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Published by reenmnor, 2021-04-21 12:05:28

TIME for Kids G1 Teachers Manual

Treasures. Macmillan. McGraw-Hill

Keywords: TIME for Kids G1 Teachers Manual

Teacher’s
Manual

Includes Blackline Masters
for Test Practice

B

Published by Macmillan/McGraw-Hill, of McGraw-Hill Education, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.,
Two Penn Plaza, New York, New York 10121.
Copyright © by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. The contents, or parts thereof, may be reproduced in print form
for non-profit educational use with Treasures, provided such reproductions bear copyright notice, but may not be reproduced in
any form for any other purpose without the prior written consent of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., including, but not limited to,
network storage or transmission, or broadcast for distance learning.
Printed in the United States of America
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 HES 13 12 11 10 09

Contents

Pacing Suggestions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v ISSUE 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
How to Use Time For Kids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi Author’s Purpose
Charts
ISSUE 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Context Clues
Retell
Photographs and Captions Eat Well, Feel Well Model the Skills
Context Clues Orange You Glad? Apply the Skills
Climb the Pyramid Diagrams
Pond Life Model the Skills
Earth Helpers Apply the Skills ISSUE 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
Leave it to Beavers Diagrams Main Idea and Details
Lists
ISSUE 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Context Clues
Main Idea and Details
Maps Sharing with Others Model the Skills
Context Clues Thanks, Mom and Dad Apply the Skills
Hamster Hide-and-Seek Poetry
Getting over the Hump Model the Skills
Not a Drop to Drink Apply the Skills ISSUE 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
Bubbles Poetry Author’s Purpose
Photographs and Captions
ISSUE 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Context Clues
Compare and Contrast
Diagrams The Forest Roof Model the Skills
Context Clues Rain Forests: From Soup to Nuts

A Ladybug’s Life Model the Skills Apply the Skills
Giving Time for the Common Good Life in the Rain Forest Diagrams

Apply the Skills ISSUE 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
The Caterpillar Poetry Main Idea and Details
Diagrams
Context Clues

Digging for Bones Model the Skills
Animals on the Move Apply the Skills
Loose and Limber Poetry

Teacher’s Manual iii

ISSUE 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 ISSUE 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111

Main Idea and Details Retell
Maps Photographs and Captions
Context Clues Context Clues

Wow! Wind Works! Model the Skills Money Goes Around Model the Skills

Blow, Wind, Blow! Apply the Skills How Money Is Made Apply the Skills

Cloud Parade Poetry U.S. Coins Charts

ISSUE 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 ISSUE 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121

Main Idea and Details Compare and Contrast
Charts Diagrams
Context Clues Context Clues

Sunny Side Up Model the Skills Things Change Model the Skills

Where Does the Water Go? Apply the Skills What a Trip! Apply the Skills

Sunflakes Poetry The Space Shuttle Diagrams

ISSUE 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 ISSUE 14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131

Main Idea and Details Compare and Contrast
Signs and Symbols Signs and Symbols
Context Clues Context Clues

Whoo’s a Wonderful Bird? Model the Skills Wild About Museums Model the Skills

Food for Whoo? Apply the Skills A Basket Maker Apply the Skills

Growing and Changing Charts Sarah Enters a Painting Poetry

ISSUE 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 ISSUE 15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141

Author’s Purpose Main Idea and Details
Charts Photographs and Captions
Context Clues Context Clues

Prize Pets Model the Skills Get Ready, Get Set, Go! Model the Skills

All for America! Apply the Skills Play Ball! Apply the Skills

Lady Liberty Diagrams From the autograph album Poetry

Short-Answer Reading Rubric . . . . . . . . . . . . . .T1
Answer Key. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .T2

iv Time For Kids

Pacing Suggestions

THREE-MONTH PACING SUGGESTION

You might wish to use the Time for Kids, Student Edition as test preparation
starting in the second half of the year. At this pace, each issue corresponds to
one week of instruction in the Teacher’s Edition.

Time for Kids, Student Edition Issue Related Teacher’s Edition Lesson
Issue 1 Unit 4 Week 1
Issue 2 Unit 4 Week 2
Issue 3 Unit 4 Week 3
Issue 4 Unit 4 Week 4
Issue 5 Unit 4 Week 5
Issue 6 Unit 5 Week 1
Issue 7 Unit 5 Week 2
Issue 8 Unit 5 Week 3
Issue 9 Unit 5 Week 4
Issue 10 Unit 5 Week 5
Issue 11 Unit 6 Week 1
Issue 12 Unit 6 Week 2
Issue 13 Unit 6 Week 3
Issue 14 Unit 6 Week 4
Issue 15 Unit 6 Week 5

USING TIME FOR KIDS THROUGHOUT THE YEAR

Each issue contains 2 articles and a poem or text feature. You might wish to
use the Time for Kids, Student Edition throughout the year by assigning one
article a week. The poem or text feature can be read with the second article.

Teacher’s Manual v

How to Use Time for Kids

TIME FOR KIDS, STUDENT EDITION
Each issue in Time for Kids, Student Edition includes two
articles and a text feature, such as a chart or a diagram, or a poem.
Each issue relates to Social Studies or Science skills.

TRANSPARENCIES
A transparency is provided for the
first article in each issue. Use the
transparency to model how to
answer test questions. Questions
are provided in Blackline Masters
found in the Time for Kids
Teacher’s Manual.

TEACHER’S MANUAL
The Teacher’s Manual contains lessons for each issue of
Time for Kids.
Article 1: Model the Skills
Use the transparency and Blackline Master to model how to answer
comprehension, vocabulary, and text feature questions. Read the
questions and answers aloud to children.

Article 2: Apply the Skills
The Blackline Master for the second article offers children the
opportunity to answer questions based on the same skills and
strategies modeled with the first article. Read the questions and
answers aloud to children.

Text Feature or Poetry: Apply the Skills
A third Blackline Master is provided for children to review
previously taught skills and strategies. Read the questions and
answers aloud to children.

vi Time For Kids

COMPREHENSION AND VOCABULARY FOCUS
As noted earlier, each issue of Time for Kids relates to Social
Studies or Science skills. However, the items in the tests that
accompany each issue focus on Reading and Language Arts skills
and strategies for comprehension, vocabulary, and text features.

SHORT-ANSWER PREPARATION
The first two tests for each issue of Time for Kids provide
opportunities for children to practice responding to short-
answer items. These items will help children to begin building
the skills and confidence they will need when they are faced
with short-answer items in a testing situation.

LEVELS OF THINKING
Test questions can be broken down into four developmentally
sequenced categories, based on the different levels of thinking
required to answer them.

• A question may have an answer that is stated in the selection.

At the most basic level, children can find or locate the answer
in the selection. Words from the question and words that
answer it are often “right there” in the same sentence. At the
next level, the answers are stated in the text but cannot be
found in a single sentence. Children must “think and search,” or
combine different parts of the selection, to find the answer.

• A question may have an answer that is not stated in the

selection. For an “author and me” question at the third level
of thinking, children must find clues and text evidence in the
selection and connect them to find the inferred or implied
answer to the question. A question that addresses the fourth
level of thinking requires children to analyze the selection
and make judgments based on text evidence to determine
the author’s style or purpose for writing.

Teacher’s Manual vii



Retell TFK Pages 6–7

MODEL THE SKILL Materials
Have children open to page 5 of Time for Kids, Student Edition.
Look at the cover and read the article titles aloud with the Transparency
class. Have children preview the photographs and captions. Tell pp. 6–7
children, We will learn how to retell the information from a text Blackline Masters
in order. 1, 2, 3

Display Transparency pp. 6–7 of the article “Pond Life” and
distribute Blackline Master 1. Ask children to turn to page 6 of
Time for Kids. Ask children to look at the title and photographs
before they read the article. Have children read the article
carefully and identify any words they do not know. Underline
these words on the transparency and review them with the class.
Then read the following question and answer choices aloud:

1 When does a swan swim?
A In the morning
B In the afternoon
C At night

From Blackline Master 1

Think Aloud This question asks when a swan swims. I can locate
the answer in the selection. First I find the part of the article that
tells about swans. Then I look for words that tell about times of
day. I see a sentence that says: In the afternoon, a swan swims.
This is the stated answer.

Elicit the correct answer (B) from children. Explain that this
choice, In the afternoon, is correct because the article says that
a swan swims in the afternoon. Work through the rest of the
answers and show that they are not correct.

For further practice with the comprehension skill, you may wish
to have children work together or independently to answer
question 2 on Blackline Master 1.

Teacher’s Manual 1

TFK Pages 6–7

Photographs and Captions

3 What animal stays up MODEL THE SKILL
at night?
A Raccoon Explain to children that texts often are accompanied by
B Swan photographs that can help them understand information from
C Heron a reading. Sometimes there will be text that explains what
is happening in the photograph. This kind of text is called a
From Blackline Master 1 caption. Invite children to look at the photographs and describe
what they see.

Then read question 3 aloud.

Think Aloud This article has photographs of different animals.
I should look for a picture of a raccoon, a swan, and a heron and
make sure to read the information that goes with the photos.
Then I can combine these details to figure out the stated answer.

Have children look at the photographs and colored captions
on pages 6 and 7. Point to the correct photograph and caption
on the transparency and read the caption aloud with the class.
Explain that the caption gives information about the animal.
Then have children select the correct answer choice (A).

Context Clues

4 On page 7, the article MODEL THE SKILL
says that a heron can
trap a bug. What does Tell children that they may not know the meaning of every
trap mean? single word in a text that they read. Explain that the context, or
A Drink the other words and sentences in the paragraph, can help them
figure out what unfamiliar words mean.
B Run
Then read question 4 aloud.
C Catch
Think Aloud The answer to this question is not stated in the
From Blackline Master 1 article. To answer it, I will have to find clues in the article and
connect them. I can start by finding the sentence that has the
word trap in it. I will see if any words or sentences near it in the
paragraph or anything in the picture can help me figure out what
trap means.

Invite children to explain what the text and the picture tell about
how and why herons trap bugs. Go through each choice and
have the class decide which answer makes the most sense in the
context of the article (C).

2 Time For Kids • Issue 1

TFK Pages 6–7

Short Answer

MODEL WRITING A SHORT ANSWER
Remind children that short-answer questions will ask them to
write an answer in complete sentences on the lines provided.
Read the following short-answer question aloud:

5 Tell, in order, when you can find different animals at the
pond. Support your answer with details from the article.

From Blackline Master 1

Think Aloud The question asks me to tell when different
animals are at the pond. I need to find details from the article
that support the idea that different animals are at the pond at
different times. I can combine these details to write the answer.

Help children put their fingers on details from the article to
answer the question, and have a volunteer underline these
details on the transparency. Have children look for clues about
time of day, such as morning and afternoon. Remind children
that the answer should be based only on information from the
article, not on something that they read or saw somewhere else.
Tell children that they should answer in their own words and that
they should not copy sentences from the article. Write a short
answer together. Remind children to form complete sentences in
their answers.

Possible response: Dragonflies are at the pond in the morning.
Swans are there in the afternoon. Raccoons are there at night.

See page T1 of the Teacher’s Manual for a short-answer rubric.
See page T2 for answers to Blackline Master 1.

Teacher’s Manual 3

Student Name

DIRECTIONS
Answer these questions about “Pond Life.”

1 When does a swan swim?
A In the morning
B In the afternoon
C At night

2 In the morning, a dragonfly looks for —
A plants
B lily pads
C bugs to eat

3 What animal stays up at night?
A Raccoon
B Swan
C Heron

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 1 Grade 1
Pond Life
4 Time For Kids

Student Name

4 On page 7, the article says that a heron can trap a bug.
What does trap mean?
A Drink
B Run
C Catch

5 Tell, in order, when you can find different animals at the
pond. Support your answer with details from the article.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 1 Time For Kids 5

Grade 1
Pond Life

TFK Pages 8–9

Show What You Know

APPLY THE SKILLS

Remind children that some of the questions they will see on a
test will focus on retelling, context clues, and using photographs
and captions. Introduce “Earth Helpers” by having children open
to page 8 of Time for Kids. Point out that the important ideas of
an article can often be found in the title and photographs. Have
children look at the photographs, captions, and headings and
then ask, What do you think the article is about?

Encourage children to share their ideas and explain how they
came to those conclusions. Record their ideas on the board. Tell
children to keep these ideas in mind as they read to see if their
ideas are correct.

Remind children to use context clues as they read to figure out
the meanings of unfamiliar words. Then have children read the
article independently.

Distribute Blackline Master 2 on pages 7-8 of the Teacher’s
Manual. Tell children that they will take a practice test on the
article they just read. Share these specific suggestions with
children to help them answer test questions:

1. Before you read, look at pictures, headings, and the title to give you an
idea of what the article is about.

2. Read “Earth Helpers” and the questions on the worksheet very carefully.
Make sure you understand what the questions are asking.

3. Make sure your answers are based on the article. If you are not sure
about the details, go back and read that part again.

4. Plan your answer carefully before you write. Make sure you answer every
part of the question and use support from the article in your answer.

5. Make sure to write complete sentences.

Have children complete Blackline Master 2. Answers can be
found on pages T2–T3 of the Teacher’s Manual.

6 Time For Kids • Issue 1

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Student Name

DIRECTIONS
Answer these questions about “Earth Helpers.”

1 Look at the chart about “Earth Helpers.”

First
Kids in green schools have lunch.

Next
Glass and plastic bottles are recycled.

Last

Which idea belongs in the bottom box?
A Bottles are made into kites.
B Bottles are thrown away in the trash.
C Bottles are made into new products.

2 Before the children go to the park, they —
A save money to help the school
B make kites from old plastic bags
C learn about animals in class

Blackline Master 2 Time For Kids 7

Grade 1
Earth Helpers

Student Name

3 Brett uses a plastic bag to make a —
A kite
B bottle
C plant

4 The article says, “During class, they find ways to reuse
things.” What does the word reuse mean?
A Talk about
B Use again
C Throw away

5 What do children in a green school do to help Earth? Support
your answer with details from the article.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 2 Grade 1
Earth Helpers
8 Time For Kids

TFK Page 10

Diagrams

APPLY THE SKILLS
Tell children that they will practice what they learned about
diagrams. Remind children that a diagram is a picture with
labels. Labels give information about what is being shown in the
picture. Have children open to “Leave It to Beavers” on page 10
of Time for Kids. Read the title “Leave It to Beavers” with children
and ask them to look at the article. Then ask them to share their
ideas on what the article is about. Write their ideas on the board.

Invite children to look at the diagram of the dam. Ask children
to think about how beavers build a dam. Ask what materials the
beavers might use and how the beavers get the materials.

Have children follow along with the text as you read it aloud. Ask
them to identify any words they do not know. After you have
finished reading, explain any unfamiliar words.

Have children look at the diagram and discuss what the beavers
do in each labeled part of the diagram. Explain that the den is a
part of the lodge.

Read aloud the question and answer choices. Tell children to
look back at the diagram to find details and facts. Then they can
combine this text evidence to determine the stated answer to
the question.

Think Aloud I need to remember that there is only one correct
answer to the question. I should look for details and facts in the
diagram that I can combine to come up with the correct answer.

Remind children that they should look for the label on the
diagram that says entrance to figure out where the entrance is.
Tell them to read each answer choice carefully.

After children have identified the correct answer (A), go back to
the diagram. Ask a volunteer to show how the arrow from the
label entrance is pointing below, or under, the water.

Have children complete Blackline Master 3 on page 10 of the
Teacher’s Manual. Answers can be found on page T3.

Teacher’s Manual 9

Student Name © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

DIRECTIONS
Answer these questions about “Leave It to Beavers,”

1 Where is the entrance to the lodge?
A Under the water
B Above the dam
C In the den

2 Where does a beaver find food?
A In the den
B At the dam
C In the pond

3 The article says, “Soon, the dam blocks the river and makes a
pond.” What does the word blocks mean?
A Opens
B Holds back
C Fills up

Blackline Master 3 Grade 1
Leave It to Beavers
10 Time For Kids

Main Idea and Details TFK Pages 12–13

MODEL THE SKILL Materials
Have children open to page 11 of Time for Kids, Student
Edition. Look at the cover and read the article titles aloud with Transparency
the class. Have children preview the photographs and captions. pp. 12–13
Tell children, We will use these articles to learn how to identify Blackline Masters
the main idea and important details in a text. 4, 5, 6

Display Transparency pp. 12–13 of the article “Getting over
the Hump” and distribute Blackline Master 4. Ask children to
turn to page 12 of Time for Kids. Ask children to look at the title
and photographs before they read the article. Have them read
the article carefully and identify any words they do not know.
Underline these words on the transparency and review them
with the class. Then read the following question and answer
choices aloud:

1 What is this article mostly about?
A What camels in Africa look like
B How children in Garissa get books
C Why young children like to read

From Blackline Master 4

Think Aloud This question asks what the article is mostly about.
That means I need to figure out the main idea of the article.
I have to look at the whole article to see what each section is
about. The headings and pictures can help me, too. Then I can
connect the details to come up with the answer.

Go through all of the answer choices with children and have
them identify the correct answer (B). Have children explain
how they got the answer. Invite a volunteer to underline on the
transparency the details he or she used to determine the answer.

For further practice with the comprehension skill, you may wish
to have children work together or independently to answer
question 2 on Blackline Master 4.

Teacher’s Manual 11

TFK Pages 12–13

Maps

3 Look at the map on MODEL THE SKILL
page 13. What is the
name of the capital of Explain that texts often are accompanied by maps that can
Kenya? help them understand information from a reading. Maps are
A Nairobi drawings that show the locations of countries, cities, and other
B Somalia places. Invite children to look at the map on page 13. On the
C Ethiopia transparency, show the outline of the country of Kenya. Point
to the labels that name the nearby countries of Ethiopia and
From Blackline Master 4 Somalia. Then point out the map key and discuss the symbols
used to show a city and the capital.

Read question 3 aloud.

Think Aloud The article talks about the village of Garissa, but it
does not mention any other cities or towns in Kenya. I need to
look at the map and the map key to find the name of the capital
of Kenya. Then I can combine these details to find the answer.

Have children look at the map and find the three names listed in
the answer choices: Nairobi, Somalia, and Ethiopia. Point to the
map key and remind children that a solid black dot stands for a
city, and a star inside a circle stands for a capital city. Then have
the children select the correct answer choice (A).

Context Clues

4 “Garissa is a remote, MODEL THE SKILL
or faraway, village in
the desert in Kenya.” Tell children that they may not know the meaning of every word
Which word in the in a text that they read. Explain that sometimes the other words
sentence helps you and sentences in the paragraph can help them figure out the
understand what meaning of an unfamiliar word.
remote means?
A faraway Then read question 4 aloud.

B village Think Aloud I see the word remote in the sentence. I can look at
the other words in the sentence for clues about what remote
C desert means. Then I can connect these clues to figure out the meaning
of the word.
From Blackline Master 4
Point to the first sentence in the article and read it aloud. Point
to the difficult word remote. This word describes the village of
Garissa. Ask children to find an easier word that also describes
Garissa (faraway). Then ask children to select the best answer (A).

12 Time For Kids • Issue 2

TFK Pages 12–13

Short Answer

MODEL WRITING A SHORT ANSWER
Remind children that short-answer questions will ask them to
write an answer in complete sentences on the lines provided.
Read the following short-answer question aloud:

5 How do children who live near Garissa get books to read?
Support your answer with details from the article.

From Blackline Master 4

Think Aloud This question asks about how the children in Garissa
get books to read. I need to look back at the text and the photos
to find details that tell how books get to Garissa. Then I can
combine these details to write the answer.

Work with children to find details from the article to answer
this question. Have a volunteer underline these details on the
transparency. Remind children that the answer should be based
on information from the text. Tell children that they should
answer in their own words, and not copy sentences from the
article. Write a short answer together. Remind children to use
complete sentences in their answers.

Possible response: The children who live near Garissa do not
have books to read. People from other countries give books to
a special library for these children. Camels carry the books to
towns near Garissa so children can read the books.

See page T1 of the Teacher’s Manual for a short-answer rubric.
See page T4 for answers to Blackline Master 4.

Teacher’s Manual 13

Student Name © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

DIRECTIONS
Answer these questions about “Getting over the Hump.”

1 What is this article mostly about?
A What camels in Africa look like
B How children in Garissa get books
C Why young children like to read

2 Books get to Garissa by —
A horse
B car
C camel

3 Look at the map on page 13. What is the name of the capital
of Kenya?
A Nairobi
B Somalia
C Ethiopia

Blackline Master 4 Grade 1
Getting over the Hump
14 Time For Kids

Student Name

4 “Garissa is a remote, or faraway, village in the desert in
Kenya.” Which word in the sentence helps you understand
what remote means?
A faraway
B village
C desert

5 How do children who live near Garissa get books to read?
Support your answer with details from the article.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 4 Time For Kids 15

Grade 1
Getting over the Hump

TFK Pages 14–15

Show What You Know

APPLY THE SKILLS

Remind children that some of the questions they will see on
a test will focus on main ideas and details, context clues, and
reading maps. Introduce “Not a Drop to Drink” by having children
turn to page 14 in Time for Kids. Point out that important ideas
of an article often are found in the headings and photographs.
Have children look at the photographs, map, and headings, and
then ask, What do you think the article is mainly about?

Encourage children to share what they think is the main idea of
the article. Have them point to the text and text features to show
how they came up with their answers.

Remind children to use context clues as they read to figure out
the meanings of unfamiliar words. Then have children read the
article independently.

Distribute Blackline Master 5 on pages 17–18 of the Teacher’s
Manual and tell children that they will take a practice test on
the article they just read. Share these specific suggestions with
children to help them answer test questions:

1. Before you read, look at pictures, headings, and the title to give you an
idea of what the article is about.

2. Read “Not a Drop to Drink” and the questions on the worksheet very
carefully. Make sure you understand what the questions are asking.

3. Make sure your answers are based on information in the article, not
something that you read or saw somewhere else. If you are not sure
about the details, go back and look at that part again.

4. For the short-answer question, plan your answer carefully before you
write. Make sure you use details from the article to support your answer.

5. Be sure to write complete sentences in your answer.

Have children complete Blackline Master 5. Answers can be
found on pages T4–T5 of the Teacher’s Manual.

16 Time For Kids • Issue 2

Student Name

DIRECTIONS
Answer these questions about “Not a Drop to Drink.”

1 Look at the web about the “Water Wise” part of the article.

Kids help out on
World Water Day.

Make Teach others
posters to take short

showers

Which idea belongs on the blank line?
A Give people water to drink
B Grow plants at home and school
C Teach others to water plants at night

2 World Water Day makes us think about —
A the importance of water
B using umbrellas in the rain
C how much water on Earth is salty

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 5 Time For Kids 17

Grade 1
Not a Drop to Drink

Student Name

3 Look at the map on page 14. What ocean is between
North America and Europe?
A Atlantic Ocean
B Pacific Ocean
C Indian Ocean

4 The article says, “So world leaders chose a day to teach
about it.” What does the word chose mean?
A Gave
B Told
C Picked

5 Why should people save water? Support your answer with
details from the article.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 5 Grade 1
Not a Drop to Drink
18 Time For Kids

Poetry TFK Page 16

APPLY THE SKILLS 1 Which words from the
first stanza rhyme?
Tell children that they will read a poem and answer questions A tank, lake
about it. Explain to children that a poem usually is written in lines B bubbles, batter
and stanzas instead of paragraphs. Many poems have words C lake, cake
that rhyme. Rhyming words usually come at the ends of lines.
Sometimes poems repeat a word or line several times to help From Blackline Master 6
express an important idea.

Have children open to “Bubbles,” on page 16 of Time for Kids.
Read the title “Bubbles” with children and ask them to share
their ideas on what the poem will be about. Write their ideas
on the board. Have children follow along with the poem as you
read it aloud. Then have children identify the images of bubbles
in the poem. Ask if they can they “see” these word pictures in
their minds. Explain any images they do not understand. (For
example, explain that spittlebugs are bugs that suck sap out of
plants and then fill the sap with bubbles. Ask if any children have
seen plants covered with frothy, or bubbly, sap.)

Distribute Blackline Master 6 on page 20 of the Teacher’s
Manual. Read aloud the first question and the answer choices.
Tell children to look at the poem to find the answer.

Think Aloud This question asks about words that rhyme. I know
that rhyming words are words that end with the same sound.
I can say the words to myself and connect the sounds to find the
ones that rhyme.

After children have identified the correct answer (C), read all of
the answer choices aloud so they can hear which pairs of words
rhyme and which do not.

Have children complete Blackline Master 6. Answers can be
found on page T5 of the Teacher’s Manual.

Teacher’s Manual 19

Student Name © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

DIRECTIONS
Answer these questions about “Bubbles.”

1 Which words from the first stanza rhyme?
A tank, lake
B bubbles, batter
C lake, cake

2 Which line from the poem has the same rhythm as “Bubbles
in the ocean”?
A “Bubbles in the lake”
B “Bubbles in the garden”
C “Bubbles from my bubble wand”

3 In which line does the poet repeat the same beginning sound
in two or more words?
A “Bubbles in the batter”
B “Flowing with the tide”
C “Where a spittlebug can hide”

Blackline Master 6 Grade 1
Bubbles
20 Time For Kids

Compare and Contrast TFK Pages 18–19

MODEL THE SKILL Materials
Have children open to page 17 of Time for Kids, Student
Edition. Look at the cover and read the article titles aloud with Transparency
the class. Have children preview the photographs and captions. pp. 18–19
Tell children, We will use these articles to learn how to compare Blackline Masters
and contrast things that are alike and different in a text. 7, 8, 9
Explain that when you compare two things, you tell how they
are alike. Some clue words that tell that things are alike are both,
and, also, like, and too. When you contrast two things, you tell
how they are different. Some clue words that tell that things are
different are yet, but, most, and than.

Display Transparency pp. 18–19 of the article “A Ladybug’s Life”
and distribute Blackline Master 7. Ask children to turn to page
18 of Time for Kids and look at the title and photographs before
they read the article. Have children read the article carefully and
identify any words they do not know. Underline these words on
the transparency and review them with the class. Then read the
following question and answer choices aloud:

1 How is the larva different from a grown ladybug?
A It is bigger.

B It is smaller.

C It is faster.

From Blackline Master 7

Think Aloud This question asks how a larva is different from a
grown ladybug. I can locate the answer in the selection. First I
find the part of the article that tells about the larva stage. Then I
look for details telling how the larva is different.

After children have had a chance to review the article, point out
the correct answer (B). Invite a volunteer to underline the detail
sentences on the transparency that give the answer (Out comes a
little bug, or larva. It is much smaller than a grown ladybug.)

For further practice with the comprehension skill, you may wish
to have children work together or independently to answer
question 2 on Blackline Master 7.

Teacher’s Manual 21

TFK Pages 18–19

Diagrams

3 Look at the diagram MODEL THE SKILL
on page 19. What
is on the ladybug’s Explain to the children that a diagram can help a reader visualize
head? information explained in the text. Diagrams usually have labels
A Leg that identify each part and captions that give information.
B Wing Explain that diagrams provide information that may not appear
C Antenna in the text.

From Blackline Master 7 Then read question 3 and the answer choices aloud.

Think Aloud This question asks what the diagram shows. I
will need to look at the picture and read the labels. Then I will
combine the information I found in the diagram and see which
answer choice is best.

Point to the diagram of the ladybug on Transparency pp. 18–19
and then point to two of the labels and read them aloud. Have
children look at the diagram of the ladybug on page 19 and
decide which answer choice is correct (C).

Context Clues

4 On page 18, the article MODEL THE SKILL
says, “A ladybug
grows in three stages.” Tell children that they may not know the meaning of every single
What does stages word they read. Explain that the pictures and other words and
mean in this sentence? phrases in the text provide context clues that can help them
A Shells determine the meaning of an unfamiliar word.
B Places
C Steps Then read question 4 aloud.

From Blackline Master 7 Think Aloud I see the word stages in the article. I cannot figure
out the meaning of stages from this sentence alone. When I
look at the article, I see the word stage in the four numbered
headings about the parts of a ladybug’s life. I need to connect this
information to figure out what stages means.

After children have had time to review the article, have them
decide which answer choice is correct (C).

22 Time For Kids • Issue 3

TFK Pages 18–19

Short Answer

MODEL WRITING A SHORT ANSWER
Remind children that short-answer questions will ask them to
write an answer in complete sentences on the lines provided.
Read the following short-answer question aloud:

5 How are ladybugs different from other bugs? Support your
answer with details from the article.

From Blackline Master 7

Think Aloud I need to find details in the article about ladybugs
and other bugs. Then I can combine the details to find out how
they how they are different. I remember that the last part of the
article, “Science Scoop,” talked about ladybugs and other bugs. I
need to go back to that section and reread it.

Work with children to find the paragraph under “Science Scoop”
that discusses the differences between ladybugs and other bugs.
Have a volunteer point to this paragraph on the transparency.
Tell children that they should write the answer in their own
words and not copy the sentences from the article. Write a short
answer together. Remind children to form complete sentences in
their answers.

Possible response: The wings are different on ladybugs than
on other bugs. Ladybugs have two outer wings and thin wings
underneath them.

See page T1 of the Teacher’s Manual for a short-answer rubric.
See page T6 for answers to Blackline Master 7.

Teacher’s Manual 23

Student Name © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

DIRECTIONS
Answer these questions about “A Ladybug’s Life.”

1 How is the larva different from a grown ladybug?
A It is bigger.
B It is smaller.
C It is faster.

2 Ladybugs and other bugs all have —
A six legs
B four legs
C three legs

3 Look at the diagram on page 19. What is on the ladybug’s
head?
A Leg
B Wing
C Antenna

Blackline Master 7 Grade 1
A Ladybug’s Life
24 Time For Kids

Student Name

4 On page 18, the article says, “A ladybug grows in three
stages.” What does stages mean in this sentence?
A Shells
B Places
C Steps

5 How are ladybugs different from other bugs? Support your
answer with details from the article.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 7 Time For Kids 25

Grade 1
A Ladybug’s Life

TFK Pages 20–21

Show What You Know

APPLY THE SKILLS

Remind children that some of the questions they will see on a
test will focus on comparing and contrasting, reading diagrams
with labels, and context clues. Introduce “Giving Time for the
Common Good” by having children open to page 20 in Time for
Kids. Point out to children that important ideas of an article can
be found in the title and photographs. Have children look at the
photographs, headings, and diagram, and then ask, What do you
think the article is about?

Encourage children to share what they think will be compared
and contrasted in the article. Have them point to the text and
text features in the article to show how they came up with their
answers.

Remind children to use context clues as they read to figure out
the meanings of unfamiliar words. Then have children read the
article independently.

Distribute Blackline Master 8 on pages 27–28 of the Teacher’s
Manual and tell children that they will take a practice test on
the article they just read. Share these specific suggestions with
children to help them answer test questions:

1. Before you read, look at the title, photographs, and captions to give you
an idea of what the article is about.

2. Read “Giving Time for the Common Good” and the questions on the
worksheet very carefully. Make sure you understand what the questions
are asking.

3. Make sure your answers are based on the article, diagram, and labels.
If you are not sure about the details, go back and read that part again.

4. For the short-answer question, plan your answer carefully before you
write. Make sure you answer every part of the question and use support
from the article in your answer.

5. Be sure to write complete sentences in your answer.

Have children complete Blackline Master 8. Answers can be
found on pages T6–T7 of the Teacher’s Manual.

26 Time For Kids • Issue 3

Student Name

DIRECTIONS
Answer these questions about “Giving Time for the
Common Good.”

1 Look at the diagram below.

Big Bend Help Big Bend
Rangers people Volunteers
Work for

free

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Which idea goes on the blank line?
A Get paid
B Fix trails
C Win awards

2 What is one way all park rangers are alike?
A They all work at Big Bend.
B They all join Take Pride in America.
C They all help people stay safe.

Blackline Master 8 Time For Kids 27

Grade 1
Giving Time for the Common Good

Student Name

3 What animal is shown on the patch on page 20?
A Sequoia
B Bison
C Bull

4 What does the word uniforms mean?
A Special clothes for workers
B Prizes for volunteers
C Rules for people in the park

5 In what ways are all volunteers alike? Support your answer
with details from the article.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 8 Grade 1
Giving Time for the Common Good
28 Time For Kids

Poetry TFK Page 22

APPLY THE SKILLS 1 The speaker in the
Tell children that they will read a poem and answer some poem thinks the
questions about it. Remind children that many poems rhyme. caterpillar’s eyes
Explain that poems often describe people, places, or things in are —
unusual or playful ways. A ugly
B big
Have children open to “The Caterpillar” on page 22 of Time for C fat
Kids and follow along with the poem as you read it aloud. Ask
children to identify any words they do not know. After you have From Blackline Master 9
finished reading, explain any unfamiliar words. Point out the
word play with the words cat and caterpillar in the first line of the
poem.

Distribute Blackline Master 9 on page 30 of the Teacher’s
Manual. Read aloud the question and answer choices. Tell
children to look at the poem to find details and ideas to
determine the stated answer.

Think Aloud To answer this question, I first need to look at the
poem and find the lines that tell about the caterpillar’s eyes. Then
I will connect the information to figure out how the speaker feels.

After children have identified the correct answer (A), go back to
the poem and have a volunteer read aloud the words or phrases
that led to the correct answer.

Have children complete Blackline Master 9. Answers can be
found on page T7 of the Teacher’s Manual.

Teacher’s Manual 29

Student Name

DIRECTIONS
Answer these questions about “The Caterpillar.”

1 The speaker in the poem thinks the caterpillar’s eyes are —
A ugly
B big
C fat

2 Which word from the poem rhymes with eyes?
A Beady
B Prize
C Fat

3 How is a caterpillar different from a cat?
A A caterpillar is very small.
B A caterpillar has a big brain.
C A caterpillar knows how to eat.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 9 Grade 1
The Caterpillar
30 Time For Kids

Author’s Purpose TFK Pages 24–25

MODEL THE SKILL Materials
Have children open to page 23 of Time for Kids, Student
Edition. Look at the cover and read the article titles aloud with Transparency
the class. Have children preview the photographs and captions. pp. 24–25
Tell children, We will use these articles to learn how to identify Blackline Masters
the author’s purpose in a text. 10, 11, 12

Display Transparency pp. 24–25 of the article “Eat Well, Feel
Well” and distribute Blackline Master 10. Have children turn to
page 24 of Time for Kids. Ask children to look at the title and
photographs before they read the article and to predict what
they think the article is about. Then have children read the article
carefully and identify any words they do not know. Underline
these words on the transparency and review them with the class.
Then read the following question and answer choices aloud:

1 The author wrote this article to —
A tell a story about a boy

B teach readers about healthy foods

C show readers how to cook

From Blackline Master 10

Think Aloud This question asks why the author wrote this article.
I know the answer will not be stated in the text. I will have to
analyze the writing to understand the author’s purpose. I will
look at the pictures and headings for clues, too. I need to think
about what the article is about and how the author presents the
information. Is the author trying to tell an entertaining story,
explain something, or show how to do something?

Explain that several answers might mention ideas from the text
but that only one answer identifies the author’s purpose for
writing the article. Allow children to select an answer choice.
Have them explain how they reached the correct answer (B).

For further practice with the comprehension skill, you may wish
to have children work together or independently to answer
question 2 on Blackline Master 10.

Teacher’s Manual 31

TFK Pages 24–25

Charts

3 Look at the chart on MODEL THE SKILL
page 25. In which
food group does corn Explain to children that some texts are accompanied by charts
belong? that give additional information about the text. Charts can help
A Fruit to organize the information in the article. Invite children to look
B Meat at the chart on page 25.
C Vegetables
Then read question 3 aloud.
From Blackline Master 10
Think Aloud This chart adds more information than the text gives
about different kinds of food. I will read the headings and the
information that goes along with the chart to find details about
food groups and corn. Then I will combine these details to figure
out the correct answer to the question.

Have children look at the chart. Read the title and headings of
the chart with children. Point out that the different foods are
classified, or grouped, by type: fruit, vegetables, meat, and dairy.
Give children a moment to choose an answer and then ask them
to show how they reached the correct answer (C).

Context Clues

4 On page 24, the article MODEL THE SKILL
says, “Oats, wheat,
and bran give you Tell children that they may not know the meaning of every word
energy.” What is the in a text that they read. Explain that context clues, or other words
meaning of energy? and phrases in the same sentence or the same paragraph, can
A Power help them figure out the meaning of an unfamiliar word.

B Shape Then read question 4 aloud.

C Hair Think Aloud This question asks what energy means. I will go
back to the text to see where the word energy is used and look
From Blackline Master 10 for clues in the sentences near it. Then I can connect the clues to
determine the answer.

Have children read through the answer choices on their own
and choose the best answer (A). Ask children to share the answer
with the class. Have volunteers underline on the transparency
the clues they connected to figure out the answer.

32 Time For Kids • Issue 4

TFK Pages 24–25

Short Answer

MODEL WRITING A SHORT ANSWER
Remind children that short-answer questions will ask them to
write an answer in complete sentences on the lines provided.
Read the following short-answer question aloud:

5 Why does the author include the photograph of the boy?
Support your answer with details from the article.

From Blackline Master 10

Think Aloud This question asks about why the author included
the photograph of the boy in the article. The answer is not stated
in the text. I will have to analyze the article to figure out the
author’s purpose. I need to ask myself why the photograph is
important to the article.

Work with children to describe the boy in the photograph and
what he is doing (using his body to play a sport, looking happy and
healthy). Ask them to think about the different ways the photo
might support the author’s purpose (adds a graphic element that
catches the reader’s attention). Remind children that they should
answer in their own words, and not copy the sentences from the
article. Write a short answer together. Remind children to form
complete sentences in their answers.

Possible response: The author wants readers to get healthy by
eating good foods and staying in shape. The boy looks healthy
and happy. Kids will see the picture and want to be like the boy.

See page T1 of the Teacher’s Manual for a short-answer rubric.
See page T8 for answers to Blackline Master 10.

Teacher’s Manual 33

Student Name © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

DIRECTIONS
Answer these questions about “Eat Well, Feel Well.”

1 The author wrote this article to —
A tell a story about a boy
B teach readers about healthy foods
C show readers how to cook

2 The author put in facts about each food group to —
A show that too much food is bad for you
B tell where to buy these foods
C show that we should eat different kinds of foods

3 Look at the chart on page 25. In which food group does
corn belong?
A Fruit
B Meat
C Vegetables

Blackline Master 10 Grade 1
Eat Well, Feel Well
34 Time For Kids

Student Name

4 On page 24, the article says, “Oats, wheat, and bran give you
energy.” What does energy mean?
A Power
B Shape
C Hair

5 Why does the author include the photograph of the boy?
Support your answer with details from the article.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 10 Time For Kids 35

Grade 1
Eat Well, Feel Well

TFK Pages 26–27

Show What You Know

APPLY THE SKILLS

Remind children that some of the questions they will see on a
test will focus on author’s purpose, charts, and context clues.
Introduce “Orange You Glad?” by having children turn to page 26
in Time for Kids. Point out that important ideas of an article can
often be found in the headings and photographs. Have children
look at the photographs, chart, and headings, and then ask,
What do you think the article is about?

Encourage children to share their ideas and explain how they
came to those conclusions. Record their ideas on the board. Tell
children to keep these ideas in mind as they read to see if their
ideas are correct.

Remind children to use context clues as they read to figure out
the meanings of unfamiliar words. Then have children read the
article independently.

Distribute Blackline Master 11 on pages 37-38 of the Teacher’s
Manual and tell children that they will take a practice test on
the article they just read. Share these specific suggestions with
children to help them answer test questions:

1. Before you read, look at photographs, headings, and the title to give you
an idea of what the article is about.

2. Read “Orange You Glad?” and the questions on the worksheet very
carefully. Make sure you understand what the questions are asking.

3. Remember that some questions have answers that are stated in the text.
For other questions, you will have to figure out an answer that is not
stated in the text.

4. Make sure your answers are based on information in the article,
photographs, and chart. If you are not sure about the details, go back
and look at that part again.

5. For the short-answer question, plan your answer carefully. Be sure to
write complete sentences.

Have children complete Blackline Master 11. Answers can be
found on pages T8–T9 of the Teacher’s Manual.

36 Time For Kids • Issue 4

Student Name

DIRECTIONS
Answer these questions about “Orange You Glad?”

1 Look at the chart about “Orange You Glad?”

Clue Clue
A sweet potato is orange, Have you ever seen a
right? Not always! Some are
purple carrot?
dark red.

Author’s Purpose

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Which idea belongs in the Author’s Purpose box?
A To tell jokes about vegetables
B To get people to eat sweet potatoes
C To describe vegetable colors

2 Look at the chart on page 27. The author put the chart
in the article to —
A show the colors vegetables can be
B tell what foods farmers like to eat
C teach how to cook vegetables

Blackline Master 11 Time For Kids 37

Grade 1
Orange You Glad?

Student Name

3 Which vegetable on the chart is only yellow or purple?
A Carrot
B Bean
C Potato

4 The article says, “They are a healthy snack.” What does
healthy mean?
A Bad for you
B Easy to find
C Good for you

5 How does the author make readers want to eat colorful
foods? Support your answer with details from the article.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 11 Grade 1
Orange You Glad?
38 Time For Kids

Diagrams TFK Page 28

APPLY THE SKILLS 1 Look at the pyramid.
From which food
Tell children that they will practice what they learned about group should you eat
diagrams. Remind children that a diagram gives information in the most?
visual form. The information is often grouped in categories. Have A Meat and
students open to “Climb the Pyramid” on page 28 of Time for beans
Kids. Read the heading for each category aloud with them and B Grains
have them follow along by pointing to the words as you read. C Oils

Guide children to see that each group is represented by a color. From Blackline Master 12
Point out the word grains on the diagram in the orange box.
Then point out the orange bar in the pyramid. Have children
identify the color of each food group in the diagram.

Distribute Blackline Master 12 on page 40 of the Teacher’s
Manual. Read question 1 aloud.

Think Aloud I need to figure out the food group that I should eat
from the most. I will have to combine information from different
parts of the diagram to figure out the answer.

Explain that the width of each colored bar in the pyramid
represents how much of that food group a person should eat.
Explain to children that they should not use the size of the
category headings to judge the importance of the food groups.
Ask children to find each answer choice on the pyramid. Then
have them tell you which bar is the widest (Grains). Explain that
this means the greatest amount of what we eat should be from
the grains group (B).

Have children complete Blackline Master 12. Answers can be
found on page T9 of the Teacher’s Manual.

Teacher’s Manual 39

Student Name © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

DIRECTIONS
Answer these questions about “Climb the Pyramid.”

1 Look at the pyramid. From which food group should you eat
the most?
A Meat and beans
B Grains
C Oils

2 From which food group should you eat the least?
A Vegetables
B Fruits
C Oils

3 The red bar shows —
A meat and beans
B fruits
C vegetables

Blackline Master 12 Grade 1
Climb the Pyramid
40 Time For Kids

Main Idea and Details TFK Pages 30–31

MODEL THE SKILL Materials
Have children open to page 29 of Time for Kids, Student
Edition. Look at the cover and read the article titles aloud with Transparency
the class. Have children preview the photographs. Tell children, pp. 30–31
We will use these articles to learn how to identify the main idea Blackline Masters
and important details in a text. 13, 14, 15

Display Transparency pp. 30–31 of the article “Sharing with Teacher’s Manual 41
Others” and distribute Blackline Master 13. Ask children to
turn to page 30 of Time for Kids. Ask children to look at the
title, headings, and photographs before they read the article.
Ask children to describe what they see. Have them predict what
they think the article will be about. Write their predictions on
the board. Then have children read the article carefully and
identify any words they do not know. Underline these words on
the transparency and review them with the class. Then read the
following question and answer choices aloud:

1 What is this article mainly about?

A There are many ways we can help others.

B Soldiers need to call home sometimes.

C We should read to young kids.

From Blackline Master 13

Think Aloud This question asks about the main idea of the article.
I will need to find details from different parts of the article and
connect them to find the answer. Even though each answer
choice may tell something from the article, I know that only one
of them will state the main idea.

Remind children that the main idea covers all of the important
details in an article, not just some of them. Remind them
that they can use the photographs, the headings, and the
information in each paragraph to answer this question. Have
children select an answer choice and then volunteer to explain
how they got the correct answer (A). Point out that the other
answer choices are details that support the main idea.

For further practice with the comprehension skill you may wish
to have children work together or independently to answer
question 2 on Blackline Master 13.

TFK Pages 30–31

Lists

3 Look at the list on MODEL THE SKILL
page 31. The money
from UNICEF goes to Explain to children that some articles include lists that can help
pay for — them understand the text and give them more information
A toys for about a topic. A list is a series of items that may be presented
children in a numbered format. Invite children to look at the list on the
transparency.
B food and
medicine Then read question 3 aloud.

C books for Think Aloud This question asks me to use the list to find specific
young girls information about UNICEF. I need to find facts about UNICEF and
then combine them to find the correct answer.
From Blackline Master 13
Read the entries on the list aloud with children. Point out that
this list gives additional information about certain organizations
that help other people. Give children time to choose an answer
and then ask them to explain how they reached the correct
answer (B). Invite volunteers to underline the information on the
transparency that helped them reach the answer.

Context Clues

4 On page 31, the article MODEL THE SKILL
says, “Tyler collects
money and toys.” Tell children that they may not know the meaning of every word
What does collects in a text that they read. Explain that in many articles the context,
mean? or other words and sentences in the paragraph, can help them
A Brings together determine the meanings of unfamiliar words.
B Throws away
C Lets go Then read question 4 aloud.

From Blackline Master 13 Think Aloud I need to find the answer choice that best matches
the meaning of the word collect. I can look back in the text to see
where the sentence is used. Then I can connect information from
nearby sentences to figure out the answer.

Have children carefully read through the answer choices and
choose the one they think is correct (A). Then ask children to
share their answers with the class. On the transparency, have a
volunteer underline any information that helped in determining
the answer.

42 Time For Kids • Issue 5


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