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Published by Duke Pratt School of Engineering, 2018-03-09 16:38:02

Duke Engineering: Inspiring Engineers

Learn more about Duke Engineering's signature undergraduate experience to cultivate confident creators at pratt.duke.edu/inspired.

ENGINEERS
DUKE'S SIGNATURE UNDERGRADUATE EXPERIENCE TO CULTIVATE CONFIDENT CREATORS


INSPIRING ENGINEERS
More than ever, the world needs leaders who understand how to develop and deploy solutions to the many complex challenges facing us on global and local scales.
At Duke Engineering, we are answering this call by embarking on an ambitious initiative to transform our undergraduate curriculum—and our students’ experience.
We are crafting a unique educational experience
that immerses Duke Engineering students in hands- on design, data, computing, research and entrepreneurship experiences from the very beginning. While traditional curricula often don’t get around to applied engineering until undergraduates’ nal years, Duke students will have the opportunity to
We see these qualities as the hallmarks of a Duke Engineer—complementing the strong interdisciplinary research engagement and educational breadth that Duke University is known for, and preparing our students for high-potential paths in industry, academia, entrepreneurship and public service.
I’m pleased to share more about our vision for “Inspiring Engineers” through this signature undergraduate experience in the pages that follow.
Ravi V. Bellamkonda Vinik Dean of Engineering Duke University
What does tomorrow’s engineer need to know? What strengths will shape the future?
work in teams on real projects with real clients
throughout their engineering education.
Engineering is exciting—and we believe giving students the experience of how engineers can make a difference will not only give them a sense of purpose and motivation to pursue this challenging path, but ultimately help them gain the most-needed and sought- after abilities for an engineer in these times:
• Ability to generate creative solutions to complex, open-ended problems
• Rigorous research, analytical, quantitative and critical-thinking skills
• Comfort with design, data and computational tools
• Experience working in diverse teams
• Excellent communication skills
• Entrepreneurial con dence
2 PRATT.DUKE.EDU
A rst-year student shows Dean Bellamkonda his team’s prototype in the new Duke Engineering Design Pod (p.6).


At Duke Engineering, we’re thinking hard about these questions, and preparing creative engineers who are inspired & equipped to solve complex societal problems.
4
inspiring engineers
14
8
10
12
6
real-world design
data & decision sciences
computational thinking
mentored research
entrepreneurial con dence
INSPIRING ENGINEERS 3


INSPIRING ENGINEERS
FOUNDATIONAL
EXPERIENCES
Innovative core courses and extensive co-curricular opportunities
• Engineering Design
• Data & Decision Sciences
• Computational Thinking
• Mentored Research
• Entrepreneurship
DISCIPLINARY
DEPTH
Intensive majors, plus extensive opportunities for double-majors, minors and certi cates across Duke
• Biomedical Engineering
• Civil Engineering
• Environmental Engineering
• Electrical & Computer Engineering
• Mechanical Engineering
• Energy Engineering (minor)
 OUR STUDENTS 1,240 undergraduates
33% female (national average: 22%)
More than 75% participate in industry internships in the U.S. or abroad
35% study abroad
25% participate in service-learning
experiences
Most Duke Engineering graduates enter the workforce directly after graduation, while 20% start graduate
or professional school
Nearly 70% conduct independent research
1 in 5 publish or present research off-campus


The Signature Duke Engineering Undergraduate Experience
CONNECTED
COMMUNITY
Engagement and support that opens doors and minds
• Personal faculty advisors
• Supportive, committed peers
• Engaged alumni network
• Extensive industry partnerships
• Internship and career services
• Global connections (study abroad, service-learning opportunities)
 TRANSFORMATIVE NEW SPACE FOR ENGINEERING EDUCATION
Duke Engineering’s undergraduate education space will soon increase by nearly 50 percent, thanks to a new $115 million, 150,000-square-foot building opening in late 2020. Two full oors will support our vision for undergraduate ed- ucation focused on real-world, team-based, creative problem-solving, with some 35,000 square feet devoted to active-learning classrooms and design spaces; specialized educational centers focused on entrepreneurship and ener- gy, engineering and environment; and a 2,000-square-foot Learning Commons dedicated to nurturing teaching excellence and the student experience.
5
CONFIDENT CREATORS
With signature strengths to maximize impact in academia, industry, public service and policy
• Ability to generate creative solutions to complex, open-ended problems
• Rigorous research, analytical, quantitative and critical-thinking skills
• Comfort with design, data and computational tools
• Experience working in diverse teams
• Excellent communication skills
• Entrepreneurial con dence


REAL-WORLD
An innovative course gives rst-year students early engineering experience as they work in teams to design, prototype and deliver solutions to meet real community needs
At Duke Engineering, students don’t wait until their nal under- graduate years to get their hands busy and minds engaged in real- world design.
While traditional engineering curricula start off with years of analytical coursework, Duke’s new First-Year Design Experience gives students opportunities to think and work like engineers from the start.
In fall 2017, 48 students piloted the new course, which is expected to soon be part of the foundational curriculum for every undergrad- uate engineer.
“In this course, students get an authentic design experience, right as they begin their education,” said Ann Saterbak, a nationally recog- nized engineering educator who directs the Duke Engineering First- Year Experience.
Sophia Santillan, who co-teaches the course, said its most innovative feature is that the projects come from real clients—from the Duke Le-
mur Center’s request for better animal feeders to a water-sampling drone for the Duke Marine Lab to a trash-trap concept for Durham, North Carolina's Ellerbe Creek Watershed Association.
“First-year students learn about the engineering design process,” said Santillan, a faculty member in Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science, “and then, apply that learning right away to a project with real-world application.”
From the Duke University School of Nursing, Duke Engineering freshmen learned that a model arm used by nursing students to prac- tice IV insertion wasn’t lifelike enough.
The student team, who only months earlier had been high school se- niors, chose an inexpensive commercial crafting material with a tex- ture closer to that of human skin. They sewed the material to the cov- ering of the model arm—and knew they were onto something when nursing students said during testing they couldn’t see evidence of previous needle marks.
6 DUKE’S UNDERGRADUATE ENGINEERING PROGRAM IS RANKED IN THE  TOP 20 NATIONWIDE  (U.S.NEWS & WORLD REPORT)


“Engineering schools for a long time have introduced design concepts with wooden-stick bridge projects and the like. What’s been missing is the client, and understanding how an engineer works to solve real problems for a real person or organization.”
—ANN SATERBAK, FIRST-YEAR EXPERIENCE DIRECTOR
Out tted with workbenches, laser cutters, 3-D printers and other tools, the new Duke Engineering Design Pod provides a dedicated 5,000-square-foot workspace and active-learning classroom for the rst-year design course.
The technical challenges of the course introduce rst-year students to the rigor of engineering school—including engineering calcula- tions, planning and communication. For assistance, teams can turn to mentors drawn from across Duke Engineering’s faculty, who provide coaching and advice.
Hands-on design opportunities don’t just pique the interest of rst- year students. Research suggests that rst-year students who take design courses are more likely to stay with engineering as their un- dergraduate degree. Students have improved self-ef cacy—a genuine belief that they can succeed in problem-solving and meet challenges going forward.
“I came to engineering school knowing I wanted to work on medical devices,” said IV arm team member Emily Barre. “To say that I’ve had a taste of my dream, in my very rst semester, is very, very exciting.”
INSPIRING ENGINEERS 7
DEEP-DIVE DESIGN
Duke Engineering offers students a progressive immersion in engineering design, from the rst-year overview to capstone design projects in their chosen disciplines. For example:
• Students in CEE’s Engineering the Planet course solve environmental engineering challenges, like improvising particulate-barrier breathing masks
• ECE’s Fundamentals of Electrical & Computer Engineering course culminates in an exciting competition in which student teams design and race robots to overcome obstacles using sensor data acquisition and processing
• ME's Engineering Innovation course teaches all students mechanical engineering fundamental skills and product design through numerous challenging projects, including creating safe, cost-effective toys for Happy Meals
• Students selected for the new BME Design Fellows program engage in a three-semester-long applied design and skill-building experience, plus a summer internship with a hospital or biomedical industry partner
• Every senior completes a Capstone Design Project in their major focused on producing actual engineering products— from custom parts for an autonomous underwater
vehicle to devices for local clients with disabilities
• Some teams work on projects sponsored by industry partners, from local startups to global corporations


& DECISION SCIENCES
By teaching students to leverage statistical analysis to glean useful insights from complex, real-world datasets, a new course aims to make data competency a signature strength of every Duke Engineering undergraduate
Imagine what we could do with the streams of data rushing from Fit- bits, Nests, satellites, microscopy, seismic networks, mobile phones, auto dashboards, credit card purchases and just about every other source of information that’s captured, tracked and shared.
Stacy Tantum wants every Duke engineer to be able to envision the possibilities—and to turn them into reality.
“With all this rich data, how can we interpret it to learn new things, see unexpected patterns and make better decisions?” said Tantum, a faculty member in Electrical & Computer Engineering. “These are skills we want all of our students to have.”
Toward that end, Duke Engineering has launched a creative new course designed to give undergraduates a foundation in the fast-growing eld of data science.
Piloted in spring 2018, “Introduction to Data & Decision Sciences,” led by Tantum and Mathematics faculty member Paul Bendich, is in- tended to become a sophomore-year staple.
With a focus on team-based, authentic problem-solving, the new data course builds on a highly successful summer program at Duke called “Data+.” The award-winning program led by the Information Initiative at Duke (iiD) brings small groups of undergraduates, grad- uate students and faculty together to design data-driven solutions to interdisciplinary challenges, most provided by external clients.
The approach has proven enormously popular, and may even aid re- cruitment and retention of students underrepresented in the eld, according to iiD director Robert Calderbank. “Data+ had over 300 applications last year—over half from women,” he said. “In a world where women are still pursuing STEM majors at lower rates than men, that is encouraging.”
8 DUKE UNIVERSITY IS RANKED AMONG THE  TOP 10 IN THE U.S. FOR BEST UNDERGRADUATE TEACHING  (U.S.NEWS)


In a world full of uncertainties, how can you maximize your chances of picking the best option? Students learn strategies for predicting probabilities through hands-on lab activities.
Plus, team-based labs that challenge students to solve real-world, po- tentially messy challenges, combined with structured teaching, give the core concepts a kind of “stickiness” that by-the-book approaches just can’t match, said Tantum.
“We want our students to really dig into data science—to learn to de- ne problems, determine what data they need to answer questions, explore and visualize the data using concepts from probability and statistics,” Tantum said.
“Our goal is for each student to emerge with a solid understanding of how to leverage data to inform and guide their work as engineers.”
“Comfort with data will be an integral skill for engineers of the fu- ture,” added Ravi Bellamkonda, Vinik Dean of Engineering. “We see Duke as the place that will lead the way.”
Fig. 4: Visualization of two significant parameters used in the cost function as related to the final school clusters.
Building better football conferences: Student teams were challenged with gathering, analyzing and visualizing datasets to sort college teams into more optimal conferences based on parameters from distance to scholastics to number of students.
INSPIRING ENGINEERS 9
DATA ON DATA-SCIENCE EDUCATION @ DUKE
 1 GOLD AWARD
Duke’s Data+ program took home gold in the 2016 Reimagine Education global competition recognizing “projects that enhance learning and employability and are both innovative and scalable”
 $9.75 MILLION
IN PHILANTHROPIC SUPPORT
for the Information Initiative at Duke will endow new professorships, graduate fellowships in engineering, and educational programs on data-driven problem- solving, both in the classroom and in the eld
 DUKE GRADUATE STUDENTS
HAVE LED 43 “DATA EXPEDITIONS”
in undergraduate courses—pop-up, hands-on projects on topics from analyzing international carbon dioxide emissions to applying linear algebra to autism detection in infants
 30+ PARTNERS
from industry, government and nonpro ts have collaborated with the Information Initiative at Duke on research, workshops, internships and other hands-on learning for students
 71 UNDERGRADUATES &
23 GRADUATE STUDENTS
teamed up with faculty to conduct 25 real-world, data-driven research projects through Duke’s Data+ program in 2017


COMPUTATIONAL
By weaving in real-world projects, Duke Engineering is piloting a new approach to introductory computing that seeks to give students not only a strong foundation in programming skills, but a vision of coding as a creative tool
Shaundra B. Daily likes to compare coding to a paintbrush.
“It is a creative tool. It can create useful things that improve the way people live,” said Daily, a faculty member in Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE).
Students don’t always think of computing that way—and that means many of them don’t think of computer science, engineering or other coding-centric careers as a potential path for them. In piloting a fresh approach to Duke Engineering’s introductory computing course, Daily and her colleague Michael Gustafson are looking to ways to change that.
“In general, rst-year students don’t always get to see what seniors see, which is that you can apply the fundamentals of programming to a wide array of elds to make a positive social impact,” said Dai- ly. “But plenty of research shows that it helps attract and retain stu-
dents when you give them earlier exposure to doing creative things through computing.”
The spring 2018 offering of the Computational Methods in Engineer- ing course continues to provide rigorous training in computational methods. But Gustafson, a Duke ECE faculty member who co-teach- es the course with Daily, said computational thinking is about more than memorizing the details of a computing language.
“It’s about being able to think in computational terms when assess- ing a problem—to use computation as part of solving that problem,” he said. In the new pilot course, students will be challenged to con- nect computing to real-world, collaborative problem-solving through team projects. They’ll draw on what they’ve learned about program- ming logic, iterative calculations and debugging to gure out what those methods can achieve for the end user and how to build an in- terface for their target audience.
10 DUKE ENGINEERING PROFESSORS HAVE WON MULTIPLE  NATIONAL AND UNIVERSITY-WIDE TEACHING AWARDS 


DUKE TECHNOLOGY
SCHOLARS:
DIVERSIFYING CODING
A new program at Duke is working to increase the number of tech-savvy women and other underrepresented groups in computer science and engineering.
Duke Technology Scholars—a joint initiative of the Departments of Electrical & Computer Engineering and Computer Science—seeks to inspire greater diversity in tech elds through building strong professional relationships and providing real-world experiences at leading technology rms.
Each student selected as a “DTech” Scholar is paired with a mentor working in a leading organization in the tech world— many DTech mentors are Duke graduates. Our mentors
help scholars build con dence and professional networks,
as do summer internships with companies in Silicon Valley, Chicago or Research Triangle Park. In fact, 96% of Scholars surveyed reported that their technical skills and con dence rose signi cantly over the summer.
DTech also offers an associates program for eligible ECE/CS majors offering training and networking events, job-search support and coaching throughout the academic year. Duke ECE's Shani Daily serves as faculty director for DTech, and Monica Jenkins is program director.
Learn more at dtech.duke.edu
In one example, students will analyze pollution levels in the Great Lakes using models from environmental engineering. They will use computational methods and tools learned during lecture—for exam- ple, linear algebra and nonlinear regression—to estimate how various environmental and other factors might impact the system over time. Then they’ll build an interface that presents the information in a va- riety of ways.
“The power of this approach is that each student is exposed to con- cepts of computational thinking right from their rst year in engi- neering school,” Gustafson said. “This gives each student a suite of basic practical skills, training in problem-solving concepts and prepa- ration for more complex computational training, letting them hit the ground running when they select their engineering discipline.”
“We want students to see that they can apply the fundamentals of programming to a wide array of elds to make a positive social impact.”
—SHANI DAILY, CO-TEACHER, COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN ENGINEERING
Duke Technology Scholars and leaders with Duke alum Eddy Cue, senior vice president of internet software and services at Apple—one of 80 leading companies the program works with


MENTORED
Duke Engineering offers students
unparalleled opportunities to conduct
original research with faculty advisors.
Almost 70 percent of our undergraduates
engage in intensive research, with one in ve either publishing or presenting a paper off campus before graduating.
PRATT RESEARCH FELLOWS
• Intensive three-semester research experience including a paid summer at Duke
• Competitive program matches students with faculty advisors in their major
• Most Fellows graduate with distinction
Pratt Research Fellow Harvey Shi
Harvey Shi’s experience in the Pratt Research Fellows pro- gram allowed him to spend more time in the laboratory during the school year and provided an entire summer to focus on his project. Shi works in the laboratory of Amanda Randles, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, who is using advanced parallel process- ing algorithms and the world’s fastest supercomputers to simulate blood ow.
The goal is to eventually have physicians use this program to help de- termine the best treatment options for their patients. For example, a simulation could tell if xing a speci c abnormality within a patient’s
12 DUKE IS  #9 AMONG TOP-RANKED U.S. ENGINEERING SCHOOLS  IN PER-FACULTY RESEARCH EXPENDITURES (U.S.NEWS DATA)


Environmental engineering major Karyn Saunders created computational models to understand problems with a greywater treatment system in Honduras—part of her NAE Grand Challenge Scholars project advised by faculty mentor David Schaad.
aorta will help the local blood ow. But because doctors don’t have the time to become experts in using supercomputers, the program needs a more intuitive interface. The basis of Shi’s project is creating such an interface using virtual reality platforms.
“Working on this project has really helped me build independent skills beyond the research, like how to manage my own project,” said Shi, who plans to take a gap year after graduation before applying for MD/PhD programs. “It’s really given me a sense of what research is. It has also helped me develop an understanding of the challenges associated with research and how to persevere through them.”
KATSOULEAS NAE GRAND CHALLENGE SCHOLARS
• Duke Engineering co-founded the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Grand Challenge Scholars Program—now active at more than 40 universities worldwide—to prepare well-rounded engineers for leadership roles in addressing the largest global issues of our time
• Unique educational journey integrates ve key themes: an interdisciplinary curriculum, innovation and entrepreneurship experience, a global experience, service learning and a research project
• Students receive up to $5,000 toward portfolio completion
• Graduates are recognized by the NAE
Growing up in southern Florida with two engineers as par- ents, Karyn Saunders has always been submerged in coastal envi- ronmental issues and challenges with water quality. At Duke, the NAE Grand Challenge Scholars program gave her the opportunity to grapple with the vital problem of ensuring access to clean water through a variety of linked experiences, from coursework to co-lead- ing an entrepreneurial effort to develop cost-effective temporary shelters with water treatment for refugees.
Saunders also traveled to Honduras with Duke Engineers for Inter- national Development to help install and then repair a greywater treatment system for a local village. But even after multiple visits, the team’s solution was having trouble.
Saunders made discovering why the focal point of her Grand Chal- lenge Scholars research with faculty mentor David Schaad. She cre- ated a computational model of their treatment system complete with complicated uid dynamics and the details of the speci c site, which has helped incorporate new ideas and emerging technologies into their plans.
“Even though we doubled the size of the system’s grease trap during my second visit, it still needed emptying daily,” said Saunders, who will continue her studies at Duke next year as part of the 4+1 Mas- ter of Engineering program. “They use a lot more oil in their cook- ing than we do. That’s something I never would have thought of and helped me understand how solutions that work in one community might not work in others for cultural, political or ethical reasons.”
INSPIRING ENGINEERS 13
RESEARCH WITHOUT BORDERS
Duke Engineering students can take advantage of a rich array of research opportunities across campus. A few examples:
• Smart Home Research Fellows: Project-based design research that addresses the broad goals of the Duke Smart Home Program to explore smart technology and ideas that enable sustainable living. Students have access to the Duke Engineering- operated Smart Home as a “living laboratory”
• Bass Connections: Brings together Duke faculty, graduate and undergraduate students from every corner of campus to explore real-world issues in interdisciplinary research teams focused around topics from synthetic biology to environmental epidemiology to energy data analytics
• Independent Study: Many engineering students conduct intensive, hands-on research for academic credit—either in Engineering or Duke’s Schools of Arts & Sciences, Medicine, Environment and beyond


CONFIDENCE
From a “Founder’s Workshop” course to a $20,000 Innovation Grant competition, Duke Engineering is investing in new initiatives to help undergraduates turn their ideas into impactful solutions
It all started at Duke with an idea.
Duke Engineering undergraduate Sam Fox had an idea for a device to help a wheelchair user take a shower.
Fox, a biomedical engineering (BME) major, brought his idea to in- structor and assistive device designer Kevin Caves, who connected him with patient care experts at Duke’s medical center. These experts informed him about a much more urgent set of problems: how to lift, transfer, and reposition bedridden patients. Although proper posi- tioning prevents bedsores, moving patients can pose a risk of injury to nurses, and many existing assistive devices are slow and cumber- some.
Fox's initial solution was too complex, but further iterations led to a focused design: a device for turning and repositioning patients in bed. He then drew on the expertise of his BME faculty advisor Robert
Malkin, a leader in the creation of effective medical technologies for the developing world.
With Malkin’s encouragement, and help with a development strate- gy, Fox got to work. He designed a device that uses air- lled tubes to safely reposition a patient.
Fox built a proof-of-concept model in The Foundry—a 7,600-square- foot, tool- lled “maker space” administered by Duke Engineering and open 24 hours to any Duke student.
The prototype won the Duke BME Prize in the annual Duke Startup Challenge competition—$5,000 that Fox used to turn his prototype into a eld-test version under the mentorship of Bill Walker—a suc- cessful entrepreneur hired as Duke Engineering’s rst Mattson Fam- ily Director of Entrepreneurial Ventures and head of the Entrepre- neurship @ Duke Engineering program.
14 DUKE WAS NAMED A  TOP 10 BEST SCHOOL FOR ENGINEERING MAJORS BY SALARY POTENTIAL  (PAYSCALE.COM)


ENTREPRENEURSHIP @ DUKE ENGINEERING
The new Entrepreneurship @ Duke Engineering program coordinates a range of opportunities to build students’ entrepreneurial con dence. A collaboration with Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship (I&E), the program is led by Bill Walker, Mattson Family Director of Entrepreneurial Ventures, and Steven McClelland, Executive-in-Residence— both successful entrepreneurs and Duke Engineering alumni who serve as dedicated mentors and advisors for engineering students and faculty.
FOUNDER’S WORKSHOP
In spring 2018, Executive-in-Residence Steven McClelland expanded entrepreneurship education at Duke with this special-topic course that guides student teams in developing startup plans while guest speakers provide real-world insight.
“Part of what we’re doing is demystifying the path,” said McClelland, a Silicon Valley tech executive who founded a web-consulting company and was chief architect at Citizen Sports when it was acquired by Yahoo. “If you start a company, no matter whether it succeeds or not, you’re going to learn a lot if you’re paying attention.”
ENTREPRENEUR’S WORKSHOP SERIES
Open to engineering undergraduates, these intensive half- day weekend workshops bring industry experts to campus to examine in detail the nancial, regulatory and logistical challenges new companies face.
BAQUERIZO INNOVATION GRANTS
This $20,000 annual program funds the development of transformative, student-led innovation. The “BIGs” encourage ambitious creativity among undergraduates and invite mentorship from faculty and industry experts, such as leading intellectual property law rm Munier Carlin and Curfman—which donated 15 hours of expert assistance each to the two inaugural BIG winning teams in spring 2018.
ENTREPRENEURIAL ECOSYSTEM
Duke Engineering’s efforts mesh with and multiply Duke University’s extensive resources for student innovators— such as the Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative’s academic certi cate program, the DUhatch student startup incubator, the Duke Startup Challenge (offering a $10,000 biomedical engineering prize), and the Innovation Co-Lab creativity incubator.
Learn more at pratt.duke.edu/ undergrad/entrepreneurship
Steve McClelland and Bill Walker (right) talk technology with student founders of OptiML, a winner of the rst Baquerizo Innovation Grants.
“Bill had a transformative impact,” Fox said. “He brought his huge wealth of knowledge and network to help me.”
Walker met weekly with Fox to review plans and provide advice. With Walker’s help, Fox pitched his startup idea to potential inves- tors among Duke alumni, raising additional funds. Now, he’s made an agreement with Duke Health to have its nurses and clinical staff eld-test the device.
Fox’s experience may, in its swift path forward, seem extraordi- nary—but his entrepreneurial drive and access to resources at Duke Engineering to support that ambition make such success stories in- creasingly common.
From creating spaces to work on personal ideas, to new courses teaching entrepreneurial skills, to new programs that fund the devel- opment of student startups—entrepreneurship is a central, and grow- ing, part of the Duke Engineering student experience.
“Our job is simple: to increase the impact of Duke innovation. Entrepreneurship
is the engine we use to do that.”
—BILL WALKER, MATTSON FAMILY DIRECTOR OF ENTREPRENEURIAL VENTURES


OFFICE OF THE DEAN
305 TEER ENGINEERING BLDG. BOX 90271
DURHAM, NC 27708-0271
Ravi Bellamkonda
Vinik Dean of Engineeri
[email protected]
I
ng
Undergradu
“Duke has a powerful opportunity now to
lead the way in undergraduate education, by systematically and energetically refocusing our curriculum around active, engaging, problem- based research and design projects. This is being done particularly well by Duke Engineering.”
—VINCENT PRICE, PRESIDENT OF DUKE UNIVERSITY
Learn more about Duke Engineering’s plan for nspiring Engineers at: pratt.duke.edu/inspired
To get involved, please
Linda Franzoni
Associate Dean for
Undergraduate Education
[email protected]
ate admissions: admission
contact:
s.duke.
Jim Ruth
Associate Dean for Development
& Alumni Relations
james.r
ed
u
[email protected]


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