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Published by Orlando Health, 2017-08-08 11:15:11

Orlando Health Choose Health Magazine Issue 3

Choose Health ISSUE 3 FINAL rev for PDF

ChooseHealth
SUMMER 2017

Brain-Boosting Foods Sun Safety
Travel Prep
New Life-Changing Heart Procedure Survival Swimming
Orlando Health Expands Services Staying Hydrated
Across the Region Spice Up Your Health

OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

I choose Orlando’s only ChooseHealth
‘Best Children’s Hospital’ranked SUMMER 2017
by U.S. News & World Report.
I choose Orlando Health Brain-Boosting Foods Sun Safety
Arnold Palmer Hospital Travel Prep
for Children. New Life-Changing Heart Procedure Survival Swimming
Orlando Health Expands Services Staying Hydrated
For eight years in a row, Across the Region Spice Up Your Health
Arnold Palmer Hospital has been
Orlando’s only nationally ranked OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth
“Best Children’s Hospital” by
Not actual patients. U.S. News & World Report. When David Strong
it comes to the best care for my President & CEO
kids, I choose a national leader. Orlando Health
Andrew J. Snyder
ArnoldPalmerHospital.com Senior Vice President,
Marketing & Communications

CHOOSE HEALTH CONTRIBUTORS

STANDING FROM LEFT:
Dani Wigle
Lauren Popeck, RD, LDN
Wendy Bacigalupi-Bednarz
Debashish Bose, MD, PhD
Lisa Nickchen
Diana Lomont
Danny Betancourt
Rod James

SEATED FROM LEFT:
Marjorie Brown, BS, RN
Donald Plumley, MD
Elizabeth Davis, MD
Samer Elbabaa, MD
Kim Marcum
Jamin Brahmbhatt, MD

NOT PICTURED:
Tracey Choroco
Roland Filart, MD
Zach Kallenbach
Jean Moorjani, MD
Lorraine Parker, MSN
Veronica Schimp, DO
Janette Sendin, MSN
Beth Smith
Todd Sontag, DO
Sajeve Thomas, MD

WELCOME

Welcome to the third issue
of Orlando Health Choose
Health magazine. We took
special care to craft this
collection of timely content,
focusing on the most up-to-
date health topics.

This summer issue contains
information to help you lead a
healthy lifestyle this season and
prepare for the upcoming school year.
We hope you find all of this helpful in
your journey to choosing health.

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

Healthy Feed Your Brain
Summer Guide at Every Age

5 – 13 22 & 23

Orlando Health Kids’ Corner
Expansion
28 & 29
14 – 16
Foundation Behind-the-
Berries May Boost Scenes Stories of Hope
Men’s Sexual Health
30
17
Upcoming Classes,
New Life-Changing Programs & Events
Heart Procedure
32 & 33
20 & 21

3ChooseHealth OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

PEDIATRIC NEUROSCIENCE

Shaping Lives Through Everyday Victories

By Samer Elbabaa, MD, Board-Certified Neurosurgeon at Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children

When we think of life-shaping experiences, we often recall At Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children, it’s part of our mission
childhood. We remember our first bicycle ride without training to make every possible neuroscience benefit accessible to
wheels, discovering our favorite foods or that first A on a school Central Florida children and their families. We’re placing the
assignment — the everyday victories that helped shape our advances of neuroscience close to home by assembling a world-
lives. For children and families who face neurologic conditions class, collaborative team that specializes in pediatric neurology;
such as brain, spine and nerve injuries or disorders, life-shaping neurosurgery, with a focus on minimally invasive surgeries for
experiences take on different meanings where every word, tumors and hydrocephalus; neuropsychology; neuro-oncology,
step or smile can represent victories. Advances in pediatric with an expanded brain tumor program; neuro-radiology;
neuroscience make these victories possible for children, even physical medicine and rehabilitation — all under one roof.
those who have not yet been born.
By offering these neuroscience services in one place, we can
Often, when people talk about neuroscience, they think of improve outcomes by making the treatment, therapy and
surgery. But neuroscience is a broad field of medical specialties recovery processes a little easier for our pediatric patients and
that studies, treats and supports many pediatric neurological their families. Each improved patient outcome — whether it’s
conditions. Conditions include traumatic brain, spine and nerve recovery from a tumor, management of epilepsy symptoms or
injuries; diseases and disorders such as tumors, hydrocephalus spina bifida repair before birth — may bring another life-shaping
(excessive accumulation of fluid in the brain) and epilepsy; experience. Another word, step or smile. An everyday victory
and congenital issues like spina bifida. When children need made possible by neuroscience.
treatment for these conditions, advanced neuroscience provides
a spectrum of medical and surgical treatment, and ongoing To learn more about our pediatric neuroscience services,
physical, emotional and psychiatric support during recovery. visit ArnoldPalmerHospital.com/Neuroscience.

4ChooseHealth OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

HEA LTHY SU MMER GU I DE

Summer is a lively season in Central Florida,
a time when many head to the beach or
spend the day poolside. In the next several
pages, you will find inspiration, information
and resources to help you stay healthy and
safe during this sunny season.

5ChooseHealth OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

HEA LTHY SU MMER GU I DE

Skin Cancer Patients Benefit
From Next-Generation Treatments

By Diana Lomont, Editorial Contributor

Sometimes the Innovative new drug therapies are showing promise for
response can be so curing patients with melanoma, the deadliest form of
quick that you see skin cancer. One such drug, Imylgic,® uses an engineered
virus to shrink and destroy tumors while stimulating the
tumors immune system to recognize and destroy cancer cells
elsewhere in the body.
start shrinking
Dr. Sajeve Thomas, Orlando Health UF Health Cancer Center, Melanoma and Sarcoma Center, has
within days used Imylgic successfully with patients who have had melanoma recur following surgery. He also has
seen major success using other immunotherapy drugs alone or in combination with radiation therapy.
of starting therapy.
Three or four years “I’ve had patients experience complete remission with no sign of melanoma coming back after
ago, we didn’t have two years,” says Dr. Thomas. “Sometimes the response can be so quick that you see tumors start
shrinking within days of starting therapy. Three or four years ago, we didn’t have these therapies.”
these therapies.
In addition to working with new immunotherapies, the cancer center expects to soon join a multi-
– Dr. Sajeve Thomas center study that will replicate a patient’s immune system T cells by the billions and infuse them
back into the patient. Early data suggest that this approach can lead to long-term remission even in
melanoma patients who have tried other therapies.

This year an estimated 87,110 new cases of invasive melanoma will be diagnosed in the U.S., and more
than 9,000 Americans are expected to die from the disease, according to the American Cancer Society.

Melanoma is very treatable if detected in its early stages. Warning signs include asymmetrical moles
or lesions with a diameter greater than 6 millimeters. See your doctor for a diagnosis if you are
concerned about any moles or lesions.

For more information, visit OrlandoHealthCancer.com or call 321.841.8470
to schedule an appointment.

ABCDE Rule for the Early Detection of Melanoma

Asymmetry Borders Color Diameter Evolving

the outer edges are uneven dark black or greater than 6mm change in size,
have multiple colors shape and color

6ChooseHealth OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

Playing It Safe in the Sun

Before Sunscreen By Diana Lomont, Editorial Contributor

Use Sunscreen Correctly

Relying on sunscreen alone is not enough. Choose a water-resistant, broad-spectrum sunscreen that protects
“Sunscreen use reduces, but does not eliminate against both UVA and UVB rays, and has an SPF of 30 to 50.
the risk of skin cancer,” says Dr. Todd Sontag, a [SPFs above 50 add negligible protection.]
family medicine physician with Orlando Health
Physician Associates. He also advises to: • Chemical sunscreens, with ingredients such as oxybenzone or
avobenzone, should be applied 30 minutes before sun exposure.
• Avoid the sun at its strongest —
between 10:00 am and 4:00 pm. • Reapply sunscreen every two hours, or more frequently after swimming
or heavy perspiration.
• Wear sun-protective clothing, including
brands that provide a sun protection factor Sun Safety for Babies and Kids
(SPF) of up to 50. A broad-brimmed hat
can help shade your face, ears and back of Severe sunburns before the age of 18 can cause melanoma, the
the neck. deadliest form of skin cancer, as an adult. “Even one bad sunburn can
double a child’s chance of getting melanoma later in life,” explains Dr. Sontag.
• Set up an umbrella or canopy
for shade at the pool or beach. • For babies under 6 months of age, avoid direct sunlight. Dress babies in
lightweight clothing that covers the arms and legs, and use brimmed hats.
• Protect your eyes by wearing large-framed, Sunscreen in small amounts is okay if there is no way to avoid the sun.
wrap-around sunglasses with 99 percent
protection from ultraviolet • Mineral sun blockers that contain zinc oxide and titanium dioxide are
(UV) radiation. preferred for young children’s sensitive skin.

Find your family physician at OrlandoHealth.com/Physician-Finder.

7ChooseHealth OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

HEA LTHY SU MMER GU I DE

A Trip to Take Before You Travel

Orlando Health’s Health Service for Travelers

By Lisa Nickchen, Editorial Contributor

If an international trip is in your future, chances are you have a checklist of
things to do before you leave. One important item that should be on that list is
a trip to a travel medicine specialist. And for this trip, you don’t have to go far.

For more than 20 years, Orlando Health’s international travel clinic,
Health Service for Travelers, has been providing care for business,
mission, leisure and adventure travelers. Its team of experienced travel
medicine specialists stays current on international health issues with daily
updates from the World Health Organization (WHO), Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention (CDC), and U.S. Department of State.

Certified travel medicine nurse Marjorie Brown, BS, RN, shares her
biggest piece of travel advice: “Plan ahead — it’s important to do your
research and be prepared.” And she adds, “We can help with that.”

Whether it’s motion-sickness patches for your Caribbean cruise,
high-altitude medication for a climb up Kilimanjaro or antibiotics for
traveler’s diarrhea during your trek to India, Health Service for Travelers
offers a wealth of information and services so you can relax and enjoy
your trip without unwanted surprises.

Did you know it’s a good idea to take along an effective insect
repellent? Illness-causing insects, especially mosquitoes and ticks, are a
concern in many areas.

It’s also important to be up-to-date on your immunizations. Health
Service for Travelers experts can ensure you’re prepared for the specific
health risks or vaccine requirements for the countries you are traveling to.

Patients are encouraged to follow up after they return home to share their
experiences, perhaps helping future travelers. “I feel like I’ve traveled
to a lot more place than I actually have,” says Brown. “I live vicariously
through my patients.”

For more information, call Health Service for Travelers
at 407.649.6821.

8ChooseHealth OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

Survival Swimming Can Protect
Your Child From Drowning

By Wendy Bacigalupi-Bednarz, Editorial Contributor

Keeping children safe is a priority What is Survival Swimming?
both inside and outside the home.
That’s especially true if you live near The YMCA of Central Florida, with support from the Dr. Phillips
water, which most Central Floridians Charities and in collaboration with Arnold Palmer Hospital for
do. It takes only a moment of parental Children, offers a survival swimming program called Safe Start.
distraction for a child to reach water The program teaches young children — even babies as young as
unsupervised and get into a potential six months old — to save themselves from drowning. Through
drowning situation, says Dr. Donald Safe Start, infants learn to hold their breath underwater, roll onto
Plumley, director of pediatric trauma their backs and float unassisted, while toddlers learn a swim-
at Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children. float-swim sequence in case they accidentally fall into a pool or
body of water.
The Florida Department of Children and Families says that
Survival swimming dates back to 1966 when behavioral scientist
out of the 73 accidental youth drownings reported in 2016, Harvey Barnett, PhD developed a self-rescue method to help
prevent accidental youth drownings. The YMCA of Central
70 percent involved children ages three and younger. There are Florida launched its program in 1999, and reports that more
than 18,500 local children have learned these essential water
safety steps you can take to help prevent drownings and provide survival skills since then. By using these techniques, nearly 100
of these youngsters have survived a potential drowning situation,
young kids with water survival skills. Survival swimming lessons according to documented stories.

should be part of your water safety plan. See how survival swimming works at YMCAcf.org.

9ChooseHealth OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

HEA LTHY SU MMER GU I DE

Keep It Cool: Three Steps to Hydration

By Elizabeth Davis, MD, Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist

There’s no doubt about it:
Central Florida summers are hot.

That extra heat — coupled
with high humidity —
can put you at risk for
dehydration and heat-
related illnesses
(HRIs). This
is especially
true when
exercise
and sports
are involved.
That’s why
it’s important to
understand three key

steps to staying hydrated.
They include getting enough
fluids, knowing when to adjust
your fluid intake based on

temperature and activity levels,
and recognizing the warning
signs of dehydration.

ChooseHealth 10 OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

Step Get Enough Fluids

1 How do you know if you are getting enough fluids? As a general

rule of thumb, you can stay hydrated by drinking eight cups of

water – or 64 fluid ounces – each day. If you don’t like the taste of

water, consider “dressing-up” water with fruits or vegetables. Water also is

much more palatable when ice cold.

Step Know When to Adjust Bored With Water?

2 While exercising or playing sports in hot and humid conditions, you’ll Try these fresh ideas from Orlando Health
need more fluids with greater frequency. If you plan to exercise for registered dietitian Lauren Popeck:

longer than one hour, you may need to supplement water with sports • Infuse water with veggies and herbs
such as cucumber and mint.
drinks to help replace electrolytes lost through sweating.
• Stir drink mixes and flavor enhancers
St3ep Know the Signs of Dehydration free of artificial colors or sweeteners
into water.
When you are well hydrated, your urine will be pale yellow
or nearly clear. And, it’s relatively easy to know when you • Combine club soda, seltzer or mineral
water with fresh or frozen fruit cubes.
are dehydrated – you feel thirsty. Other dehydration signals
• Enjoy iced or hot decaffeinated tea with
to be aware of include dark yellow urine, headache, nausea, faintness and a squeeze of orange or lemon.

vomiting. Watch for these signs in children when they exercise or play sports • Indulge with iced or hot decaffeinated
coffee.
in hot weather. Dehydration can lead to more serious HRI risks, including heat
• Use freshly squeezed lemons and natural
syncope, or fainting caused by high temperatures; heat exhaustion, a condition sweeteners such as Stevia to create
homemade lemonade.
caused by heat and dehydration; and heatstroke, or a dangerous

rise in body temperature.

By following these three hydration steps, you can
play safely outdoors, even on the hottest days.

Visit OrlandoHealth.com/Hydration for a video about staying hydrated.

Foods to Keep You Hydrated

Healthy foods with high water content can assist you in staying hydrated, says Orlando Health registered
dietitian Lauren Popeck. A cup of fruit and/or vegetables equals about 6 ounces of water. She recommends:

• Celery, cucumbers, lettuce, radishes and zucchini, which are 95 percent to 96 percent water
• Tomatoes, which are 94 percent water
• Cabbage, cauliflower, eggplant, peppers, spinach, strawberries

and watermelon, which are 92 percent to 93 percent water

11ChooseHealth OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

HEA LTHY SU MMER GU I DE

By Lauren Popeck, RD, LDN, Registered and Licensed Dietitian at Orlando Health

We reach for spices to This heat-producing spice has Studies have shown the benefits of
add some zing to our benefits for cancer protection, cinnamon for managing cholesterol,
spaghetti sauce or some reducing inflammation and sugar and insulin levels.
heat to our chicken weight loss.
wings. But new research Try blending cinnamon in
is reminding us of their Add to sautéed veggies or salads. moderation into smoothies, coffee
medicinal properties Try spicy tuna salad. A dash of or tea, butternut squash and chili.
too — something the cayenne is a great complement on Tastes great sprinkled on brown rice,
ancients knew thousands cooked bitter greens. Use in hot quinoa and oatmeal.
of years ago. Some sauce or salsa with scrambled eggs
spices can treat motion or soup.
sickness, while others
battle inflammation and
cholesterol. So take an
extra minute to add the
health-enhancing flavors
of these six common
spices to your meals.
You probably have most
of them already in your
pantry or refrigerator.

12ChooseHealth OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

One of the world’s oldest herbs, garlic has potent medicinal
properties. It can boost the immune system, help lower blood
pressure and improve cholesterol levels.

For a simple and fresh salad dressing, blend fresh garlic, extra
virgin olive oil and lemon juice plus fresh herbs. Stuff garlic cloves
into chicken breasts and roasts, or add to stew. Purée roasted
garlic, cooked potatoes and olive oil for garlic mashed potatoes.

Effective in treating nausea and This herb has one of the highest The spice that gives curry its yellow
motion sickness, studies show antioxidant ratings of any color, turmeric has powerful anti-
that ginger also may help lower food. Oregano also has anti- inflammatory effects. Studies
cholesterol levels, prevent cancer inflammatory, anti-cancer and have found that its main active
development and support brain anti-bacterial properties, and ingredient, curcumin, supports brain
health. helps relieve upper respiratory health, may help prevent heart
infections. disease and cancer, and shows
Fresh minced or ground ginger promise in treating depression.
instantly adds flair to sautéed Use oregano for more than pizza
vegetables and marinades. Sprinkle and spaghetti sauce. Enliven Add 1-2 teaspoons to any soup
ground ginger on sweet potatoes sandwiches, casseroles and salad recipe, or add a color pop to rice
for an antioxidant-packed side dish. dressings. Try a slice of whole grain dishes by mixing 1/2 teaspoon
toast with mozzarella and a sprinkle in water when cooking the rice.
of oregano. Sprinkle into sautéed or braised
greens such as kale, collard greens
and cabbage.

For more articles about food and nutrition, go to OrlandoHealthBlog.com.

13ChooseHealth OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

ORLANDO HEALTH EXPANSION

Consumer Convenience Drives
Expansion of Services Across Region

By Wendy Bacigalupi-Bednarz, Editorial Contributor

Rendering of Orlando Health Emergency Room and Medical Pavilion in Lake Mary, scheduled to break ground this fall

Central Florida continues to in Lakeland, Florida,” says David Strong, Orlando
grow at unprecedented rates. Health president and chief executive officer. “We
So do residents’ expectations have signed a letter of intent and expect the
for connected, quality affiliation to be finalized in October.”
healthcare that’s near where
they live and work. Like Orlando Health, Lakeland Regional Health is a
private, not-for-profit healthcare system that has a
“Consumers tell us they want convenient access long legacy of caring for its community. It includes
to healthcare services so it’s easier to take care Lakeland Regional Health Medical Center, Florida’s
of themselves and their families,” says Greg Ohe, fifth-largest hospital and the nation’s busiest
Orlando Health senior vice president for ambulatory emergency room.
services. To meet those needs, Orlando Health is
expanding its range of facilities and services across “This affiliation will create an integrated regional
the region. healthcare system that enables us to expand
clinical programs, improve patient access and
“One of the biggest initiatives underway is our manage population health across the region, as we
proposed affiliation with Lakeland Regional Health jointly work toward enhancing the clinical quality
of the services we both provide our patients and
communities,” says Strong.

14ChooseHealth OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

Advanced Cancer Care

“A cancer diagnosis is a life-changing event and we know how
important it is to patients to receive their cancer treatment close
to home,” says Dr. Mark Roh, president of Orlando Health UF
Health Cancer Center. That’s why Orlando Health has opened
two freestanding cancer care facilities — one in Lake Mary and
the other near South Lake Hospital — over the last 18 months.

Two more treatment facilities

Waiting area of the Women’s Imaging Center are scheduled to open next
at Orlando Health Imaging Centers’ location
year — one on the Dr. P.
in Southwest Orange County
Phillips Hospital campus
Outpatient Imaging Services
and the other on the Health
Orlando Health Imaging Centers now
offers advanced imaging services at Central Hospital campus. Coming Summer 2018:
six locations throughout the Orlando The cancer center in Ocoee A New, Expanded Orlando Health
metro area. The newest location opened will feature a state-of-the-art UF Health Cancer Center – Ocoee
in May at the Orlando Health Medical
Pavilion — Spring Lake, expanding ViewRay unit, one of only two
access to outpatient imaging services
in the Dr. Phillips area. Its Women’s in Florida, which uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to
Imaging Center features an upscale,
spa-like environment with the highest monitor tumors in patients undergoing radiation therapy.
level of personalized care, says Ohe. A
private suite with gown warmers and Medical Pavilions
beverage service ensures patients’
comfort, while state-of-the-art With a range of integrated
technology provides exceptional quality.
services and physicians under
Next-day appointments are available at
OHIC locations, which do not charge a one roof, Orlando Health
facility fee. Besides the Dr. Phillips area,
OHIC outpatient imaging services can Medical Pavilion — Spring
be found in Ocoee, downtown Orlando,
Altamonte Springs and Sanford. Lake delivers one-stop

Each location offers a variety of shopping to consumers,
imaging services, including open and
closed 3T MRIs, PET/CT, ultrasounds, says Ohe. “For the best
digital X-rays, mammography with
TOMO and DEXA (services vary by experience, consumers want
location). Medical Center Radiology
Group oversees quality standards at their primary care physicians
all facilities, ensuring access to a range
of board-certified and sub-specialty near specialists and all of
radiologists.
them close to diagnostic Orlando Health Medical Pavilion – Spring
services, such as imaging and Lake, located in Dr. Phillips community

labs. Patients want a café so

they can eat something after a blood draw and a pharmacy

to fill prescriptions after a doctor visit. They want one-stop

shopping,” he says. “That’s what healthcare consumers will find

at Orlando Health Medical Pavilion — Spring Lake.”

Located in the Dr. Phillips area, it’s the first such design in

Central Florida and a rarity in the nation. The 60,000-square-

foot pavilion opened in January and has offices for more than

30 physicians representing a dozen specialties. “This concept is

something we really believe in,” says Ohe. Plans are underway for

other medical pavilions in Orange, Seminole, Lake and Osceola

counties. continued on page 16

15ChooseHealth OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

continued from page 15 I choose the convenience
of online scheduling.
Rendering of Orlando Health Emergency Room I choose Orlando Health.
and Medical Pavilion at Horizon West
Introducing Orlando Health Online Scheduling.
Freestanding Emergency Rooms Now, scheduling a doctor’s appointment is easier than
ever. With our convenient online tool, new and existing
Next year, Orlando Health will open a patients can schedule an office visit for a well-care
78,000-square-foot freestanding emergency checkup, a nonurgent medical concern or a follow-up
room and connected medical office building for an existing condition. A tap or a click gives you
at Horizon West in West Orange County. The access to Orlando Health’s network of primary care
emergency room will feature 24 patient beds providers and physicians in more than 40 specialties.
and direct access to diagnostic services on the Because when it comes to your health, it’s important to
first floor. Medical offices on the second floor will find the time — at a time that’s right for you.
house family and internal medicine physicians,
along with cardiology, gastrointestinal and OrlandoHealth.com/OnlineScheduling
OBGYN specialists.

Rendering of Orlando Health Emergency Room Not an actual patient.
and Medical Pavilion in Kissimmee

The first of several planned freestanding
emergency rooms, the facility will later include
a 103-bed acute care hospital to offer localized
inpatient care to the community. Other
freestanding emergency rooms are planned in
Lake Mary, Kissimmee and Lake County.

For more information about Orlando Health’s
locations, go to OrlandoHealth.com/Locations.

16

MEN ’S HEA LTH

Berries May Boost
Men’s Sexual Health

By Jamin Brahmbhatt, MD, Urologist and Co-Director of The PUR Clinic at South Lake Hospital

Berries, blackberries and cherries are
good for overall health, but they also
may improve sexual health in men.

In a study published last year in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition,
researchers found that foods rich in flavonoids — nutrients that give fruits and
vegetables their color — are linked to a lower risk of erectile dysfunction,
a condition that affects 40 percent of men older than 40 and 52 percent
of men overall. Flavonoids also are found in citrus fruits and red wine.

More fruit consumption reduced a man’s risk of erectile dysfunction by 14 percent.
Adding regular exercise to a diet rich in flavonoids reduced the risk by 21 percent.

Three types of flavonoids — anthocyanins, flavanones and flavones — had the biggest
effect on preventing erectile dysfunction. Anthocyanin, an antioxidant found in blue,
purple and red fruits and vegetables, also is linked to improved blood vessel health,
which may explain why it helps combat erectile dysfunction.

All it takes is a few servings a week of flavonoid-rich foods for men to reap the health
benefits, the study showed. However, it’s important to note that the research only
found an association between these foods and men’s sexual health — not a direct
cause-and-effect relationship.

Erectile dysfunction can signal other, more serious health issues. In young healthy
males, erectile dysfunction can be an early warning sign of heart disease.

If you’re concerned about this condition, there are things you can do to reduce your
risk. Staying fit and healthy is key, so get a few hours of moderate exercise
every week. And follow a balanced diet — berries included.

For more articles about men’s health,
go to OrlandoHealthBlog.com.

17ChooseHealth OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

WOMEN ’S HEA LTH

Certified Excellence in
Mother and Baby Care

By Lisa Nickchen, Editorial Contributor

Choosing where to have your baby is an important decision,
whether it’s your first or fourth child.

“When it’s time to have your baby, you want everything to go as planned — no surprises,” says
Lorraine Parker, MSN, patient care administrator at Orlando Health Winnie Palmer Hospital
for Women & Babies. “But if the unexpected does happen, you want to know that you have
teams nearby with the experience and skill to handle any complications and provide expert,
compassionate care for both mom and baby.”

Certification from the nation’s oldest and largest accrediting body in healthcare can help
reassure parents they are making the right choice.

Winnie Palmer Hospital recently received Perinatal Care Certification, following a rigorous
review from The Joint Commission. This designation means families can count on receiving

exceptional care every step of the way — from prenatal care, through labor and delivery,
to baby’s six-week checkup, and everything in between. Winnie Palmer Hospital is one
of just over 30 hospitals in the country — and the only one in Orlando — to earn this
recognition.

At Winnie Palmer Hospital, teams from several specialties provide
comprehensive perinatal care during the pregnancy and through baby’s
six-week checkup. The certified program also offers:

• Early identification of high-risk pregnancies and births with
state-of-the-art technology and advanced medical expertise

• Patient education and support so that each expectant mom
understands all medical options and has the birth experience
she wants

• Family education and community resources to make sure
mom has help throughout her entire pregnancy and entry
into motherhood

“This certification recognizes the outstanding level of care that Winnie
Palmer Hospital provides our families and our commitment to being the
best hospital possible,” says Parker. “And that commitment is more than just
a promise — it’s a daily practice.”

If you’re already expecting or planning a pregnancy soon,
visit us at WinniePalmerHospital.com to learn more.

ChooseHealth 18 OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

O RLA N DO HEA LTH FACI LI TY SPOTLI GHT IN YOUR COMMUNITY

Orlando
Regional
Medical Center

ORLANDO

Arnold Palmer
Hospital
for Children

ORLANDO

83 W. Miller St. Winnie Palmer Hospital for Health Central
Orlando, FL 32806 Women & Babies Hospital
321.843.9792
DOWNTOWN ORLANDO OCOEE

Dedicated to the unique healthcare needs of women and Orlando Health
babies, Orlando Health Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women Heart Institute
& Babies provides personalized, compassionate care in
a soothing, family-centered environment. As a leader in ORLANDO
comprehensive healthcare for women throughout all stages of
life, we offer a wide range of obstetric and gynecologic services. Orlando Health
UF Health
Winnie Palmer Hospital is Orlando’s only nationally certified Cancer Center
hospital in perinatal care, in 2017 earning the highest level of
recognition for excellence in prenatal through postpartum ORLANDO
care.* Our high-level services include fetal diagnostics,
maternal fetal medicine, labor and delivery, maternal intensive Dr. P. Phillips
care and one of the largest centers for neonatal intensive care Hospital
in the country.
SOUTHWEST
As a Center of Excellence in Minimally Invasive Gynecology ORANGE COUNTY
surgery, Winnie Palmer Hospital provides highly trained
physicians and the most advanced technology to effectively South Seminole
treat gynecologic conditions with fewer complications and Hospital
faster recoveries. Our new Women’s Gynecology Unit offers
focused care for our gynecologic surgery and gynecologic LONGWOOD
oncology patients.
South Lake
To learn more about our hospital and take a virtual tour Hospital
of our facility, visit WinniePalmerHospital.com.
CLERMONT
*Awarded by The Joint Commission

ChooseHealth 19 OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

PATIENT TESTIMONIAL

New Heart
Procedure Is a
‘Life Changer’

By Lisa Nickchen, Editorial Contributor

For more than 20 years, Janet
Johnson-Mergenov knew she
had an irregular heartbeat,
but the occasional flutter in
her chest had never slowed
her down. She continued to
enjoy an active lifestyle and
frequent games of tennis and
golf. Then 10 years ago on her
first visit to a cardiologist, she
discovered she had a heart
condition known as atrial
fibrillation, or Afib. Its most
common complication is a five
times greater risk of stroke.

ChooseHealth 20 OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

“Having a stroke, and being incapacitated,
was the worst scenario I could imagine,” says

the 80-year-old great-grandmother.
“I didn’t want to become a burden on my family.”

But Johnson-Mergenov couldn’t tolerate the only medication
available to help her avoid the most common risk for Afib
patients. Two variations landed her in the hospital with internal
bleeding each time.

“With atrial fibrillation, the upper chambers of your heart beat Physicians on Janet Johnson-Mergenov’s Watchman team
irregularly — quivering like Jell-O,” says Orlando Health Heart included, from left, Dr. Amelio Duran, Dr. Roland Filart
Institute clinical nurse specialist Janette Sendin, MSN. “Because and Dr. Mark Steiner.
it’s quivering in that manner, the atria cannot fully squeeze the
blood out, and the blood pools. When it pools, it stagnates and After a stringent screening process, Johnson-Mergenov had the
can develop a clot.” Watchman procedure at Orlando Health in December 2016. This
one-time, minimally invasive procedure involves implanting the
If a clot breaks off, enters the bloodstream and lodges in an Watchman device to prevent clots from traveling out from the
artery leading to the brain, a stroke results. While anticoagulant heart into the bloodstream and possibly causing a stroke.
medications thin the blood and decrease the clot risk, they
increase the risk of bleeding. “Mrs. Johnson-Mergenov is a vibrant lady who enjoys life to
the fullest,” says Dr. Roland Filart, an electrophysiologist with
The Lake Mary resident thought she was out of treatment Orlando Health Heart Institute Cardiology Group, and part of the
options. “I lived my life as usual, but I felt like I was just waiting Watchman implant team. “We were happy to help her continue
for the other shoe to drop,” she recalls. “There was a cloud this lifestyle without the fear of recurrent bleeding complications
hanging over my head.” associated with long-term anticoagulation therapy.”

For Johnson-Mergenov, that cloud was lifted when her Johnson-Mergenov is thankful she could have this procedure
cardiologist told her about a new minimally invasive procedure done locally. “It’s an absolute life changer — a great weight
being offered by Orlando Health Heart Institute Cardiology lifted off,” she says. “I have a big family, with one great-
Group. The Watchman™ implant device is approved by the Food grandchild and two more on the way, and I want to be around a
and Drug Administration (FDA) as an alternative to reduce the long time to see them grow up.”
risk of stroke for some types of Afib patients who cannot be
treated with blood thinner medication due to bleeding concerns. “We were happy to help her continue this
lifestyle without the fear of recurrent bleeding
She was eager to
have the procedure. complications associated with long-term
“I wanted to be sure anticoagulation therapy.” – Dr. Roland Filart
that I had done
everything I could If you or a loved one suffers from nonvalvular atrial
possibly do,” she says. fibrillation and can’t tolerate blood thinners, talk to your
cardiologist about Watchman. For more information, visit
“As much as you try to Dr. Arnold Einhorn, with patient OrlandoHealth.com/AFib.
put it out of your mind, Janet Johnson-Mergenov, is part
it’s there. You’re always of the Watchman team.
wondering, ‘Am I going
to have a stroke?’ ”

ChooseHealth 21 OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

There’s no such thing as a magic
pill to make us smarter. But there
are foods — brain foods — that
can boost brain power through all
stages of our lives. From prenatal
stages to older adulthood, brain
foods contain vital nutrients that
can help nurture developing
brains, enhance concentration and
improve memory. While it’s not
magic, plenty of evidence shows
that smart food choices can lead
to better brain function.

ChooseHealth 22 OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

By Wendy Bacigalupi-Bednarz, Editorial Contributor The MIND Diet

Brain Foods and Children Americans who forgo red
meat and fast foods in favor
Even before birth, foods can begin enhancing brain development. Studies have connected of healthier options could
prenatal consumption of foods containing the omega-3 fatty acid DHA with children who reduce their incidences of
may perform better on cognitive tasks. Researchers believe DHA – which is found in fatty Alzheimer’s disease by up
fish such as salmon, blue fin tuna and sardines, as well as fortified eggs and yogurt – helps to 53 percent, according
in the formation of neurons. to research funded by the
National Institute of Aging.
“Fresh or canned wild salmon provides ample Omega 3s, healthy fats that decrease
inflammation and enhance brain function,” says Orlando Health registered dietitian Dubbed the MIND diet —
Lauren Popeck. short for Mediterranean-
DASH Intervention for
Iron is vital to a baby’s continued brain development. At about six months of age, babies Neurodegenerative Delay
deplete the iron storage they were born with, and it must be replenished through diet. — it separates 10 brain-
Supplemental iron is found in solid foods such as fortified cereals. healthy food groups from five
unhealthy food groups.
School-aged children and teens can boost their brain power and improve focus by adding
complex carbohydrates such as beans, peas, whole grains and vegetables to their diets. The good: Green, leafy
vegetables and other
Brain Boosters for Adults vegetables, beans, berries,
nuts, whole grains, fish,
In adulthood, about 10 percent of women are diagnosed with anemia. Recent studies poultry, olive oil and wine
suggest that iron-deficient anemia is related to learning, memory and attention deficits.
The unhealthy: Red meats,
A diet that includes beans, meats, soy and dark, leafy greens can help restore iron cheese, butter and margarine,
levels and cognitive function. pastries and sweets, and fried
or fast foods
With more than five million Americans battling Alzheimer’s
disease – a population that is expected to triple within 35 years For more nutrition news, go
– adults are more motivated than ever to defend their minds to OrlandoHealthBlog.com.
and cognitive abilities against aging. Nutritional allies in that
battle include the antioxidants found in brightly colored fruits
and leafy vegetables.

“Take your pick from blueberries, blackberries and raspberries,
which are loaded with antioxidants that are good for your
memory,” says Popeck. And don’t forget your spinach, which packs
a brain-saving boost of B vitamins and folic acid. On a sweeter note,
adds Popeck, dark chocolate (containing 80 percent or more cocoa)
can improve mental focus and promote relaxation.

ChooseHealth 23 OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

TECHNOLOGY

New High-Tech Treatment Extending Lives
of Pancreatic Cancer Patients

By Diana Lomont, Editorial Contributor

A new surgical technology at Orlando Health Candidates for the Procedure
UF Health Cancer Center gives patients with the
most advanced forms of pancreatic cancer a new NanoKnife is an option for patients
treatment option that can significantly improve with pancreatic or liver cancer who
survival rates. haven’t had success with other
treatments or who can’t be treated
Using the NanoKnife® technology, oncologists deploy electrical using traditional methods. It also may
currents to punch holes in the cancer cell membranes of a tumor and be suitable for patients who have
cause cell death. The targeted electrical currents affect only the cancer previously undergone chemotherapy
cells, allowing oncologists to treat the tumor while preserving healthy or surgery, but their cancer has
tissue, veins and nerves surrounding the tumor. Cancer specialists such returned.
as Dr. Debashish Bose, director of the Pancreas Center at Orlando
Health UF Health Cancer Center, believe NanoKnife offers promise for Patients with small tumors less than
those late-stage patients who often have few options. 5 centimeters who aren’t candidates
for radiation therapy or traditional
“The results are good in patients receiving the NanoKnife treatment at surgery also may be candidates
cancer centers across the country. On average, we’re seeing no disease for NanoKnife and should talk to
progression 14 months after treatment,” says Dr. Bose. “We expect to their oncologist about whether the
see the same results or better with patients we treat here at Orlando procedure is appropriate for them.
Health. For the right patients, NanoKnife will make a big difference.”
NanoKnife is still a relatively
new treatment, pioneered at the
University of Louisville. Orlando
Health UF Health Cancer Center is
the first surgical center in Central
Florida to provide this breakthrough
technology.

For more information about NanoKnife treatments
at Orlando Health UF Health Cancer Center, visit
OrlandoHealthCancer.com/NanoKnife.

ChooseHealth 24 OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

GYNECOLOGICAL CANCER

Ovarian Cancer:
How History Predicts the Future

By Wendy Bacigalupi-Bednarz, Editorial Contributor

Gynecologic oncologists are leveraging family histories at the genetic
level to make timely ovarian cancer diagnoses. “One of the most
powerful predictors of ovarian cancer risks is the knowledge of
family history,” says Dr. Veronica Schimp, chief of gynecologic
oncology at Orlando Health UF Health Cancer Center.

Some ovarian cancer cases are hereditary, passed on to family members through
inherited gene mutations. In fact, about 5 percent to 10 percent of women are
genetically at risk for developing ovarian or breast cancer. Ninety percent of
ovarian cancer cases are non-inherited or “sporadic.” Hereditary ovarian
cancers more often develop earlier in life than non-inherited cases.

Different types of gene changes or mutations can trigger ovarian cancer.
They are referred to as germline, where mutations are passed on to
offspring through reproductive cells, and somatic, where DNA changes
occur within cells after conception.

Other risk factors for ovarian cancer include:
• Age
• Having few or no children
• Early onset menstruation
• Late-age menopause
• Breaks in oral contraceptive use

According to Dr. Schimp, five consecutive years of oral contraceptive use
is a protective measure associated with reduced ovarian cancer risks.

Recognizing genetic risk indicators, such as mutations in the BRCA 1 or
BRCA 2 tumor suppressor genes and Lynch syndrome (hereditary non-
polyposis colon cancer syndrome), is key to getting a timely diagnosis
and life-saving treatment. Based on family history and general risk factors,
women should seek out genetic counseling or testing if they receive
abnormal results during a medical exam.

Learn more about ovarian cancer at
OrlandoHealthCancer.com.

ChooseHealth 25 OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

OUR PHYSICIANS

oMnetehtetOherlNanedwoesHtePahltyhsiTcieaanms*

Stephen K. Susan Samer K. Robert
Ball, MD Constantino, MD Elbabaa, MD Faber, MD

THORACIC HEMATOLOGY PEDIATRIC INTERNAL
SURGERY AND ONCOLOGY NEUROSURGERY MEDICINE
DOWNTOWN
ORLANDO CAMPUS SEMINOLE COUNTY DOWNTOWN DOWNTOWN
321.841.7700 ORLANDO CAMPUS ORLANDO CAMPUS
321.843.2100
A board-certified 321.841.3050 407.425.8121
thoracic surgeon, In February, Dr.
Dr. Ball joined Constantino joined Dr. Elbabaa is a Dr. Faber joined
Orlando Health Orlando Health board-certified the Orlando Health
Cardiovascular and UF Health Cancer neurosurgeon Internal Medicine
Thoracic Surgery in Center as a medical who joined Arnold practice in April. He
April. He earned his oncologist and Palmer Hospital for is board certified in
medical degree from hematologist. She Children in May. internal medicine
the University of is board certified in He specializes in and specializes in
Mississippi Medical medical oncology, pediatric brain and preventive care
Center (Jackson, hematology and spinal cord tumor as well as the
MISS), where he internal medicine. microneurosurgery, management of
also completed Previously she was a neuroendoscopy complex or chronic
his residency. He medical oncologist and fetal conditions. Dr.
performed his and hematologist neurosurgery. Faber earned his
fellowship at Rush at the Orlando VA He earned his medical degree from
University Medical Medical Center. medical degree at the University of
Center (Chicago). Dr. Constantino the University of Miami, where he
earned her medical Jordan, completed also completed his
*New physicians from education from his residency in residency.
February 2017 through May 2017. Creighton University neurosurgery at the
(Omaha, NE), where University of North
she also completed Carolina at Chapel
her residency. Hill and performed
She performed a clinical fellowship
her fellowship at in pediatric
Orlando Health. neurosurgery at the
Cleveland Clinic.

ChooseHealth 26 OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

The physicians at Orlando Health are part
of a collaborative network that works toward
one common goal: your health.

Jarod Jessica M. Tawfiq
Fox, MD Gielow, DO Lahham, MD

INFECTIOUS GENERAL NEUROLOGY
DISEASE SURGERY
WEST ORANGE
DOWNTOWN SOUTH SEMINOLE COUNTY
ORLANDO CAMPUS HOSPITAL
407.296.1910
407.423.1039 407.767.5808
A board-certified
Board certified in Dr. Gielow joined specialist, Dr.
infectious disease, Orlando Health Lahham joined
Dr. Fox joined Surgical Group in West Orange
Orlando Health February as a general Neurology Specialists
Infectious Disease surgeon. She earned in February. He
Group in March. her medical degree received his
He earned his in osteopathic medical degree
medical degree medicine from from Damascus
from St. George’s the Kansas City University (Syria)
University School of University of and his neurology
Medicine (Grenada), Medicine and residency training at
and completed Biosciences, St. Louis University
his residency and completed School of Medicine.
at Memorial both her general He completed a
University Medical surgery internship neurophysiology
Center (Savannah, and residency at fellowship in
Georgia) followed Philadelphia College neuromuscular
by a fellowship at of Osteopathic diseases and
Orlando Health. Medicine. She also electromyography
specialized in burn at the University of
surgery and critical Pittsburgh Medical
care at the Nathan Center and a
Speare Regional second fellowship
Burn Center in in neuromuscular
Philadelphia. diseases at
Northwestern
University (Chicago).

KIDS CORNER

Avoid Backpack Pain:
Learn to Be Pack-Smart

By Jean Moorjani, MD, Pediatrician at Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children

Backpacks are an indispensable tool for carting around books,
computers, tablets and other school necessities. But
when they’re overloaded or incorrectly worn,
injuries happen. Kids can suffer from neck,
back and shoulder pain, as well as posture
problems. Help your kids avoid backpack
pain with these pack-smart strategies.

Size it Right Choose a backpack that is an
appropriate fit for your child’s unique size and
build. Start with a lightweight version that has
two wide and padded shoulder straps, a padded
back and a waist strap. These features will help
distribute and balance the weight your child
carries. Remember that less is more. The larger
the backpack, the more your child will put into
it. Select a size that carries the essentials —
not the extras.

Pack it Light Pack lightly and avoid overloading.
A backpack should weigh no more than 10 percent
to 15 percent of a child’s body weight and only
contain items necessary for the day. Place heavier
items lower and toward the center of the backpack.
To lighten the book load, help your child plan frequent
locker stops between classes and consider keeping
a second set of school books at home.

Wear it Right Backpacks work best when worn correctly.
Tighten the straps to keep the pack closer to your child’s
back. The bottom of the backpack should rest no lower
than your child’s waist. Be sure kids use both shoulder
straps to carry the backpack, so that the pack’s weight
is evenly distributed.

Brought to you by:

ChooseHealth 28 OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

Stretches Help Prevent Sports Injuries

By Elizabeth Davis, MD, Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist

Whether in summer leagues or school sports camps,
kids can avoid sports injuries and play their best by
using the right stretches whenever they train or play.

How are stretches different? Some stretches warm up Static stretching is ideal for cool downs and
muscles before exercising, while others cool them down involves extending and holding a muscle slightly
afterward. They’re known as dynamic stretches and static beyond its range of motion. This helps increase
stretches, and are equally important in preventing sports muscle flexibility, reduce tightening and prevent
injuries that can put kids on the bench. injuries. Common static stretches include
hamstring and quadriceps stretches. Kids should
Dynamic stretching is best for warming up, and uses cool down from five to 10 minutes after exercising.
movement and momentum to help muscles reach their
range of motion. Dynamic stretches include jogging, arm Learn more about preventing sports injuries in
swings, hip circles and walking lunges. Kids should warm this video at OrlandoHealth.com/Stretching.
up from five to 15 minutes before exercising.

Stealthy and Healthy Lunch Bag Power-Ups

By Lauren Popeck, RD, LD/N, Registered and Licensed Dietitian at Orlando Health

Kids love all things sweet, savory and crunchy in their school lunches. Parents do,
too, as long as these items are healthy. Here are a few stealthy and healthy lunchtime
power-ups to pack in kids’ lunch bags.

Whole grains with a twist: Go savory by topping a Naturally sweet: Fruits are nature’s candy.
whole grain tortilla with low sodium turkey breast, Substitute sugary candy with grapes,
part-skim mozzarella cheese, crunchy lettuce and clementine oranges, apples and raisins.
savory mustard. Roll-up and slice in half. Go sweet by
spreading peanut butter on a whole wheat tortilla,
adding a banana to the middle and rolling it up.

Protein power-up: Pack a punch of protein with Greek
yogurt, cottage cheese, cheese sticks, or packs of nuts
such as almonds, cashews or peanuts.

Curb crunch and sugar cravings: Replace chips
with carrot sticks and hummus. Straighten out
snack time with low-sugar granola bars,
graham crackers, pretzels or whole grain
crackers with peanut butter.

ChooseHealth 29 OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

FOUNDATION ROUNDUP

Foundation Tours Share
Behind-the-Scenes Stories of Hope

By Diana Lomont, Editorial Contributor

It’s not every day you get to see a hospital through the eyes of former
patients who overcame life-threatening circumstances. But that’s what you
can experience during a new Orlando Health Foundation tour program.

Dana Emerick, manager of Care Coordination, with team member You might hear about Leeann Lee, who was one of the first patients
Joaquin Rojas, RN, who was treated at ORMC following the Pulse to receive treatment at the Center for Proton Therapy at UF Health
nightclub shooting. Today, Rojas cares for other trauma patients. Cancer Center – Orlando Health for a brain tumor. Or you may meet
Karen Lorenz, who was treated at South Seminole Hospital for a stroke,
then transported by helicopter to Orlando Regional Medical Center
where she underwent surgery to remove the clot in her brain.

Tours for groups and community members are available at Orlando
Regional Medical Center/UF Health Cancer Center – Orlando Health,
The Howard Phillips Center for Children & Families, Arnold Palmer
Medical Center and Health Central Hospital.

The 60-minute programs are designed to immerse and engage guests
in learning about the unique healthcare services provided by Orlando
Health, says Zach Kallenbach, vice president of the Orlando Health
Foundation. In the process, they hear first-hand experiences from
team members, patients and volunteers.

“These tours let community members step behind-
the-scenes to gain a glimpse of the hope, healing and
compassionate care we offer,” says Kallenbach.

The tour of ORMC, for example, includes the inspiring story of
Joaquin Rojas, RN, told by his supervisor Dana Emerick, MSW,
manager of Care Coordination. Rojas survived last summer’s Pulse
nightclub shooting and today cares for other trauma patients. With a
wounded arm and many friends lost, Rojas walked to ORMC, where
he has since undergone several surgeries and relearned how to use
his right hand.

“The care he received restored his passion to be a nurse,” says
Emerick. “I’m honored to work next to those who saved his life.”

To schedule a tour, call 407.841.5194 or visit
OrlandoHealthFoundation.com.

ChooseHealth 30 OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

COMMUNITY GOOD

Orlando Health in the Community

By Beth Smith, Editorial Contributor

2 1 The hope of every volunteer is that their efforts will lead to
4 something better – a better life for a child, more independence for
a retiree, a promising future for a disabled veteran. Orlando Health
team members put those hopes into action in a range of projects
that spanned the Central Florida region. Here’s how they helped:

1 Habitat for Humanity’s Women Build During this national event,
Orlando Health team members joined hundreds of local women build a house

3 where Latrina and her family can create lasting memories.

2 Central Florida Disability Chamber of Commerce
Orlando Health team members volunteered their time to the chamber’s
Veterans Business Initiative program, which works with military veterans
and their spouses to develop and refine business skills.

3 Edgewood Children’s Ranch Dr. P. Phillips Hospital team members
served dinner to youngsters at Edgewood Children’s Ranch, while the hospital
leadership team worked on landscaping projects around the property.

4 Center for Independent Living RAMPage Ramp Build

5 Orlando Health team members helped build a wheelchair ramp so that Ruth,

a retired teacher, could once again come and go from her home independently.

5 Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida A group of
Orlando Health team members sorted and distributed food for local families
in need. Second Harvest collects, stores and distributes donated food to more
than 550 feeding partners in six Central Florida counties.

Orange Center Elementary Garden Pink Ribbon Garden As the presenting sponsor for the Pink

With help from Orlando Health team members, nearly Ribbon Garden Project, Orlando Health teamed up with breast cancer
400 Orange Center Elementary students harvested survivors from underserved communities to address food inequality
an American Heart Association Teaching Garden as part and nutritional challenges. For each bag harvested from the raised-bed
of an educational initiative to build healthy bodies and vegetable garden the cancer survivors tend, they collect another bag
minds. Locally sponsored by Arnold Palmer Hospital for a patient undergoing treatment. The project is the creation of Robin
for Children, the program provides a real-life laboratory Maynard, from Libby’s Legacy Foundation, and Grammy Award- winning
where students learn how to plant seeds, nurture growing Melissa Etheridge.
plants, harvest produce and better understand the value
of good eating habits. To learn more about how Orlando
Health supports the Central Florida
community, see our Community
Benefit Report at OrlandoHealth.com/
CommunityBenefit.

31ChooseHealth OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

UPCOMING CLASSES & PROGRAMS

Childbirth Education

Please call 321.8HEALTH (843.2584) for more Prenatal Breastfeeding
information on how to register. These classes Introduces women to breastfeeding
are held at Orlando Health Winnie Palmer basics: the benefits, how breast milk
Hospital for Women & Babies, 83 W. Miller St., is made, how to know if your baby is
Orlando, FL 32806. getting enough milk, prevention and
treatment of common breastfeeding
Baby Inside You problems, and pumping, collecting and
Specifically designed to provide information during a woman’s storage of breast milk. $40 per couple.
second trimester. Topics: relaxing techniques, pre-term labor
recognition, nutrition, exercise, etc. $40 per couple. Mothers Matter
An emotional support group for pregnant and postpartum women.
Preparation for Childbirth The group offers peer-to-peer emotional support facilitated by a
Access to our eight-chapter, interactive, web-based e-class that licensed clinician specializing in perinatal mood disorders. No fee.
uses videos, personal birth stories, animations, activities and For information, call 321.843.7034.
games to teach essential information parents need to know to
prepare for their baby’s birth. $100 per couple. Basic Infant Care
A lecture-style class where parents-to-be learn what they need
Prenatal Yoga to know about caring for a newborn. Information about normal
Prepare your mind and body for the arrival of your baby in a one- behaviors and parenting included. $40 per couple.
hour class designed for expectant mothers.
Mother-Baby Connection
Formerly known as Moms Meeting Moms, the Mother-Baby
Connection is designed for mothers with babies from birth to 9
months. Meet other moms and receive interesting information
from our expert guest speakers. $10 fee.

ChooseHealth 32 OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

UPCOMING CLASSES & PROGRAMS

Cancer Support Community Upcoming
Events
To learn more about these and other cancer support groups and classes, call 321.841.5056.

Most sessions are held at the Ambulatory Care Center, 22 W. Underwood St.,
2nd Floor, Orlando, FL 32806. Please call to register and confirm.

Breast Cancer Support The Inspiration Choir Women’s Cancer 3rd Annual
This group is open to any An informal singing group Support Group Gynecologic
woman at any stage of her for cancer patients and Come for support and to Community
breast-cancer journey. caregivers interested in having connect with other women Awareness Event
fun. No prior singing or choir who have been diagnosed
Caregivers Support Group experience necessary. with cancer. This group covers September 10, 2017
Drop by to relax with fellow a wide range of topics and 8:00 am – 11:00 am
cancer caregivers. Learn Laughter Yoga occasionally features guest
ways to cope with stress, Join the world’s happiest speakers. Lake Eola Park
while enjoying snacks and workout and reap multiple Downtown Orlando
companionship. benefits, including improving
breathing, managing your
stress and boosting your
creativity. You only need a
sense of humor.

Open Art Studio
Cancer patients and caregivers
join artist Angilyn Watson
for creative art time. No art
experience necessary, just
the desire to participate and
surprise yourself.

Support, Classes & Programs

To learn more about these and other support groups and classes, call 321.8HEALTH (843.2584). Stop the Bleed —
Please call to register and confirm. Training Classes
for Community
Bariatric Weight Loss Support Group Pre-Operation
Postoperative patients are strongly encouraged to attend this Joint Replacement August 10
group. We also welcome preoperative patients who are interested This patient education class 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
in learning more about the lifestyle changes necessary to be provides an overview of what
successful with weight loss. you need to know about September 14
having joint replacement 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Bariatric Weight Loss Surgery surgery. The content will
Information Session cover general information October 12
Learn more about the bariatric surgical options to prepare you for your 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
available, find out if you are a candidate for surgery, recovering in the
surgery and speak with one of our bariatric hospital, planning for your safe Visit OrlandoHealth.com/
surgeons at this free information session. discharge and rehabilitation, StoptheBleed for more
Register at OrlandoHealth.com/WeightLoss including physical therapy. information.

ChooseHealth 33 OrlandoHealth.com/ChooseHealth

Award-Winning Specialty Care Near You.

Orlando Health Winnie Palmer Orlando Health Arnold Palmer
Hospital for Women & Babies provides Hospital for Children has earned
comprehensive healthcare for all stages national recognition as one of the
of a woman’s life. It has received “Top “Best Children’s Hospitals” by
Teaching Hospital” recognition for meeting rigorous U.S. News & World Report and a
quality and safety standards, and “Magnet” designation “Top Children’s Hospital” by the Leapfrog Group, which
for nursing excellence and high-quality patient care. The measures quality and safety. Arnold Palmer Hospital offers
hospital also has earned national certification in perinatal expertise in virtually all pediatric specialties and is “Magnet
care for excellence in prenatal through postpartum care. Recognized” for nursing excellence and high-quality
patient care.

Orlando Health Orlando Health
Heart Institute
is Central UF Health Cancer
Florida’s premier
cardiovascular Center is one
program, receiving
the highest quality of Florida’s four
ratings possible
from the Society state-designated
of Thoracic
TM Surgeons (STS) for Cancer Centers of
two of the most-
common heart surgeries. Our team of renowned cardiac Excellence and the
care professionals, including specialized heart physicians
and surgeons, work together to create the best possible only one in Central
patient experience.
Florida. It brings THE ONLY CANCER CENTER OF
together the most EXCELLENCE IN CENTRAL FLORIDA
experienced cancer

doctors and top cancer researchers from Orlando Health

and the University of Florida’s health system to provide

the most effective cancer care for our communities and

unique treatments tailored to each patient’s needs.

When it comes to medical care in Central Florida,
Orlando Health has you covered.
Choose Orlando Health.

Visit OrlandoHealth.com for exact locations.

* Expected affiliate date of October 1, 2017, pending completion of due diligence

OrlandoHealth.com/Disney

Coordinated Concierge for MAILING ADDRESS Non-Profit
Organization
Disney Cast Members 1414 Kuhl Ave., MP 56 U.S. Postage
Orlando, FL 32806
844.WDW.OHFP PAID
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OrlandoHealth.com/Disney Permit No. 3459
Orlando, FL
© 2017 Orlando Health

I choose treatment on my time.
I choose Orlando Health.

Not an actual Choosing treatment on my time for my minor emergencies is just a click away.
patient. Orlando Health, the leader in emergency care in Central Florida, has a new online
scheduling tool that allows me to check in and select an estimated treatment time
so I can wait at home until my time to be seen.* And, with 6 conveniently located
ERs, including Central Florida’s only Level One Trauma Center, you’ll have teams of
highly trained physicians and top emergency care close when it counts.
That’s why I choose Orlando Health.

TheEmergencyExperts.com

*For patients with conditions that are not life- or limb-threatening.


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