apple flavors are supported by bright acidity and barrel spice.
The Reserve Malbec composed of 85 percent Malbec, 5 percent Cabernet Sauvignon, 5 percent Merlot, 5
percent Shiraz can be found around $170/case or $18/bottle. Dark violet, red rim, blackberry, currants and
earthy nose. On the palate raspberry, chocolate, black pepper balanced by proper acid/tannic/fruit equation.
Finishes long and dry. Keep in mind, folks, these are new releases. You may be looking at the 2016s locally.
It is actually bud break in Argentina now. If you see any 2013 hanging around under $18, snatch it up. The
Reserve Cab spent 10 months on oak, will need a few years. This should appeal to those who like Cabs
with chalky mineral notes. There are sufficient cherry and currant aromas, fruit flavors supported with barrel
spice, subdued tannic grip and proper acidity. A step up from the $14 generic Cab that is worth taking. All
three are certified organic.

Haven’t visited Spain lately. How about Bodegas LAN? Name is the first letters of the three DOCa Rioja
Provinces: Logrono, Alava and Navarra, which lie along the Ebro River Valley. The primary grape for
Crianza is Tempranillo. The new release 2014 is 100 percent Tempranillo, dark crimson-colored.

The nose is complex with raspberry, barrel notes of vanilla, paprika and buttery caramel (often described
as toffee but, as one who enjoys toffee, I find it lacking as a descriptor due to toffee’s many variations),
smooth palate with firm tannins and a long, pleasing finish. Easily findable under $12 or $110/case. The
LAN Riserva is blended of 80 percent Tempranillo, 10 percent Mazuelo and 10 percent Garnacha. I prefer
the 2009 or the 2010. My notes on 2010 written in 2013 were: Blackberry, popcorn, pomegranate, orange
zest aromas. Fruit and acidity, tart with grippy tannins. The wine has come together beautifully and is
available in many locations at $19, 89 McD.

Vina San Pedro 1865 Single Vineyard Sauvignon Blanc Leyda Valley, Chile, 2016 was underrated by many
because of the vegetal notes. I find these very appealing for food compatibility. This is a $22 value 90-point
McD. Great with oysters and broiled buttery rockfish. Green-tinged pale golden colored. Interesting nose
with vegetal notes such as green pepper and asparagus, with grapefruit and pea back notes.

The grapefruit and some lime repeat on the palate with supporting acidity and minerals for its full body and
long, bright finish. They also produce a very favorably priced, under $18, Elqui Valley Single Vineyard Pinot
Noir, 88 McD. Garnet colored, raspberry, roses, and barrel spice nose add some herbal notes on the palate.
Fruit sweet attack with tart backing and mild tannins. Here’s wishing all a wonderful Thanksgiving weekend.
Hopefully without any Black Friday bruises.

December 4, 2018
Circulation: 1,150,000

Cheese Talk: John and Kendall Antonelli

Robert Taylor

Veldhuizen Fat Tailed Tomme
Milk: Sheep

Category: Washed-rind tomme

Region: Dublin, Texas

Age: 3 to 10 months

Price: $36 per pound

John says: If Oma is an everyday fave and Fourme d'Ambert is an old friend, then Fat Tailed Tomme is
the novelty that recently came into our lives. Made in Dublin, Texas, by the Veldhuizen family, this is their
first attempt at sheep's-milk cheeses, a rarity in Texas—if they existed at all! Stuart and Connie have been
making raw cow's-milk cheeses for decades and aging them in their caves built in the side of a hill, and
we're excited they've added this to their lineup. When their daughter Rebecca wanted to move back to the
family farm, they told her she needed to earn her keep. It was her dream and hard work that launched their
farmstead sheep’s-milk creamery.

Taking inspiration from popular Manchego styles, Fat Tailed Tomme is named after the Awassi breed of
sheep, known for their high milk production and—you guessed it—fat tails. Made with raw milk, it's aged a
minimum of two months, but they're finding that flavor peaks around eight to 10 months, with notes of
pineapple and other tropical fruit flavors, as well as hints of pasta. It develops a natural rind that is rubbed
with olive oil.

John’s recommended pairing: Pair it with a dry sparkling cider.

Wine Spectator picks: Sheep’s milk has more than twice the fat content of cow’s milk, yielding cheeses
with especially rich pastes. Fat Tailed Tomme is a Lone Star tribute to Spanish Manchego, so try it with a
late-release Rioja Crianza like Bodegas Faustino 2014 (88, $14, 88,000 cases made), Bodegas LAN
2014 (88, $14, 96,000 cases made) or Cune 2015 (88, $13, 10,000 cases imported).

December 7, 2018
Circulation: 90,000

Drink Me’s Ultimate Gift Guide

Ultimate Wine Selection That Covers All Holiday Pairings

Holiday meals traditionally feature a wide range of flavors being brought to a modern table. That means
hosts must choose wisely when it comes to finding the perfect wine for pairing. Combining the best of Rioja
tradition and innovative winemaking, Bodegas LAN’s food-friendly Classic Range showcases the highest-
quality wines from the region, which are also highly affordable, making them the ideal gift for holiday giving.
Wine lovers can choose from one of four options to make their seasonal experience complete:

LAN Crianza 2015

This great value, everyday wine is produced from 95% Tempranillo and 5% Mazuelo in vineyards between

10-20 years of age. It is aged for 14 months in mixed barrels (American and French),\followed by 9 months

of bottle conditioning.
LAN Reserva 2011

This wine is produced from 92% Tempranillo and 8% Graciano in select vineyards of the Rioja Alta and
Alavesa subzones with an average age of 20-25 years. It is aged for 16 months in mixed oak barrels
(American and French), followed by an additional 24 months of bottle conditioning.

LAN Gran Reserva 2010

This wine is produced from 90% Tempranillo in select vineyards of the Rioja Alta área (Haro, Villalba and
Foncea) and 10% Mazuelo from the Viña Lanciano estate. It is aged for 24 months in American and French
oak barrels, followed by an additional 36 months of bottle conditioning.
LAN D12 2015

The most unique wine, from tank number 12, is 100% Tempranillo, produced with select vines from small
parcels in the Rioja Alta and Alavesa. LAN D-12 revives the tradition of Riojan vignerons who choose their
best tank to keep and drink themselves.
These wines range between the incredibly affordable prices points of $14 to $20.

December 19, 2018
Circulation: 20,000

LAN Delivers Rioja Excellence In Spanish Duo

Dave Nershi

Rioja is the most famous red wine of Spain and undoubtedly one of
its best. We pop the cork on two releases from famed Rioja
producer Bodegas LAN.

Richness of Rioja

Winemaking in Spain’s Rioja region got a huge boost from

Bordeaux winemakers who settled there in the 19th century. The

French eventually departed, but left behind improved winemaking
techniques, including the use of oak barrels for aging.

The earthy flavors of oak and leather have long been hallmarks of
wine made in the Rioja region. We recently opened a pair of Rioja
wines from Bodegas LAN, one the regions top producers.

Winemaker’s Choice

The LAN D-12 2015 Rioja is 98% Tempranillo and 2% Mazuelo (also known
as Carignan). The moniker is a reference to Deposit 12, the stainless steel
tank that holds the most outstanding wine from each vintage. The grapes are
hand selected from two plots in Haro and two in Laguardia. The wine gets 12
months in French and American oak and another year of bottle aging before
release.
D-12 is a deep ruby in the glass. On the palate, there are nicely structured
tannins with a rounded texture. The flavor is intense with tart red fruit, a touch
of spice and a flavor of malted chocolate.

You can find the D-12 for about $18, and it is a rich, rewarding wine. Rioja
can be tannic, but this was smooth and supple after we let it open up for a
few minutes.

Stepping Up To Reserva
LAN’s Reserva gets an extra measure of aging, for 16 month in hybrid barrels

with American oak staves and French oak heads. Afterward, there is another

24 months of aging in the bottle.

The 2011 Rioja Reserva is a delightful wine. It is 92% Tempranillo and 8%
Graciano coming from selected 20- to 25-year-old vines. In the glass it is an
inviting deep garnet color.

Although it’s ready to drink now, it could easily age for another five years.
This is a savory wine with notes of baking spice and ripe cherries. The flavor
is intense and the finish is long lingering. It’s a fine wine experience for about
$20. It’s perfect for stews or marinated meat dishes.

LAN represents Rioja in three letters. The name is an acronym based on the
initials of each of the three provinces that form the D.O.Ca. Rioja: Logroño
(currently part of La Rioja), Alava and Navarra. LAN is a sure bet when you are seeking a flavorful Rioja
wine at an excellent price point. The 2011 Reserva and 2015 D-12 are great choices for wintertime sipping.

Full disclosure: This wine was received as a marketing sample.


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