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As the international design authority, Architectural Digest offers exclusive access to the best in decorating, architecture, shopping, art and antiques, and travel destinations. AD brings you inspiration, ideas, and sources from across the design spectrum—from sleekly modern to grandly traditional, and everything in between. The digital edition presents the magazine's stellar photography in a captivating new light, and signature features such as additional photos and supplemental videos invite you to go deeper into AD's stories than ever before.


In this issue

Over the Rainbow Designer Frances Merrill composes a symphony of brilliant hues and fanciful decorative

motifs for a mother and son with gutsy tastes. BY MAYER RUS Home on the Range Photographer Douglas Friedman takes refuge on an otherworldly site in Marfa, Texas. BY MAYER RUS

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Published by Read My eBook for FREE!, 2020-03-23 12:33:15

Architectural Digest - USA (February 2020)

As the international design authority, Architectural Digest offers exclusive access to the best in decorating, architecture, shopping, art and antiques, and travel destinations. AD brings you inspiration, ideas, and sources from across the design spectrum—from sleekly modern to grandly traditional, and everything in between. The digital edition presents the magazine's stellar photography in a captivating new light, and signature features such as additional photos and supplemental videos invite you to go deeper into AD's stories than ever before.


In this issue

Over the Rainbow Designer Frances Merrill composes a symphony of brilliant hues and fanciful decorative

motifs for a mother and son with gutsy tastes. BY MAYER RUS Home on the Range Photographer Douglas Friedman takes refuge on an otherworldly site in Marfa, Texas. BY MAYER RUS

PROMOTION





















ST.









PETERSBURG









MAY 8–13, 2020



























Explore one of the world’s most fascinating cities on an
exclusive design and art tour hosted by Architectural Digest’s

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Insider access to: stylish homes / private collections / artist studios / luxurious gardens / local shopping /

authentic dining / cultural influencers / accommodations at one of the city’s most elegant hotels
AD Access: Travel by Design is a new way of seeing the world, through itineraries inspired by impeccable
style and beautiful design. These journeys are created in partnership with Indagare, the travel planning company
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CONTENTS february







48




DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN’S
GETAWAY IN
MARFA, TEXAS.



















































10 Editor’s Letter 62


12 Object Lesson
A VINCENZO DE COTIIS–
Inspired by the simple seating of ocean DESIGNED RESIDENCE
liners, Eileen Gray devised an armchair with IN ITALY.
transatlantic appeal.


17 Discoveries
Frank Gehry and Louis Vuitton reunite for
the brand’s dazzling new flagship . . . Inside the
new Aman Kyoto . . . The best dining chairs
earn their place at the table . . . Steven Gambrel
unpacks a Chicago dressing room for takeaway
tips . . . A drawing room by John Fowler leaves
Suzanne Rheinstein spellbound . . . and more!


34 Over the Rainbow
Designer Frances Merrill composes a
symphony of brilliant hues and fanciful
decorative motifs for a mother and son
with gutsy tastes. BY MAYER RUS FROM TOP: DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN; OBERTO GILI


48 Home on the Range
Photographer Douglas Friedman takes refuge
on an otherworldly site in Marfa, Texas.
BY MAYER RUS




4 ARCHDIGEST.COM


CONTENTS february






34





A HOME DESIGNED BY
FRANCES MERRILL IN
ALTADENA, CALIFORNIA.

















































62 Brute Force

Vincenzo De Cotiis infuses a brutalist
concrete shell on the outskirts of Milan with
warmth and texture. BY PILAR VILADAS

74 Seoul Sensations

Meet five firms forging the South Korean
FOLLOW @ARCHDIGEST capital’s new creative frontier. BY HANNAH MARTIN

78 Car Talk

Dan Fink designs the ultimate automobile-
SUBSCRIPTIONS friendly man cave for real estate developer
FOR SUBSCRIPTION
INFORMATION GO TO Rick Caruso. BY SHAX RIEGLER
ARCHDIGEST.COM,
CALL 800-365-8032,
OR EMAIL 84 Living Legacy
[email protected] Studio Shamshiri and Commune Design
ARCHDIGEST.COM.
work their subtle magic on a Northern
DIGITAL EDITION
DOWNLOAD AT California residence. BY MAYER RUS
ARCHDIGEST.COM/APP.
94 Resources
NEWSLETTER
SIGN UP FOR AD’S The designers, architects, and products
DAILY NEWSLETTER,
AT ARCHDIGEST.COM/ featured this month.
NEWSLETTER.
THE DINING ROOM OF
COMMENTS A FRANCES MERRILL– 96 Last Word
CONTACT US VIA DESIGNED RESIDENCE
SOCIAL MEDIA IN ALTADENA, CA. “OVER Claude and François-Xavier Lalanne’s LAURE JOLIET (2)
OR EMAIL US AT THE RAINBOW,” PAGE playful sculptures land in Miami Beach’s
[email protected] 34. PHOTOGRAPHY BY
ARCHDIGEST.COM. LAURE JOLIET. Raleigh Gardens.




6 ARCHDIGEST.COM


t
The weave hat makes waves.

feat. T H E S U M I C O L L E C T I O N







t
l
Rugs or he houghtfully ayered home.
f
t


THE INTERNATIONAL DESIGN AUTHORITY VOLUME 77 NUMBER 2


EDITOR IN CHIEF Amy Astley

CREATIVE DIRECTOR David Sebbah EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, DIGITAL Keith Pollock EDITORIAL OPERATIONS DIRECTOR Diane Dragan
EXECUTIVE EDITOR Shax Riegler FEATURES DIRECTOR Sam Cochran
INTERIORS & GARDEN DIRECTOR Alison Levasseur STYLE DIRECTOR Jane Keltner de Valle DECORATIVE ARTS EDITOR Mitchell Owens
WEST COAST EDITOR Mayer Rus

FEATURES AD PRO CREATIVE COMMUNICATIONS + EDITORIAL PROJECTS
SENIOR DESIGN EDITOR Hannah Martin EDITOR Katherine Burns Olson DESIGN DIRECTOR Natalie Do EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, PUBLIC RELATIONS
DEPUTY DIRECTOR, DIGITAL DEPUTY EDITOR Allie Weiss VISUALS DIRECTOR Michael Shome Erin Kaplan
Kristen Flanagan SENIOR STYLE & MARKET EDITOR VISUALS EDITOR, DIGITAL Melissa Maria DIRECTOR, EDITORIAL PROJECTS
SPECIAL PROJECTS DIRECTOR, DIGITAL Benjamin Reynaert Jeffrey C. Caldwell
Sydney Wasserman FEATURES EDITOR Anna Fixsen VIDEO MEMBERSHIP SERVICES LEAD
ENTERTAINMENT DIRECTOR Dana Mathews NEWS EDITOR Madeleine Luckel VICE PRESIDENT, VIDEO Matt Duckor DaVonne Onassis Bacchus
EXECUTIVE FEATURES EDITOR David Foxley REGIONAL NEWS EDITOR Tim Latterner SUPERVISING PRODUCER Allison Ochiltree
CLEVER EDITOR Nora Taylor ASSOCIATE VISUALS EDITOR DIRECTORS Matt Hunziker, Dan Siegel, CONTRIBUTORS
FEATURES EDITOR, DIGITAL Nick Mafi Gabrielle Pilotti Langdon Rusty Ward CONTRIBUTING EDITOR AT LARGE
ASSOCIATE ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR ASSOCIATE EDITOR Mel Studach SENIOR PRODUCERS Frank Cosgriff, Michael Reynolds
Rachel Wallace Ali Inglese CONTRIBUTING STYLE EDITORS
ASSOCIATE CLEVER EDITOR Zoë Sessums PRODUCTION PRODUCER Thomas Werner Lawren Howell, Carolina Irving
ASSISTANT EDITORS Elizabeth Fazzare, EDITORIAL OPERATIONS MANAGER ASSOCIATE PRODUCERS CONTRIBUTING EDITORS
Katherine McGrath (Digital), Nick Traverse Jon Charles Weigell, Kara Yennaco Amanda Brooks, Howard Christian,
Carly Olson PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Nicole Stuart Gay Gassmann
ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR IN CHIEF PRODUCTION MANAGERS Brent Burket, ARCHDIGEST.COM CONTRIBUTORS
Gabriela Ulloa Roberto Rodríguez ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT Fabiola Beracasa Beckman,
PRODUCTION DESIGNER Cor Hazelaar Erika Owen Derek Blasberg, Peter Copping,
MARKET SENIOR MANAGER, ANALYTICS Laura Lines Sarah Harrelson, Pippa Holt, Patricia
MARKET EDITOR Madeline O’Malley COPY AND RESEARCH SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER Elise Portale Lansing, Colby Mugrabi, Carlos Souza
COPY DIRECTOR Joyce Rubin ASSOCIATE SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER EDITOR EMERITA Paige Rense Noland
RESEARCH DIRECTOR Andrew Gillings Sarah Ratner
COPY MANAGER Adriana Bürgi
RESEARCH MANAGER Leslie Anne Wiggins


CHIEF BUSINESS OFFICER Jennifer Mormile

HEAD OF SALES, HOME Jeff Barish HEAD OF MARKETING Bree McKenney VICE PRESIDENT, FINANCE & BRAND DEVELOPMENT Rob Novick
VICE PRESIDENT, MARKETING Casey McCarthy ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, MARKETING Josh McDonald SENIOR BUSINESS DIRECTOR Jennifer Crescitelli

HEADS OF SALES
FASHION, AMERICAN Amy Oelkers FASHION, INTERNATIONAL David Stuckey BEAUTY Lucy Kriz AUTO Erica Siegel MEDIA/ENTERTAINMENT Bill Mulvihill
BIZ/FI/TECH Doug Grinspan VICE Laura Sequenzia CPG Jordana Pransky TRAVEL Beth Lusko-Gunderman HEALTH Carrie Moore
VICE PRESIDENT, REVENUE—MIDWEST Pamela Quandt VICE PRESIDENT, REVENUE—SAN FRANCISCO Devon Rothwell VICE PRESIDENT, ENTERPRISE SALES—LOS ANGELES Dan Weiner

PUBLIC RELATIONS
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, COMMUNICATIONS Molly Pacala SENIOR MANAGER, COMMUNICATIONS Savannah Jackson







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CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Roger Lynch France AD, AD COLLECTOR, GLAMOUR, GQ, VANITY OR COPYRIGHT COOPERATION PRODUCING PREMIUM CONTENT WITH A FOOTPRINT
CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER & PRESIDENT, FAIR, VOGUE, VOGUE COLLECTIONS, VOGUE HOMMES Australia GQ, VOGUE, VOGUE LIVING OF MORE THAN 1 BILLION CONSUMERS IN 31
INTERNATIONAL Wolfgang Blau Germany AD, GLAMOUR, GQ, GQ STYLE, VOGUE Bulgaria GLAMOUR MARKETS. CONDENAST.COM PUBLISHED AT 1 WORLD
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GLOBAL CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER & PRESIDENT, India AD, CONDÉ NAST TRAVELLER, GQ, VOGUE TRADE CENTER, NEW YORK NY 10007.
U.S. REVENUE Pamela Drucker Mann Italy AD, CONDÉ NAST TRAVELLER, EXPERIENCE IS, DESIGN, CONDÉ NAST TRAVELER, GQ, GQ LAB,
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OF OPERATIONS Kathryn Friedrich PUBLISHED UNDER JOINT VENTURE Ukraine VOGUE, VOGUE CAFÉ KIEV
Brazil CASA VOGUE, GLAMOUR, GQ, VOGUE
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russia AD, GLAMOUR, GLAMOUR STYLE BOOK,
Jonathan Newhouse GQ, GQ STYLE, TATLER, VOGUE



8 ARCHDIGEST.COM


QUESTROYAL FINE ART, LLC


Important American Paintings


editor’s letter






















1. A HOUSE AND
INTERIORS DESIGNED
BY VINCENZO DE
COTIIS NEAR MILAN.
2 & 3. CHARMING
VIGNETTES FROM OUR
COVER STORY, BY
FRANCES MERRILL
OF REATH DESIGN.
4. WITH PHOTOGRAPHER
DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN
AND 5. HIS MARFA,
TEXAS, POOL.





2





1


“Simplicity in architecture, with a modicum
of grace, turns out to be quite difficult.

My humble idea of desert living just kept
ballooning.” —Douglas Friedman



Douglas Friedman’s name is certainly familiar to any close reader of
AD: He is a noted photographer who regularly (and cheerfully!)
hops planes, trains, and automobiles to “get the shot” of extraordinary
and far-flung homes for our pages. Being a nomad is something of 3
an occupational hazard, but when Friedman discovered the tiny,
4
dusty West Texas town of Marfa nine years ago, he fell hard. “I have
to take two flights and then drive three hours to get there, but the
journey culminates at the end of a dirt road, with no visible neighbors
5
and endless views of this incredibly beautiful, soulful terrain,” says
a smitten Friedman, who bought 10 acres of land and proceeded to
put down roots. It is a special joy to witness a member of our AD
family, one of our own, build his dream house after a career devoted
to documenting other people’s happy places. In this issue Friedman
turns his camera on his own creation, experiencing, he confessed
to me, both the pride and vulnerability that our homeowners (his
subjects) feel when their private spaces suddenly go public. The
Friedman ranch, as friends affectionately term it, is a quintessential
example of highly personal living and decorating—nothing generic
to see here. In fact, this issue abounds with bold personal style, from
the cover residence, designed by rising star Frances Merrill and bursting 4. SEAN ZANNI/PATRICK MCMULLAN/GETTY IMAGES; 5. DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN
with a riot of controlled color and pattern, to the rugged, brutalist chic
of a building and interiors outside Milan designed in singular style by
the formidable talent Vincenzo De Cotiis. And don’t miss the garage/
office/bar/barbershop conjured by 1. OBERTO GILI; 2. & 3. LAURE JOLIET;
AD100 designer Dan Fink for a
lucky client in the Pacific Palisades— AMY ASTLEY
it can only be described as the Editor in Chief
ultimate man cave. @amyastley




10 ARCHDIGEST.COM


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object lesson THE STORY BEHIND AN ICONIC DESIGN







Sea Change




Inspired by the simple

seating of ocean liners,

Eileen Gray devised

an armchair that has

transatlantic appeal
















































































MANUEL BOUGOT


EILEEN GRAY’S SYCAMORE-AND-
CANVAS TRANSAT CHAIR AT VILLA
E.1027 ON THE CÔTE D’AZUR.





12 ARCHDIGEST.COM


DISCOVERIES









2













































1 1. BERTRAND LIMBOUR/HOUSE OF PICTURES; 2. © 2014 PHILLIPS AUCTIONEERS LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED; 3. STEPHAN JULLIARD, ARTWORK: ETTORE SOTTSASS © 2020 ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK / ADAGP, PARIS; ©NABIL NAHAS; 4. JÉRÔME GALLAND



V illa E.1027, the modernist Côte d’Azur retreat
that Eileen Gray created for herself and Jean
Badovici, both architects—she renowned, he
not so much—in the late 1920s, looks like a
houseboat ready to set sail. A big nautical map
hung in the lovers’ bedroom (it “gives rise to 3
1. A TRANSAT SITS FIRESIDE IN THIS BELGIAN PAVILION,
reverie,” the Irishwoman mused). On the first-floor terrace a low lounge BUILT BY THE ARCHITECT MAARTEN VAN SEVEREN.
evoked the easy-breezy deck chairs of an ocean liner, an effortless pairing of 2. A CIRCA-1930 TRANSAT CHAIR THAT WILL BE SHOWN
AT BARD GRADUATE CENTER STARTING FEBRUARY 29.
comfort (a sling of black canvas; an adjustable headrest) and class (a sleek 3. A BEIRUT HOME BY CLAUDE MISSIR. 4. CHRISTIE’S
sycamore frame). SOLD A MINT-GREEN TRANSAT IN 2001.
Called the Transatlantique (later truncated to Transat), said armchair,
originally created in 1922, emerged as a Gray icon when E.1027 was published 4
in Badovici’s L’Architecture Vivante in 1929. The young maharaja of Indore
commissioned one for his palace bedroom in 1930 (it sold at Phillips in 2014 for
more than $1 million); in 1981, interior designer Andrée Putman placed a pair
in a model room at Lord & Taylor. In 2018, Christie’s sold a calfskin specimen
for more than $1.5 million.
Today, Ecart International, founded by Putman, produces licensed Transat
reproductions (from $17,640 at Ralph Pucci). Gray herself made just 12, in
a range of materials that were “dictated by the recipient and the destination,”
according to Cloé Pitiot, curator at Paris’s Musée des Arts Décoratifs. “Near the
sea, Gray preferred canvas, more resistant to salt and seawater, while for the
maharaja’s bedroom, she chose lacquered wood and leather.” Pitiot has gathered
two original Transats for Eileen Gray, an exhibition that is opening at New
York’s Bard Graduate Center Gallery on February 29.
She describes the Transat as “a call for slowness; a chair for rest,” and it’s an
idea many designers seem to have embraced, employing it most often in spots
built for relaxation, like a beach house in Amagansett by David Netto or Pamela
Shamshiri’s abode above Laurel Canyon. Netto, who calls the design “achingly
beautiful,” loves employing one solo in black leather and lacquer, which, he
says “delivers a shot of glamour in any room.” ralphpucci.net —HANNAH MARTIN




14 ARCHDIGEST.COM


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THE BEST IN SHOPPING, DESIGN, AND STYLE EDITED BY SAM COCHRAN DISCO









































































































AD VISITS VERIES

Together Again


FRANK GEHRY AT
LOUIS VUITTON’S NEW
KI-YONG NAM Frank Gehry and Louis Vuitton reunite SEOUL FLAGSHIP,
WHICH HE DESIGNED
for the brand’s dazzling Seoul flagship
IN COLLABORATION
WITH PETER MARINO.



ARCHDIGEST.COM 17


1
1. OBJETS NOMADES
COCOON BY FERNANDO
AND HUMBERTO
CAMPANA. 2. GEHRY’S
GLASS PANELS CROWN
THE FAÇADE. 3. THE
ENTRY. 4. OBJETS
NOMADES TALISMAN
TRAY BY INDIA MAHDAVI.
5. SOFT TRUNK.



























5












4





2


W e wanted a lantern on the street,”
Frank Gehry says of the new
Seoul flagship he designed for
Louis Vuitton. “Something open
and inviting.” Perched atop the
tony Cheongdam-dong ward in
the Gangnam shopping district, with the Bukhansan
mountains as a backdrop, the five-story beacon of
light is the first retail space that the Pritzker Prize
winner has completed since the early days of his
career—and his first for the French luxury brand. Of
course, the two are familiar friends following their
collaboration on the Fondation Louis Vuitton,
unveiled in Paris in 2014.
With curved glass panels that stretch up toward
the sky like sails, the Seoul boutique is both an
evolution of the Paris building and a reflection of the KI-YONG NAM (2): PRODUCT: COURTESY OF LOUIS VUITTON
architect’s deep appreciation for Asian culture. Gehry,
who has two half-Korean granddaughters, found
inspiration for the store in the swooping movements
of the traditional Dongnae Hakchum crane dance.
“I’m always looking for ways to create feeling with
three-dimensional materials,” he notes. “I love dance
because it expresses movement as sculpture.”
3


18 ARCHDIGEST.COM


DISCOVERIES




1


2




















1. THE BUILDING AGLOW AT NIGHT.
2. OBJETS NOMADES CONCERTINA SHADE
BY RAW EDGES. 3. AN INTERIOR TERRACE.
4. OBJETS NOMADES SPIRAL LAMP GM BY
ATELIER OÏ. 5. MONOGRAMMED SUITCASE.



















5


which were conceived by










4











while swings by the Campana Brothers for
Vuitton’s Objets Nomades collection hang
overhead, greeting visitors. Elsewhere, intimate
lounge spaces feature groovy 1960s and ’70s 3
pieces by the likes of Pierre Paulin and Carlo
Scarpa. And a concrete staircase doubles as a
vertical gallery, with bright color-field paintings
by many of the contemporary artists whose work interior terraces, all curved glass and sloping
Marino collects. Those steps lead to a top-floor steel columns. There is no merchandise—just
gallery of rotating exhibitions (currently Alberto chic seating curated by Marino and perfect city
Giacometti works on loan from the foundation). views over the treetops. In an age of online
“It’s meant to be a fun, happy experience,” says shopping—rather, online everything—the space KI-YONG NAM (2): PRODUCT: COURTESY OF LOUIS VUITTON
Marino. “I know architects don’t use the word makes a convincing argument for retail IRL.
happy a lot, but I do. I think Frank’s architecture
is very joyful—and I like that.”
The ambitious project underscores Vuitton’s
deep commitment to design, from fashion to
furniture to art to architecture. Perhaps the best
interplay of these media can be found on the Louis Vuitton store.” —JANE KELTNER DE VALLE




20 ARCHDIGEST.COM


DISCOVERIES




1

SEE
From the hotel,
it’s an easy walk to
some of the city’s
iconic temples.
Start your morning
at Kinkaku-ji, clad
in gold leaf that
shines in the rising
sun. Then head to
Ryoan-ji, home to
Japan’s most famous
rock garden, before
continuing on to
Ninna-ji, a sprawling
complex dating back
to the early Edo
period. Stamina per-
mitting, take the
tram to Arashiyama,
where you can visit
the Bamboo Grove
and Katsura Imperial
Villa (a must accord-
ing to Roman Alonso
2
of the AD100 firm
Commune Design).
1. STONE STEPS LEAD The latter requires
TO A SECRET GARDEN advance permis-
AT THE AMAN KYOTO.
2. AN OUTDOOR sion—ask the hotel
BATH AT THE HOTEL’S for help.
ONSEN SPA.
TRAVELS SHOP
Tradition still thrives
in Kyoto, where small
Soak It All Up shops spotlight local
craft and cuisine. Pick
up tea at Ippodo,
Relaxing at its most incense at Shoyeido,
and stationery at
refined, the new Aman Kamisoe, a fave of
AD100 architect
Kyoto is both a gateway Toshiko Mori. On the
same street is a col-
to the city and a world lective of artisans
selling wares inside a
unto itself machiya, as well as
a tiny sweets store,
Umezono Sabo.

EAT
Peruse the food
Y there is no gym at the new Aman stalls at Nishiki
ou might be surprised to learn that
Market. Slurp soba
Kyoto, now the world’s most buzzed-
at Misoka-an
Kawamichi-ya or
about wellness destination. There’s
Itsutsu, both
no need for one—thoughts of tread-
beloved for their
mills and free weights couldn’t be herring/noodle
further from guests’ minds. Those lucky enough to combos. And for a
visit the hotel’s 26 rooms and suites will instead find themselves drawn to the spectacular special treat, snag
a coveted bar seat
landscape: an 80-acre tableau of indigenous plants and ancient rocks, with lovingly revived at Monk, where chef
gardens that date to the late Edo period. Who needs kettlebells when the leaves of 20,000 Yoshihiro Imai cooks
Japanese maples are turning? set seasonal menus
(pizza included!) out
Rejuvenation (mental, physical, spiritual) comes in the form of walks along moss-
of a stone oven.
covered paths, in the shadow of towering sugi trees, or hikes up monumental stone steps
to a secret clearing where the hotel offers yoga and guided meditation. But rest assured FLY
Start your cultural
you will break a sweat during your stay: Indoor and outdoor baths fed by natural hot springs
immersion on the
offer a contemporary take on the onsen experience. Like this spa, the guest pavilions and tarmac: ANA airline’s
dining spaces were all designed by the late architect Kerry Hill, who incorporated tradi- cabins (on flights
tional Japanese touches—from tatami mats to blackened timber façades to cypress soaking from NYC to Tokyo) COURTESY OF AMAN
were just redone by
tubs. Of course, a trip to Kyoto is about exploring, not just unwinding. AD rounded up
Japanese architect
some favorite stops in this historic city. aman.com —SAM COCHRAN Kengo Kuma.




22 ARCHDIGEST.COM


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DISCOVERIES









ONE TO WATCH
Hanna



Hansdotter




“This area has a long history of producing
glass,” the artist says of Småland, the
Swedish province where she keeps her
studio and hot shop. In the 18th century,
timber from dense local forests fueled
the furnaces that yielded assorted trea-
sures for the royal family. Today, the
region’s main manufacturers, Kosta Boda
and Orrefors, produce affordable table-
ware alongside car parts for Volvo. It’s
this multifaceted history that has inspired
Hansdotter’s work, which, she notes,
hovers “between craft and mass produc-
tion.” After training in the region, dubbed
the Kingdom of Crystal, she headed to
art school, where she experimented with
blowing molten glass into industrial iron
frameworks. These ad hoc molds would
imprint patterned, almost alien surfaces
onto her vessels, as the glass bulged and
oozed through openings in the grates.
“How can I make repetitive objects that are
still unique?” she asks, reflecting on her
process—a dynamic interplay between
heavy metal and slick, often mirrored glass
that she continues to explore. The answer,
Hansdotter notes, lies in the slump, which
translates to “chance” or “luck” in English
but, fortuitously, reads just as well in
Swedish. —HANNAH MARTIN


HANSDOTTER IN HER STUDIO IN SWEDEN.













DEBUT
COVER STORY

Holly Hunt has applied its
modern, all-American eye to its
first collection of wall coverings.
Launching at its Manhattan show-

room this month, the 118 patterns
range from shimmering panels to TOP: JONAS LINDSTRÖM; BOTTOM: WALL COVERINGS COURTESY OF HOLLY HUNT
natural silks to hand-painted wood
veneers. As JoAnnah Kornak,
the brand’s executive creative

director, says, “They’re really
art on the wall.” hollyhunt.com
—CARLY OLSON


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT CUMULUS SHIMMER,
LISBON VISTA, STEPPING UP, CORNERSTONE.




24 ARCHDIGEST.COM


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DISCOVERIES






AN OAK-CLAD
DRESSING ROOM
IN CHICAGO BY
S.R. GAMBREL INC.


































THE EXPERT


Clothes
“A DRESSING ROOM isn’t the place to experiment with color.” So says
AD100 interior designer Steven Gambrel, a maestro of sensational polychrome
decorating schemes who understands that when it comes to storage, the Encounter
clothing shouldn’t have to compete for attention. Thus, pallor is key in the
330-square-foot dressing room he created in collaboration with Liederbach &
Graham Architects for an apartment in Chicago’s 1929 Palmolive Building. Steven Gambrel
The dominant material is walnut that has been “bleached and bleached and
bleached, followed by some other treatments because it’s typically dark brown unpacks a Chicago

and doesn’t want to be light,” Gambrel explains, adding that the wood has a dressing room
tight, straight grain. “Cherry is tacky, and maple looks cheap. Oak is delightful
because it’s a light wood but has a really open grain, so it feels casual. I wanted for takeaway tips
a wood that was more refined.” Cabinets with elegant grilles keep wardrobes
in view for quick decision-making. (The space is shared by a married couple.)
A window seat makes a perfect perch for putting on shoes, and at center is a
leather-topped, double-sided chest of drawers. Striéd carpeting, purposefully
pale, pulls the walnut’s grain across the floor. Notes Gambrel, “You try to find
like-minded materials that don’t have too much contrast.” —MITCHELL OWENS






OPEN-
AND- TOP: ERIC PIASECKI (2); BOTTOM FROM LEFT: DANIEL BERNAUER; ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES
SHUT

CASES

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flexible solutions as company on its first modular wardrobes feature ingenious,
the brand’s coveted built- storage, launching this month; space-saving folding doors;
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28 ARCHDIGEST.COM


The Design Team at






www.interiorsbysteveng.com





























































































An impressive design firm and noted resource for
developers of luxury residential and commercial
projects worldwide.
Steven G. Corporate Headquarters/Showroom
encompasses over 110,000 square feet of exquisite
furnishings, textiles, lighting and objet d’art.
Recipient of numerous design awards LEED
certified. Established 1984



CoRpoRAtE HEADquARtERS: 2818 Center port Circle pompano Beach, FL 33064 p 954.735.8223 FL State Licensed Designer IB13000407


DISCOVERIES




1










































1. EVANGELINE
BRUCE’S FRENCH-
INFLECTED LONDON
DRAWING ROOM,
WITH ITS LEGENDARY
SILK DRAPERIES.
2. IT APPEARED IN AD’S
MARCH 1991 ISSUE.


















THEN AND NOW

London Pride



A soigné circa-1970 drawing

room by John Fowler 2

leaves decorator Suzanne and Fowler was mad about Marie Antoinette. “The hand-


Rheinstein spellbound painted silk cushions, the Louis XVI furniture, the palette of
melons, lemons, corals, and blues. That lightheartedness made
a big impression on me,” the Los Angeles–based Rheinstein
says of the Bruces’ confectionary digs in Albany, London’s most
I observes of a favored interior: the London drawing thing in it was wonderful of its kind.” Notably the fantastical FROM TOP: DERRY MOORE; GABRIELLE PILOTTI LANGDON
exclusive apartment house. “It had so much charm, and every-
t’s still kind of thrilling,” designer Suzanne Rheinstein

oyster silk draperies frothing from ceiling to floor, the fabric
room of best-dressed hostess and amateur historian
Evangeline Bruce, featured in AD in March 1991.
cut with scalloped pinking shears, a detail that Fowler had
Decorated about two decades earlier by John Fowler,
took the bait. “I got this very, very, very elderly lady out of
a partner in the blue-chip British firm of Sibyl Colefax spotted on an antique dress in a museum. Rheinstein, smitten,
& John Fowler, it had a Francophile air and understandably retirement who had a pinking machine,” the decorator recalls,
so. Bruce’s late husband, David, had been U.S. ambassador to “and had her make curtains for my daughter’s room with a
Paris (among other spots); her favorite year was 1795, a Colefax and Fowler glazed chintz that was so shiny you could
tumultuous period when the Bourbon monarchy collapsed; practically see your reflection.” —MITCHELL OWENS




30 ARCHDIGEST.COM


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DISCOVERIES































































GOOD WORKS n the Achham district of western Nepal, some 600 miles from

Doctor’s I capital Kathmandu, patients historically have had to travel up
to seven days to reach a doctor. Thanks to a new project by the
do-good architecture firm Sharon Davis Design, high-quality
Orders health care just got closer to home. Working in collaboration with
the nonprofit Possible Health and the Nepalese government, the
New York–based practice has redesigned and expanded what was an
Architectural designer obsolete medical facility. Reborn as the Bayalpata Regional Hospital, the

Sharon Davis teams campus now delivers top-level care (both primary and specialized) to
this corner of the country. One of the main challenges of the site was the
with nonprofit Possible climate: Seasonal temperatures can range from freezing to over 100

degrees Fahrenheit, and there was not sufficient grid reliability to support
Health to bring off-the- a traditional heating and cooling system. Inspired by a previous mud-

grid care to a Nepalese brick project, Davis turned to rammed earth, a low-cost heat-storing
material. Unfamiliar with the construction method, locals needed some
community in need convincing. “We found one person in Nepal who had been making
rammed-earth walls, and he agreed to make a mock-up for us,” explains
Davis, who then worked with a structural engineer to perfect the mix of
concrete and earth. With it, the firm designed six new hospital buildings
(among them an emergency room, pharmacy, and maternity ward),
as well as doctors’ housing and visitor dormitories. In most, natural
ventilation, breezeways, and ceiling fans help mitigate heat; landscaped
courtyards serve as waiting areas; and separate public and private spaces
combat the swell of foot traffic while keeping doctors organized. The
pitched roofs, familiar to many who hail from the surrounding country-
side, are topped with photovoltaic panels designed and supplied by
nonprofit SunFarmer. Since it opened in November, the 7.5-acre campus
has yielded net positive energy. When building in a remote location, ELIZABETH FELICELLA
NEPAL’S BAYALPATA says Davis, “this project is a model of how vernacular materials can be
REGIONAL HOSPITAL, BY
SHARON DAVIS DESIGN. utilized to create modern architecture.”—ELIZABETH FAZZARE




32 ARCHDIGEST.COM


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A SKIRTED COCKTAIL TABLE ANCHORS THE
LIVING ROOM. NICKEY KEHOE SOFA; CUSTOM
CHAISE IN A ROSE CUMMING LINEN; VIGGO
BOESEN CANED ARMCHAIR; CUSTOM RUG BY
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34 ARCHDIGEST.COM


W Outside Los Angeles, designer Frances Merrill composes a symphony of brilliant hues and fanciful decorative motifs for a mother and son with gutsy tastes






























































































O VER THE RAINBO TEXT BY MAYER RUS PHOTOGRAPHY BY LAURE JOLIET


KATIE AND HANK WITH
THEIR BLACK LAB, ECHO,
IN THE COURTYARD.
LANDSCAPE DESIGN BY
TERREMOTO.


JENNIFER SHORTO WALLPAPER COMPLEMENTS THE BURGUNDY BEAMS IN THE DINING ROOM. NICKEY KEHOE
TABLE; JOSEF HOFFMANN CHAIR; SENTIENT WALNUT BENCHES COVERED IN AN OSBORNE & LITTLE WEAVE.


ARCHDIGEST.COM 37


“I was blessed


to find a kindred


spirit in Katie,”


says designer


Frances Merrill.


“She’s incredibly


adventurous when


it comes to color


and pattern.”






IN THE KITCHEN, A CUSTOM BANQUETTE WEARS A KNOLL
MOD PLAID. CUSTOM TABLE BY MONROE WORKSHOP;
SHAKER CHAIRS BY S. TIMBERLAKE; THE CABINETS ARE
PAINTED IN BENJAMIN MOORE’S LAFAYETTE GREEN.


LEFT IN THE POOL ROOM, A CUSTOM CURTAIN IS COMPOSED OF
ASSORTED LINENS. ROBERT VENTURI CHAIR. BELOW TILE BY
HEATH CERAMICS COVERS A SHOWER. VOLA FITTINGS; SHOWER
CURTAIN OF A GERT VOORJANS FOR JIM THOMPSON PRINT.






























































it's












“I was blessed to find a kindred spirit in Katie. She’s
incredibly adventurous when it comes to color and pattern,
both in the vintage clothes she loves to wear and the kind of
home she wants to live in,” Merrill says. “If ornament is crime,
Katie is my accomplice,” the designer adds, taking a sly dig
at Adolf Loos. Jordan, for her part, returns the compliment.
“Without Frances, I imagine my house would be a hodgepodge
of a lot of beautiful things with no common denominator. I
not that Frances Merrill never met a color or pattern she didn’t get excited by so many different fabrics and colors, and so does
like. Not at all. “It just has to be the right color, the right pattern,” my son, Hank. He actually picked the paint colors in his room.
says the wildly imaginative founder of the Los Angeles–based Frances took all of our passionate chaos and made sense of it,”
firm Reath Design. A case in point is the classic midcentury the homeowner notes.
home Merrill recently reinvented for Katie Jordan, a cofounder Early conversations between Merrill and her client
of the youth-aid organization Foster a Dream, in the L.A. focused on ways to soften the taut lines and hard angles of the
suburb of Altadena. To say that the home is animated by a riot existing architecture. “We talked a lot about feminizing the
of polychromatic wallpapers, fabrics, and paints would be house. Although I appreciated the broad expanses of glass and
misleading. Despite the kaleidoscopic array of brilliant hues the connection to nature, I didn’t like how masculine it felt.
and fanciful patterns, the overall effect registers as warm, I honestly wasn’t sure if it was possible to make it cozy,”
welcoming, and joyous—there’s nothing cacophonous about it. Jordan recalls.


ABOVE IN THE MASTER BEDROOM, ASH SIDE TABLES BY KALON FRAME THE BED. HEADBOARD AND BED SKIRT OF A VERVAIN
LINEN; BEDDING BY HAWKINS NEW YORK; BOLSTER PILLOW OF A KERRY JOYCE LINEN; SHAMS OF A DESIGNERS GUILD LINEN-COTTON.




Merrill’s response was to play against type, rejecting the not simply confined to the house’s primary social spaces, like
all-too-common impulse to dress a midcentury house entirely the generous open kitchen, where bright-green cabinetry is
in period furniture and finishes. “When I was a kid, we had a punctuated with abstracted floral cutouts and humble Shaker
family friend who owned a Marcel Breuer house in Princeton chairs are unexpectedly adorned in red and black canvas tapes.
that was furnished with Persian rugs and old family heirlooms. The joy of color and pattern extends into a bathroom clad in
There was something compelling about the tension between blue tile accented by cherry-red fixtures and a sprightly red-
the angular architecture and the traditional furniture,” Merrill and-blue floral shower-curtain fabric designed by Gert Voorjans
says. “I tried to channel that spirit here. The chaise we picked for Jim Thompson. (Fun fact: Thompson, the Thai silk czar
for the living room, which is covered in a Rose Cumming floral, who disappeared mysteriously in Malaysia in 1967, was Merrill’s
could easily work in somebody’s grandmother’s house.” great-great-uncle.) There’s also a rainbow coalition of
Nevertheless, it’s the rare granny who would choose to paint brilliantly hued outdoor dining chairs, custom color-blocked
all the interior and exterior wood beams and columns a shade cushions for the pool chaises, and a massive ultramarine
of burgundy similar to that of a Japanese maple. Or to paper the outdoor sofa set against the ivy-covered hillside that cradles
dining room in a strange, trippy pattern of oranges erupting the house.
into tiny cityscapes. Or even to install a rainbow curtain of eight “There was a skeleton of a great midcentury garden that
separate color panels that visually extends from the master had been denuded over the years. Our job was to rebuild
bedroom to the lounge off the pool. what was there and elevate some of the materials and details,”
What’s most extraordinary, perhaps, is the completeness says David Godshall, cofounder of the burgeoning L.A.-
of the designer’s vision. Merrill’s orchestration of delight is and San Francisco–based landscape-design firm Terremoto.




ARCHDIGEST.COM 41


“The giant boulders


on the site were the


launching point for



our work,” says


landscape designer


David Godshall.





A COAST LIVE OAK SHADES THE POOL. VINTAGE BAMBOO ARMCHAIRS.


RATTAN DIRK VAN SLIEDREGT BARSTOOLS STAND AT THE COUNTER. THE BEAMS ARE PAINTED IN BENJAMIN MOORE’S BORDÉAUX RED.






“Frances took all


of our passionate That process involved redoing an aged acrylic fence with
panels of tempered glass and replacing what Godshall describes
chaos and made as “Rice Krispies concrete paving” with period-appropriate
exposed-aggregate concrete framed with wood borders. “The

sense of it.” giant boulders on the site were the launching point for our
work. The original garden made references, both subtle and
overt, to Japanese landscape design, and we underscored
that affinity by doing things like installing pathways of buried
boulders combined with square and rectangular concrete
pavers. Horticulturally, the garden is part Japanese, part native
California, and part jungle,” Godshall explains.
One of the plantings Godshall chose—a red Abyssinian
banana tree—gives a clear nod to Merrill’s color choice for
the architectural framing, which sets the tone, literally and
figuratively, for the entire house experience. When asked if she
has any advice for do-it-yourselfers eager to hop aboard the
crazy color wagon, Merrill demurs. “It’s not something you can
codify or teach. It’s intuitive,” she insists, adding, “This isn’t
exactly rocket science, except that it kind of is.”




44 ARCHDIGEST.COM


IN THE FRONT GARDEN, KATIE SITS ON A CUSTOM CURVED SECTIONAL COVERED IN A SUNBRELLA FABRIC. FIRE PIT BY WP THATCHER DESIGN.


design notes THE DETAILS THAT MAKE THE LOOK































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Despite all the

patterns, the house
ERICA CARPET; feels grounded,
TO THE TRADE.
not flighty.”
STARKCARPET.COM
—Frances Merrill





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46


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Frances was how
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—Katie Jordan















HANK’S BATH FEATURES TILES $70 PER GALLON.
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FITTINGS, AND A SHOWER
CURTAIN OF A JIM THOMPSON
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OUTSIDE, MOROSO
ARMCHAIRS SURROUND
AN RH TABLE.
PRODUCED BY MADELINE O’MALLEY


After jetting around the globe to document


the lifestyles of the rich and famous,


photographer Douglas Friedman takes refuge


on an otherworldly site in Marfa, Texas





TEXT BY MAYER RUS PHOTOGRAPHY BY DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN STYLED BY MICHAEL REYNOLDS
















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