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Published by Orlando Health, 2017-08-08 16:16:11

2016 Community Benefit Report

2016 Community Benefit Report

OURWE CHOOSE

COMMUNITY

2016
COMMUNITY

BENEFIT
REPORT

ORL ANDO HEALTH COMMUNIT Y BENEFIT REPORT | 2

ON THE COVER: Detail from “Orlando Standing With Pride” by Anna A-Kissoonlal.
The painting was donated to ORMC, where it now hangs, as a symbol of the strength and courage

of all who lost their lives, the survivors and everyone that helped during the Pulse tragedy.

3 | ORL ANDO HEALTH COMMUNIT Y BENEFIT REPORT

LET TER FROM DAVID STRONG | PRESIDENT AND CEO | ORL ANDO HEALTH

Dedicated

In this 2016 Community Benefit Report, you’ll
learn about community outreach programs
that are transforming the health and safety of
our citizens.

Our Community Grant Program invests received numerous community awards for our
in the community by funding initiatives, medical care coordination during this crisis.
such as a campaign for safer car seats and Making a positive difference in your life and
a farmers market that fills a void in a “food the life of our community is a driving force
desert” that lacks a grocery store and access behind Orlando Health. We are committed to
to fresh produce. We’ve also supported a providing you with the kind of care we all want
program at the University of Central Florida to receive — care that’s aimed at improving
to help children with delayed or hindered your health by blending advanced technologies
mobility gain independence of movement with kindness, compassion and respect.
with customized, motorized toy cars.
We pay special tribute in this report to the Sincerely,
hundreds of Orlando Health team members
who demonstrated extraordinary poise David Strong
and courage as our community faced the President and CEO
unthinkable, tragic event of the Pulse nightclub Orlando Health
shooting on June 12, 2016. Orlando Health

ORL ANDO HEALTH COMMUNIT Y BENEFIT REPORT | 1

ABOUT $2.8 BILLION

Orlando not-for-profit healthcare organization
Health* and community-based network of
physician practices, hospitals and
outpatient care centers throughout
Central Florida.

8 A statutory teaching hospital system, Orlando Health is proud to offer the
region’s only Level One Trauma Center; the area’s first heart program;
HOSPITALS specialty hospitals dedicated to children, women and babies; a major
cancer center; and long-standing community hospitals.

1 Orlando Health Orlando Regional Medical Center

2 Orlando Health Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children

3 Orlando Health Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women & Babies

4 Orlando Health UF Health Cancer Center

5 Orlando Health Dr. P. Phillips Hospital

6 Orlando Health – Health Central Hospital

7 Orlando Health South Seminole Hospital

8 Orlando Health South Lake Hospital

AREAS OF EXPERTISE

HEART AND CANCER NEUROSCIENCES PEDIATRIC NEONATOLOGY
VASCULAR CARE AND SURGERY ORTHOPEDICS AND WOMEN’S
SPORTS MEDICINE
HEALTH

ONE OF CENTRAL 15,709 BABIES
FLORIDA’S LARGEST BORN
EMPLOYERS
111,197 PATIENT ADMISSIONS
18,518 TEAM MEMBERS INCLUDING NEWBORNS

2,847 157

PHYSICIANS FACULTY MEMBERS

* Fiscal Year 2016
2 | ORL ANDO HEALTH COMMUNIT Y BENEFIT REPORT

The organization includes an extensive COMMUNITY
network of physicians representing BENEFIT FINANCIALS
more than 40 specialties and primary
care; eight wholly-owned or affiliate B ased on: A Guide for Planning & Reporting
hospitals; a skilled nursing and Community Benefit, Catholic Health Association
rehabilitation center; and multiple (CHA) of the United States, 2008 edition.
outpatient care centers offering urgent
care, same-day surgery, and laboratory, $69,382,950
imaging and rehabilitation services.
CHARITY CARE
252 MEDICAL RESIDENTS Charity care is the total cost of services
incurred by Orlando Health to provide
19 7 medical services to those patients who have
demonstrated their inability to pay. Charity
FELLOWSHIP RESIDENCY care does not include bad debt.
PROGRAMS PROGRAMS
+
3 MILLIONPROVIDINGACCESSTONEARLY $68,846,680
CENTRAL FLORIDA RESIDENTS
COMMUNITY BENEFIT
MORE THAN EMERGENCY PROGRAMS AND SERVICES
VISITS
798,714 +
368,063 $114,774,672
OUTPATIENT VISITS
MEDICAID AND OTHER
2,319 BEDS MEANS-TESTED
PROGRAMS SHORTFALLS**
3,807 TRAUMA
CASES TOTAL COMMUNITY BENEFIT

$253,004,302

+
$18,192,849

MEDICARE SHORTFALLS**

+
$165,451,421

BAD DEBT
Bad debt is the total cost of services incurred
by Orlando Health for services provided to
patients who have not paid their bills and
who have not demonstrated their inability
to pay.

+
$484,157

COMMUNITY-BUILDING ACTIVITIES
Community-building activities include
programs that address the root causes
of health problems, such as poverty,
homelessness and environmental problems.
Costs of these activities include cash, in-kind
donations and budgeted expenditures for
the development of a variety of community-
building programs and partnerships above
reimbursement.

TOTAL VALUE TO THE COMMUNITY

$437,132,729

**Medicare, Medicaid, and other means-tested
programs pay Orlando Health less than it costs
the organization to provide care to its Medicare,
Medicaid and other means-tested programs
patients. The amounts shown are the actual costs
to provide these services above reimbursement.

ORL ANDO HEALTH COMMUNIT Y BENEFIT REPORT | 3

LEFT TO RIGHT
Thomas Smith, MD, Emergency
Medicine Resident; Carlos Alvarez,
UV Environmental Tech; Maricelis
Pagan, Medical Technologist, Sr;
Susan K. Ono, BSN, RN, PCCN-K,
Trauma Program Manager;
Ben Wilkinson, Security Officer

Making Every
Second Count

Orlando Health’s lifesaving care during America’s
deadliest mass shooting

In the early morning hours of Sunday, June 12, 2016, team members
in Orlando Regional Medical Center’s Emergency Room and Level
One Trauma Center were having a quiet night and discussing who
might go home early. Within minutes, their world changed. At 2:04
am, the first shooting victim arrived, brought in from the nearby
Pulse nightclub with reports of dozens more to come.

4 | ORL ANDO HEALTH COMMUNIT Y BENEFIT REPORT

LEFT TO RIGHT
Holly Stuart, Director of Patient
Experience; Jamie Moscovitz, RN
First Assistant; Chadwick Smith,
MD, FACS, Surgical Critical Care
Program Director, ORMC;
Liam Barton, Physical Therapist

ORL ANDO HEALTH COMMUNIT Y BENEFIT REPORT | 5

LEFT TO RIGHT
Lourdes Miller, Blood Bank, Supv,
Lab Section; Amy C. DeYoung,
RRT, Administrator of Allied
Health, Support Services and
Orlando Health Rehabilitation
Institute; Chris Ponder, MD,
Emergency Medicine Resident;
Eric Alberts, Corporate Manager,
Emergency Preparedness;
Katie Strauss, Radiology Tech

6 | ORL ANDO HEALTH COMMUNIT Y BENEFIT REPORT

PREPARED FOR THE COMMUNITY

Alerted to what would become the deadliest mass shooting in
modern U.S. history, the Emergency Room (ER) staff called in 20
additional team members to help manage the crisis. Surgery ramped
up from two available operating rooms (ORs) to six, fully staffed
ORs. Chadwick Smith, MD, the trauma surgeon on call, rapidly
assembled a team of six additional trauma surgeons, along with

vascular and orthopedic surgeons and anesthesiologists.

Thirty-six patients arrived in 36 minutes, by proved to be inaccurate, but in the initial hours of
ambulance and police vehicles, and even a pick-up the crisis, hospital staff remained focused on their
truck owned by an officer. As the only Level One patients’ well-being at the risk of their own personal
Trauma Center in Central Florida, ORMC has a safety.
team ready to provide rapid diagnosis and immediate Throughout the crisis, other team members also
treatment for life-threatening injuries 24/7. The stepped up to perform critical tasks: Environmental
sheer volume of trauma on this night put the team to Services personnel cleaned and disinfected exam
the ultimate test. rooms rapidly, wiping away considerable amounts of
blood. The organization’s leaders, including David
Total Team Effort Strong, president and CEO, coordinated distribution
The hospital’s security team and all available hands of supplies.
transferred incoming gunshot-wound victims to In less than 12 hours, 75 surgeries were performed
gurneys, swiftly filling all available exam rooms. and 550 units of blood given to sustain life. Of the
Additional victims waited in the hallways or in beds 44 people who came through ORMC’s doors on that
near the nursing station. Dr. Smith quickly evaluated tragic night, 35 were saved. While the staff continues
each of the 44 people brought from the nightclub. to mourn those nine whose wounds proved fatal, they
ER doctors, residents, other physicians and are grateful for the coordinated, rapid response of
nurses applied tourniquets, bandaged wounds and their trauma center that empowered the team to save
sent patients with the most urgent, life-threatening so many others.
injuries to surgery. Guest Services personnel stepped Equally gratifying was the team’s ability to
out of their normal roles as goodwill ambassadors to provide medical care for the 450 patients already
put pressure on bleeding wounds. hospitalized when the tragedy occurred. As of
Surgical teams operated tirelessly to repair organs, 10:00 am Sunday morning, the ER and Level One
remove injured bowels, sew up torn arteries and Trauma Center were re-stocked. Thirteen unrelated
blood vessels, and massage hearts that had stopped surgeries were performed over the course of the day,
beating. This team response, expert emergency care appropriate patients went home, and hundreds of
and coordination between departments exemplified patients continued to receive quality care.
on a large scale the care the ORMC Level One
Trauma Center is equipped to provide at every hour Preparation Key to Coordinated Response
of the day. More than 400 team members pitched in during
As the medical team worked without pause in the the initial hours following the Pulse shooting.
ER and operating rooms, they endured the additional Environmental Services, Chaplains, Guest Services,
stress of an active-shooter alert, issued to indicate a Laboratory, Surgery, Supply Chain, Blood Bank,
shooter might be within the hospital. The alert later Security, External Affairs & Community Relations,

550 UNITSOFBLOOD 8 OPERATING ROOMS
USED FOR PULSE RUNNING SIMULTANEOUSLY
PATIENTS. AVERAGE FOR PULSE VICTIMS
USE FOR ONE DAY IS THROUGHOUT THE DAY.
35 UNITS.

ORL ANDO HEALTH COMMUNIT Y BENEFIT REPORT | 7

LEFT TO RIGHT
Mark Jones, Senior Vice President,
Orlando Health and President of
ORMC; Michael L. Cheatham, MD,
FACS, FCCM, Chairman, Orlando
Health Surgical Group and Chief
Surgical Quality Officer, ORMC;
Carlos Carrasco, Chief Operating
Officer, ORMC

8 | ORL ANDO HEALTH COMMUNIT Y BENEFIT REPORT

PREPARED FOR THE COMMUNITY

Respiratory Therapy and family members gathered

Patient Transport all assumed at the hospital during

vital roles, alongside doctors the night and into the

and nurses. morning. The hospital had

What might have devolved become the community’s

into chaos on the night center of refuge, and Holly

of June 12 proved to be a Stuart, director of patient

well-orchestrated effort at experience, arrived at

ORMC, thanks to meticulous ORMC early that morning to

preparation by the hospital provide assistance. Stuart,

Emergency Preparedness who had been expecting

and Safety team, the entire 40 people, went into high

Orlando Health system gear, arranging for food
and other community System-wide Emergency Response Drill | March 2016 and water, gathering cell

organizations. phone chargers for guests,

On the night of the tragedy, Mark Jones, senior vice recruiting Spanish interpreters and calling in

president of Orlando Health and president of ORMC, spiritual counselors for those who were grieving. A

activated a Hospital Incident Command System to clinical provider helped guests with fainting episodes

coordinate all aspects of the emergency response and other physical ailments.

effort. “We have a leadership team that brings strong

“The team trained, and when the moment came, skills to provide gracious hospitality,” Stuart

they did their job extraordinarily well and at a level says. “That Sunday morning, we saw several team

of intensity that none of us ever wanted to have to members showing up looking to help.”

prove,” Jones says. Amy DeYoung, administrator for Allied Health

System-wide emergency response drills over two Services, took the lead in developing a hospital

months in early 2016 provided critical preparation communication resource for families looking for

for the real event. They included a mass casualty their loved ones. She offered her personal email

drill involving 57 agencies, 15 hospitals and 17 buses address to families and became the catalyst in

to transport 533 volunteer victims. During the drill, connecting descriptions and identifying information

two waves of patients arrived at ORMC, including a to the hospital staff and law enforcement so that

mock shooter. The FBI, Orlando Police Department families could be reunited.

and Florida Department of Law Enforcement all “That day, we really took care of our community,

participated in the drill. both emotionally and physically,” she says.

A comparison of photos taken during that exercise A Unified Front
and on June 12 shows doctors and staff in the same

place doing the same things. “It’s eerie, but there is The superb crisis management executed by the

no doubt the full-scale exercise helped save lives,” ORMC Level One Trauma Center arguably created

says Eric Alberts, corporate manager, Emergency a protocol for the entire country on how to handle

Preparedness for Orlando Health. a mass casualty event. For the Orlando Health

Dr. Smith who saw firsthand the victims as they team, the events of June 12, 2016, left a permanent

poured into the ER, affirmed the value of the drills: impression of a trauma center stretched to capacity

“You need to practice for these types of things. It’s and responding exceptionally in the face of

about figuring out what you don’t know. We may community tragedy.

think we don’t have time for all of the drills, but they The team developed a guiding principle to help

do make a difference.” them remember: “This day and every day.”

Establishing a Center of Refuge They strive to deliver medical care with a selfless
spirit every day, in every encounter with patients and

As events unfolded, more than 225 friends and families of the Central Florida community.

6000 CALLSTOOUR 51 TEAMMEMBERSWERE
OPERATORS WORKING IN THE
ON SUNDAY, EMERGENCY ROOM
JUNE 12. WITHIN A MATTER
OF THREE HOURS –
ORIGINALLY THERE WERE
32 TEAM MEMBERS.

ORL ANDO HEALTH COMMUNIT Y BENEFIT REPORT | 9

THE 15,000 Weassistedabout DID YOU KNOW:
ORLANDO 15,000 parents NEARLY 3 OUT OF 5
with their car seats CAR SEATS ARE USED
HEALTH in 2016.
COMMUNITY INCORRECTLY

GRANT
PROGRAM

The Orlando Health COMMUNITY
Community Grant
Program is one way GRANT

Orlando Health RECIPIENT
invests back into
our community,
providing support
for the important
work being done in
Central Florida.

The 2016 grant ARNOLD PALMER MEDICAL CENTER TRANSPORT TEAM (Left to Right)
recipients are: Sergio Santiago, Patient Transporter and Equipment Specialist; Kayla Atkinson,
Patient Transporter and Equipment Specialist; Joebany Martinez, Patient
Center for Transporter; Patricia Eugene, Patient Transporter and Equipment Specialist;
Multicultural Carlos Trujillo, Group Lead, Patient Transport; Lina Chico, Manager, Support
Wellness and Services; Sherryann Bissessar, Patient Transporter and Equipment Specialist;
Prevention Victor Rivera, Patient Transporter and Equipment Specialist

Central Florida
Disaster Medical

Coalition

Children’s Home
Society of Florida

Community
Health Centers

Dental Care
Access Foundation

Frontline
Outreach

Grace
Medical Home

Second Harvest
Food Bank

Florida
Department
of Health in
Seminole County

Arnold Palmer
Medical Center
Transport Team

Howard Phillips
Center Teen Xpress

10 | ORL ANDO HEALTH COMMUNIT Y BENEFIT REPORT

CERTIFIED CHILD PASSENGER SAFETY TECHNICIAN CAR SEAT
We are one of the few hospitals that offer a certified child passenger STATS

safety technician at discharge to assist the parents in properly
harnessing their child and installing their car seat.

Car Seats Matter

The consequences associated with a baby or child not secured in a safe
car seat are chilling. In fact, motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause
of death among children in the United States, and studies have shown
that an estimated 59 percent of car seats are misused, putting children’s
safety in jeopardy.

Lina Chico, manager of support with the Children’s Safety Village
services at Arnold Palmer Medical of Central Florida, they were able
Center, and Valerie Mardle, to purchase 59 new car seats. The
philanthropy director for Children’s money also helped Lina’s program
Home Society of Florida, recognized conduct five free “checkpoints”
a need in the community for car in the community and four child
seat assistance, but required seat safety classes at Arnold
funding to move forward with their Palmer Hospital for Children. The
respective initiatives. Both found checkpoints, at which car seats were
support through the Orlando Health evaluated and replaced if necessary,
Community Grant Program. reached more than 100 families.
“The grant program, launched As part of its Healthy Families
last year, allows team members of initiative, The Children’s Home
Orlando Health the opportunity to Society of Florida conducted similar
support causes they are passionate programs with their $15,000 grant.
about and expand their reach beyond The nonprofit’s largest event, with
the hospital walls,” says Lainie assistance from Orlando Health
Fox Ackerman, JD, community team members, attracted 13 families.
benefit director at Orlando “We conducted a 30-minute
Health. “And for community workshop and 19 car seat
organizations, grant support can inspections,” says Valerie. “Fourteen
help them make a greater impact.” seats were distributed to families
Lina, who has been with whose seats were either damaged,
Orlando Health for eight years expired or not the correct seat
as part of the transport team, for the child.” The organization
saw the need for community car also conducted many smaller,
seat assistance in her daily work independent events, as well as
helping families coming to and one-on-one visits with families.
going from the hospital. Broken “This grant allowed us to educate
car seats, improper installation families and help those who didn’t
and mildew topped the list. have access to proper car seats,”
“I just knew we could do so says Valerie. “As part of our mission
much more,” says Lina, who is a to support families and children,
certified child passenger safety car seat safety is very important.”
technician. “Before the grant, Very important indeed. According
the Orlando area didn’t have a lot to Safe Kids Worldwide estimates,
of choices for car seat education when seated in a properly installed
or events. We are so grateful.” car seat, the lives of up to 71
Lina’s “Car Seat Matters” program percent of all infants involved
received a $5,000 grant. Partnering in car crashes are saved.

ORL ANDO HEALTH COMMUNIT Y BENEFIT REPORT | 11

GOLDSBORO DID YOU KNOW
FARMERS MARKET Goldsboro, the second town in Florida

STATS incorporated by African-Americans,
was among the largest vegetable-shipping

hubs in the nation in 1911.

To Market
To Market
The community of Goldsboro, tucked away within the city of Sanford south of
Lake Monroe, has a proud heritage. The farming community founded more than
120 years ago is one of the oldest African-American communities in the country.

Unfortunately, the financially struggling “From there, our community partners
Goldsboro is also a designated food desert by wanted to create a more farm-to-table model,
the United States Department of Agriculture, such as a farmers market,” says Donna. The
leading to high incidences of diabetes, heart idea thrives on bringing partners together to
disease and obesity. But strides are being made provide accessible and convenient nutritious
to change all of that. foods, thereby creating a path to healthier
The Florida Department of Health lifestyles within the community.
in Seminole County, working with Goldsboro Venise White, grants writer and community
Front Porch Council and the City of Sanford, programs manager for the Department of
has opened a farmers market at the Westside Health in Seminole County, says some of
Community Center, offering residents access to the grant money is allocated as stipends
locally grown fresh fruits and vegetables. for vendors who participate, since there is
Launched December 2, 2016, the start-up uncertainty in how much business will be
farmers market was made possible through the garnered at the moment. There is no vendor fee
Orlando Health Community Grant Program. for the space as well.
A $25,000 grant paid for set-up materials and The market has grown from three to six
provisions, marketing, and a farmers market vendors, including Jason Files Produce,
coordinator position. Winter Park Honey and MelloStevesPnuts,
“The market would be very difficult without and attendance has increased weekly to about
this grant,” says Donna Walsh, health officer for 40 residents. The Goldsboro market is open
the Department of Health in Seminole County. from 2:00 pm – 6:00 pm every Friday; the
“It would have had a much slower start.” weekday was chosen as not to compete with
The idea for a farmers market grew out of a established area Saturday markets.
survey aimed at reversing the growth of health The next steps are to move the market to
issues festering in Goldsboro. Much of that a permanent facility and recruit residents
is attributed to the lack of a grocery store or who grow their own produce to participate
access to healthy foods. Prior to earning the as vendors. That would bring the farming
grant from Orlando Health, Donna’s office community aspect of their heritage full circle.
distributed 100 grow boxes to create the seeds “It’s a work in progress,” admits Donna. “We
for establishing community gardens that have a lot of exciting things taking place to
produce fresh fruit and vegetables. make this a healthier area to live.”

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE GOLDSBORO FARMERS MARKET: contact Venise White at 407.665.3008
or visit the Healthy Seminole County Facebook page for farmers market updates.

12 | ORL ANDO HEALTH COMMUNIT Y BENEFIT REPORT

18 FLAVORS WinterParkHoneyoffersover 125 LB MelloStevesPnuts
18 different flavors of honey has sold over 125
every week, each offering a pounds of peanuts
variety of health benefits. at the Goldsboro
Farmers Market.

COMMUNITY

GRANT

RECIPIENT

CLOCKWISE (Top Right): Donna J. Walsh, MPA, BSN, RN, Health
Officer, Florida Department of Health in Seminole County;
Venise White, MPH, MHPE Grants Writer & Community Programs
Manager, Florida Department of Health in Seminole County;
Juley Cetoute, B. S. Epidemiology: Health Planning and Policy
Research Epidemiology Contractor, Florida Department of Health in
Seminole County; Darryl Stokes Jr., co-owner, MelloStevesPnuts.

ORL ANDO HEALTH COMMUNIT Y BENEFIT REPORT | 13

COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS

Go
Baby

Go
FOR THE FIRST TIME IN HIS YOUNG LIFE, Lucas Mueller is able to explore
his surroundings. The smile on his face behind the wheel of his very own car is
both heartwarming and encouraging as he works to gain the mobility limited
by Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a form of childhood onset epilepsy.

The University of Central Florida’s (UCF) Go Baby nationwide. The UCF chapter is one of the more
Go! is a new initiative that gives two-and-a-half-year- successful organizations, due to community
old Lucas and other children with delayed or hindered partnerships and a strong volunteer base.
mobility a chance to experience the independence Seeing the positive impact that this new-found
of discovering their own little world. The idea is mobility has on these children and understanding
relatively simple: purchase off-the-shelf motorized toy its importance for their physical, cognitive and
cars, then rewire and retrofit them for children with social development, the Orlando Health Community
unique abilities. Benefit department and Arnold Palmer Hospital for
Dr. Jennifer Tucker, pediatric specialist and Children’s Outpatient Rehabilitation joined on as
physical therapy clinical director at UCF, brought active supporters of UCF’s program.
the program to UCF in 2015. The program was “By bringing community partners together to help
founded in 2012 by Dr. Cole Galloway, professor advance this program, Orlando Health and UCF
and infant behavioral specialist at the University of are opening up new worlds of discovery for children
Delaware. Today, Go Baby Go! boasts 60 chapters with mobility issues,” says Lainie Fox Ackerman, JD,

14 | ORL ANDO HEALTH COMMUNIT Y BENEFIT REPORT

ORL ANDO HEALTH COMMUNIT Y BENEFIT REPORT | 15

COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS

community benefit director at are the beneficiaries. When a child an array of positive results when
Orlando Health. laughs for the first time or siblings children with little or no mobility
fight over a toy car for the first get the chance to move about like
Community Partnerships time, that’s exciting. At the end of other kids.
Go Baby Go! Workshops — also the day, it’s all about the child. You “Lucas understands he can get
known as builds — for parents want them to be thinking or saying, somewhere new,” says Angie. “I
and therapists bring together ‘It’s so easy to make it move! I push see him more motivated to move.
community leaders and students a button and I can make it move!’” And he understands the cause and
to retrofit the cars. Prior to the The program’s grassroots effect aspect. The cars help these
workshops, the cars are rewired efforts are growing fast due kids find their environments.”
by UCF students so that toddlers to three major attributes: the When Angie learned of Go
can make the car move forward program is affordable, innovative Baby Go!, she encouraged Lucas’s
with the touch of a button on the and accessible. Affordability parents, Megan and Cory, to apply
steering wheel. is especially important. Many for one of the cars. Dr. Tucker
“We have students involved “adaptive” products for children selects the recipients based on
from a variety of different with unique abilities are expensive, applications received online.
disciplines, from engineering to adding further financial burdens “He does like to push buttons,”
physical therapy,” explains Dr. on families. says Megan. “We were extremely
Tucker. “The fuel that makes it “The cars give them a chance pleased to be chosen.” Lucas
run is the students.” to be mobile,” says Katie is one of the 10 children who
At last year’s workshop, Kinder, occupational therapist received a car in 2016. The cars
volunteers from Orlando Health, and supervisor of Arnold are offered to the families at no
Orlando City Soccer and Arnold Palmer Hospital’s Outpatient charge and maintained by UCF
Palmer Invitational took part Rehabilitation. “While there are if any adjustments are needed.
in the build at UCF. Ten red wheelchairs for toddlers, it’s a huge When the child outgrows the car,
Lightening McQueen cars investment. This is affordable.” families are asked to return it to
were customized for each child Katie says the goal is to involve UCF so another child can share
depending on their needs. The children with mobility issues in the experience.
miniature automobiles were the program at a young age to Since Lucas received his car,
decorated with stickers and decals help boost confidence. Most of Megan says his confidence to be
that the children chose before the children taking part in Go mobile has steadily increased.
they got behind the wheel and Baby Go! cannot walk, and these “He travels down hallways at
lined up for their big ride. Funding recrafted cars offer them the home,” she says. “He takes it
from Orlando Health provided freedom to explore and learn on outside onto the sidewalk. He
10 cars in 2016, 10 cars in 2017, their own. loves that car.”
plus individual builds for children “Our goal and our hope is that
throughout the year. Positive Results he will walk on his own, and he is
“It’s an emotional roller coaster Angie Krahn, Lucas’s physical starting to show signs that he will,
and a win for the therapists, for therapist at Arnold Palmer especially with a gate trainer,”
us and for all partners,” says Dr. Hospital’s Outpatient she adds. “We thank everyone
Tucker. “The families and parents Rehabilitation, says studies show involved. We are so blessed.”

“Our goal and 20 children with motor impairments
our hope is that at the workshops received
he will walk on modified toy cars to allow them
his own, and he the opportunity to play and
is starting to participate with their peers.
show signs that
he will...” 160 volunteers from across Orlando
Health, Orlando City Soccer
MEGAN MUELLER Club, Arnold Palmer Invitational,
UCF, and other community
organizations came together to
build cars for kids.

16 | ORL ANDO HEALTH COMMUNIT Y BENEFIT REPORT

OUR PARTNERS

Beyond our programs and services, the true value of our community benefit is illustrated best through the
relationships we maintain with like-minded organizations. By collaborating with more than 130 not-for-profit

groups, we are able to have a bigger, more meaningful impact on the Central Florida community.

100 Black Men of Orlando, Inc. Downtown Orlando Partnership Nathaniel’s Hope

* Adult Literacy League * Downtown South National Alliance for Mental Illness

* African American Chamber of * Early Learning Coalition * National Eating Disorder Association
Commerce of Central Florida of Orange County
* New Hope for Kids
* A Gift for Teaching * East Orlando Chamber
of Commerce Orange County Government
Ali’s Hope Foundation
* Edgewood Children’s Ranch * Orange County Regional
Always Wear Your Seatbelt History Center
Foundation Florida Alliance for Arts Education
* Orlando Ballet
Alzheimer’s & Dementia * Florida Chamber of Commerce
Resource Center * Orlando City Soccer Foundation
Florida Executive Women
* American Cancer Society Orlando Community Arts
Foundation for Foster Children
* American Diabetes Association * Orlando Day Nursery
* Foundation for Seminole County
* American Foundation for Public Schools * Orlando Economic Development
Suicide Prevention Commission
* Foundation for Seminole
* American Heart Association State College Orlando Magic Youth Foundation

* American Lung Association * Garden Theatre * Orlando Museum of Art

Apopka Area Chamber of * Girl Scouts of Citrus * Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra
Commerce
Give Kids the World Orlando Police Department
* Arab American Community Center
* Gr8 to Don8 * Orlando Repertory Theatre
* Asian American Chamber of
Commerce * Grace Medical Home * Orlando Science Center

* ATHENA International * Grove Counseling Center, The * Orlando Shakespeare Theater

Autism Society of Greater Orlando Habitat for Humanity * Oviedo-Winter Springs Chamber
of Commerce
* BASE Camp Children’s * Harbor House of Central Florida
Cancer Foundation * Rescue Outreach Mission
* Health Care Center for
* Beacon Network, The the Homeless * Ronald McDonald House Charities
of Central Florida
* Camp Boggy Creek * Healthy Start Coalition,
Orange County Runway to Hope
Canine for Companions
* Heart of Florida United Way Second Harvest Food Bank
Center for Independent Living
* Hispanic Business Initiative Fund Seminole County Cultural
* Central Florida Black Nurses Arts Council
Association * Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
of Metro Orlando * Seminole County Regional Chamber
Central Florida Disability Chamber of Commerce
of Commerce * Hispanic Heritage Scholarship Fund
Seminole Cultural Arts Council
* Central Florida Hotel & * Hope & Help Center
Lodging Association * Seniors First
* HOPE Helps, Inc.
* Central Florida Kidney Centers * Sharing Center, The
* IDignity
* Central Florida Partnership * Shepherd’s Hope, Inc.
Indian American Chamber
Central Florida Public Schools of Commerce Spina Bifida Association
Pantries
* International Drive Resort Area Sports 4 the Kids
* Central Florida Urban League Chamber of Commerce
Summer of Dreams
* Central Florida Zoo * Jewish Community Center
* Take Stock in Children
* Children’s Advocacy for Jewish Federation of
Osceola, Inc. Greater Orlando UCP of Central Florida

* Children’s Home Society * Junior Achievement * United Arts of Central Florida

* Children’s Safety Village Juvenile Diabetes Research * United Negro College Fund
Foundation
Christian Service Center of * University of Central Florida
Central Florida Kissimmee Osceola County Alumni Association
Chamber of Commerce
City of Orlando University of Central Florida College
* Leadership Florida of Medicine
* City Year
Leukemia/Lymphoma Society University of Central Florida Health
* Coalition for the Homeless Awareness and Prevention Society
of Central Florida * Lift Orlando
* Valencia College
Colon Cancer Coalition Macedonia Missionary
Baptist Church Victim Services Coalition of
* Community Based Care Central Florida
of Central Florida * Make-a-Wish Foundation
* Victory Cup Initiative
Community Health Center, Inc. * March of Dimes
* Visit Orlando
Cornerstone Hospice Foundation * Martin Luther King Jr.
Holiday Commission * West Orange Chamber
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation of Commerce
MBA Orlando
Down Syndrome Foundation * Winter Park Chamber of Commerce
Mental Health Association of
Downtown Arts District Central Florida * WMFE UCF

* YMCA of Central Florida

*Denotes Orlando Health board representatOioRnL A N D O H E A LT H C O M M U N I T Y B E N E F I T R E P O R T | 4

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