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Published by Alpha Omicron Pi, 2015-09-09 15:31:11

1915 September - To Dragma

Vol. X, No. 4

CONVENTION NUMBER

and

DIRECTORY

A
T

To Dragma

of

Alpha Omicron Pi Fraternity

QTabl* of (HanttntB

A Message from our New President 249

Program—Alpha Omicron Pi Convention 250

The Story of a Dear Week 250

Refined Family Vaudeville 252

Toast List for Banquet at Hotel Oakland, July 2 253

A Copy of the Minutes of the Grand Council Meeting at

Berkeley, June 28-July 2, 1915 254

Report of the Grand President for the years 1912-1915 257

Some Proposed Amendments to our Constitution, By-laws and

Rules and Regulations 261

Editorials 262

Chapter Reports 266

Just That—Or Something More? 271

Directory of Alpha Omicron Pi

Directory of Active Chapter Officers 272

General Directory of Alpha Omicron Pi 275

DIRECTORY OF OFFICERS Z
S
FOUNDERS O F ALPHA OMICRON PI T
D
Jessie Wallace Hughan, Alpha, '98, 663 Quincy Street, Brooklyn, N . Y . G
Helen St. Claire Mullan (Mrs. George V . ) , Alpha, '90, Andrew Avenue, Uni- E

versity Heights, New York. L
Stella Stern Perry (Mrs. George H . ) , Alpha, '98- 2243 Green Street, San I
T
Francisco, Cal. C
Elizabeth Heywood Wyman, Alpha, '98, 456 Broad Street, Bloomfield, N. J .

OFFICERS

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Grand President, Isabelle Henderson, 2655 Wakefield Ave., E . Oakland, Cal.
Grand Recording Secretary, Helen N . Henry, Whittier Hall, 1230 Amsterdam

Ave., New York City.
Grand Treasurer, Lillian Gertrude MacQuillin, 155 Angell St., Churchill

House, Providence, R. I .

Grand Vice-president, Jean Loomis Frame (Mrs. J . E . ) , 606 W. 122nd St.,
New York City.

Grand Historian, Stella Stern Perry (Mrs. George H . ) , 2243 Green St., San
Francisco, Cal.

Registrar, Marie Vick Swanson (Mrs. A. E . ) , 522 Church St., Evanston, 111.
Auditor, Helen Dickinson, 1646 Fair Oaks Ave., Pasadena, Cal.
Examining Officer, Linda Best Terry (Mrs. M. L . ) , 231 Avalon Place,

Memphis, Tenn.
Chairman Committee on New Chapters, Viola Gray, 1527 So. 23rd St.,

Lincoln, Neb.
Editor-in-Chief of To DRAGMA, Mary Ellen Chase, Bozeman, Montana.
Business Manager of T o DRAGMA, Marguerite Pilsbury Schoppe (Mrs. W. F . ) ,

Bozeman, Montana.

PAN-HELLENIC CONGRESS

Delegate, Anna Estelle Many, 1325 Henry Clay Ave., New Orleans, L a .

EDITORIAL BOARD OF TO DRAGMA

Editor-in-Chief, Mary Ellen Chase, Bozeman, Montana.
Business Manager, Marguerite Pilsbury Schoppe (Mrs. W. F . ) , Bozeman,

Montana.
Assistant Business Manager, Antoinette Treat Webb, 124 Cottage St., Nor-

wood, Mass.
Exchanges, Helen Charlotte Worster Caribou, Maine.
Chapter Letters, Margaret June Kelley, 52 Essex St., Bangor, Maine.

ALUMNAE ASSISTANT EDITORS

Alpha—Inactive.
Pi—Alice Ivy, 1556 Calhoun St., New Orleans, L a .
Nu—Elinor Byrns, 27 Cedar St., New York, N . Y .
Omicron—Roberta Williams, Faust Addition, Chattanooga, Tenn.
Kappa—Nannie Vaden, 120 Cowarden Ave., Richmond, V a .

Zeta—Emma Schrieber Hunter (Mrs. F . M . ) . 3234 Starr St., Lincoln, Neb.
Sigma—Mrs. Ward B. Esterly, 244 Alvarado Road, Berkeley, Cal.
Theta—Irene McCIeod (Mrs. Le Roy), Browns Valley, Ind.
Delta—Mrs. Maurice J . Keating, 244 Weston St., Waltham, Mass.
Gamma—Elizabeth F . Hanley, Caribou, Maine.
Epsilon—Agnes Dobbins, 386 Classon Ave., Brooklyn, N . Y .
Rho—Harriet R . Moses (Mrs. E . L . ) , 344 South Ave., Glencoe, I I I .
Lambda—Corinne Bullard, Porterville, Cal.
Iota—Mary Wells, Watseka, 111.
Tau—June Wimer, Elmore, Minn.
Chi—Ruby Davis, 17 3rd Ave., Gloversville, N . Y .

ALUMNAE ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGERS

Alpha—'Inactive.
P i — M r s . George P. Whittington, Alexandria, L a .
Nu—Daisy Gans, 497 Halsey St., Brooklyn, N . Y .
Omicron—Harriet Cone Greve, College of Women, Columbia, S. C .
Kappa—Frances Allen, 1012 Federal St., Lynchburg, V a .
Zeta—Mrs. B. O. Campbell, 1971 Sewell St., Lincoln, Neb.
Sigma—Emma Black, 2913 Fillmore St., San Francisco, Cal.
Theta—Ceilia Bates, Winchester, Ind.
Delta—Genevieve L . Fosdick, 3 Summit Ave., Somerville, Mass.
Gamma—Alice Farnsworth Phillips (Mrs. G . A . ) , I I Norfolk St., Bangor, Me
Epsilon—Isabella Stone, 27 Lincoln St., Needham, Mass.
Rho—Harriet R . Moses (Mrs. E . L . ) , 344 South Ave., Glencoe, 111.
Lambda—Mrs. E . F . Cykler, 2810 Ashby Ave., Berkeley, Cal.
Iota—Annette Stephens Shute, 5818 Erie St., Austin, 111.
Tau—Zora Robinson, Breckenridge, Minn.
Chi—Ethel Harris, Verona, N. Y .

CHAPTER ROLL

Alpha—Barnard College, Columbia University, New York City.
P i — H . Sophie Newcomb Memorial College, New Orleans, L a .
Nu—New York University, New York City.
Omicron—University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn.
Kappa—Randolph-Macon Woman's College, Lynchburg, Va.
Zeta—University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb.
Sigma—University of California, Berkeley, Cal.
Theta—De Pauw University, Greencastle, Ind.
Delta—Jackson College, Tufts College, Mass.
Gamma—University of Maine, Orono, Me.
Epsilon—Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y .
Rho—Northwestern University, Evanston, 111.
Lambda—Leland Stanford University, Palo Alto, Cal.
Iota—University of Illinois, Champaign, 111.
Tau—University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn.
Chi—Syracuse University, Syracuse, N . Y .
Upsilon—University of Washington, Seattle, Wash.
New York Alumnfe—New York City.
San Francisco Alumnaj—San Francisco, Cal.
Providence Alumna;—Providence, R. I .
Boston Alumna:—Boston, Mass.
Los Angeles Alumna;—Los Angeles, Cal.

Lincoln Alumna;—Lincoln, Neb.
Chicago Alumna—Chicago, 111.
Indianapolis Alumnae—Indianapolis, Ind.

ASSOCIATE EDITORS

ACTIVE CHAPTERS

Alpha—Inactive.
Pi—Solidelle Felicite Renshaw, 741 Esplanade Ave., New Orleans, L a .
Nu—Mary B. Peaks, 244 Waverly Place, New York City.
Omicron—Mary Dora Houston, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn.
Kappa—Helen Hardy, College Park, Va.
Zeta—Helen Wehrli, 1232 R St., Lincoln, Neb.
Sigma—Kathleen Mains, 2345 Channing Way, Berkeley, Cal.
Theta—Edna McClure, A 0 II House, Greencastle, Ind.
Delta—Dorris B. Morse, Metcalf House, Jackson College, Medford, Mass.
Gamma—Leola Chaplin, Balentine Hall, Orono, Maine.
Epsilon—Viola B. Dengler, Sage College, Ithaca, N. Y .
Rho—Louise Hoffman, Pearsons Hall, Evanston, 111.
Lambda—Constance Chandler, A O II House, Stanford University, Cal.
Iota—Leota Mosier, Urbana, 111.
T a u — E l s a H . Steinmetz, 406 n t h Ave. S. E . , Minneapolis, Minn.
Chi—Emily A. Tarbell, 503 University Place, Syracuse, N . Y .

ALUMNAE CHAPTERS

PRESIDENTS

New Y o r k — E d i t h Dietz, 217 VV. 105th St., New York City.
San Francisco—Blanche Ahlers, 2300 Divisadero St., San Francisco, Cal.
Providence—Louella F . Darling (Mrs. L . M . ) , 37 Kossuth St., Pawtucket, R. I .
Boston—Blanche Hooper, 125 Professors Row, Tufts College, Mass.
Lincoln—Jennie Piper, 1731 D St., Lincoln, Neb.
Los Angeles—May Chandler, 623 Park View Ave., Los Angeles, C a l .
Chicago—Elva Pease Pettigrew (Mrs. J . ) , 21 E . 155th St., Harvey, 111.
Indianapolis—Irene B. Newnam, 620 E . 13th St., Indianapolis, Ind.

CHAPTER SECRETARIES
Alpha—Inactive.
Pi—Clara W . Hall, 1231 Washington Ave., New Orleans, L a .
Nu—Jane Monroe, 144 West 104th St., New York City.
Omicron—Alice Calhoun, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn.
Kappa—Helen Hardy, College Park, Va.
Zeta—Helen Wehrli, 1232 R St., Lincoln, Neb.
Sigma—Frances Corlett, 2345 Channing Way, Berkeley, Cal.
Theta—Beatrice Woodward, A O II House, Greencastle, Ind.
Delta—Helen Rowe, 20 Vine St., Winchester, Mass.
Gamma—Elizabeth Bright, Mt. Vernon House, Orono, Maine.
Epsilon—Mary Albertson, Risley Hall, Ithaca, N. Y .
Rho—Alice Kolb, 555 Arlington Place, Chicago, 111.
Lambda—Alice Moore, A 0 I I House, Stanford University, Cal.
Iota—Opal Frost, 511 W . High St., Urbana, 111.
Tau—Vivian Watson, 406 n t h Ave. S. E . , Minneapolis, Minn.
Chi—-Frances Carter, 503 University Place, Syracuse, N . Y .
Upsilon—Esther Knudson, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash.





To D R A G M A

VOL. X SEPTEMBER, 1915 No. 4

To DRAGMA is published at 450-454 Ahnaip Street, Menasha, Wis., by George
Banta, official printer to the fraternity. Entered at the Post Office at Menasha,
Wis., as second-class matter, April 13, 1909, under the act of March 3, 1897.

To DRAGMA is published on the twenty-fifth of November, February, May
and September.

Subscription price, One Dollar per year payable in advance; single copies
twenty-five cents.

Mary Ellen Chase, Editor-in-Chief. Marguerite Pilsbury Schoppe, Business
Manager.

A MESSAGE FROM OUR NEW PRESIDENT

When the West stretched forth her hands and called to the
East and the South—and the call was answered—then did we
of the West know what Fraternity means. Since "to give is
far greater than to receive", you can appreciate in some degree,
what our pleasures were and what the memories mean.
Memories were not alone left, for there came to us also a
responsibility, that every day is becoming more of a reality.

Sigma rejoices greatly in this honor bestowed upon her,
and since no one Chapter can faithfully carry out the duties
imposed upon it, through the office of Presidency, without the
cooperation and support which comes from close contact with
other sister chapters, she looks to you all for assistance in
furthering the ideals of this Fraternity—ideals which assume
bigger and broader proportions, as we in our growth attempt
to direct our steps toward the goal of Service and Love.

Isabelle Henderson.

250 TO DRAG MA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI

PROGRAM—ALPHA OMICRON PI CONVENTION

JUNE 28—JULY 3

June 28 6:00 p.m. Dinner and Informal Evening. Century Club.

June 29 8 :oo a. m. Breakfast. Century Club.

9 :oo a- m. Business Session. Century Club.
12:00 m. Luncheon. Century Club.
1 » o p. m. Business Session. Century Club.
6 :oo p. m. Dinner. Century Club.

8:15 p.m. Chapter Stunts. Alpha Omicron P i house. '
June 30 8:00 a.m. Breakfast. Century Club.

9 :oo a. m. Business Session. Century Club.
12:00 m. Luncheon. Century Club.
3 to 5 p. m. Informal Tea. Alpha Omicron Pi House.

6 :oo p. m. Dinner. Century Club.
7:10 p.m. Key Route car leaves Bancroft and Telegraph for

Exposition. A l l wishing to go sign up at Century
Club.

July 1 8:00 a.m. Breakfast. Century Club.
9 :oo a. m. Business Session. Century Club.

11 :5o a. m. Key Route car leaves for San Francisco and trip to
Stanford by automobile bus. Luncheon en route.

5 130 p. m. Dinner at Stanford.

July 2 7 :oo p. m. Return by bus to San Francisco.
8:00 a.m. Breakfast. Century Club.

9 :oo a. m. Business Session. Century Club.
12:00 m. Luncheon. Century Club.
1 x>o p.m. Session. Century Club.

July 3 6:15 p.m. Special cars leave Bancroft and Telegraph for banquet
at Hotel Oakland.

8 :oo a. m. Breakfast. Century Club.

THE STORY OF A DEAR WEEK

By ones, twos, and threes, and even by nines (as was the case with
Pi) we arrived in Berkeley, June 28. By Monday night prac-
tically all of us were there to enjoy our first dinner together. Not
a stranger was among us—we were all old, old friends! How
could it be otherwise with the strong sister feeling in each heart,
and the dear bond cementing us so closely together? Sigma and
Lambda girls were on all sides, charming hostesses, who surely
know how to entertain and make one feel at home. That night
there were three long tables filled by us. An Alpha O. song would
be started in one part of the room, then taken up and carried on
by the whole family. I t was a dear, lovely time—the forerunner
of a week of joy.

Tuesday was given to business sessions. We were so disappointed
as we assembled for the first session not to have our dear Miss

TO DRAG MA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI 251

Safford with us, but Anna Many, another loyal member of Pi chap-
ter whom we all know as one of our most loyal and hard-working
Grand Officers, presided, and everyone fell in love with her.

Tuesday night we enjoyed a most unique and original vaude-
ville at the Alpha O. House, given by the A w f u l O. Artists. Pi's
minstrels made it hard to believe that six of our members had not
come straight from the wilds of Africa. Rho's solo dancer held us
enthralled throughout her act. No one seemed to suit the fussy Tau
gentleman but the Alpha O. co-ed. Zeta showed her talent in danc-
ing and singing. Sigma and Lambda held the medal for romance,
for each chapter gave a most thrilling and heart-rending play.
Kappa's motion picture, which unfortunately does not appear on the
program printed in this number, has been passed by the Board of
National Pan-Hellenic, and consisted of three "reels": I . Im-
mediate Pledging. I I . Midyear Pledging. I I I . Sophomore Pledg-
ing. After the performance all hands met the performers, and en-
joyed the refreshments of "Copies" and "Crispettes".

Wednesday morning came another business session. I n the after-
noon a reception was given at which mothers and friends were in-
vited. A t this reception we were delighted to meet two of our new
sisters-to-be from Seattle, and to assure them of the welcome we most
surely feel. The house was beautifully decorated with flowers such
as can be found only in California. Ice cream with cakes and tea
was served, and then we rushed home and put on our suits to be in
readiness to start for the Exposition in the evening.

For this trip the girls were divided into groups under the leader-
ship of Sigma girls. We had intended to "do" the Zone, but no one
could tear herself away from Mrs. Perry's interesting accounts of the
buildings and statuary long enough to go into the bowls of joy.
How proud we were were of her—one of the mothers of Alpha O.!

Thursday morning we had a short business session, and then off
we went to Stanford to visit the Lambda girls. After being ferried
across the bay, we found three large automobile buses waiting for us.
Imagine the fun we had! We did wish for every Alpha O. in this
big land to share it with us. Each one had a box lunch which was
disposed of soon after reaching the suburbs of San Francisco. As we
reached the beautiful Stanford campus, Lucile Curtiss by means of
a megaphone pointed out to us the points of interest, and at last we
reached the very attractive Alpha O. House, and were greeted by the
Lambda girls.

One of our hostesses had a ukulele, so we grouped around her
on the big lawn and had a sing. Is there anything that can draw

lends nearer together? Then we enjoyed a splendid dinner, served

252 TO PRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI

by several of the summer school boys, who said that it was rather
dull around there, and that they had decided to see what the Alpha
O's were like. Evidently they were not disappointed, for when it
was time to start for home, several young ladies came near being left
behind. A l l the way home we sang our songs and talked over every
incident of the lovely trip and lovelier visit with Lambda. Before
reaching the ferry all three of our machines broke down, but the
delay only added to the fun and excitement, and we did not in the
least mind our arrival at one the next morning.

The last business session of Friday morning was the most interest-
ing of all, for then were chosen our new officers for the coming two
years. As their names were read, I am sure every delegate and
visitor there felt a great desire to work with those officers for the
betterment of Alpha O.,—a betterment that can be realized only by
living up to our high ideals.

That evening the banquet at the Hotel Oakland closed our con-
vention. I t was there that the feeling of love and loyalty was at
its highest height. Each girl resolved then and there to work with
body and soul for her fraternity, and each one realized anew the
noble types of womanhood who have gone before us as our examples.
The Jessie Wallace Hughan Cup, won by Kappa for standing first
in the service of its college and community, was passed from lip to
lip and christened, and the convention closed by our clasping hands
around the banquet table and singing our beloved song.

DORIS CURRIER, '15.

Pelegate from Gamma Chapter.

REFINED FAMILY VAUDEVILLE

BY AWFUL O H ! ARTISTS

T U E S D A Y , J U N E 29, 1915

Pi "Carnival".
Hazelle Beard, Anna Many, Innes Morris, Jennie Snyder,
Clara Lee Snyder, Dorothy Safford

Rho. Quartette and Entertainers.
Tau. Minnesota Album.

"Pictures" formed by Edith Mitchell, Marguerite Gillette,
Martha Wolff, Beatrice Northey, Helen Pierce, Zora Robinson.

Pictures explained by Mellie Quayle
Intermission. Selection by "Stranded Stringed Scandanavian Orchestra"
(Due to the European War we were able to secure these artists)
Zeta. "Nameless but Clever".

Edna Tray, Doris Scroggin, Grace Gannon

1t
-n

T VI 1
r. 1

1

-

3 ^V.

a



m



TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA 0MICRON PI 253

Sigma. "The Romantics".

Sylvette f L o v e r s \ Mary de Witt
J Rose Evenallyn Bell
Percinet \ V

Bergamin. Percinet's father Jeanett Miller

Pasquinot. Sylvette's father Dorothy Clarke

Straforel. Universal Genius Claudia Lawton

f Mary Butler

Ruffians \ Ella Crawford

Musician Carrie Bright Kistler

Scene. Anywhere.

Lambda. Romance on the Stanford Farm.

Featuring—

Sheza L a Beaute, a coquettish co-ed.

Willie Hoof-nickle, a famed female fusser.

John Smith, poor, proud, powerful, popular.

A Kandy Kounter Kueen.

Beta Flea Freshes.

Roughs.

Scene I . Beta Flea House, 7:30 p. m.
Scene I I . "Sticky" Wilson's Candy Store, 10 p. m.

Produced by All-Star Cast of Lambda Chapter

AFTER T H E SHOW

Coy Co-eds! "Copies" and "Crispettes"

TOAST LIST FOR BANQUET A T H O T E L OAKLAND,
JULY 2

PANAMA-PACIFIC EXPOSITION OF A L P H A OMICRON P I

Toastmistress Rose Von Schmidt Bell
The Court of the Universe Rochelle Gachet

OUR FRATERNITY Isabelle Henderson
Stella Stern Perry
The Column of Progress
Lucile Curtiss
OUR FUTURE Rose Gardner Marx

The Court of the Four Seasons Lillian MacQuillin
Virginia Judy Esterly
OUR HISTORY

The Inside Inn

OUR H E A R T H S T O N E S

The Joy Zone

OUR JESTER'S PALACE

The Palace of Fine Arts

OUR MASTERPIECES

" e Tower of Jewels

OUR POSSIBILITIES

254 TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI

A COPY OF T H E MINUTES OF T H E GRAND COUNCIL
M E E T I N G A T B E R K E L E Y , J U N E 28-JULY 2, 1915

The twenty-third regular meeting of the Grand Council of A O I I was
called to order at 9:30 a. m., Tuesday, June 29, 1915, by Grand Secretary
Anna Many, acting as Grand President.

ROLL CALL OF GRAND COUNCIL MEMBERS

Present in person 33
Present by proxy 40
Absent and no proxy
9

Records of the two special meetings, one held in Boston, May 19, 1913,
and the other at New Orleans, June 1, 1914, were read and approved.

Grand Secretary Anna Many, acting as Grand President, explained the
absence of the Grand president, Dorothy Safford, and the Grand Vice-
president, Edith Dietz. She herself assumed the Grand Presidency for this
Convention, and appointed Margaret Henderson Dudley as acting Grand
Secretary.

The reports of officers and chapters were next in order.

REPORTS OF OFFICERS

Grand President's report was read by Rochelle Gachet. In this report
Miss Safford told of her attendance at the Meeting of the Grand Presidents
during the National Pan-Hellenic Congress in October, 1912; of her installing
the Chicago Alumna; chapter and Tau chapter at the University of Minnesota;
of her tour of inspection with a report of Zeta, Rho, Iota, Theta, T a u , and
the Lincoln Alumna;; of a second tour of inspection in the spring of 1913
with a report of Omicron, Kappa, Alpha, Delta, Gamma, Epsilon, Nu, Boston
Alumna;, Providence Alumna;, and New York Alumn<e chapters. She reports
that Chi chapter has been formed at Syracuse, and an alumna; chapter at
Indianapolis. A petition has been presented by a group of girls at Seattle,
Washington. She deeply regrets the unspeakable loss of Alpha chapter.
Her aim has been to raise the scholarship of the fraternity, to increase the
circulation of To DRAGMA, to raise our National standing, to take steps toward
a definite alumna; work, and to discover any basis in A 0 I I for the criticism
against fraternities.

It was moved and carried that this report be accepted, and that we pass
a resolution of regret to Miss Safford upon her inability to be present at
the Convention, and a vote of thanks for her work and loyalty to A 0 I I .

Grand Secretary's report was read by the acting Grand Secretary, accepted
and filed.

Grand Treasurer's report was accepted with thanks and filed. A supple-
mentary report of Dorothy Safford's was presented with her trips and ex-
penses, and her reasons for failing to inspect Sigma and Lambda.

The Grand Historian gave an informal report. She wished that the privi-
leges of Alpha active chapter be given to their alumna; as a matter of cour-
tesy. She feels that there is started the beginning of the cure against frater-
nities. Upon inquiry she has found out that the main objection to fraternities
is not secrecy, but the method of membership. A cup to be called the "Jessie
Wallace Hughan" cup was presented by Mrs. Perry to the fraternity to be

TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI 255

given at each convention to the chapter standing first in the service of its
college and community. The Executive committee and Grand Historian are
to pass judgment from the annual reports.

It was moved and carried that Mrs. Perry's report be accepted and a vote
of thanks be given her for the cup and for her talk.

Auditor—No report. The Treasurer had her report audited by two pro-
fessional auditors, and two fraternity members. It was moved and carried
that the report of the professional auditors be accepted in place of the frater-
ternity Auditors.

Examining Officer's Report, read by Clara Graffe, Epsilon, was accepted

and filed.
The Chairman on Committee for New Chapters reported the establishment

of Chi at Syracuse, the petition for a charter from a group of git Is at Seattle,
two petitions, one from Pittsburg and one from Jackson, Miss., which were
deemed unworthy, and the installation of an Alumna; Chapter at Indian-
apolis. Report was accepted and filed.

Editor's report was read and accepted. I t was moved and carried that a
vote of thanks be given to the Editor and Business Manager for their good
work on the magazine.

Business Manager's report was accepted.
Registrar's report was accepted and filed.

CHAPTER REPORTS

Written reports were received from every active chapter, except Omicron
and Iota. An informal report of Chi was given by Clara Graffe, Epsilon.

Written reports were received from all the Alumna; Chapters except
Indianapolis which gave no report, and Chicago and New York, which were
represented by informal talks by Aveline Kindig and Viola Turck.

Finance Committee reported on the necessary expenditures for the next

two years as estimated.
Pan-Hellenic report was presented by Lillian MacQuillin for Mrs. Camp-

bell, with supplementary reports from Miss Safford and Mrs. Parmelee, Delta
Delta Delta. Mrs. Campbell asked that the report concerning the bidding
of High School sorority members be ratified by Grand Council. Dorothy
Safford asked that her supplementary report concerning secrecy be discussed.
Mrs. Campbell's entire report accepted and filed.

Nominating Committee presented the official ballot for officers.
Committee on National Alumna; Work gave its report which was accepted.

SECOND D A Y OF CONVENTION A paper

Miss Kate Foster read an article on the World Peace Conference.
w a s later signed by those in favor of such a movement.

Mrs. Farmer presented the petition of Alpha Upsilon, a local at Seattle,
Wash., to the Grand Council members, giving also additional data. It was
moved and carried unanimously that a charter be granted. It was moved
and carried that a telegram be sent to Seattle immediately.

Miss Marion Rich read a report with reference to Pan-Hellenic troubles
a t the University of Maine. The Grand Council desired also the reading of
numerous letters. The points causing trouble were with reference to the
unanimous vote (there being only two) of Pan-Hellenic Meeting, the lower-
8, n of the standard of scholarship, and the conferences before and after the
fending 0 f the bids. It was moved and carried that Miss Rich continue her
"ivestigations with instructions to send a circular letter to each member of the

256 TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI A
It
faculty at Maine and to all persons who are interested in the matter, telling so
them of the sense of responsibility A O I I feels. to
P
It was moved and carried that we send to our A 0 IT delegate of Pan- u
Hellenic our expression of opinion that we are willing to change our pledge g
so that the promise of secrecy covers only the ritual, motto, sub-motto and e
secret signs. Four negative votes.
th
It was moved and carried that we also send to said delegate as an ex- in
pression of our opinion that it is the policy of A 0 I I not to bid a girl who p
shall join a High School sorority after September i , 1915.
T
The Barnard situation was discussed and numerous papers read. It was S
moved and carried (with three negative votes) that the status of Alpha chap- t
ter be not changed on our records except that the word inactive be placed s
after Alpha for two years until next convention. There is a very slight possi- t
bility that fraternities may be reinstated. Therefore, it was the consensus a
of opinion that Alpha chapter continue to exist, that it have the same number of
Grand Council Members as if active, and that the charter remain in its hands.

It was moved and carried that a letter be written to the faculty of Barnard
that A 0 n is willing to cooperate with the college for the good of the
college, that we are opposed to secrecy except in some small points, and that
if ever it becomes the feeling that fraternities be reestablished at Barnard
we wish to be informed immediately.

THIRD D A Y OF CONVENTION

A letter from Adelme Burd was read. It was moved and carried that
no action be taken on Miss Burd's letter concerning the old songbooks.

The notes of the minutes taken the preceding day were read and approved.
The subject of National Alumna; Work taking the form of Social Work
was discussed. Letters and reports concerning a field for such work in
Hindman, K y . , were read. The main objection to our attempting such an
undertaking is our lack of sufficient funds. I f T o D R A G M A were self-support-
ing, the $400 a year, which is the amount now given to its support, could be
counted upon to pay the salary of a district nurse in the mountains of Ken-
tucky, or to be spent in some other worthy way.

It was moved and unanimously carried that we go on record as in favor
of supporting some National Fraternity Work, and that a committee be
formed to keep in touch with opportunities and need for such work, so that
we may go on with it when the treasury be in condition to do it.

It was moved and carried that we amend the constitution.
Numerous amendments.

FOURTH D A Y OF CONVENTION

A telegram of greetings from Alpha Phi was read.
It was moved and carried that we send Kappa Alpha Theta a telegram of
our good wishes.

It was moved and carried that we draw up resolutions to be recorded
upon the minutes, and that a copy be sent to chapters on the deaths of mem-
bers during the last three years.

More amendments.

It was moved and carried that after the amendments have been ratified
by the chapters, the constitution be rewitten to include all amendments, j
Registrar to be chairman, and a copy to be sent to each member of Grand
Council and chapters.

TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI 257

A petition of two girls, Margaret Vaughan and Shirley McDavitt,
Alpha O's, was presented to Grand Council for a charter at Dallas, Texas.
t passed Convention, and now is to pass life members and chapters. A new
ong committee was appointed.

Mrs. Perry presented her report on awarding of cup, which was given
o Kappa Chapter, for its activities of a broad nature. Honorable mention,
Pi Chapter—Kappa 52 points and Pi 4 5 ^ . Work in the mountains impressed
us in Kappa, and entire field covered by their work. Mentioned spirit of
going to Texas to start a new chapter.

Nominating Committee submitted a ballot from which the following were

elected:
Grand President—Isabelle Henderson.
Grand Vice-president—Jean Loomis Frame (Mrs. J . E . )
Grand Secretary—Helen N. Henry.
Grand Treasurer, Lillian MacQuillin.
Chairman of Committee on New Chapters—Viola Gray.
Examining Officer—Linda Best Terry (Mrs. L . M . )
Registrar—Marie Vick Swanson (Mrs. A . E . )
Grand Historian—Stella G. Stern Perry (Mrs. G . H . )
Auditor—Helen Dickinson.
Pan-Hellenic Delegate—Anna Estelle Many.
Editor of To DRAGMA—Mary Ellen Chase.
Business Manager—Marguerite Pilsbury Schoppe (Mrs. W . F . )

By motion carried it was moved that the convention express its thanks to
the entertaining chapters, Sigma and Lambda.

By motion carried it was voted that a telegram be sent to Dorothy Safford
n appreciation of her spirit and in expression of our gratitude.

By motion carried the convention expressed its thanks to Anna Many for
presiding.

Adjourned.
Signed—

MARGARET HENDERSON DUDLEY.
Acting Grand Secretary.

REPORT OF T H E GRAND PRESIDENT FOR T H E

YEARS 1912-1915

1306 Webster St.,
New Orleans, La.
June 22, 1915.

To the IQI$ Convention of A O I I Assembled at Berkeley, Col.:
Sisters:

It now becomes my duty to submit to you in writing my report for
the past three years which I had so earnestly hoped and believed I
should present in person. Without saddening your pleasure or dis-
tracting your minds from the subjects which must claim your f u l l
attention during the next few days, I cannot here offer the reasons
or my absence. I had planned to lay aside all personal feeling and

e with you, but yesterday circumstances over which I have no con-

258 TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI to
w
trol arose, and these point very plainly to a duty here which is gr
stronger even than that I owe to my fraternity. But you may be
sure that during every hour devoted to the work or the pleasure of of
A O IT, I am with you loyally, fraternally, lovingly. fo
of
When I assumed my present office in June, 1912, it was with a no
feeling of my utter unworthiness, and now when I lay it down in th
1915, unworthiness gives place to humility. My one excuse for
retaining the office after illness and overwork had rendered me in- lu
capable of filling it as I had hoped to do, is that each day I hoped to th
do better, and dreaded more to cast the burden of poorly-done work pr
on someone else. Not one criticism made of me can equal my own
opinion of my failure. Just let me pause one moment to thank those m
who have so loyally supported me, and so splendidly carried out the I
spirit of "Charity that vaunteth not itself". lu
lo
The first duty which fell to me was the attendance at the meeting th
of presidents during the N . P. C. in October, 1912. A report of this br
has been made long ago, and the situation is referred to in my message fe
concerning N . P. C. Therefore, I shall not discuss it here. 1
in
Directly after the N . P. C. I installed the Chicago Alumnae Chap- if
ter, which has since proved such an important factor in the life of th
our fraternity. Then I installed Tau at the University of Minnesota, th
and returned later to get the chapter in good running order and of
under proper Pan-Hellenic conditions. I then visited Zeta, Rho, C
Iota, Theta, Pi, and the Lincoln Alumnae Chapter. During this
trip I tried to impress the chapters with the fact that I was on a tour pi
of inspection rather than a round of social pleasures. However, the
pleasures were there in abundance, and were thoroughly enjoyed by an
the guest.
ter
A report of this inspection is herewith enclosed, and I should
like to have it read although it has already been presented to the f
chapters.
01
During the spring of 1913, I attended the Special Grand Council
Meeting in Boston, and inspected Omicron, Kappa, Alpha, Delta,
Gamma, Epsilon, N u , the Boston Alumnae, the Providence Alumnae,
and the New York Alumnae. I also enjoyed a social meeting with a
number of the Chicago Alumnae, and attended the General Inter-
fraternity Congress in Chicago.

A report of this inspection can be briefly made, for the chapters,
taking my report of the former inspection as a warning, had "their
houses in order", and presented almost no vulnerable points. Omi-
cron was filled with zeal to be a live chapter of A O I I . I t has
always been loyal. Alpha's painstaking care to attain perfection
equalled its enthusiasm. Delta showed the qualities that helped

TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI 259

o make our nation—can I say more? Epsilon decided to combine
work and play in such a way that its members would be neither

rinds nor butterflies, but loyal, earnest daughters of Alpha O.

Nu was given the choice of becoming an active, growing chapter
f A O I I , or of leaving our band. I t was a hard moment (especially
or the Grand President) but Nu, being composed largely of lawyers
f course, did the logical thing, and at the end of the year N u was
ot guilty of a single misdemeanor. Do we not gladly now give Nu
he password.

I am almost afraid to speak of those three alumnae chapters. A
ump comes into my throat whenever I think of their enthusiasm,
heir loyalty, their strength. You know how it feels to be in the
resence of the mighty!

When the round of my inspection was complete, each chapter cla-
mored to know which was the best. I hesitated to say, first because

am small enough to stand very much in awe of several hundred
usty girls, and secondly, because I was unable through the temporary
oss_rjf our treasury to visit Lambda and Sigma. But now I feel
hat you will make allowances for the prejudice of a single mind, the
revity of my visits, and the great possibility of my being unjust, and
eel only great pride when I say that at the time in question (1912-
913), Gamma and Kappa were our best chapters of those which I
nspected. This did not include Sigma or Lambda, which were near

not in the first place. Gamma and Kappa were so totally unlike
hat it was only after much thought, and careful study of my notes
hat I made this decision. I t might be well to state that my standard
f measurement was the object of our fraternity as outlined in the
Constitution. These chapters almost attained the ideal.

During these visits of inspection, my aims were as follows:
I - To investigate chapter records and have them properly com-
iled.

LI. To urge the girls to place the college first, the fraternity next
nd themselves last.

H I . To encourage a spirit of hearty cooperation within the chap-
r , and the national organization.

To discourage the political game.

V- To advance scholarship.

To abolish debt in the chapters.

• To advocate wise and moderately rapid expansion,

fu ^ ° *e x c m c e sectional prejudice and unfriendly criticism

«ie members of A O I I .

• To gain a more loyal support of To DRAGMA.

260 TO DRAG MA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI S

How far I succeeded I do not know. I have had numerous letters R
saying comforting things, but who can really judge? C
h
Since this time referred to a petition has been granted to a group t
at Syracuse University, and the petitioners have become Chi Chap- g
ter of A O I I . A strong alumnae chapter has been established in a
Indianapolis. Petitions have come to us from elsewhere, and one o
from Seattle will, I trust, be granted by you. I n addition to the w
alumna: chapters already mentioned, A O I I is proud of those in San w
Francisco and Los Angeles. To know more of them means simply
to look over the roll of National Officers and see the great work of A
California women. V

Since only through great loss we are able to measure our great N
gain, it has been given to us to lose our Alpha Chapter. Because S
it was our Alpha Chapter, and because from its founders, the in-
spiration of A O I I grew, our loss is unspeakable. The greatest A
memorial we can erect to Alpha is to order our lives by the rule and
line, which have marked out the way of that nearest and dearest
founder and friend, Stella George Stern Perry.

Aside from my work directly connected with the chapters, I have
tried in my small way: ( 1 ) to raise the scholarship of the fraternity
as a whole through the work of our two excellent scholarship com-
mittees, ( 2 ) to increase the circulation of To DRAGMA, which under
the wise and capable management of Mrs. Esterley and Miss Hen-
derson deserves our best support, ( 3 ) to increase and better our
national standing, ( 4 ) to take the initial steps in deciding upon a
definite work for alumnae chapters, ( 5 ) to discover any basis in
A O I I for the unjust criticism directed against fraternities. (Each
chapter was requested to read, discuss, and make a report on Miss
Picket's articles in the 1912 Century, and to correct whatever was in
error.)

Finally, I have striven to batter down the wall of narrow pre-
judice, which sometimes surrounds the undergraduate mind, to en-
courage a spirit of fraternity and love among all the members of
A O I I regardless of religious differences, regardless of geographical
or social position, regardless of all things, save the "Charity that
beareth all things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth
all things."

Respectfully submitted,

DOROTHY NOBLE SAFFORD.

TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI 261

SOME PROPOSED A M E N D M E N T S TO OUR CONSTITU-
TION, BY-LAWS, AND RULES AND REGULATIONS

Of the several amendments of our Constitution, By-laws, and
Rules and Regulations proposed at the recent meetings of the Grand
Council and now submitted to the several chapters, the following
have been selected for publication. Limited space does not permit
the publication of the amendments in f u l l . Furthermore, those not
given here have to do mainly with technicalities, word substitutions,
and details of chapter government, and except to officers and chapter
officials are not of general interest. Those given below, however,
will be of interest to every Alpha O. I f amended as proposed, they
will read as follows:

Articles BY-LAWS
V, VI, VII.
Renumber Articles V and V I to Articles V I and V I I , and
insert new Article V as follows: The fraternity shall be
divided geographically into four districts, Eastern, Southern,
Middle Western, and Western. Eastern district to include
Alpha, Nu, Gamma, Delta, Epsilon, and C h i ; Southern
district to include Kappa, Omicron, and P i ; Middle Western
district to include Zeta, Theta, Rho, Iota, and T a u ; and
Western district to include Sigma, Lambda, and the new
chapter at Seattle. Each district shall have a superintendent
to investigate and keep in touch with the chapters of her
district and report annually to the Executive Committee. No
expenses shall be incurred without the approval of the
Executive Committee.

New Article V. Each active chapter shall nominate a District Superintendent
Section 2. to be elected by the Executive Committee for a term of two
years. Nominations shall be in the hands of the Executive
Committee on or before June first of convention year, except
for the years 1915-1917 when the District Superintendent
shall be appointed by the Executive Committee.

Article VII. Add the following: The September issue (of T o D R A G M A )
shall be composed of a Directory of Officers, Directory of all
members, and material exclusively Alpha Omicron Pi, and no
exchanges of this issue shall be granted.

R U L E S AND REGULATIONS

In line 2 after "size" add "structure", and add at the end of
the section, "The use of guard pins shall be prohibited."

Substitute, "Initiated members shall not be per-
mitted to wear pledge pins".

262 TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI

EDITORIALS

ENTHUSIASM

D O we who are Greeks know what, in the language of the
Greeks, enthusiasm means? I t comes from ev- 0eo;, and means
"filled with God". I like to think of that meaning. I t takes away
all idea of short-lived, abnormal fanaticism, and hallows genuine,
honest eagerness to do and be.

The Convention is over. The officers who served us so faithfully
and to whom we are so grateful have given place to others who,
with the support of each chapter, will do their best to serve us as
well. Was the enthusiasm which we felt during that week in June
the real thing—the enthusiasm which will make us march forward
altogether toward the fulfillment of our ideals? Let us prove that
it was by starting at the beginning of this college year, and oh—let
no one get out of step!

T H E PAST AND THE FUTURE

T H I S September number of To DRAGMA is the first-born of its
new Editorial Board. Had it not been for the members of the
past board, who have served so truly splendidly for five years, you
would not now be reading this number. The newr Editor, who could not
attend the Convention, has no words with which to thank every mem-
ber of that board of loyal Sigmas, but she will never forget the long,
wonderfully prompt letters, filled with the very things she wanted to
know, in reply to her desperate and almost tearful inquiries from a
Rocky Mountain cabin where mail came twice a week, "roads per-
mitting". Nor will she forget the faith and confidence and en-
couragement, which those dear Sigmas gave to her—her whom not
one of them has ever seen. Truly it was that confidence and that
encouragement which gave birth to this September number of To

DRAGMA.

You who have been watching and at the same time, I hope, helping
(though did you ever realize how many of us just watch and don't
help at all?) have seen the progress of To DRAGMA during these last
five years, and it is you who can join with me in giving gratitude and
praise to Mrs. Esterly and Miss Henderson, and the other three who
have helped "bring up" our magazine for so long.

The new Editors and Business Managers realize to the f u l l the
responsibilities which they have inherited, and they do want to prove
true. They share the ideal of their predecessors in wanting to make
To DRAGMA something more than the "official publication of the
fraternity". They want it to be the expression and promoter of that

TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI 263

bond which holds us together, the registry of the best thoughts, aims,
and work of every chapter, and—yes, they will tell you their dearest
hope—they want it to be a real inspiration. But inspirations don't
soar until they are formed and moulded by hard, practical, every-day
work. W i l l you all stand by and help us do it?

BUPSILON CHAPTER
EFORE this number of To DRAGMA reaches its readers, Alpha
O. will have been enriched by a new chapter—Upsilon at the
University of Washington in Seattle. This chapter is to be installed
on September 1 8 by Gladys Courtian Britton of Sigma chapter,
whom we know so well as our past Registrar. We want here to
extend to those new sisters a welcome from every chapter of Alpha
O. We receive you joyfully into our fellowship, feeling sure that
you have brought into Alpha Omicron Pi the very possessions you
will gain from her—a capacity for friendship, a faithfulness to ser-
vice, and a desire to make your fraternity stand for the things that
are really worth while.

ALPHA CHAPTER

T ) U T the installation of no new chapter, however fine it may be,
can lessen the sorrow and regret we feel over the probable

loss of our mother chapter. The situation is reviewed elsewhere
m this number. Here we can only express to Alpha our appreciation
of her loyalty during these last trying years, our gratitude for her
strength and enthusiasm in times past, and our unspeakable thank-
fulness and admiration for her founders who made possible for us
our own chapters of Alpha Omicron Pi.

The word "Inactive" must now appear after the chapter's name,
but we know that the members of Alpha chapter are not inactive,
either toward their fraternity or toward their college. I t is their
activity which must keep the "sacred fire burning", that fire which
m a y in the future mean the establishment of a new Alpha, dedicated
!° t n e i^als and traditions of her earlier sisters and their common
founders.

I HE SUPPORT OF To DRAGMA

^ O \ OU know that, according to the Business Manager's report

m t n e May issue, out of gSj alumnae there are 236 subscribers

0 o DRAGMA ? This means that the great majority of our alumna;

V* not keeping in touch with the life of Alpha O. since comparative-
f

y ew of them are near their active chapters. Do you know that the

264 TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI Be
ap
money sent annually by the Grand Council to To DRAGMA could be wa
devoted to real, definite service in districts of our country where of
service is imperative, i f two-thirds of the alumnae of your chapter an
would subscribe to their magazine? Your Alumnae Assistant Busi-
ness Manager cannot do all the work. Won't you stand by her, and
make yourself responsible for one new subscriber? You will be
doing more than helping To DRAGMA. YOU will be bringing your
alumnae into closer touch with you and with their fraternity, and in
that way strengthening both your local chapter and your National
Organization.

T H E JESSIE WALLACE HUGHAN CUP

TH R O U G H the loyalty and generosity of Stella Stern Perry,
whose personality has meant so much in the growth of Alpha
Omicron Pi, a cup was given to Alpha O. at the recent convention.
This cup bears a name known to every Alpha O.—that of one of our
four eldest sisters, Jessie Wallace Hughan. We of Alpha are justly
proud of the position she holds among the women of our land, for
always she is in the front rank of those working toward social better-
ment and progress. But we are most proud because she really belongs
to our big family, and because she is not too busy to work faithfully
for our interests as well as for those of the larger world.

Elsewhere in this number the conditions which govern the award-
ing of the cup are described. This year it was given to Kappa be-
cause of her service not only to her college and fraternity, but also
to the community in which she is placed. Honorable mention for
loyalty to the same big ideal was given to Pi. One and all do we
extend our heartiest congratulations and praise to our sister chap-
ters, and one and all do we join in thanking Mrs. Perry for her
loving thoughtfulness and for her beautiful gift. What chapter at
next convention will be esteemed most worthy?

T H E NOVEMBER ISSUE

T H E November issue will contain an account of the installation
of Upsilon chapter, material having to do with the University
of Washington and life there, accounts of the recent National Pan-
Hellenic Congress and of the Meeting of Editors of National Pan-
Hellenic Journals, a poem and sketch reprinted from other maga-
zines in which they have appeared, two new Alpha O. songs, the
usual chapter letters, especially good alumnae notes, and other
material of interest. Don't let your subscription expire!

TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI 265

As this number of To DRAGMA goes to press, we receive from
erkeley the news that Miss Henderson was operated upon for
ppendicitis, August 16, and that the operation was in every
ay successful. We want to assure her that she has the best wishes

the fraternity, every member of which hopes for her a most rapid
nd complete recovery.

A haze on the far horizon,
The infinite, tender sky,

The ripe, rich tint of the corn-fields
And the wild geese sailing high.

And all over upland and lowland

The charm of the golden-rod,
Some of us call it Autumn

And others call it God.
From "Each in His Own Tongue"

by W. H . C A R R U T H .

266 TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA 0MICRON PI T
of
CHAPTER REPORTS • tha
led
( I t must have been a feeling of great pride with which those
pioneers who mothered Alpha O. in her childhood and those officers I
and delegates, who have worked so hard for her progress listened thr
to the reports of her various chapters, as given at the recent con- the
vention. Three weeks later the Editor, far up in the Montana ple
mountains, also felt that pride as she read the same reports. I t was com
her desire and plan to publish every one of them in f u l l in place of tio
chapter letters, but space and the To DRAGMA treasury both said, fin
"Impossible". Therefore, she has been obliged to do what human De
beings have been doing ever since the world began, namely, to wh
substitute. two
Th
I n these days of anti-fraternity-agitation and even legislation, we tes
are being asked the excuse for our existence. "What are you doing?" un
these antagonists ask. "Are you bettering the colleges? Are you had
helping your communities? What is your excuse for being at all?" to
co
The antagonism will not cease until we can prove that we are org
of distinct service not only to the college but to the community. tha
Is Alpha O. proving this? As I read the reports of the chapters, I It
cannot but believe that she is. And because above every other aim— mi
far above class and college honors, college loyalty, and even scholar- eff
ship—we place the aim of Service, I have taken from these reports to
the accounts of work done to create and foster a better spirit of spo
friendship among the different fraternities and among nonfraternity de
girls, and to help by definite, personal service those more unfortunate any
than ourselves—in short, work done which will prove that Alpha str
Omicron Pi is making the world better for her being in it.
a
Several chapters are not represented in this report. This does
not mean that they are not serving. I n most cases it means that their ex
reports were verbal and not obtainable in f u l l , or that through the rea
separation of so many members during this summer of travel, and tW l
through the necessary haste in the compilation of this number, they as
were impossible to obtain. Personal honors are here omitted. Every oc
chapter has a list of those and they are commendable, but they do not
prove that we have a reason for being. pa

I n closing I would say that I am publishing Alpha's report in 0
f u l l , partly because it gives briefly the fraternity situation at Bar-
nard, mostly because it may prove to be our dear mother chapter's
"swan-song".)

TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI 267

ALPHA, BARNARD COLLEGE

The three years since the last convention has been the period
anti-fraternity agitation at Barnard, and it is therefore necessary
at this report consist entirely of a statement of the conditions which
to the suspension of fraternities there.

I n the early part of 1913 a few prominent nonfraternity students
rough the channels of a Barnard publication severely condemned
e fraternity system as it existed at Barnard, and made an earnest
ea for investigation and reform. I n the spring of that year a
mmittee was formed purely for the purpose of studying the ques-
n, but with no legal power of enforcing any regulations that its
ndings might seem to justify. This committee consisted of the •
ean, the Provost, four members of the faculty, four alumnae, one of
hom was Mrs. Helen St. Clair Mullan, and four undergraduates,
o of whom were fraternity members and two nonfraternity.
his committee met weekly for several months, and at these meetings
stimony was invited from any member of the faculty, alumnae, or
ndergraduates of Barnard. After weighing the testimony which
ad been thus received, the committee presented two recommendations

the faculty. The majority report recommended that fraternities
ontinue at Barnard provided their purpose and a few points of
ganization be not kept secret. The minority report recommended
at for a period of three years fraternities take in no new members.

was this latter report which was accepted by the faculty com-
ittee on Student Organizations, the members of which put into
fect legally the recommendations made in that report. According

their report the flagrant evils of the fraternity which were re-
ponsible for this action were secrecy, national affiliation, and un-
emocracy. The final action which we believe permanently vitiates
ny chance of the reestablishment of fraternities at Barnard was a
raw vote of the undergraduates taken last year which resulted in

majority of over one hundred against fraternities.

For the past two years Alpha chapter has had a very devitalized
xistence. Its own activity and its enthusiasm were lessened by the
alization that its career was about to end. The chapter affiliated
t h its alumnae in its meetings and activities, and continued as far
s possible to represent not only Barnard but Alpha on every
ccasion.

During the past year particularly we realize that the national
aternity of which we are so proud to be a part has had little reason

be proud of us. We can only hope that our sisters in other

apters will think not so much of the things that the younger mem-

268 TO PRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI

bers of Alpha chapter have left undone, but rather of the beginning
of our fraternity, and of the many splendid things accomplished
by the first members of Alpha chapter, the founders of our frater-
nity.

Respectfully submitted,

CONSTANCE M. GERATY,

President of Alpha Chapter.

PI, H. SOPHIE NEWCOMB MEMORIAL COLLEGE

Says the Pi secretary in her report of the chapter: "True to
our beautiful motto, we tried to think of a way in which to broaden
our sphere of usefulness, and show the real Alpha Omicron Pi spirit,
and we could think of no better than for each one in the chapter
to adopt a little orphan, whom we could visit, help in every way
possible, and occasionally take for an outing—a rare pleasure. This
we did, and the year of 1912-1913, filled with so much pleasure to
us all, ended with an orphan party, at which 'our children's' joy
more than repaid us.

"At the suggestion of Chi Omega the fraternities at Newcomb
started a lunch room for the unfortunate girls i n one of our New
Orleans cotton factories. Pi gave not only of its means, but of its
time, the girls at stated times serving in the lunch room."

KAPPA, RANDOLPH-MACON WOMAN'S COLLEGE

The Kappa secretary writes of "one of our girls who is doing
Eight Weeks' Club work among the poor whites in the Virginia
mountains and is. very enthusiastic". She speaks also of the co-
operation of Kappa chapter with the Y. W. C. A., of which an
Alpha O. is president. " I n 1912-1913 prayer meetings, gymnasium
classes, classes for study, and social gatherings were begun among
the house-maids, who are mostly ignorant mountain girls. We en-
couraged several of our 'less serious' Alpha O. girls to enter into
this work and they became very enthusiastic. The maids in the
study classes are taught anything they want from geography to Latin,
and—oh, it means so much to them!

"We have Freshman Clubs where an upperclassman takes a club
of Freshmen for the first three months of school to make them feel
at home, and to understand the spirit of the college, etc. These
clubs of which one of our Alpha O. girls is the head give each year
all the Christmas dolls and toys that the chidren in a North Caro-
lina milling town get. Much work for the Belgians was also carried

TO PRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI 269

g on by these clubs. We feel that showing the Freshmen we are inter-
d ested in them as just 'girls' and not for the 'frat', does much to
cause what a National Y. W. C. A. Secretary called 'the best
- sorority situation she had ever seen'."

SIGMA, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

Sigma speaks of its interest in the Emergency Fund for which

Alpha O. is working, and for the support of which each student

is taxed. This fund aids the self-supporting girls at California.

Her secretary also reports the relief work done for the war sufferers
o of Europe—particularly "Belgian babies". The report of the San
n Francisco Alumna? also shows the nature of Sigma's interests.
,
r DELTA, JACKSON COLLEGE

y "During the year (1912-1913)" writes the Delta secretary, "our
s alumna? furnished a room at Richardson House, one of the dormi-
o tories, in memory of the Delta girls who had died. This room is
y for the use of any who desire or need it, whether Alpha O. girls

or not, and it is cared for by a committee of active girls.
b "The Christian Guild received new impetus under the direction of
w two of our girls, who held the offices of President and Secretary, and
s definite work was started in connection with some of the Boston

settlements.

" I n December, 1913 we instituted a new custom in regard to the

spending of our Christmas sum. Instead of making a present to

g the fraternity room as we had previously done, we decided to spend
a this sum hereafter in making Christmas more Christmasy for some
- of those countless ones for whom the day would otherwise be sad.
n
m "A new custom was recently started by the local chapter of Chi
g Omega when they invited the Seniors of the other fraternities to a
- party in their fraternity room. We spent a delightful informal
o evening, and felt a close, all-Greek feeling. Probably the custom
e will be continued next year, with Alpha O. as a follower. Up to
, this time the fraternity rooms have been hermetically sealed, but
Chi Omega has demonstrated how attractive and natural it is for
the chapters to entertain their sister Greeks in the rooms which are

after all dedicated to the same cause and purpose."
b
l GAMMA, UNIVERSITY OF MAINE

e In spite of hard work to earn money for their longed-for bunga-

r low. Gamma has not forgotten that after all a chapter needs more

- than a house. She has tried to prove herself a useful member of the
d community, and has this last year given a scholarship which is to be

270 TO DRAG MA OF ALPHA O MIC RON PI

renewed yearly. This scholarship is known as the Elizabeth Balen-
tine Scholarship, and is to be given yearly to a candidate appointed
by the faculty. Character, scholarship, and need of financial help
are to be considered in making this decision. The candidate may be
a member of any sorority or of none.

EPSILON, CORNELL UNIVERSITY

Epsilon's secretary in her recital of the many honors which have
been Epsilon's during the last three years speaks also of girls who
have devoted an afternoon and evening each week to social service,
and girls who have worked with all their hearts for a Belgian Relief
Fund representative of Cornell University.

LAMBDA, L E L A N D STANFORD JR. UNIVERSITY

"Life entirely for self certainly does not count anywhere", writes
the Lambda secretary, "and I believe that Lambda has become
stronger in her resolves to be known and counted in her sphere in
the college. I t takes time, effort, love, forethought, and patience,
especially on the part of the upperclassmen, but it is worth while,
because until a girl sees beyond her own pleasures, she is not a
true college woman, or the real woman of the age. We have been
working to create an all-around interest in activities—not an abnor-
mal enthusiasm. Our social service work has been done in con-
nection with the Y. W. C. A. of which an Alpha O. is Secretary.
We are glad to say that two of our girls managed sewing classes in
the Mayfield Grammar School—a very poor school district near
Stanford. They carried this work on throughout the year, planning
all the work, buying material, and doing much to better the environ-
ment of these poor, ill-kept children.

"Lambda truly desires the best, and will always aim for the best.
We have a goodly number to start with next August, with all
hearts steadfastly placed at the front to search for the best and to do
it."

TAU, UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA

The Tau secretary writes of Tau's desire to "count for some-
thing". She tells of Christmas work among the poor of Minne-
apolis, of willing contributions to War Relief Funds, and of work
in furnishing the Elizabeth Northrup Cottage for women.

TO DRAG MA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI 27!

ALUMNA CHAPTERS

Our Alumnae Chapters are examples in usefulness to the active.

Boston Alumnse Chapter tells of social work, and of a scholarship at

Jackson College. The secretary of the San Francisco Alumna; says,

" I n 1913 we did philanthropic work for the Berkeley Day Nursery

by making 'little garments'. Here began our search for definite

local and national alumnse work I n 1914 we found real

local alumnae work. Each member is now contributing twenty-five

cents a meeting to be donated to charity. We are providing the

groceries for a worthy family of six children who are in dire need of

aid. This local work we are glad to do, and shall be happy to have

national work to do as well.

JUST THAT—OR SOMETHING MORE?

Is the girl whom you are considering—you who initiate in
November—just pretty—or something more? Is she just well-
dressed and charming in appearance—or something more? She
is attractive to men. Why not consider in just what way before
you decide to say "Yes"? She has lovely manners. An asset
surely. Are they in evidence on every occasion, used toward all,
without respect to age, wealth, learning, or social position?
If so, they mean more than manners. They stand for character
as well. If not, it is well to hesitate. She is a fine student. Is
she something more—a good comrade as well? She has a strong
personality. Has she balance enough to make it useful? Doubt-
less she woidd be a leader. In what direction would she lead?

Remember she is ours for all time when once we and she have
said "Yes". Don't say it because of "Just that". Say it be-
cause of "Something more".

A word is dead, when it is said
Some say.

I say it just begins to live
That day!

EMILY DICKINSON.

272 TO DRAG MA OF ALPHA O MIC RON PI

DIRECTORY OF ALPHA OMICRON PI

( A great effort has been made to make this directory up to date. I f
there are errors, i t is neither the fault of the Editors nor the Registrar.
I t is rather due to the carelessness of chapter officers who have not sent in
changes in names and addresses to the Registrar. This is an essential and
important part of the work of every chapter. W i l l each chapter therefore
please see that any mistakes are corrected immediately by sending corrections
to the Registrar, M r s . A . E . Swanson, 522 Church St., Evanston, 111.)

DIRECTORY OF ACTIVE CHAPTER OFFICERS

ALPHA
Inactive

PI

President—JANE C O R D I L L S N Y D E R , 1201 N . Dorgenois St., New Orleans.
Vice-president—SOLIDELI.E F E L I C I T E R E N S H A W , 741 Esplanade Ave., New

Orleans.
Treasurer—GRACE D I VAI, G I I . L E A N , 1625 2nd St., New Orleans.
Secretary—LESSIE H . MADISON, 1231 Washington Ave., New Orleans.
Corresponding Secretary—CLARA W E N D E L L H A L L , 1231 Washington Ave.,

New Orleans.
Registrar—ERIN O ' N I E L L , 1222 Calhoun St., New Orleans.
To D R A G M A Editor—SOLWELLE F. R E N S H A W .

NU

President—CECILE I S E L I N , 34 Halstead St., East Orange, N . J .

Vice-president—HELEN M . W I L L I A M S , 132 West 12th St., New Y o r k City.

Secretary—ELIZABETH J . MONROE, 144 West 104th St., New York City.

Treasurer—KATHERINE G R O L T , 860 Carroll St., Brooklyn, N . Y .

To DRAGMA Editor—MARY B . P E A K S , 244 Waverly PL, New York City.

OMICRON

President—MARY A N N I E L A N D Y , University o f Tennessee, Knoxville.

Vice-president—AUBRY F A U L K N E R , 1407 Fremont Place, Knoxville.

Secretary—ALICE C A L H O U N , University o f Tennessee, Knoxville.

Treasurer—WISTA B R A L Y , University o f Tennessee, Knoxville.

Registrar—ELIZABETH A Y R E S , University o f Tennessee, Knoxville.

T o D R A G M A Editor—MARY DORA H O U S T O N , University o f Tennessee,

Knoxville.

KAPPA

President—LVCY R. S O M E R Y I L L E , College Park, V a . R . M . W . C .
Vice-president—VIRGINIA A L L E N , College Park, Va. R . M . W . C .
Treasurer— R E B E C C A L A M A R , College Park, Va. R . M . W . C .
Corresponding Secretary—HELEN H A R D Y , College Park, V a . R . M . W . C .
Recording Secretary—LUCILE M A R S A L I S , College Park, V a . R . M . W . C .

TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI 273

ZETA

President—EDNA FROY D , 1232 R St., Lincoln, Neb.
Corresponding Secretary—HELEN W E H R L I , 1232 R St., Lincoln, Neb.
Recording Secretary—DORIS SCROGGINS, 1232 R St., Lincoln, Neb.
Registrar—CARRIE M A R S H A L L , 1232 R St., Lincoln, Neb.
Treasurer—MABEL SANDERS, 1232 R St., Lincoln, Neb.
To DRAGMA Editor—HELEN W E H R L I .

SIGMA

President—MAY P R E U S S , 2345 Channing W a y , Berkeley, Cal.
Vice-president—ROSALINDA O L C E S E , 2345 Channing W a y , Berkeley, Cal.
Corresponding Secretary—HELEN C L O W E S , 2345 Channing W a y , Berkeley, Cal.
Recording Secretary—ELLA CRAWFORD, 2345 Channing W a y , Berkeley.
Treasurer—EDNA T A B E R , 451 Hudson St., Oakland, Cal.
Business Manager—FRANCES C O R L E T T , 2345 Channing W a y , Berkeley.

THETA

President—OLIVE B R A I N , A 0 I I House, Greencastle, I n d .
Vice-president—GRACE ROBERTSON, A 0 I I House, Greencastle, I n d .
Corresponding Secretary—BEATRICE WOODWARD, A 0 I I House, Greencastle,

Ind.
Recording Secretary—MARGUERITE B E N N E T T , A 0 I I House, Greencastle, I n d .
Treasurer—GEORGIA G I L K E Y , A 0 LI House, Greencastle, I n d .
To DRAGMA Editor—EDNA M C C L U R E , A O I I House, Greencastle, I n d .

DELTA

President—RUTH B U R B A N K , Start House, T u f t s College, Mass.
Vice-president—LYDIA J . P I P E R , Start House, T u f t s College, Mass.
Corresponding Secretary—HELEN A . R O W E , 20 Vine St., Winchester, Mass.
Recording Secretary—MADELINE J E F F E R S , Metcalf H a l l , T u f t s College, Mass.
Treasurer—EMILIE P. OSBORN, Metcalf H a l l , T u f t s College, Mass.
Registrar—LYDIA J . P I P E R .

To DRAGMA Editor—DORRIS B. MORSE, Metcalf H a l l , T u f t s College, Mass.

GAMMA

President—SYBIL R U S S E L L , Orono, Maine.
Vice-president—DORIS C U R R I E R , M t . Vernon House, Orono, Maine.
Corresponding Secretary—ELIZABETH B R I G H T , M t . Vernon House, Orono,

Maine.

Treasurer—HELEN D A N F O R T H , M t . Vernon House, Orono, Maine.
Recording Secretary—ALFREDA E L L I S , N o r t h H a l l , Orono, Maine.
To DRAGMA Editor—LEOLA C H A P L A I N , Balentine H a l l , Orono, Maine.

EPSILON

President—BERTHA F . Y E R K E , Sage College, Ithaca, N . Y . Ithaca,
Vice-president—GLADYS K . C O M B S , Sage College, Ithaca, N . Y .
Corresponding Secretary—MARY A L B E R T S O N , Prudence Risley H a l l ,

N. Y .

Recording Secretary—KATHLEEN W . C O L P I T T S , Sage College, Ithaca, N . Y .
Treasurer—LUCY C. H A W L E Y , Prudence Risley H a l l , Ithaca, N . Y .
Registrar—SARAH L . C A M P B E L L , Sage College, Ithaca, N . Y .
To DRAGMA Editor—VIOLA B . D E N G L E R , Sage College, Ithaca, N . Y .

274 TO DRAG MA OF ALPHA 0MICRON PI

RHO

President—GERTRUDE N I Z Z E , W i l l a r d H a l l , Evanston, 111.

Vice-president—JEAN R I C H A R D S O N , 1217 Lee St., Evanston, 111.

Corresponding Secretary—ALICE K O L B , 5 5 6 A r l i n g t o n Place, Chicago, 111.

Recording Secretary—ALMA S E E G M I L L E R , Chapin H a l l , Evanston, 111.

Registrar—HAZEL C R A B I L L , W i l l a r d H a l l , Evanston, 111.

To D R A G M A Editor—LOUISE H O F F M A N , Pearsons H a l l , Evanston, 111.

LAMBDA

President—LUCILE C U R T I S , A 0 I I House, Stanford University, Cal.
Vice-president—ERNA T A Y L O R , A O I I House, Stanford University, Cal.
Corresponding Secretary—ALICE MOORE, A 0 LI House, Stanford University,

Cal.
Recording Secretary—MARIAN B O A L , A 0 I I House, Stanford University, Cal.
Treasurer—MURIEL T U R N E R , A 0 I I House, Stanford University, Cal.
T o D R A G M A Editor—CONSTANCE C H A N D L E R , A 0 I I House, Stanford Univer-

sity, Cal.

IOTA

President—ETHEL BROOKS, 712 W . Oregon St., Urbana, 111.
Vice-president—OPAL TROST, 511 W . H i g h St., Urbana, 111.
Corresponding Secretary—OPAL T R O S T .

Recording Secretary—NELLIE J A N E S , I O I I Oregon St., Urbana, 111.
Treasurer—MATE GIDDINGS, 210 E. John St., Champaign, 111.

To D R A G M A Editor—LEOTA M O S I E R , 908 W . I l l i n o i s St., Urbana, 111.

TAU

President—CECILE R . MORIARTV, 578 Winslow Ave., St. Paul, M i n n .

Vice-president—GERTRUDE F A L K E N H A G E N , 406 n t h Ave. S. E., Minneapolis,

Minn.

Corresponding Secretary—VIVIAN W A T S O N , 406 n t h Ave. S. E., Minneapolis,

Minn.

Recording Secretary—DOROTHY M C C A R T H Y , 3829 Pleasant Ave. S.,

Minneapolis, Minn.

Treasurer—HELEN M . P I E R C E , 800 5th Ave. S. E., Minneapolis, M i n n .

To D R A G M A Editor—ELSA H . S T E I N M E T Z , 406 n t h Ave. S. E., Minneapolis,
Minn.

CHI

President—EMILY T A R B E L L , 503 University Place, Syracuse, N . Y .

Vice-president—MEDA K A Y , 503 University Place, Syracuse, N . Y .

Corresponding Secretary—FRANCES C A R T E R , 503 University Place.

Recording Secretary—ALMA J O N E S , 503 University Place.

Treasurer—LILLIAN B A T T E N F E L D , 503 University Place.

Registrar—CLARA B E L L , 209 E l k St., Syracuse, N . Y .

T o D R A G M A Editor—EMILY TARBELL.

TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI

GENERAL DIRECTORY OF ALPHA OMICRON PI

*To DRAGMA subscribers

ALPHA

ADAMS, J E A N N E T E W I C K (Mrs. P e r r y ) , '04,
P. 286 F i f t h Ave., New York City.

A L L A N , A L I C E R U T H , '09,
P. 209 Midland Ave., Montclair, N . J.

ANDERSON, H E L E N B E A T R I C E , '05,
P. W . 151st St., New Y o r k City.

ARON, BEATRICE MARGUERITE, '09,
P. 154 Engle St., Englewood, N . J .

BECKER, E L S A GERTRUDE, '14,
P. 232 W . 137th St., New Y o r k City.

BLAISDELL, H E T T Y D E A N (Mrs. Ferren), '10,
P. Tellico Plains, Tenn.

BOLGER, J U L I A VIRGINIA, '14,
P. 1891 Madison Ave., New Y o r k City.

BRACKETT, MARY MORRELL, '99,
P. 604 W . 115th St., New York City.
T. Box 234, Covington, La.

BRODIE, E L E A N O R V A N COTT (Mrs. Orrin L . ) , '02,
P. 240 Fiske Ave., West New Brighton, S. I . , New York.

*BROWN, F A N N I B E L L E L E L A N D (Mrs. Oswald), '05,
P. Bryn Mawr, Washington.

• B U R C H E N A L , E M M A H O W E L L S , '07,
P. 2790 Broadway, New Y o r k City.

BURGESS, E S T H E R , '13,
P. 29 Boston Ave., W . M e d f o r d , Mass.

BURROWS, E D I T H M A Y , '08,
P. 25 Neperan Road, T a r r y t o w n , N . Y .

CAMPBELL, A N N A BOSS (Mrs. Clarence), '05,
P. W . 95th St., New York City.

COCHRAN, J E S S I E I S A B E L L E , '09,
P. 120 W . 12 th St., New Y o r k City.

CODDINGTON, E L I Z A B E T H CADMUS, '02,
P. Passaic, N . J.
T. c|o Ginn & Co., Publishers, 5th Ave., New York City.

•CONANT, BESSIE SCOTT (Mrs. Frederick B . ) , '05,
P. 282 Lafayette Ave., Passaic, N . J.

CURDY, A N N E H A L L (Mrs. Robert J.), '98,
P. 2544 Forest Ave., Kansas City, Mo.

DEARDEN, EDWINA MARY, '15,
P. 125 E. 91st St., New Y o r k City.

DE V I L L A L V I L L A , MARIA D I A Z , '13,
P- 536 W . 113th St., New Y o r k City.

• D I C K S O N , A G N E S L I L L I A N , '99,
P. 52 Summit Ave., Jersey City, N . J.

• D I E T Z , E D I T H AUGUSTA, '05,
P. 217 W . 105th St., New Y o r k City.

276 TO PRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI

DOODY, M A R I E C E C E L I A , '15,

P. 107 W . 82nd St., New Y o r k City.

DORRANCE, M A R Y MAXON (Mrs. Wayland C l a r k ) , '08

P. 2549 Decatur Ave., New Y o r k City.

DOWNES, H E L E N RUPERT, '14,

P. 526 Van Courtland Park Ave., Yonkers, N . Y .

D R E W , GEORGE MARY, '99,

P. 342 Gregory Ave., W . Orange, New Jersey.

D R U L E Y , EUGENIA C. L E E (Mrs. Waldo P.), spec,

P. 735 2nd St., Brewerton, Wash.

ELLYSON, H E L E N G L E N N (Mrs. ) , '04,

P. 33 Forest Ave., Atlanta, Ga.

F A R R E L L , G R A C E , '15,

P. 443 W . 42nd St., New Y o r k City.

F L E E R , FRIEDA, '15,

P. 301 W . Lincoln Ave., Mt. Vernon, N . Y .

• F R A M E , J E A N L o o m s (Mrs. James E . ) , '04,

P. 606 W . 122nd St., New Y o r k City.

G A R V I N , C E C I L I A SILLCOX (Mrs. W . C ) , '08,

P. c|o W a r d S, Manhattan State Hospital, New Y o r k City.

G E R A T Y , CONSTANCE M A R Y , '15

P. South Mountain Ave., Montclair, N . J.

• H A R R I S , SARAH E . L A Y (Mrs. J. A r t h u r ) '07,

P. Cold Spring Harbor, Long Island, N . Y.

H E N R Y , MARGARET E L L I M A N , ( M r s . James B.) '02,

P. 240 Prince George St., Annapolis, M d .

• H O L D E N , E L E A N O R SANFORD, '06,

P. Madison, N . J.

• H U G H A N , J E S S I E W A L L A C E , '98,

P. 61 Quincy St., Brooklyn, N . Y .

HULBERT, E D Y T H E JOSEPHINE, grad.,

P. 64 W . 68th St., New Y o r k City.

H U N L E Y , E T H E L VIRGINIA, '15,

P. 526 173rd St., New Y o r k City.

• H U R T Y , K A T H L E E N E L I Z A B E T H , '07,

P. 608 E . 17th St., New York City.

JACQUES, MARY VOORIIEES, 'IO,

P. 44 Morningside Ave., West, New York City.

JONES, E L I Z A B E T H T . , '12,

P. 1 Midland Ave., White Plains, New York.

JONES, JENNIS PRESTON (Mrs. Benjamin F.), '01,

P. 151 I r v i n g Ave., South Orange, N . J.

J O H N S O N , L U C E T T A P I T N E Y , '07,

P. Morristown, N . J.
T . 419 W . 118th St., New York City.

JORDAN, A N N A , '15,

P. 126 W . 102nd St., New Y o r k City.

K U T N E R , MARGARET, '12,

P. Berlin W., Nassanischestr 21, Germany.

LAWRENCB, R U T H EARLD (Mrs. Richard W . ) , '02,

P. 2519 Sedgwick Ave., University Heights, New York City.

TO DRAG MA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI 277

MACDONALD, E V E L Y N B L U N T , '08,

P . 417 Riverside Drive, New York City.

MARRIOTT, ELIZABETH ROBINSON (Mrs. William McKim),o8,

P . 104 W . 84th St., New Y o r k City.
T. Washington University, St. Louis, Mo., c|o Professor Robinson.

M A R C H , E D I T H F E T T R E C H (Mrs. H i r a m S.), '05,

p . 31 Bartlett Ave., Arlington, Mass.

MORRISON, E L I N O R N E U ( M r s . James A . ) , '12,

P . 137 Lynch St., Brooklyn, New Y o r k .

• M U L L A N , H E L E N S T . C L A I R ( M r s . George V . ) , '98,

P 2215 Andrews Ave., University Heights, New Y o r k City.
T . 118 W . 183rd St., New Y o r k City.

M U Z Z Y , M A R T H A MOORE ( M r s . Samuel), '02, deceased.

N E L S O N , B E S S I E S W A N (Mrs. A r t h u r M . ) , '04,

P . 340 Langdon Ave., M t . Vernon, New Y o r k .

BERRY, L I L L I A N HOWARD (Mrs. Francis T . ) , '06,

P . 93 St. Mark's Place, New Brighton, S. I . , N . Y .

• P E R R Y , S T E L L A S T E K N (Mrs. George H o u g h ) , '98,

P . 2243 Green St., San Francisco, Calif.

P E T R I , L U D I E A N N A , '14,

P . 278 Decatur St., Brooklyn, N . Y .

PICABIA, M A R I E M A R R I N , (Mrs. Lorenzo), '07,

P . 306 W. 91st St., New York City.

P I T N E Y , E L I Z A B E T H C H A D W E L L (Mrs. Frederick V . ) , '07,

P. Morristown, N . J.

P O L L A K , WlLMA VERA, '02,

P . 1730 Broadway, New Y o r k City.

• P R A T T , J O S E P H I N E SOUTHWORTH, '07,

P . 64 Mahlstradt Place, New Rochelle, N . Y .

RAGAN, MILDRED SCHLESSINGER (Mrs. Carroll), '09,

P- 373 S. Broadway, Yonkers, N . Y.

RICHARDSON, ADELAIDE A G N E S , '09,

P . 839 Jennings St., New Y o r k City.

RITCH, BEATRICE, 'IO,

P. Pittsfield, Mass.

ROBINSON, A N N A K A T H L E E N , '14,

P . Sea Cliff, L . I .

R O C K W E L L , E T H E L H U G H A N (Mrs. Frederick Frye), '04,

P. Putnam, Conn., R. F. D . No. 2.

R U S K , H E S T E R M . , '12,

P . 310 S. n t h St., St. Joseph, Mo.

R U S H , L O U I S E , ' I I , deceased.

•SANVILLE, FLORENCE LUCAS, 'OI,

P . 419 S . Broad St., Philadelphia, Pa.

•SCHOEDLER, LILLIAN, ' I I ,

P. 240 Purdy St., Steenway, S. I . , N . Y .
T . 249 W. 107th St., New York City.

SCHRAMM, E T H E L B E L L , '07,

P . 430 East Broad St., Westfield, N . J.

SERCOMB, MARGARET G R A C E , '05,

P. 778 Stowell Ave., Milwaukee, Wis.

278 TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI

• S H I P M A N , H E L E N BRIGGS, '14,

P. Hotel Glencairn, 9th and Spring Sts., Seattle, Wash.
T. Palo Alto, Calif.

•SILLCOX, LOUISE MILDRED, ' I I ,

P. 610 West 139th St., New York City.

S M I T H , J O S E P H I N E P R A H L ( M r s . Chas. Thompson), '08,

P. Laneville, W . Va.

S U M N E R , MARGARET C L A R K ( M r s . Francis B . ) , '02,

P. 3736 Hillegass Ave., Berkeley, Calif.

• S W E E N E Y , LORA ROSE, spec,

P. 333 Park Ave., Paterson, N . J .

THOMPSON, A L I C E S M I T H ( M r s . W m . S.), '05,

P. 230 Parker Ave., Buffalo, N . Y .

• T H O R P , A N N A FRANCES M U R I E L , '05,

P. 459 Ellison St., Paterson, N . J.

*TOMS, E L I Z A B E T H IVERSON, '06,

P. 18 W . 128th St., N e w Y o r k City.

• T U R C K , VIOLA, '13,

P. 460 Riverside Drive, New York City.

* V A N H O R N E , K A T H E R I N E , '00,

P. 50 Maple Ave., Morristown, N . J .
T. Ely Court, Greenwich, Conn.

W A T K I N S , J U L I A COOPER, '00,

P. 11 James St., Montclair, N . J .

W A Y T , H A Z E L I R E N E , '10,

P. 161 F r a n k l i n St., Astoria, L . I . , N . Y .

W I L S O N , H E L E N V A N DUERSEN ( M r s . David Wilson), '04,

P. 48 Church St., Amsterdam, N . Y .

W Y L I E , J E N N I E D W I G H T , '09,

P. 10 W . 96th St., New Y o r k City.

W Y M A N , E L I Z A B E T H HEYWOOD, '98,

P. 456 Broad St., Bloomfield, N . J.

Y A T E S , MARGARET H A L L , '08,

P. 611 West 112th St., New York City.

PI

BANCROFT, A N N A D E K I E , '15,

P. 109 Hobson Ave., H o t Springs, A r k .

BEARD, HAZELLE, 'I6,

P. 102 E . Henry St., Savannah, Ga.
T. 1231 Washington Ave., New Orleans, L a .

BRES, SARAH, '16,

P. 630 Pine St., New Orleans, La.

• C A F F E R Y , MARY T. FRERE (Mrs. John M . ) , '11,

P. Franklin, La.

C A R R I E S , J U L I A B Y R N E ( M r s . J o h n ) , '07,

P. Guijillo, Honduras.
CARTER, ALICE SANDIDGE (Mrs. Thomas Carter), grad.,

P. 108 Wesley H a l l , Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn.

TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI

CARTER, H E L E N G U R L E Y (Mrs. Charles C ) , '07,

P. Hammond, La.

CHAPMAN, LILLIAN, 'I6,

P. Bay, St. Louis, Miss.
T . 4621 Prytanea St., New Orleans, L a .

CONNERY, E V A H O W E ( M r s . Jos.), '04,

P. 8313 Pritchard Place, New Orleans, L a .

COOK, CAROLINE G U Y O L ( M r s . Abner H . ) , '09,

P. 134 Cedar St., H o t Springs, A r k .

Cox, E L I Z A B E T H B. L Y O N ( M r s . W . E . ) , '07,

P. R. F . D . No. 1, Columbus, Miss.

DAVIS, LEONORA L E W I S (Mrs. Cary N . ) , '04,

P. Huntington, W . Va.

DAVIS, MARGUERITE SAUNDERS (Mrs. Eugene), '07,

P. Charleston, W . Va.

" DEMAREST, CORA SPEARING ( M r s . Frank E d w a r d ) , '12,

P. 1452 Calhoun St., New Orleans, L a .

DUFOUR, ROSALIE E L I Z A B E T H , '15,

P. 1663 Valmount St., New Orleans, L a .

• D U P R E , BETSY, '13,

P. Opelousas, L a .
T . A p t . 202-1762 M St., N . W . , Washington, D . C.

DUPRE, E D I T H G A R L A N D , '00,

P. Opelousas, L a .
T . Louisiana Industrial Institute, Lafayette, La.

• D U P R E , MARY L I L Y B E L , '07,

P. Opelousas, L a .
T . c|o Mrs. O. McNees, Baton Rouge, L a .

E U S T I S , N E L L BRES, ( M r s . Ernest L . ) , '07,

P. 7400 Pearl St., New Orleans, L a .

FAIRCHILD, L I L Y MYSING ( M r s . Edmund Harrington), '08,

P. 17 Rosa Park, New Orleans, L a .

FORTIER, L I L L I A N , '17,

P. 1735 M i l a n St., New Orleans.

• F O U L E S , MARGARET DUNBAR, '14,

P. Greenville, Miss.
T . 1231 Washington Ave., New Orleans, L a .

F R E R E T , E M I L Y MARY, '10,

P. 611 Carrolltcn Ave., New Orleans, L a .

FRIERSON, L U C I A DAVIDSON, '08,

P. 101 S. Main St., Columbia, Tenn.

• C A C H E T , R O C H E L L E RODD, '09,

P. 1640 Arabella St., New Orleans, L a .

GARLAND, RIETTA G L A S S E L L , '17,

P. 1039 Arabella St., New Orleans, L a .

G I L L E A N , GEORGIA ISABEL, '14,

P. 1625 2nd St., New Orleans, L a .

G I L L E A N , G R A C E D U V A L , '16,

P. 1625 2nd St., New Orleans, L a .

G I L L E A N , S U E K A T H E R I N E , '03,

P. 1625 2nd St., New Orleans, L a .

280 TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI

G I M P E R . AI.MA W I L S O N (Mrs. Earle H . ) , 'oo,

P. 323 W . 9th St., Corona, Calif.

H A L L , CLARA W E N D E L , '16,

P. Executive Mansion, Baton Rouge, La.
T . 1231 Washington Ave., New Orleans, L a .

HARDIE, FLORA SANDERS, (Mrs. Eben) '05,

P. 815 Pine St., New Orleans, L a .

H I L L , J E A N , '17,

P. 1418 Jena St., New Orleans, La.

H I L L , ROSAMOND AGNES, '14,

P. 1418 Jena St., New Orleans, L a .

H I M E L , L A U R A O ' N E I L L ( M r s . Rene V . ) , '02,

P. Franklin, La.

* I V Y , A L I C E P A L F R E Y , '03,

P. 1556 Calhoun St., New Orleans, La.

K I N G , J O S E P H I N E C R I P P E N (Mrs. Stanhope H . ) , '02,

P. 1514 Fern St., New Orleans, L a .

L E B R E T O N , DAGMAR R E N S H A W (Mrs. Edmund J.), '12,

P. 741 Esplanade Ave., New Orleans, L a .

MADISON, L E S S I E H E N R I E T T A , '17,

P. Bastrop, La.
T . 1231 Washington Ave., New Orleans, L a .

* M A N Y , A N N A E S T E L L E , '07,

P. 1325 Henry Clay Ave., New Orleans, L a .

M C L E E S , A N G I E LOUISE, '14,

P. Orangeburg, S. C.
T . 1912 State St., New Orleans, La.

M C L E L L A N , M A R I E E. BRES (Mrs. Chas.), '06,

P. 1934 M i l a n St., New Orleans, L a .

M C N E E S , C L E V E L A N D D U P R E (Mrs. Oswald), '04,

P. Baton Rouge, La.

M E N I S E , MARY Y O U N G (Mrs. John), '00,

P. 3418 Serento St., Meridian, Miss.

MOISE, Io BRES (Mrs. Harold A . ) , '00,

P. Birch St., New Orleans, La.

•MORRIS, INNES, 'IO,

P. 1318 Nashville Ave., New Orleans, L a .

N E W M A N , M A T T I E A Y R E S (Mrs. John W i n . ) , '04,

P. Little Rock, A r k .

NORMAN, MARY MARGUERITE, '06,

P. Pass Christian, Miss.

O ' N I E L L , E R I N , '16,

P. Franklin, La,
T . 1229 Calhoun St., New Orleans.

O ' N I E L L , K A T H L E E N , '17,

P. 1229 Calhoun St., New Orleans.

P A R K E R S O N , M A Y S T E R L I N G , '03, deceased.
PATTON, B E T H A E S T E L L E MEADER (Mrs. A v e r y ) , '99,

P. Greenville, S. C.

•PEARCE, MARY, 'IO,

P. Sarasota, Florida.

TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI

RAND, E L L E N W H I T E (Mrs. Paul King), '11,

p. Madison, Wisconsin.

RAYMOND, MARY, '17,

P. 1324 Nashville Ave., New Orleans, L a .

R E E D , K A T H E R I N E MARGUERITE, '00,

P. 4423 Pitt St., New Orleans.
T . Coker College, Hartsville, S. C .

RENSHAW, GLADYS A N N E , '14,

p . 741 Esplanade Ave., New Orleans.

RFNSHAW, MILDRED, '17,

p . 741 Esplanade Ave., New Orleans, La,

RENSHAW, SOLIDELI.E F E L I C I T E , '16,

P. 741 Esplanade Ave., New Orleans, L a .

•SAFFORD, DOROTHY NOBLE, 'IO,

P. 1306 Webster St., New Orleans, La.

SINCLAIR, MARY COLCOCK (Mrs. Frederick W . ) , '02,

P . Short and Burthe Sts., New Orleans, La.

SNYDER, CLARA L E E , '17,

P. Norwood, La.
T . 1201 N . Dorgenois St., New Orleans, L a .

SNYDER, J E N N I E C O R D H I L L , '16,

P. Norwood, La.
T . 1201 N . Dorgenois St., New Orleans, L a .

SOUTHERLAND, JOSIE H A N D Y (Mrs. W m . S.), '07,

P . 644 Sinclair St., Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

STANTON, L I L L I A N J U N G (Mrs. Gideon), '08,

P . 1409 Louisiana Ave., New Orleans, L a .

SUMNER, MARY CLAYTON, '17,

P . 571 Audubon St., New Orleans, L a .

• S U M N E R , THEODORA D U V A L , '14,

P . 571 Audubon St., New Orleans, L a .
T . A l l Saints College, Vicksburg, Miss.

TOBIN, E L I S K A PROVOSTY (Mrs. John F.), '05,

P . 2522 Esplanade Ave., New Orleans, L a .

W A L K E R , ANDREE J . PROVOSTY (Mrs. Clifton P . ) , '06,

P. Chicago, Illinois.

WATERMAN,, MILDRED NORTON ( M r s . George A . ) , '05,

P . Pensacola, Fla.

W H A L E Y , E D N A R E A D (Mrs. Marcellus S.), '03,

P. College Place, Columbia, S. C.

• W H I T E , W I L L I E W Y N N , '14,

P. Alexandria, La.
T . 1231 Washington Ave., New Orleans, L a .

• W H I T T I N G T O N , MARY T H O M A S ( M r s . George Purnell), '11,

P. Alexandria, La.

W I N N , A D E L E MERCIER (Mrs. Wm. W . ) , '02,

P. San Rafael, Calif.

• W I T H E R S , VIRGINIA R E E S E , '09,

P. Greensboro, Ala.
T . A . G. I . S. Montevallo, A l a .

WOOD, MARGUERITE COPE (Mrs. Burris), '12,

P. 360 Broadway, New Orleans, La.

282 T0 PRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI

NU

A R N O L D , B L A N C H E H A M M E T , deceased.
ARTHUR, HELEN VAN TYCH, 'OI,

P. 220 Broadway, New York City.

• A S H L E Y , J E S S I E , '02,

P. Hotel Earl, New York City.

B A K E K , THEODORE VV. ( M r s . Frank C ) , '08,

P. 480 East 19th St., Brooklyn, N . Y .

BENEDICT, C A T H E R I N E CRYSTAL EASTMAN ( M r s . Wallace), '07,

P. 235 Lyon St., Milwaukee, W i s .

BOOTH, LAURA, '04,

P. 160 Waverly Place, New York City.

BRUNINO, FLORENCE E D I T H , '07,

P. 1925 Seventh Ave., New Y o r k City.

• B R Y A N T , F L O R E N C E BOYCE ( M r s . Frederick N . ) , '05,

P. 122 F r a n k l i n St., Malone, N . Y .

BURD, ADEI.MA H E L E N E , '03,

P. 37 Cedar St., New York City.

BURNET, MARGARET MAY, 'OI,

P. 120 West 57th St., New Y o r k City.
T . 2 Rector St., New York City.

BYRNS, ELINOR, spec,

P. 27 Cedar St., New York City.

CASSASA, IDA, '10,

P. 419 West 147th St., New York City.

• C H A P M A N , E D I T H , '12,

P. 37 Clinton Ave., Jamaica, L . I . , N . Y .

•CLARK, ALICE L. 'II,

P. Chester, Conn.
T . 210 West 21st St., New Y o r k City.

C O R N I S H , R U B Y NORTON ( M r s . Reynelle G. E . ) , '10,

P. 89 North 18th St., Portland, Oregon.

C O T H R E N , MARION BENEDICT ( M r s . Frank H . ) , spec,

P. 173 S. O x f o r d St., Brooklyn, N . Y .

D I L L I N G H A M , A L I C E , '05,

P. 117 West 58th St., New York City.

D O T Y , MADELINE ZABRISKIE, '02,

P. 21 West 8th St., New York City.
Du Bois, ALISON G. '17,

P. 14 Waiden PI., Montclair, N . J .
T . 83 Washington PI., New York City.

EARP, E M M A M I L L E R ( M r s . W . F . ) , '07,

P. 67 Riverside Drive, New York City.

EASTMAN, IDA R A N K ( M r s . M a x ) , '02,

P. 39J/2 Washington Square, New Y o r k City.

• F U L L E R , FLORA TODD ( M r s . Bert C ) , '03,

P. 380 Lewis Ave., Brooklyn, N . Y .

• C A N S , DAISY, '04,

P. 497 Halsey St., Brooklyn, N . Y .

TO PRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI

GARLAND, O L I V E ROSAMOND, '02,

P . 220 Broadway, New Y o r k City.

G R E E L E Y , H E L E N H O Y ( M r s . Harold D . ) , '03,

P . 17 West 8th St., New York City.

GROUT, K A T H E R I N E , '17,

P . 860 Carrol St., Brooklyn, N . Y .

HASCALL, F L O R E N C E K I N G , '02,

P . 120 East 31st St., New York City.

HERZOG, SADIE R O T H S C H I L D ( M r s . Samuel A . ) , '04,

P . 71 East 87th St., New Y o r k City.

HOAG, F L O R E N C E GRANDON, '17,

P . 625 West 156th St., New Y o r k City.

HUMIDSON, MARY G R A C E ( M r s . H o w a r d ) , '03,

P . 159 West 88th St., New Y o r k City.

I S E L I N , C E C I L E , '16,

P. 34 Halsted St., East Orange, N . J .

IVES, E D I T H PRESCOTT ( M r s . Frederick A . ) , '05,

P . 15 West 123rd St., New Y o r k City.

JACKSON, A L I C E D A Y ( M r s . Percy), '04,

P . 61 East 52nd St., New York City.

K E N YON, DOROTHY, '17,

P. 321 West 82nd St., New York City.

MARSHALL, FRANCIS WORSTELL (Mrs. Clifton G . ) , grad.,

P . 155 West 58th St., New York City.
T . 33 East 17th St., New York City. (The Century Co.)

M C K E E N H E L E N JOSEPHINE, '05,

P. 5 Montague Terrace, Brooklyn, N . Y .

MOLLENHAUR, VIRGINIA M A Y , '12,

P . 2178 Grand Ave., University Heights, New Y o r k City.

MONROE, E L I Z A B E T H J A N E , '15,

P . 144 West 104th St., New Y o r k City.

•Moss, E L I Z A B E T H JACKSON, '05,

P . 23 East 127th St., New York City.

MYRES, PRISCILLA NOEL, '09,

P . 840 Riverside Drive, New York City.

NOTMANN, W I N I F R E D , '16,

P . 136 Joralemon St., Brooklyn, N . Y .

P E A K S , MARY BRADFORD, '17,

P . 244 Waverly PI., New York City.

POPE, E L I Z A B E T H SOPHIA, '06,

P . 27 Cedar St., New York City.

POTTER, H E L E N , '08,

P . 855 West E n d Ave., New York City.

POTTER, MARY GROSVENOR, '07,

P . 39 West 60th St., New York City.

QUIMBY, ALDANA R I P L E Y , '15,

P . 278 West 86th St., New Y o r k City.

R A D T K E , E V E P A U L I N E , '07,

P . 223 East 17th St., New York City.
T . Englishtown, New Jersey.

284 TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI

RANLETT, HELEN A.

P. 106 East 52nd St., New Y o r k City.

R E M B A U G H . B E R T H A , '04,

P. 107 Waverly PI., New Y o r k City.

R I C E , MRS. FRANCES MARTIN, grad.,

P. 515 Macon St., Brooklyn, N . Y .

• S I L B E R H O R N , ROSINA JOSEPHINE, '07,

P. 89 Midland Ave., Montclair, N . J.

S H E I L , C E C E L I A MALLORY ( M r s . Peter A . ) , '10,

P . 3300 Olinville Ave., Williams Bridge, N . Y .

SMART, E L I Z A B E T H A L L E N , '13,

P. Cambridge, N . Y .
T. 29 East n t h St., New Y o r k City.

STARK, NORA I R E N E , '15,

P. Lynbrook, Long Island, N . Y .

STEPHENS, E M M A CALHOUN ( M r s . W . C ) , '07,

P . 576 St. Nicholas Ave., New York City.

T O M P K I N S , J E A N B U R N E T T ( M r s . Leslie J a y ) , '11,

P. I West 68th St., New York City. c|o Woman's University Ciub.

T O W L E , MARY R., '10,

P. 107 Waverly Place, New Y o r k City.

V A N DE W A T E R , DOROTHY AGNES, '12,

P. Cedarhurst, Long Island, N . Y .

V O L L M E R , H E L E N GERTRUDE, '15,

P. 877 Ocean Ave., Brooklyn, N . Y .

W I L L I A M S , H E L E N S M I T H ( M r s . W m . K . ) , '15,

P. 29 East n t h St., New Y o r k City.
T . 70 F i f t h Ave., New Y o r k City.

W I T T E , M A B E L E L V A , '10,

P. 375 Fulton St., Brooklyn, N . Y .

•WOODLETON, G R A C E A., '10,

P. Box 49, Elkins Park, Va.

OMICRON

*ARMSTRONG, N E T T I E B E L L E , spec,

P. Rogerville, Tenn.
T. Johnson City, Tenn.

A Y R E S , E L I Z A B E T H COOKE, spec,

P. University Campus, Knoxville, Tenn.

B A N K S , H O L M E S S M I T H ( M r s . E. L . ) , '07,

P. 4521 Columbia Ave., Dallas, Texas.

BERGHAUSER, A L E C Y P O W E L L ( M r s . Albert Garton), '02,

P. Greenville, S. C.

• B I C K L E Y , L U C R E T I A JORDAN ( M r s . W m . Elbert), '08,

P. The Marion, Laurel Ave., Knoxville, Tenn.

BONDURANT, N E L L E L O U I S E , '14,

P. Hickman, K y .
T . 1007 Market St., Greensboro, N . C.

B R A L Y , W I S T A , '17,

P. Lewisburg, Tenn.
T . Barbara Blount H a l l , University o f Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn.

TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI 285

BUCHANAN, LOIS WAGGONER ( M r s . Sumner), '05,

p. Fayetteville, Tenn.

BUCHANAN, MARY H A R T , '10,

p. Granada, Miss.

B U S H N E L L , N I N A G O O K I N ( M r s . Charles L . ) , '03,

p. 414 N . E l m St., Greensboro, N . C.

CALDWELL, H A R R I E T MOORE, '07,

P. 410 West Main Ave., Knoxville, Tenn.

CALDWELL, K A T H E R I N E , '07,

P . 410 West Main Ave., Knoxville, Tenn.

CALHOUN, A L K . E LAVVSON, '17,

P. Franklin Road, Nashville, Tenn.
T. University o f Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn.

CAULKINS, E D I T H , '08,

P . 503 W . Vine Ave., Knoxville, Tenn.

CAULKINS, F A N N I E L E E , '04,

P. 436 McCallie Ave., Chattanooga, Tenn.

CONOVER, MARGARET, '16,

P . 1679 Danbridge Pike, Knoxville, Tenn.

CONVERSE, E L L E N CRESSWELL, '15,

P. Ridgedale Station, Chattanooga, Tenn.

CROMER, JESS EDMUNDS ( M r s . Paul), spec,

P. 1134 21st St., Des Moines, l a .

DOUTHAT, K A T H L E E N MAVOURNEEN, '07,

P. Fayetteville, Tenn.
T. Lewisburg, Tenn.

FAULKNER, AUBREY, '16,

P . 1407 Fremont Place, Knoxville, Tenn.

GIBSON, A N N A W I L L I A M S O N , '07,

P . Corner 7th and Chestnut Sts., Chattanooga, Tenn.

GREEVE, HARRIET CONE, '06,

P . 523 West 121st St., New Y o r k City.

HARRIS, S A L L I E W . F R A N C E S ( M r s . E d w a r d ) , '05,

P. Fayetteville, Tenn.

HARRISON, K A T H E . U . V E G R E S H A M ( M r s . Raymond B . ) , '07,

P. Knoxville, Tenn.

H A Y E S , A L I C E NEWTON, '14,

P . Bradford St., Nashville, Tenn.

HERBST, BERNICE TAYLOR ( M r s . Albert), spec,

P. San Benito, Texas.

HOBSON, P A U L I N E , '16,

P. Somerville, Tenn.
T. Barbara Blount H a l l , University o f Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn.

HOUSTON, MARY DORA, '18,

P . 2807 Belmont Blvd., Nashville, Tenn.
T. University o f Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn.

H U N T , E M M A A L B E R S ( M r s . James O'Connor), '05,

P . 709 W . Cumberland Ave., Knoxville, Tenn.

H U N T , M I N N E L O I S , '12,

P . 509 E . H i l l Ave., Knoxville, Tenn.

286 TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI

J A R N I G A N , DOROTHY G R E V E ( M r s . M i l t o n ) , '05,

P. University of Georgia, Athens, Ga.

JONES, M A R T H A L O U , '15,

P. Bailey, Tenn.

K E N N E D Y , H E L E N , spec,

P. 728 N . Central Ave., Knoxville, Tenn.

L A N D Y , MARY A N N I E , '16,

P. Louisburg, Tenn.
T . University o f Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn.

M A Y O , J A N I E , '08, deceased.
MAYO, L A U R A S W I F T , '09,

P. 721 Eleanor St., K n o x v i l l e , Tenn.

MCCARGO, E L I Z A B E T H , spec,

P. M t . Airy, N . C.
T. Warrensburg, Tenn.

M C D A N I E L , W A L L A C E S M I T H ( M r s . Chas. Thomas), '07,

P. 109 N . 10th St., Poplar B l u f f , M o .

M C F A R L A N D , J E S S I E S U E , '13,

P. Cor. 4th and Frazee Sts., Knoxville, Tenn.
T. Lynville, Tenn.

* M E T C A L F , F E L I C I A L E I G H , '09,

P. Fayetteville, Tenn.

N O L A N , DOROTHY M A R Y , '18,

P. 396 South Avery Place, Memphis, Tenn.
T. University o f Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn.

OWENSBY, Q U E E N I E M C C O N N E L L ( M r s . W i l b u r S.), '07,

P. 1418 Van Ness Ave., Los Angeles, Cal.

P E A S E , MARJORIE H E W I T T , '12,

P. Poplar Bluff, Mo.

PEAVY, MARY J A N E , spec,

P. 1520 Austin Ave., Brown wood, Texas.

P E E T , A I L C Y K Y L E ( M r s . Albert Stanton), '10,

P. Boston, Mass.
T . 1617 H i g h l a n d Ave., Knoxville, Tenn.

P O W E L L , MARY Q U E E N . '13,

P. 558 Oak St., Chattanooga, Tenn.

R A N K I N , J E S S I E S W A N ( M r s . L a m a r ) , '06,

P. Jefferson City, Tenn.

ROGERS, MARGARET E L I Z A B E T H , '18,

P. Buford, Tenn.
T. University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn.

R U S T , MARY, '14,

P. Wolfville, Nova Scotia, c|o Acadia Seminary.

S T O K E L E Y , A N N A M A Y , '06,

P. Newport, Tenn.

S W I F T , BLOSSOM I R E N E , '14,

P. Palestine, Texas.

T A R P L E Y , R U T H , spec,

P. 1017 V i l l a Place, Nashville, Tenn.
T . University o f Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn.

TO DRAGMA OF ALPHA OMICRON PI

TERRY, E T H E L , '17.

P 1344 Jackson Ave., Memphis, Tenn.
T Barbara Blount H a l l , University o f Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn.

* T 0 M P K I N S , M Y R T L E C U N N I N G H A M ( M r s . George W y t h e ) , '10,

p. Toms Creek, Va.

VERRAN, E D I T H B E N N E T T , '15, Tenn.

p. Rockwood, Tenn.
T . 1800 Oak St., Chattanooga,

WAGGONER, LAURA MOORE, '08,

p. Fayetteville, Tenn.

W E L L A , L I L L I A N K A T H A R I N E , '08,

P . 203 H i g h St., Chattanooga, Tenn.

• W I L E Y , LOUISE M A N N I N G , '13,

p. 922 N i n t h St., Knoxville, Tenn.

W I L K E Y K A T H R Y N , '17,

P . 456 Vine St., Chattanooga, Tenn.
T. Barbara Blount H a l l , University o f Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn.

WILLIAMS, HARRIETTE A I K E N , '12,

p. Faust Addition, Chattanooga, Tenn.

• W I L L I A M S , ROBERTA BRIGHT, '08,

P. Faust Addition, Chattanooga, Tenn.

KAPPA

ADAMS, IONE M A T H I S ( M r s . A l f r e d A . ) , spec,

P. 1210 Madison Ave., Memphis, Tenn.

* A L L E N , FRANCES MAURICE, '13,

P. 1012 Federal St., Lynchburg, V a .

A L I E N , VIRGINIA A R C H E R , '16,

I J*. 1012 Federal St., Lynchburg, V a .

ARGUE, L A U R A , '13,

P. Woodville, Miss.
T. Stevens College, Columbia, Mo.

•ATKINSON, A N N A F I E L D , '13,

P. Champ, V a .

ATKINSON, MARGARET BOLLING, '16,

P. Champ, Va.
T. R.M.W.C., College Park, Va.

• B A S K E R V I L L E , MARGARET L U O I S , '08,

P. Mason, Tenn.
T . c|o I . I . & C , Columbus, M o .

•BASKERVILLE, MARY H U R T ( M r s . George), '09,

P. 1616 10th Ave., South Birmingham, A l a .

BERRY, CLARICE W A T K I N S ( M r s . Lyman F . Berry), '09,

P. Avenue G and 30th St., Birmingham, A l a .

BOWMAN, G E N E V I E V E , '15,

P. Hillsboro, Texas.

*BRAME, L I D A B E L L , '14,

P. N . State St., Jackson, Miss.

BRADS HAW, B L A N C H E L A RACY, '06,

P. 222 S. Main St., H i g h Point, N . C.


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