The words you are searching are inside this book. To get more targeted content, please make full-text search by clicking here.

[Committee_on_Food_Chemicals_Codex] FOOD CHEMICALS CODEX

Discover the best professional documents and content resources in AnyFlip Document Base.
Search
Published by Perpus Kota Semarang, 2018-10-09 22:53:37

[Committee_on_Food_Chemicals_Codex] FOOD CHEMICALS CODEX

[Committee_on_Food_Chemicals_Codex] FOOD CHEMICALS CODEX

THIRD SUPPLEMENT
TO THE

FOURTH EDITION

FOOD
CHEMICALS

CODEX

Effective December 31, 2001

NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS
Washington, D.C.

NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS • 2101 Constitution Avenue, N.W. • Washington, DC 20418

NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose
members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of
Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for
appropriate balance.

Support for this project was provided by U.S. Food and Drug Administration Contract No. 223-99-2321. The views presented in this
report are those of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Food Chemicals Codex and are not necessarily those of the funding agencies.

International Standard Book Number 0-309-07430-4
Library of Congress Control Number: 2001096469

Additional copies of this report are available for sale from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Box 285,
Washington, D.C. 20055. Call (800) 624-6242 or (202) 334-3313 (in the Washington metropolitan area), or visit the NAP’s home page at
www.nap.edu. The index of this report is available at www.nap.edu.

For more information about the Institute of Medicine, visit the IOM home page at: www.iom.edu.

Copyright 2001 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

Printed in the United States of America.

The serpent has been a symbol of long life, healing, and knowledge among almost all cultures and religions since the beginning of
recorded history. The serpent adopted as a logotype by the Institute of Medicine is a relief carving from ancient Greece, now held by the
Staatliche Museen in Berlin.

“Knowing is not enough; we must apply.
Willing is not enough; we must do.”

—Goethe

INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE

Shaping the Future for Health

National Academy of Sciences
National Academy of Engineering
Institute of Medicine
National Research Council

The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit, self-perpetuating society of distin-
guished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furtherance of
science and technology and to their use for the general welfare. Upon the authority of the charter
granted to it by the Congress in 1863, the Academy has a mandate that requires it to advise the
federal government on scientific and technical matters. Dr. Bruce M. Alberts is president of the
National Academy of Sciences.

The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964, under the charter of the Na-
tional Academy of Sciences, as a parallel organization of outstanding engineers. It is autonomous
in its administration and in the selection of its members, sharing with the National Academy of
Sciences the responsibility for advising the federal government. The National Academy of
Engineering also sponsors engineering programs aimed at meeting national needs, encourages
education and research, and recognizes the superior achievements of engineers. Dr. Wm. A. Wulf
is president of the National Academy of Engineering.

The Institute of Medicine was established in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to
secure the services of eminent members of appropriate professions in the examination of policy
matters pertaining to the health of the public. The Institute acts under the responsibility given to
the National Academy of Sciences by its congressional charter to be an adviser to the federal
government and, upon its own initiative, to identify issues of medical care, research, and educa-
tion. Dr. Kenneth I. Shine is president of the Institute of Medicine.

The National Research Council was organized by the National Academy of Sciences in 1916 to
associate the broad community of science and technology with the Academy’s purposes of fur-
thering knowledge and advising the federal government. Functioning in accordance with general
policies determined by the Academy, the Council has become the principal operating agency of
both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in providing
services to the government, the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. The
Council is administered jointly by both Academies and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Bruce M.
Alberts and Dr. Wm. A. Wulf are chairman and vice chairman, respectively, of the National
Research Council.

COMMITTEE ON FOOD CHEMICALS CODEX

S. Suzanne Nielsen (Chair (2001– ); Vice-Chair (1998–2000), Department of Food Science, Purdue University, West
Lafayette, Indiana

Steve L. Taylor (Chair 1989–2000), Department of Food Science and Technology, Food Processing Center, University of
Nebraska, Lincoln

Michael H. Auerbach, Danisco Cultor America, Inc., Ardsley, New York
Jonathan DeVries, General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota
Mark Dreher, Mead Johnson Nutritionals, Evansville, Indiana
E. Allen Foegeding (2000–2001), Department of Food Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh
Carl Frey, Givaudan, East Hanover, New Jersey
David S. Frick, Warner Jenkinson Company, St. Louis, Missouri
Glen Ishikawa, NutraSweet Company, Mt. Prospect, Illinois
Richard W. Lane, Unilever Bestfoods NA, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey
Merle D. Pierson, Department of Food Science and Technology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University,

Blacksburg
John W. Salminen, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Shelly Schmidt, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana
Pamela J. White, Food Science and Human Nutrition Department, Iowa State University, Ames

Consultants
Grady W. Chism, III, Department of Food Science and Technology, Ohio State University, Columbus
Andrew G. Ebert, The Kellen Company, Atlanta, Georgia

Staff
Ricardo A. Molins, Project Director
Marcia S. Lewis, Research Assistant

FOOD AND NUTRITION BOARD

Cutberto Garza (Chair), Department of Nutrition Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York
Alfred H. Merrill, Jr. (Vice-Chair), Department of Biochemistry and Center for Nutrition and Health Sciences, Emory

University, Atlanta, Georgia
Robert M. Russell (Vice-Chair), USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston,

Massachusetts
Virginia A. Stallings (Vice-Chair), Division of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia,

Pennsylvania
Larry R. Beuchat, Center for Food Safety and Quality Enhancement, University of Georgia, Griffin
Benjamin Caballero, Center for Human Nutrition, Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore,

Maryland
Robert J. Cousins, Center for Nutritional Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville
Shiriki Kumanyika, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine,

Philadelphia
Lynn Parker, Food Research and Action Center, Washington, D.C.
Ross L. Prentice, Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington
A. Catharine Ross, Nutrition Department, Pennsylvania State University, University Park
Barbara O. Schneeman, Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis
Robert E. Smith, R.E. Smith Consulting, Inc., Newport, Vermont
Steve L. Taylor, Department of Food Science and Technology, Food Processing Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Barry L. Zoumas, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology, Pennsylvania State University, University

Park

Staff
Allison A. Yates, Director
Linda Meyers, Deputy Director
Gary Walker, Financial Associate

v

Reviewers

This report has been reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise, in
accordance with procedures approved by the NRC’s Report Review Committee. The purpose of this independent review is to
provide candid and critical comments that will assist the institution in making its published report as sound as possible and
to ensure that the report meets institutional standards for objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The
review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the deliberative process. We wish to
thank the following individuals for their review of this report:

Francis P. Busta, University of Minnesota
Ronald Eitenmiller, Cornell University
Richard L. Hall, retired
Earl G. Hammond, Iowa State University
Although the reviewers listed above have provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they were not asked to
endorse the conclusions or recommendations nor did they see the final draft of the report before its release. The review of
this report was overseen by Joseph H. Hotchkiss, Cornell University, appointed by the Institute of Medicine, who was
responsible for making certain that an independent examination of this report was carried out in accordance with
institutional procedures and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the final content of this
report rests entirely with the authoring committee and the institution.

vi

The Third Supplement to the Fourth Edition of the Food Chemicals Codex contains additions and changes to certain
sections of the original text and the First and Second Supplements. The Supplement contains each new or revised
monograph in its entirety, each preceded by a boxed explanatory section. The exception is Section 3/Flavor Chemicals, in
which the boxed sections follow each entry. The revised monographs supersede those in the Fourth Edition and its First and
Second Supplements. However, changes in Section 5/General Tests and Assays (Appendixes I through X) of the Fourth
Edition are specific to the relevant individual test or assay. The entire appendix in which the revised test or assay appears is
not reprinted and it is necessary to still refer to the Fourth Edition for unchanged portions.

Users of this Supplement are reminded to consult the general policies and guidelines given in Section 1/General
Provisions and Requirements Applying to Specifications, Tests, and Assays of the Food Chemicals Codex, Fourth Edition,
pages 1 through 7. The policies and guidelines given therein remain in effect and are pertinent to this supplement.

Contents

Section

1 GENERAL PROVISIONS AND REQUIREMENTS APPLYING

TO SPECIFICATIONS, TESTS, AND ASSAYS OF THE FOOD
CHEMICALS CODEX … 1
Heavy Metals Limits Policy (revised) … 1

2 MONOGRAPH SPECIFICATIONS … 3

Acidified Sodium Chlorite Solutions (new) … 3
Ammonium Phosphate, Dibasic (revised) … 4
Ammonium Phosphate, Monobasic (revised) … 4
L-Arginine (revised) … 5
Aspartame–Acesulfame Salt (new) … 5
DL-Aspartic Acid (revised) … 7
L-Aspartic Acid (revised) … 7
Canola Oil (revised) … 8
Carmine (revised) … 10
Cellulose Gum (revised) … 11
Citric Acid (revised) … 12
Cocoa Butter Substitute (revised) … 13
Curdlan (new) … 15
gamma-Cyclodextrin (new) … 16
Enzyme Preparations (revised) … 17
Ethoxyquin (revised) … 23
FD&C Blue No. 1 (revised) … 24
FD&C Blue No. 2 (revised) … 24

vii

FD&C Green No. 3 (revised) … 25
FD&C Red No. 3 (revised) … 26
FD&C Red No. 40 (revised) … 27
FD&C Yellow No. 5 (revised) … 28
FD&C Yellow No. 6 (revised) … 29
Grape Skin Extract (revised) … 29
DL-Isoleucine (revised) … 30
L-Isoleucine (revised) … 31
Lanolin, Anhydrous (revised) … 31
Lemongrass Oil (revised) … 32
DL-Leucine (revised) … 32
Lovage Oil (revised) … 33
Maltitol (revised) … 33
Mentha Arvensis Oil, Partially Dementholized (revised) … 34
Pectins (revised) … 35
Polyglycerol Polyricinoleic Acid (new) … 38
Pork Collagen (new) … 39
Potassium Phosphate, Monobasic (revised) … 40
Potassium Phosphate, Tribasic (revised) … 41
Potassium Pyrophosphate (revised) … 41
Potassium Sorbate (revised) … 42
Potassium Tripolyphosphate (revised) … 43
L-Proline (revised) … 43
Quinine Hydrochloride (revised) … 44
Rapeseed Oil, Fully Hydrogenated (revised) … 44
Rapeseed Oil, Superglycerinated (revised) … 45
Salatrim (new) … 46
DL-Serine (revised) … 50
L-Serine (revised) … 50
Silicon Dioxide (revised) … 51
Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate (revised) … 52
Sodium Metaphosphate, Insoluble (revised) … 52
Sodium Phosphate, Dibasic (revised) … 53
Sodium Phosphate, Monobasic (revised) … 54
Sodium Phosphate, Tribasic (revised) … 54
Sodium Polyphosphates, Glassy (revised) … 55
Sodium Potassium Tripolyphosphate (revised) … 56
Sodium Trimetaphosphate (revised) … 56
Sodium Tripolyphosphate (revised) … 57
Solin Oil (new) … 58
Sorbic Acid (revised) … 59
Soy Protein Concentrate (new) … 59
Sucrose Acetate Isobutyrate (new) … 60
L-Threonine (revised) … 60
Triacetin (revised) … 61
L-Valine (revised) … 62

viii

3 FLAVOR CHEMICALS … 63

Acetaldehyde Diethyl Acetal (new) … 64
Acetoin (revised) … 64
2-Acetylpyrrole (revised) … 64
2-Acetyl Thiazole (new) … 64
Allyl Isothiocyanate (revised) … 64
Allyl Phenoxy Acetate (new) … 64
Allyl Propionate (new) … 66
1-Amyl Alcohol (revised) … 66
Amyl Butyrate (revised) … 66
Amyl Formate (revised) … 66
Borneol (new) … 66
2-sec-Butyl Cyclohexanone (new) … 66
Butyl 2-Methyl Butyrate (new) … 66
Butyric Acid (revised) … 66
Cinnamic Acid (revised) … 66
Cyclohexyl Acetate (revised) … 68
p-Cymene (revised) … 68
(E),(E)-2,4-Decadienal (revised) … 68
(E)-2-Decenal (revised) … 68
(Z)-4-Decenal (revised) … 68
1,2-Di-[(1′-ethoxy)ethoxy]propane (revised) … 68
Dihydrocarveol (revised) … 68
d-Dihydrocarvone (revised) … 68
Dimethyl Benzyl Carbinyl Butyrate (revised) … 70
2,3-Dimethylpyrazine (revised) … 70
2,5-Dimethylpyrrole (revised) … 70
Dimethyl Succinate (revised) … 70
Dimethyl Sulfide (revised) … 70
Diphenyl Ether (new) … 70
δ-Dodecalactone (revised) … 70
(E)-2-Dodecen-1-al (revised) … 70
Ethone (revised) … 72
Ethyl Acetoacetate (revised) … 72
Ethyl Benzoyl Acetate (revised) … 72
Ethyl-(E)-2-butenoate (revised) … 72
Ethylene Brassylate (revised) … 72
2-Ethyl Hexanol (revised) … 72
Ethyl Lactate (revised) … 72
Ethyl Levulinate (revised) … 72
Ethyl 2-Methylbutyrate (revised) … 72
Ethyl 2-Methylpentanoate (revised) … 74
Ethyl 3-Methylthiopropionate (revised) … 74
Ethyl Salicylate (revised) … 74
Ethyl 10-Undecenoate (revised) … 74

ix

Ethyl Valerate (revised) … 74
Farnesol (revised) … 74
d-Fenchone (new) … 74
Fenchyl Alcohol (new) … 74
Furfuryl Alcohol (new) … 74
2-Furyl Methyl Ketone (new) … 74
Fusel Oil, Refined (revised) … 76
(E),(E)-2,4-Heptadienal (revised) … 76
Heptanal (revised) … 76
2-Heptanone (revised) … 76
(Z)-4-Hepten-1-al (revised) … 76
(E)-2-Hexen-1-al (revised) … 76
(Z)-3-Hexenyl Isovalerate (revised) … 76
(Z)-3-Hexenyl 2-Methylbutyrate (revised) … 76
Hexyl Alcohol (revised) … 76
Hexyl Isovalerate (revised) … 78
Hexyl 2-Methylbutyrate (revised) … 78
Isoamyl Alcohol (revised) … 78
Isoamyl Benzoate (revised) … 78
Isoamyl Butyrate (revised) … 78
Isoamyl Phenyl Acetate (revised) … 78
Isoamyl Salicylate (revised) … 78
Isobutyl Cinnamate (revised) … 78
Isobutyraldehyde (revised) … 78
Isopropyl Acetate (revised) … 80
Levulinic Acid (revised) … 80
l-Limonene (revised) … 80
Menthol (revised) … 80
l-Menthone (revised) … 80
dl-Menthyl Acetate (revised) … 80
l-Menthyl Acetate (revised) … 80
2-Methoxy-3(5)-methylpyrazine (revised) … 82
2-Methyl Butanal (revised) … 82
3-Methyl Butanal (revised) … 82
2-Methylbutyl Acetate (revised) … 82
2-Methylbutyl Isovalerate (revised) … 82
Methyl Butyrate (revised) … 82
2-Methylbutyric Acid (revised) … 82
Methyl Ionones (revised) … 82
Methyl Isobutyrate (revised) … 82
Methyl-3-methylthiopropionate (revised) … 82
4-Methyl-2-pentanone (revised) … 84
2-Methyl Propyl 3-Methyl Butyrate (revised) … 84
4-Methyl-5-thiazole Ethanol (revised) … 84
Nerolidol (revised) … 84
(E),(E)-2,4-Nonadienal (revised) … 84

x

(E),(Z)-2,6-Nonadienal (revised) … 84
(E),(Z)-2,6-Nonadienol (revised) … 84
Nonanoic Acid (revised) … 84
(E)-2-Nonenal (revised) … 84
(E)-2-Nonen-1-ol (revised) … 86
(Z)-6-Nonen-1-ol (revised) … 86
3-Octanol (revised) … 86
1-Octen-3-yl Acetate (revised) … 86
1-Octen-3-yl Butyrate (revised) … 86
α-Pinene (revised) … 86
Propenylguaethol (revised) … 86
Propyl Acetate (revised) … 86
Propyl Alcohol (revised) … 86
Propyl Propionate (revised) … 88
Terpinen-4-ol (revised) … 88
α-Terpineol (revised) … 88
Terpinyl Acetate (revised) … 88
Terpinyl Propionate (revised) … 88
2-Tridecenal (revised) … 88
Trimethylamine (revised) … 88
3,5,5-Trimethyl Hexanal (revised) … 88
2,3,5-Trimethylpyrazine (revised) … 90
1,3,5-Undecatriene (revised) … 90
(E)-2-Undecenol (revised) … 90
Veratraldehyde (revised) … 90
Zingerone (revised) … 90

4 INFRARED SPECTRA … 93

Acetaldehyde Diethyl Acetal (new) … 94
2-Acetyl Thiazole (new) … 94
Allyl Phenoxy Acetate (new) … 95
Allyl Propionate (new) … 95
Aspartame–Acesulfame Salt (new) … 96
Borneol (new) … 96
2-sec-Butyl Cyclohexanone (new) … 97
Butyl 2-Methyl Butyrate (new) … 97
gamma-Cyclodextrin (new) … 98
Diphenyl Ether (new) … 98
d-Fenchone (new) … 99
Fenchyl Alcohol (new) … 99
Furfuryl Alcohol (new) … 100
2-Furyl Methyl Ketone (new) … 100
Salatrim (new) … 101
Sucrose Acetate Isobutyrate (new) … 101

xi

5 GENERAL TESTS AND ASSAYS … 103

Fluoride Limit Test (Method IV) (Appendix IIIB) (revised) … 103
α-Acetolactatedecarboxylase Activity (Appendix V) (new) … 104
Aminopeptidase (Leucine) Activity (Appendix V) (new) … 105
Lipase (Microbial) Activity for Medium- and Long-Chain

Fatty Acids (Appendix V) (new) … 105
Lysozyme Activity (Appendix V) (new) … 106
Peroxide Value (Appendix VII) (revised) … 108
Curcumin Content (Appendix VIII) (revised) … 109
Solutions and Indicators … 110
Acetic Acid TS, Strong (new) … 110
Nickel Standard Solution TS (new) … 110
Quimociac TS (revised) … 110
Sodium Hydroxide, 1 N (revised) … 110
Index … 111
Cumulative Index … 117

xii

⁄1 General Provisions and
Requirements Applying to
Specifications, Tests, and Assays
of the Food Chemicals Codex

POLICIES AND GUIDELINES is not the largest source of lead exposure, it is a significant one.
While ingestion of FCC substances does not represent the major
Revision: Lead and Heavy Metals Limits (Policy) source of dietary lead, it is desirable to lower the lead limits for all
revised to remove the heavy metals (as Pb) FCC substances, particularly for those substances consumed in
specifications and to replace them with individual tests high amounts. Therefore, the committee’s policy is to reduce lead
for relevant heavy metals. and other heavy metals limits to the lowest extent feasible,
especially given that more recent evidence shows deleterious
Heavy Metals Limits (Policy) The Committee on Food Chem- neurobehavioral effects occurring in children exposed to lead at
icals Codex notes the importance of providing limits for individ- levels below those previously considered acceptable.
ual heavy metals as required by the source and composition of
individual food additives. Thus, it has decided to progressively In setting limits for lead and other heavy metals, the com-
remove from the monographs the general heavy metals (as lead) mittee considers the amount of a food chemical consumed, the
limits and test and, based on the current level and availability of feasibility of manufacturing a product within these limits, and the
scientific information and on the policy stated below, to replace availability of analytical methods to ensure compliance. The
them with limits and tests for specific heavy metals such as lead, constraints of good manufacturing practice and the availability of
cadmium, and mercury as may be relevant to each substance. reliable analytical methods are often limiting factors in setting
lower limits for lead and other heavy metals.
The committee recognizes the desirability of lowering ex-
posure to lead and other heavy metals, especially in the case of The committee regards as one of its goals the assurance of
infants and children. Overall exposure to heavy metals in general, the safety of properly used food chemicals. This means that FCC
and to lead in particular, is a public health concern. Although diet specifications will respond to advances in knowledge about new
manufacturing methods, analytical techniques, or toxicology and
safety issues.

1



⁄2 Monographs

This is a new monograph: requirements of the Lead Limit Test, Appendix IIIB, using 10 µg
of lead ion (Pb) in the control.
Acidified Sodium Chlorite Solutions Mercury Transfer 2.0 mL of the Sample Solution into a 50-mL
beaker, add 10 mL of water, 1 mL of dilute sulfuric acid (1:5), and
DESCRIPTION 1 mL of potassium permanganate solution (1:25), cover with a
watch glass, boil for a few s, and cool. Use the resulting solution
Acidified Sodium Chlorite (ASC) Solutions occur as clear, color- as the Sample Preparation as directed under the Mercury Limit
less to pale yellow liquids. The ASC Solutions are equilibrium Test, Appendix IIIB.
mixtures of sodium chlorite (NaClO2) and chlorous acid (HClO2). pH Determine as directed under pH Determination, Appendix
ASC Solutions are produced by lowering the pH of a sodium IIB.
chlorite solution using a safe and suitable acid to achieve a pH Sodium Chlorite (21 CFR 173.325; “Determination of Sodium
within the range of 2.3 to 3.9 depending on the intended use. Chlorite: 50 ppm to 1500 ppm,” Alcide Corporation)

Functional Use in Foods Antimicrobial agent in processing Sample For solutions containing 40 to 250 ppm, use a 100-
water used to spray, dip, rinse, or store food before processing, to g sample; for those containing 250 to 500 ppm, use a 50-g sample;
be followed by rinsing in potable water or by blanching, cooking, for those containing 500 to 1100 ppm, use a 20-g sample; for
or canning; sanitizing hard surfaces; broad-spectrum bactericide, those containing 1100 to 1500 ppm, use a 15-g sample.
virucide, fungicide, and sporicide.
Procedure Transfer the sample into a tared 250-mL Erlen-
REQUIREMENTS meyer flask, and record the weight to the nearest 0.1 mg. Add a
magnetic stirring bar. Add approximately 2 g of potassium iodide,
Lead Not more than 1 mg/kg. place the flask over a magnetic stirrer, and stir until the potassium
Mercury Not more than 1 mg/kg. iodide crystals dissolve (about 1 min). Add 1 mL of 6 N hydro-
pH Between 2.3 and 3.9. chloric acid, and stir for 30 s. Under continuous stirring, titrate the
liberated iodine with standardized 0.025 N sodium thiosulfate
Note: The pH is chosen depending on the application; it (Na2S2O3). When most of the brownish iodine color has faded,
controls the concentration of metastable chlorous acid, add 2 mL of starch indicator solution, and titrate to a clear
which rapidly breaks down into chlorine dioxide, chlor- endpoint, allowing adequate mixing time between additions of
ide, and in some applications, chlorate. titrant near the endpoint. Record the volume of titrant, V, in mL.

Caution: To minimize the evolution of hazardous Calculation Calculate the amount of Sodium Chlorite, in
chlorine dioxide gas, do not adjust the pH below 2.3. ppm, by the equation

Sodium Chlorite Between 40 and 1200 ppm, depending on the ppm of Sodium Chlorite =
application. (V × N × 90.44 × 1000)/(W × 4),

TESTS in which V is the volume, in mL, of titrant; N is the normality of
the sodium thiosulfate titrant; 90.44 is the molecular weight of
Lead A 1.0-mL portion of the sample solution, mixed with 5 Sodium Chlorite; 1000 is a conversion factor from mg/g to ppm;
mL of water and 11 mL of 2.7 N hydrochloric acid, meets the W is the sample weight, in g; and 4 is the milliequivalents of
sodium thiosulfate per milliequivalent of Sodium Chlorite.

Alternative Methods The concentration of Sodium
Chlorite can be determined also using ion chromatog-
raphy by following U.S. Environmental Protection

3

4 / Ammonium Phosphate, Dibasic / Monographs FCC IV, Supplement 3

Agency Method 300.11 or amperometrically by follow- TESTS
ing American Public Health Association Method 4500-
ClO2.2 Assay Dissolve about 600 mg, accurately weighed, in 40 mL of
water, and titrate to a pH of 4.6 with 0.1 N sulfuric acid. Each mL
Packaging and Storage Store Sodium Chlorite solutions in of 0.1 N sulfuric acid is equivalent to 13.21 mg of (NH4)2HPO4.
closed, opaque containers. Avoid exposure to sun or ultraviolet Arsenic A solution of 1 g in 35 mL of water meets the require-
light because it will generate chlorine dioxide gas in the solution. ments of the Arsenic Test, Appendix IIIB.
Fluoride Determine on a 2-g sample as directed in Method IV
Revision: Fluoride test corrected; Heavy Metals (as Pb) under the Fluoride Limit Test, Appendix IIIB.
specification and determination deleted.
Packaging and Storage Store in tight containers.

Note: The Committee on Food Chemicals Codex is Revision: Fluoride test corrected; Heavy Metals (as Pb)
proposing the following additional heavy metal limits specification and determination deleted.
for this substance: Cadmium, not more than 2 mg/kg;
Lead, not more than 4 mg/kg. Manufacturers and users Note: The Committee on Food Chemicals Codex is
are invited to comment on the proposed limits. proposing the following additional heavy metal limits
for this substance: Cadmium, not more than 2 mg/kg;
Ammonium Phosphate, Dibasic Lead, not more than 4 mg/kg. Manufacturers and users
are invited to comment on the proposed limits.
Diammonium Phosphate

(NH4)2HPO4 Formula wt 132.06 Ammonium Phosphate, Monobasic
INS: 342(ii) CAS: [7783-28-0]

Monoammonium Phosphate

NH4H2PO4 Formula wt 115.03

DESCRIPTION INS: 342(i) CAS: [7722-76-1]

White crystals, crystalline powder, or granules. It is freely soluble DESCRIPTION
in water. The pH of a 1:100 solution is between 7.6 and 8.2.
White crystals, crystalline powder, or granules. It is freely soluble
Functional Use in Foods Buffer; dough conditioner; leavening in water. The pH of a 1:100 solution is between 4.3 and 5.0.
agent; yeast food.
Functional Use in Foods Buffer; dough conditioner; leavening
REQUIREMENTS agent; yeast food.

Identification A 1:20 solution gives positive tests for Ammo- REQUIREMENTS
nium and for Phosphate, Appendix IIIA.
Assay Not less than 96.0% and not more than 102.0% of Identification A 1:20 solution gives positive tests for Am-
(NH4)2HPO4. monium and for Phosphate, Appendix IIIA.
Arsenic (as As) Not more than 3 mg/kg. Assay Not less than 96.0% and not more than 102.0% of
Cadmium (See the note at the beginning of this monograph.) NH4H2PO4.
Fluoride Not more than 10 mg/kg. Arsenic (as As) Not more than 3 mg/kg.
Lead (See the note at the beginning of this monograph.) Cadmium (See the note at the beginning of this monograph.)
Fluoride Not more than 10 mg/kg.
1Hautman, Daniel P. and Munch, David J. “Method 300.1: Lead (See the note at the beginning of this monograph.)
Determination of inorganic anions in drinking water by ion
chromatography, Revision 1.0.” U.S. Environmental Protection TESTS
Agency, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water. 1997.
Online. Available: http://www.epa.gov/OGWDW/methods/ Assay Dissolve about 500 mg, accurately weighed, in 50 mL of
sourcalt.html [accessed July 26, 2000]. water, and titrate to a pH of 8.0 with 0.1 N sodium hydroxide.
Each mL of 0.1 N sodium hydroxide is equivalent to 11.50 mg of
2Franson, MA, ed. 1998. Standard methods 4500-ClO2, am- NH4H2PO4.
perometric method II. In: Standard Methods for the Examination Arsenic A solution of 1 g in 35 mL of water meets the require-
of Water and Wastewater, 20th Ed. Baltimore, MD: APHA/ ments of the Arsenic Test, Appendix IIIB.
AWWA/WEF. Pp. 4-73–4-79.

FCC IV, Supplement 3 Monographs / Aspartame–Acesulfame Salt / 5

Fluoride Determine on a 2-g sample as directed in Method IV Specific Rotation, Appendix IIB Determine in a solution con-
under the Fluoride Limit Test, Appendix IIIB. taining 8 g of a previously dried sample in sufficient 6 N hydro-
chloric acid to make 100 mL.
Packaging and Storage Store in tight containers.
Packaging and Storage Store in well-closed, light-resistant
Revision: Identification test corrected; Heavy Metals containers.
(as Pb) specification and determination deleted.
This is a new monograph:
L-Arginine
Aspartame–Acesulfame Salt
L-2-Amino-5-guanidinovaleric Acid
APM–Ace; [2-carboxy-β-(N-(b-methoxycarbonyl-2-phenyl)eth-
NHCH2CH2CH2CCOOH ylcarbamoyl)]ethanaminium 6-methyl-4-oxo-1,2,3-oxathiazin-3-
ide-2,2-dioxide; L-Phenylalanine, L-α-aspartyl-2-methyl ester
C NH H NH2 compound with 6-methyl-1,2,3-oxathiazin-4(3H)-one 2,2-di-
oxide (1:1)
NH2

C6H14N4O2 Formula wt 174.20

CAS: [74-79-3]

DESCRIPTION CH2
HOOCCH2CHCONHCHCOOCH3
White crystals or a white crystalline powder. It is soluble in water,
but insoluble in ether and sparingly soluble in alcohol. It is NH3
strongly alkaline, and its water solutions absorb carbon dioxide
from the air. N SO2
OO
Functional Use in Foods Nutrient; dietary supplement.
CH3
REQUIREMENTS
C18H23O9N3S Formula wt 457.46
Identification Heat 5 mL of a 1:1000 solution with 1 mL of CAS: [106372-55-8]
triketohydrindene hydrate TS (ninhydrin TS). A reddish purple
color appears. DESCRIPTION
Assay Not less than 98.5% and not more than 101.5% of
C6H14N4O2, calculated on the dried basis. Aspartame–Acesulfame Salt occurs as a white, crystalline
Lead Not more than 10 mg/kg. powder. It is sparingly soluble in water and slightly soluble in
Loss on Drying Not more than 1.0%. alcohol.
Residue on Ignition Not more than 0.2%.
Specific Rotation [α]2D0°: Between +26.0° and +27.9° after Functional Use in Foods Sweetener.
drying; or [α]2D5°: Between +25.8° and +27.7° after drying.
REQUIREMENTS
TESTS
Identification An infrared absorption spectrum of a potassium
Assay Dissolve about 200 mg, accurately weighed, in 3 mL of bromide dispersion of Aspartame–Acesulfame Salt exhibits max-
formic acid and 50 mL of glacial acetic acid, add 2 drops of ima only at the same wavelengths as that of a typical spectrum as
crystal violet TS, and titrate with 0.1 N perchloric acid to a green shown in the section on Infrared Spectra.
endpoint or until the blue color disappears completely. Each mL Assay Not less than 63.0% and not more than 66.0% of as-
of 0.1 N perchloric acid is equivalent to 8.710 mg of C6H14N4O2. partame, calculated on the dried basis. Not less than 34.0% and
Lead A Sample Solution prepared as directed for organic com- not more than 37.0% of acesulfame, calculated as acid formed on
pounds meets the requirements of the Lead Limit Test, Appendix the dried basis.
IIIB, using 10 µg of lead ion (Pb) in the control. 5-Benzyl-3,6-dioxo-2-piperazineacetic Acid (DKP) Not more
Loss on Drying, Appendix IIC Dry at 105° for 3 h. than 0.5%.
Residue on Ignition, Appendix IIC Ignite 1 g as directed in the Lead Not more than 1 mg/kg.
general method.

6 / Aspartame–Acesulfame Salt / Monographs FCC IV, Supplement 3

Loss on Drying Not more than 0.5%. min, and the approximate retention time of aspartame is 11 min).
Optical (Specific) Rotation [α]D20°: Between +14.5° and +16.5°, Measure the peak area response of 5-benzyl-3,6-dioxo-2-piper-
calculated on the dried basis. azineacetic acid in each chromatogram.
Other Related Impurities Not more than 1.0%.
Potassium Not more than 0.5%. Calculation Calculate the percentage of 5-benzyl-3,6-
dioxo-2-piperazineacetic acid in the sample by the formula
TESTS
1000 × (AUCS)/(ASWU),
Assay (Note: Use a combination pH-electrode for all titrations.)
Accurately weigh between 0.100 and 0.150 g of sample, and in which AU and AS are the peak area responses of 5-benzyl-3,6-
dissolve it in 50 mL of ethanol. Perform the titration under a flow dioxo-2-piperazineacetic acid in the Sample Preparation and in
of nitrogen. Titrate with standardized 0.1 N tetrabutylammonium the Standard Preparation, respectively; CS is the concentration, in
hydroxide in methanol or 2-propanol. Determine the volume of mg/mL, of 5-benzyl-3,6-dioxo-2-piperazineacetic acid in the
titrant needed to reach the first equivalence point (V1 mL) and the Standard Preparation; and WU is the weight, in mg, of sample
second equivalence point (V2 mL). taken for the Sample Preparation.
Lead Determine as directed for Method II in the Atomic Ab-
Perform a blank titration with 50 mL of ethanol. Calculate sorption Spectrophotometric Graphite Furnace Method under the
the percentage of acesulfame and aspartame, respectively, taken Lead Limit Test, Appendix IIIB.
by the formulas Loss on Drying Determine as directed under Loss on Drying,
Appendix IIC, drying a sample at 105° for 4 h.
[(V1 – VB) × N × 163]/(10 × W), Optical (Specific) Rotation Determine as directed under Op-
tical (Specific) Rotation, Appendix IIB, using a solution con-
[(V2 – V1) × N × 294]/(10 × W), taining 6.2 g of sample in sufficient 15 N formic acid to make 100
mL. Make the determination within 30 min of preparation of the
in which V1, V2, and VB are the number of mL of 0.1 N tetra- sample solution. Divide the calculated specific rotation by 0.646
butylammonium hydroxide in methanol or 2-propanol used for to correct for the Aspartame content in Aspartame–Acesulfame
the sample (first and second equivalence points) and the blank, Salt.
respectively; N is the normality; W is the weight, in g, of sample Other Related Impurities Proceed as directed in the test for 5-
taken; and 163 and 294 are the formula weights of acesulfame and Benzyl-3,6-dioxo-2-piperazineacetic Acid, but use the following
aspartame, respectively. Standard Preparation and Procedure:
5-Benzyl-3,6-dioxo-2-piperazineacetic Acid
Standard Preparation Pipet 1.5 mL of the Sample Prep-
Mobile Phase Weigh 5.6 g of potassium phosphate, mono- aration from the test for 5-Benzyl-3,6-dioxo-2-piperazineacetic
basic, into a 1-L flask, add 820 mL of water, and dissolve. Use Acid into a 100-mL volumetric flask, dilute to volume with the
phosphoric acid to adjust the pH to 4.3, add 180 mL of methanol, Diluting Solvent, and mix.
and mix. Filter through a 0.45-µm disk, and de-gas.
Procedure Separately inject equal 20-µL portions of the
Diluting Solvent Add 200 mL of methanol to 1800 mL of Standard Preparation and the Sample Preparation into the chro-
water, and mix. matograph, and record the chromatograms for a time equal to
twice the retention time of Aspartame. In the chromatogram
Standard Preparation Transfer about 25 mg of USP Ref- obtained from the Sample Preparation, the sum of the responses
erence Standard 5-Benzyl-3,6-dioxo-2-piperazineacetic Acid, of all secondary peaks, other than that for 5-benzyl-3,6-dioxo-2-
accurately weighed, into a 100-mL volumetric flask. Add 10 mL piperazineacetic acid and Acesulfame, is not more than the re-
of methanol, and dissolve. Dilute to volume with water, and mix. sponse of the Aspartame peak obtained in the chromatogram from
Pipet 15 mL of this solution into a 50-mL volumetric flask, dilute the Standard Preparation.
to volume with the Diluting Solvent, and mix. Use a freshly Potassium
prepared solution.
Standard Solutions Transfer 190.7 mg of potassium chlor-
Sample Preparation Transfer about 50 mg of sample, ide, previously dried at 105° for 2 h, to a 1000-mL volumetric
accurately weighed, into a 10-mL volumetric flask. Dilute to flask, dilute with water to volume, and mix. Transfer 100.0 mL of
volume with Diluting Solvent, and mix. Use a freshly prepared this solution to a second 1000-mL volumetric flask, dilute with
solution. water to volume, and mix to obtain a Stock Solution containing 10
µg of potassium per mL (equivalent to 19.07 µg of potassium
Chromatographic System Use a suitable high-pressure chloride). Into separate 100-mL volumetric flasks, pipet 10.0-,
liquid chromatograph equipped with a detector measuring at 210 15.0-, and 20.0-mL aliquots of the Stock Solution; add 2.0 mL of a
nm and a 250- × 4.6-mm column packed with octadecyl silanized 1:5 sodium chloride solution and 1.0 mL of hydrochloric acid to
silica (10-µm Partisil ODS-3, or equivalent) and operated under each; dilute with water to volume; and mix. The Standard Solu-
isocratic conditions at 40°. The flow rate of the Mobile Phase is tions obtained contain, respectively, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 µg of
about 2 mL/min. potassium per mL.

System Suitability The area responses of three replicate Test Solution Transfer about 3.0 g of sample, accurately
injections of the Standard Preparation show a relative standard weighed, to a 500-mL volumetric flask, dilute with water, and
deviation of not more than 2.0%. mix. Transfer 10 mL of this solution to a 100-mL volumetric flask
and add 2.0 mL of a 1:5 sodium chloride solution and 1.0 mL of
Procedure Separately inject equal 20-µL portions of the
Standard Preparation and the Sample Preparation into the chro-
matograph, and record the chromatograms (the approximate
retention time of 5-benzyl-3,6-dioxo-2-piperazineacetic acid is 4

FCC IV, Supplement 3 Monographs / L-Aspartic Acid / 7

hydrochloric acid, dilute with water to volume, and mix. Filter the green endpoint or until the blue color disappears completely.
solution. Perform a blank determination (see General Provisions), and
make any necessary correction. Each mL of 0.1 N perchloric acid
Procedure Concomitantly determine the absorbances of is equivalent to 13.31 mg of C4H7NO4.
the Standard Solutions and the Test Solution at the potassium Lead A Sample Solution prepared as directed for organic com-
emission line of 766.5 nm, with a suitable atomic absorption pounds meets the requirements of the Lead Limit Test, Appendix
spectrophotometer equipped with a potassium hollow-cathode IIIB, using 10 µg of lead ion (Pb) in the control.
lamp and an air–acetylene flame, using water as the blank. Plot Loss on Drying, Appendix IIC Dry at 105° for 3 h.
the absorbance of the Standard Solutions versus concentration, in Residue on Ignition, Appendix IIC Ignite 1 g of sample as
µg/mL, of potassium, and draw the straight line best fitting the directed in the general method.
plotted points. From the graph so obtained, determine the concen-
tration, C, in µg/mL, of potassium in the Test Solution. Calculate Packaging and Storage Store in well-closed, light-resistant
the percent potassium in the sample taken by the formula containers.

500C/W, Revision: Identification test corrected; Heavy Metals
(as Pb) specification and determination deleted.
in which W is the quantity, in mg, of sample taken to prepare the
Test Solution.

Packaging and Storage Store in well-closed containers in a
cool, dry place.

L-Aspartic Acid

L-Aminosuccinic Acid

Revision: Identification test corrected; Heavy Metals HOOCCH2CCOOH
(as Pb) specification and determination deleted.
H NH2

DL-Aspartic Acid C4H7NO4 Formula wt 133.10
CAS: [56-84-8]

DL-Aminosuccinic Acid

C4H7NO4 HOOCCH2CH(NH2)COOH DESCRIPTION

Formula wt 133.11 White crystals or crystalline powder. It is slightly soluble in water,
but insoluble in alcohol and in ether. It melts at about 270°.
CAS: [617-45-8]
Functional Use in Foods Nutrient; dietary supplement.
DESCRIPTION
REQUIREMENTS
Colorless or white crystals. It is slightly soluble in water, but
insoluble in alcohol and in ether. It is optically inactive and melts Identification Heat 5 mL of a 1:1000 solution with 1 mL of
with decomposition at about 280°. triketohydrindene hydrate TS (ninhydrin TS). A bluish purple
color appears.
Functional Use in Foods Nutrient; dietary supplement. Assay Not less than 98.5% and not more than 101.5% of
C4H7NO4, calculated on the dried basis.
REQUIREMENTS Lead Not more than 5 mg/kg.
Loss on Drying Not more than 0.25%.
Identification Heat 5 mL of a 1:1000 solution with 1 mL of Residue on Ignition Not more than 0.1%.
triketohydrindene hydrate TS (ninhydrin TS). A bluish purple Specific Rotation [α]2D0°: Between +24.5° and +26.0° after
color is produced. drying.
Assay Not less than 98.5% and not more than 101.5% of
C4H7NO4, calculated on the dried basis. TESTS
Lead Not more than 10 mg/kg.
Loss on Drying Not more than 0.3%. Assay Dissolve about 200 mg, accurately weighed, in 3 mL of
Residue on Ignition Not more than 0.1%. formic acid and 50 mL of glacial acetic acid, add 2 drops of
crystal violet TS, and titrate with 0.1 N perchloric acid to a green
TESTS endpoint or until the blue color disappears completely. Perform a
blank determination (see General Provisions), and make any
Assay Dissolve about 200 mg of sample, accurately weighed, in necessary correction. Each mL of 0.1 N perchloric acid is equiv-
3 mL of formic acid and 50 mL of glacial acetic acid, add 2 drops alent to 13.31 mg of C4H7NO4.
of crystal violet TS, and titrate with 0.1 N perchloric acid to a

8 / Canola Oil / Monographs FCC IV, Supplement 3

Lead A Sample Solution prepared as directed for organic com- Cold Test Passes test.
pounds meets the requirements of the Lead Limit Test, Appendix Color (AOCS-Wesson) Not more than 1.5 red/15 yellow.
IIIB, using 5 µg of lead ion (Pb) in the control. Erucic Acid Not more than 2.0%.
Loss on Drying, Appendix IIC Dry at 105° for 3 h. Free Fatty Acids (as oleic acid) Not more than 0.05%.
Residue on Ignition, Appendix IIC Ignite 1 g of sample as Iodine Value Between 110 and 126.
directed in the general method. Lead Not more than 0.1 mg/kg.
Specific Rotation, Appendix IIB Determine in a solution con- Linolenic Acid Not more than 14.0%.
taining 8 g of a previously dried sample in sufficient 6 N hydro- Peroxide Value Not more than 10 meq/kg.
chloric acid to make 100 mL. Refractive Index Between 1.465 and 1.467 at 40°.
Saponifiable Value Between 178 and 193.
Packaging and Storage Store in well-closed, light-resistant Stability Not less than 7 h.
containers. Sulfur Not more than 10 mg/kg.
Unsaponifiable Matter Not more than 1.5%.
Revision: Description and Functional Use in Foods Water Not more than 0.1%.
modified, Heavy Metals (as Pb) specification and
determination deleted. TESTS

Canola Oil Acid Value Determine as directed for Acid Value, Method II,
under Fats and Related Substances, Appendix VII.
Low Erucic Acid Rapeseed Oil; LEAR Cold Test Proceed as directed under Cold Test, Appendix VII.
Color Proceed as directed for Color (AOCS-Wesson) under Fats
DESCRIPTION and Related Substances, Appendix VII. Use a 133.4-mm cell.
Erucic Acid Determine as part of Fatty Acid Composition,
Canola Oil occurs as a light yellow oil. It is typically obtained by Appendix VII.
a combination of mechanical expression followed by n-hexane Free Fatty Acids Proceed as directed under Free Fatty Acids,
extraction, from the seed of the plants Brassica juncea, Brassica Appendix VII, using the following equivalence factor (e) in the
napus, or Brassica rapa of the family Cruciferae. The plant formula given in the procedure:
varieties are those producing oil-bearing seeds with a low erucic
acid (C22:1) content. It is a mixture of triglycerides composed of Free fatty acids as oleic acid, e = 28.2.
both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. It is refined, bleached,
and deodorized to substantially remove free fatty acids; phos- Iodine Value Proceed as directed under Modified Wijs Method,
pholipids; color; odor and flavor components; and miscellaneous, Appendix VII.
other non-oil materials. It can be hydrogenated to reduce the level Lead Determine as directed under Method II in the Atomic
of unsaturated fatty acids for functional purposes in foods. It is a Absorption Spectrophotometric Graphite Furnace Method under
liquid at 0° and above. the Lead Limit Test, Appendix IIIB, using a 1-g sample.
Linolenic Acid Proceed as directed under Fatty Acid Composi-
Functional Use in Foods Cooking or salad oil; component of tion, Appendix VII.
margarine or shortening; coating agent; emulsifying agent; for- Peroxide Value Proceed as directed under Peroxide Value in the
mulation aid; texturizer. monograph for Hydroxylated Lecithin. However, after the addi-
tion of saturated potassium iodide and mixing, mix the solution
REQUIREMENTS for only 1 min and begin the titration immediately instead of
allowing the solution to stand for 10 min.
Labeling Hydrogenated Canola Oil less than fully hydroge- Refractive Index, Appendix IIB Determine with an Abbé or
nated must be labeled as Partially Hydrogenated Canola Oil. other refractometer of equal or greater accuracy.
Identification Unhydrogenated Canola Oil exhibits the follow- Saponifiable Value Determine as directed under the general
ing composition profile of fatty acids as determined under Fatty method, Appendix VII.
Acid Composition, Appendix VII. Stability Proceed as directed under Stability, Appendix VII.
Sulfur Organosulfur compounds present in the sample react
Fatty Acid: <14 14:0 16:0 16:1 18:0 18:1 18:2 with Raney nickel to produce nickel sulfides. Nickel sulfides are
treated with a strong acid to produce hydrogen sulfide, which is
Weight % (Range): <0.1 <0.2 <6.0 <1.0 <2.5 >50 <40.0 trapped and titrated with mercuric acetate using a dithizone
indicator.
Fatty Acid: 18:3 20:0 20:1 22:0 22:1 24:0 24:1
Caution: This test requires the use of the following
Weight % (Range): <14 <1.0 <2.0 <0.5 <2.0 <0.2 <0.2 hazardous substances: mercuric acetate, spongy nickel,
and dibenzyl disulfide. Conduct the test in a fume hood.
Acid Value Not more than 6.
Apparatus Fit a 125-mL round-bottom boiling flask with a
cylindrical filling funnel (20 mL with open top), an ST PTFE
metering valve stopcock, and a gas inlet tube (see the figure for

FCC IV, Supplement 3 Monographs / Canola Oil / 9

Raney Nickel Reduction Apparatus in Appendix IIIC under Sulfur flask. Immerse the bubbler in a 250-mL beaker containing 50.0
(by Oxidative Microcoulometry). On top of the boiling flask, fit a mL of 1 N sodium hydroxide, and stir slowly. Boil the sample for
water-jacketed distillation column with hooks. To the distillation 90 min. Add 50 mL of acetone and 0.5 mL of Dithizone Indicator
column, fit a piece of glass tubing with ground ST inner joints Solution to the 250-mL beaker. Add 20 mL of 60% hydrochloric
with hooks, and connect the distillation column and a gas dis- acid into the filling funnel fitted onto the boiling flask, and adjust
persion tube with ST outer joints with hooks. the nitrogen flow to 2 to 3 psi. Position the stir bar directly under
the bubbler for maximum dispersion of the hydrogen sulfide
Dibenzyl Disulfide Solution Accurately weigh 0.75 g of bubbles. Slowly add the solution of 60% hydrochloric acid to the
dibenzyl disulfide and place in a 250-mL volumetric flask. Dilute boiling flask. Begin the titration with Mercuric Acetate Titrant
to volume with methyl isobutyl ketone, and mix. until the bright amber color changes to strawberry red. Add
enough hydrochloric acid to turn the solution in the boiling flask
Sulfur Standard Accurately weigh five 250.0-g samples of green, and then let it boil for 15 min. Continue the titration
food-grade peanut oil. Transfer 0.0, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and 4.0 mL of throughout the boiling stage, making sure to rinse the inside of the
the Dibenzyl Disulfide Solution into the peanut oil samples; the bubbler with the solution in the beaker by turning off the nitrogen
samples contain 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12 mg/kg of sulfur, respectively. flow until the solution rises to the top of the vertical tube. Rinse
the tube a second time (the solution usually returns to amber
Raney Nickel Preparation (Caution: Raney nickel is pyro- during the first rinse). Continue the titration and record the
phoric when dry.) Raney nickel is produced by reacting nickel– volume of titrant used to the nearest 0.01 mL.
aluminum alloy with sodium hydroxide. Weigh accurately 1 g of
nickel–aluminum alloy powder (50% Ni, 50% Al), place it in a Calculation The concentration of sulfur in the sample, in
50-mL centrifuge tube, and chill it in an ice bath. Each pellet is mg/kg, is calculated by the following formula:
enough catalyst for one determination. Slowly add 5 mL of water
per tube, and let the tube stand for 10 min. Then, slowly add 10 (VS – VB) × K/W,
mL of 2.5 N sodium hydroxide, and allow the mixture to react for
30 min. Cap the tubes, and place them in a 50° water bath for 2 h. in which VS is the volume, in mL, of titrant to the endpoint for the
Centrifuge the mixture at 1000 rpm for 10 min, and discard the sample; VB is the volume, in mL, of titrant to the endpoint for the
supernatant liquid. Wash the pellets twice with 15 mL of water blank (usually about 0.10 mL); K is a constant determined from
and twice with 15 mL of isopropanol, centrifuging between each the calibration of the Sulfur Standard (expressed as µg sulfur per
wash. The catalyst may be stored under isopropanol for a period mL titrant); and W is the weight, in g, of the sample.
no longer than 2 weeks.
The Sulfur Standards are analyzed, in duplicate, to de-
Note: Properly dispose of the unused Raney Nickel termine the constant, K, and are calculated by the following
Preparation by transferring it to a 250-mL Erlenmeyer formula:
flask, and placing it in a fume hood. Add 20 mL of 60%
(w/v) hydrochloric acid, and allow complete digestion K = W × C/(VS – VB),
of the catalyst.
in which W is the weight, in g, of the Sulfur Standard; C is the
Caution: Hydrogen gas evolves during the digestion concentration, in mg/kg, of the Sulfur Standard; VS is the volume,
process. in mL, of titrant for the Sulfur Standard; and VB is the volume, in
mL, of titrant for the Titration Reagent Blank.
Dithizone Indicator Solution Dissolve 10 mg of dithizone Unsaponifiable Matter Proceed as directed under Unsaponi-
(diphenylthiocarbazone) in a 10-mL volumetric flask with ace- fiable Matter, Appendix VII.
tone. Water Proceed as directed under Water Determination using
the Karl Fischer Titrimetric Method, Appendix IIB. However, in
Mercuric Acetate Titrant (Note: Mercuric acetate is a place of 35 to 40 mL of methanol, use 50 mL of a 1:1 chloro-
strong irritant when ingested or inhaled or upon dermal exposure.) form:methanol mixture to dissolve the sample.
Transfer 3.82 g of mercuric acetate into a 1000-mL volumetric
flask containing 950 mL of water. Add 12.2 mL of glacial acetic Packaging and Storage Store in well-closed containers.
acid, dilute to volume with water, and mix. Transfer 10.0 mL of
this solution into a 100-mL volumetric flask, dilute to volume
with water, and mix. The titrant solution contains 0.0012 M
mercuric acetate.

Titration Reagent Blank Add 50.0 mL of 1 N sodium
hydroxide and 50.0 mL of acetone to a 250-mL beaker, and mix.
Add 0.5 mL of the Dithizone Indicator Solution, and titrate with
Mercuric Acetate Titrant until the color changes from bright
amber to strawberry red. Record the volume of titrant used.

Procedure Test a representative portion of the sample.
Accurately weigh 15 to 20 g of the sample, and place it on the
bottom of the boiling flask. Discard the isopropanol from the
Raney Nickel Preparation, add 10 mL of 95% isopropanol, mix,
and place the mixture in the sample oil. Attach the water con-
denser and the nitrogen line to the boiling flask and adjust the gas
flow to 4 psi through the sample. Place a heating mantle under the

10 / Carmine / Monographs FCC IV, Supplement 3

Revision: Description and Assay test corrected. ima in the range 520–550 nm, when determined in a 1-cm cell
with a suitable spectrophotometer against a water blank, and the
Carmine absorbance at 520 nm is not less than 0.30.
Assay Not less than 42.0%1 of carminic acid (C22H20O13),
Carminic Acid calculated on the dried basis.
Arsenic (as As) Not more than 1 mg/kg.
CH2OH O CH3 Ash Not more than 12.0%.
COOH Lead Not more than 10 mg/kg.
H OH Loss on Drying Not more than 20.0%.
OH H Microbial Limits:

HO Salmonella Negative in 25 g.
OH
TESTS
H HO
Assay Accurately weigh about 0.100 g of Carmine (~ 52%
HO OH carminic acid content), dissolve in 30 mL of 2 N hydrochloric
OH O acid, and heat to a boil for 30 s. After cooling, dilute to a volume
Formula wt 492.39 of 1 L. Determine the absorbance of this solution in a 1-cm cell at
C22H20O13 CAS: [1390-65-4] the wavelength of maximum absorbance at about 494 nm, with a
INS: 120 suitable spectrophotometer, using a 1:3 dilution of 2 N hydro-
chloric acid as the blank. To obtain accurate results, the ab-
DESCRIPTION sorbance must be in the range of 0.650 to 0.750. Adjust the
starting weight as necessary to achieve this absorbance. Calculate
Carmine is the aluminum or the calcium–aluminum lake, on an the percentage of carminic acid in the sample of Carmine taken by
aluminum hydroxide substrate, of the coloring principles obtained the formula
by an aqueous extraction of cochineal. Cochineal consists of the
dried female insects Dactylopius coccus costa (Coccus cacti L.), 100 × A/13.9 W,
enclosing young larvae; the coloring principles derived therefrom
consist chiefly of carminic acid (C22H20O13). in which A is the absorbance of the sample solution and W is the
weight, in g, of the sample taken.
Carminic acid crystallizes from water as bright red crystals
that darken at 130° and decompose at 250°; it is freely soluble in Note: If a black or brown precipitate forms, filter the
water, in alcohol, in ether, in concentrated sulfuric acid, and in solution.
solutions of alkali hydroxides; it is insoluble in petroleum ether
and in chloroform; its aqueous solutions at pH 4.8 are red-orange Arsenic, Appendix IIIB Transfer 3.0 g of the sample into a 500-
to yellow, and at 6.2 are dark red to violet. mL Kjeldahl flask equipped with a steam trap, add 5 g of ferrous
sulfate and 75 mL of hydrochloric acid, and mix. Connect the
Carmine occurs as bright red, friable pieces or as a dark red flask with the steam trap and with a condenser, the delivery tube
powder. It is soluble in alkali solutions, slightly soluble in hot of which consists of a large-size straight adapter and extends to
water, and practically insoluble in cold water and in dilute acids. slightly above the bottom of a 500-mL Erlenmeyer flask con-
taining 100 mL of water. Begin heating the Kjeldahl flask and
Before use in food, Carmine must have been pasteurized or collect about 40 mL of distillate in the Erlenmeyer flask. Pour the
otherwise treated to destroy all viable Salmonella microorgan- distillate mixture into a 600-mL beaker, add 20 mL of bromine
isms. According to the pertinent U.S. color additive regulation (21 water, and heat on a hot plate until the volume is reduced to about
CFR 73.100), “pasteurization or such other treatment is deemed 2 mL. Transfer the residual liquid into a 125-mL arsine generator
to permit the adding of safe and suitable substances (other than flask (see Appendix IIIB, Figure 11) with the aid of 35 mL of
chemical preservatives) that are essential to the method of pas- water, and continue as directed in the Procedure under Arsenic
teurization or other treatment used.” Test, Appendix IIIB, beginning with “Add 20 mL of dilute sulfuric
acid (1:5). . . .”
Note: The specifications and tests in this monograph Ash Transfer about 1 g of the sample into a tared, previously
refer to Carmine without any added substances for ignited and cooled porcelain crucible, and ignite with a Meker
pasteurization or any other such treatment. burner (red-hot) to constant weight.

Functional Use in Foods Color.

REQUIREMENTS 1The 42.0% minimum content of carminic acid specified herein
does not indicate that the FCC-grade product is of any lower
Identification Mix 333 mg of Carmine with 44 mL of water, quality than that described in the second supplement to FCC II
0.15 mL of sodium hydroxide solution (1:10), and 0.2 mL of (page 18), which specified 50.0%. Rather, the revised Assay
ammonium hydroxide, warm to dissolve, and dilute to volume procedure used for this edition gives a more accurate indication of
with water in a 500-mL volumetric flask. Pipet 10.0 mL of this the true carminic acid content.
solution into a 250-mL volumetric flask, dilute to volume with
water, and mix. The resulting solution exhibits absorption max-

FCC IV, Supplement 3 Monographs / Cellulose Gum / 11

Lead A Sample Solution prepared as directed for organic com- Sodium Not more than 12.4% after drying.
pounds meets the requirements of the Lead Limit Test, Appendix Viscosity of a 2%, Weight in Weight, Solution Not less than
IIIB, using 10 µg of lead ion (Pb) in the control. 25 mPa·s (equivalent to 25 centipoises).
Loss on Drying, Appendix IIC Dry a 1-g sample at 135° for 3 h.
Microbial Limits: TESTS

Salmonella Proceed as directed in chapter 5 of the FDA Assay Calculate the percentage of Cellulose Gum by subtract-
Bacteriological Analytical Manual, Eighth Edition, 1998. ing from 100 the percentages of Sodium Chloride and Sodium
Glycolate determined as follows:
Packaging and Storage Store in well-closed containers in a
cool, dry place. Sodium Chloride Accurately weigh about 5 g of the sam-
ple, transfer into a 250-mL beaker, add 50 mL of water and 5 mL
Revision: Specifications for Degree of Substitution and of 30% hydrogen peroxide, and heat on a steam bath for 20 min,
Sodium modified; Heavy Metals (as Pb) specification stirring occasionally to ensure complete dissolution. Cool, and
and determination deleted. using silver and mercurous sulfate–potassium sulfate electrodes
and stirring constantly, add 100 mL of water and 10 mL of nitric
Cellulose Gum acid, and titrate with 0.05 N silver nitrate to a potentiometric
endpoint. Calculate the percentage of sodium chloride in the
Sodium Carboxymethylcellulose; CMC; Modified Cellulose sample by the formula

O H OR 584.4 × V × N/(100 – b) × W,
H
H in which V and N represent the volume, in mL, and the normality,
OR H n respectively, of the silver nitrate; b is the percentage of Loss on
H Drying, determined separately; W is the weight, in g, of the
sample; and 584.4 is an equivalence factor for sodium chloride.
O
Sodium Glycolate Transfer about 500 mg, accurately
CH2OR weighed, of the sample into a 100-mL beaker, moisten thoroughly
with 5 mL of glacial acetic acid, followed by 5 mL of water, and
INS: 466 in which R = H or CH2COONa stir with a glass rod until solution is complete (usually about 15
CAS: [9004-32-4] min). Slowly add 50 mL of acetone, with stirring, then add 1 g of
sodium chloride, and stir for several min to ensure complete
DESCRIPTION precipitation of the Cellulose Gum. Filter through a soft, open-
textured paper, previously wetted with a small amount of acetone,
It occurs as a white- to cream-colored powder or as granules. The and collect the filtrate in a 100-mL volumetric flask. Use an
powder is hygroscopic. A 1:100 aqueous suspension has a pH additional 30 mL of acetone to facilitate transfer of the solids and
between 6.5 and 8.5. It is readily dispersed in water to form to wash the filter cake, then dilute to volume with acetone, and
viscous, colloidal solutions. It is insoluble in most solvents. mix.

Functional Use in Foods Thickener; stabilizer. Prepare a series of standard solutions as follows: Transfer
100 mg of glycolic acid, previously dried in a desiccator at room
REQUIREMENTS temperature overnight and accurately weighed, into a 100-mL
volumetric flask, dissolve in and dilute to volume with water, and
Identification While stirring, add about 1 g of powdered sam- mix. Use this solution within 30 days. Transfer 1.0 mL, 2.0 mL,
ple to 50 mL of warm water to produce a uniform dispersion. 3.0 mL, and 4.0 mL of the solution into separate 100-mL volu-
Continue stirring until a colloidal solution is produced, and then metric flasks, add sufficient water to each flask to make 5 mL,
cool to room temperature. Use this solution for tests A and B. then add 5 mL of glacial acetic acid, and dilute to volume with
acetone.
A. Add 10 mL of cupric sulfate TS to about 10 mL of the
sample solution. A fluffy, bluish white precipitate is formed. Transfer 2.0 mL of the sample solution and 2.0 mL of each
standard solution into separate 25-mL volumetric flasks, and
B. The sample solution gives a positive test for Sodium, prepare a blank flask containing 2.0 mL of a solution of 5% each
Appendix IIIA. of glacial acetic acid and water in acetone. Place the uncovered
Assay Not less than 99.5% and not more than 100.5% of Cellu- flasks in a boiling water bath for exactly 20 min to remove the
lose Gum, calculated on the dried basis. acetone, remove from the bath, and cool. Add to each flask 5.0 mL
Degree of Substitution Not less than 0.2 and not more than of 2,7-dihydroxynaphthalene TS, mix thoroughly, add an addi-
1.50 carboxymethyl groups (—CH2COOH) per anhydroglucose tional 15 mL, and again mix thoroughly. Cover the mouth of each
unit after drying. flask with a small piece of aluminum foil. Place the flasks upright
Lead Not more than 3 mg/kg. in a boiling water bath for 20 min, then remove from the bath,
Loss on Drying Not more than 10.0%. cool, dilute to volume with sulfuric acid, and mix.

Using a suitable spectrophotometer, determine the absor-
bance of each solution at 540 nm against the blank, and prepare

12 / Citric Acid / Monographs FCC IV, Supplement 3

a standard curve using the absorbance values obtained from Revision: Description revised; Heavy Metals (as Pb)
the standard solutions. From the standard curve and the absor- and Ultraviolet Absorbance specifications and
bance of the sample, determine the weight (w), in mg, of glycolic determinations deleted; Tridodecylamine specification
acid in the sample, and calculate the percentage of sodium gly- revised; Readily Carbonizable Substances test replaced;
colate in the sample by the formula Residue on Ignition test reworded.

12.9 × w/(100 – b) × W, Citric Acid

in which 12.9 is a factor converting glycolic acid to sodium HO O
glycolate; b is the percentage of Loss on Drying, determined
separately; and W is the weight, in g, of the sample. C6H8O7 HO OH OH
Degree of Substitution Weigh accurately about 200 mg of the C6H8O7.H2O OO
sample, previously dried at 105° to constant weight, and transfer it
into a 250-mL glass-stoppered Erlenmeyer flask. Add 75 mL of INS: 330 Formula wt, anhydrous 192.13
glacial acetic acid, connect the flask with a water-cooled con- Formula wt, monohydrate 210.14
denser, and reflux gently on a hot plate for 2 h. Cool, transfer the
solution to a 250-mL beaker with the aid of 50 mL of glacial CAS: anhydrous [77-92-9]
acetic acid, and titrate with 0.1 N perchloric acid in dioxane while CAS: monohydrate [5949-29-1]
stirring with a magnetic stirrer. Determine the endpoint poten-
tiometrically with a pH meter equipped with a standard glass DESCRIPTION
electrode as well as an unsealed calomel electrode that has been
modified as follows: Discard the aqueous potassium chloride Citric Acid is anhydrous or contains one molecule of water of
solution contained in the electrode, rinse with water, and fill with hydration. It occurs as colorless, translucent crystals or as a white,
the supernatant liquid obtained by shaking thoroughly 2 g each of granular to fine crystalline powder. The hydrous form is efflores-
potassium chloride and silver chloride (or silver oxide) with 100 cent in dry air. One g is soluble in about 0.5 mL of water, in about
mL of methanol, then add a few crystals of potassium chloride and 2 mL of alcohol, and in about 30 mL of ether.
silver chloride (or silver oxide) to the electrode.
Functional Use in Foods Sequestrant; dispersing agent; acidi-
Record the mL of 0.1 N perchloric acid versus mV (0- to fier; flavoring agent.
700-mV range), and continue the titration to a few mL beyond the
endpoint. Plot the titration curve, and read the volume (A), in mL, REQUIREMENTS
of 0.1 N perchloric acid at the inflection point.
Labeling Indicate whether it is anhydrous or hydrous.
Calculate the degree of substitution by the formula Identification A 1:10 solution gives positive tests for Citrate,
Appendix IIIA.
(16.2 A/G)/[1.0 – (8.0 A/G)], Assay Not less than 99.5% and not more than 100.5% of
C6H8O7, calculated on the anhydrous basis.
in which G is the weight, in mg, of the sample taken; 16.2 is one- Lead Not more than 0.5 mg/kg.
tenth of the molecular weight of one anhydroglucose unit; and 8.0 Oxalate Passes test.
is one-tenth of the molecular weight of one sodium carboxy- Readily Carbonizable Substances Passes test.
methyl group. Residue on Ignition Not more than 0.05%.
Lead A Sample Solution prepared from a 2-g sample as directed Tridodecylamine (in solvent-extracted Citric Acid only) Not
for organic compounds meets the requirements of the Lead Limit more than 0.1 mg/kg.
Test, Appendix IIIB, using 6 µg of lead ion (Pb) in the control. Water Anhydrous form: not more than 0.5%; monohydrate
Loss on Drying, Appendix IIC Dry to constant weight at 105°. form: not more than 8.8%.
Sodium From the weight of the sample and the number of mL
of 0.1 N perchloric acid consumed in the determination of Degree TESTS
of Substitution, calculate the percentage of sodium. Each mL of
0.1 N perchloric acid is equivalent to 2.299 mg of sodium. Assay Dissolve about 3 g, accurately weighed, in 40 mL of
Viscosity of a 2%, Weight in Weight, Solution Determine as water, add phenolphthalein TS, and titrate with 1 N sodium
directed under Viscosity of Cellulose Gum, Appendix IIB. hydroxide. Each mL of 1 N sodium hydroxide is equivalent to
64.04 mg of C6H8O7.
Packaging and Storage Store in well-closed containers. Lead Determine as directed under the Atomic Absorption Spec-
trophotometric Graphite Furnace Method, Method I, in the Lead
Limit Test, Appendix IIIB.
Oxalate Neutralize 10 mL of a 1:10 solution with 6 N am-
monium hydroxide, add 5 drops of 2.7 N hydrochloric acid, cool,
and add 2 mL of calcium chloride TS. No turbidity is produced.

FCC IV, Supplement 3 Monographs / Cocoa Butter Substitute / 13

Readily Carbonizable Substances Transfer 1.00 ± 0.01 g of Determine the absorbance of each solution in a 5-cm cell at
finely powdered Citric Acid to a 150-mm × 18-mm (od) tube 400 nm, with a suitable spectrophotometer standardized prior to
previously rinsed with 10 mL of 98% sulfuric acid at 90° or used analysis, against chloroform:heptane (1:1 v/v). The net absor-
exclusively for this test. Add 10 ± 0.1 mL of 98% sulfuric acid, bance of the sample (S4 – S3) is not greater than that of the
carefully agitate the tube until solution is complete, and immerse standard (S2 – S1).
the tube in a water bath at 90° ± 1° for 1 h. Occasionally remove Water Determine as directed under the Karl Fischer Titrimetric
the tube from the water bath and carefully agitate it to ensure that Method, Appendix IIB.
the Citric Acid is dissolved and gaseous decomposition products
are allowed to escape to the atmosphere. Cool the tube to ambient Packaging and Storage Store in tightly closed containers.
temperature, carefully shake the tube to ensure that all gases are
removed, and using an adequate spectrophotometer, measure the Revision: Description corrected, Heavy Metals (as Pb)
absorbance and transmission of the solution at 470 nm in a 1-cm specification and determination deleted.
cell. The absorbance does not exceed 0.52, and the transmission is
equal to or exceeds 30%. Cocoa Butter Substitute
Residue on Ignition Determine as directed under Residue on
Ignition, Appendix IIC, igniting a 4-g sample. DESCRIPTION
Tridodecylamine (in solvent-extracted Citric Acid only)
Cocoa Butter Substitute occurs as a white, waxy solid that is
Buffered Indicator Solution Prepare a mixture consisting predominantly a mixture of triglycerides derived primarily from
of 700 mL of 0.1 M Citric Acid (anhydrous, reagent grade), 200 palm, safflower, sunflower, or coconut oils. The resulting prod-
mL of 0.2 M disodium phosphate, and 50 mL each of 0.2% ucts may be used directly or with cocoa butter in all proportions
bromophenol blue and of 0.2% bromocresol green in spectro- for the preparation of coatings. In contrast to many edible oils and
grade methanol. hard butters, Cocoa Butter Substitute has an abrupt melting range,
changing from a rather firm, plastic solid below 32° to a liquid at
No-Indicator Buffer Solution Prepare a mixture consisting about 33.8° to 35.5°.
of 700 mL of 0.1 M Citric Acid (anhydrous, reagent grade), 200
mL of 0.2 M disodium phosphate, and 100 mL of spectrograde Functional Use in Foods Coating agent; formulation aid; tex-
methanol. turizer.

Amine Stock Solution Transfer between 40 and 45 mg of REQUIREMENTS
tridodecyl(trilauryl)amine, accurately weighed, into a 500-mL
volumetric flask, dilute to volume with isopropyl alcohol, and Identification Cocoa Butter Substitute exhibits the following
mix. Discard after 3 weeks. typical composition profile of fatty acids as determined under
Fatty Acid Composition, Appendix VII:
Standard Amine Solution Using a graduated 5-mL pipet,
transfer into a 100-mL volumetric flask an amount of Amine Stock Fatty Acid: ≤12 12:0 14:0 16:0 16:1
Solution equivalent to 400 µg of tridodecylamine, dilute to vol-
ume with isopropyl alcohol, and mix. Prepare this solution fresh Weight % (Range): 0.0 0.0 0.0 21–24 0.0
on the day of use.
Fatty Acid: 18:0 18:1 18:2 ≥20
Procedure Dissolve 160 g of anhydrous reagent-grade
Citric Acid (not the sample to be tested) in 320 mL of water, and Weight % (Range): 40–44 31–35 0.5–1.5 0.3–0.7
divide the solution equally between two 250-mL separators, S1
and S2. Add 5 mL of No-Indicator Buffer Solution to S1. Add 2.0 Color (AOCS-Wesson) Not more than 2.5 red.
mL of Standard Amine Solution and 5 mL of Buffered Indicator Free Fatty Acids (as oleic acid) Not more than 1.0%.
Solution to S2. Glycerides Not less than 98.0% of total.

To prepare solutions of the sample being tested, dissolve 160 Monoglycerides Not more than 1.0%.
g of anhydrous Citric Acid sample in 320 mL of water (or 174 g of Diglycerides Not more than 7.0%.
Citric Acid monohydrate sample in 306 mL of water). Divide the Triglycerides Not less than 90.0%.
test solution equally between two 250-mL separators, S3 and S4. Hexane Not more than 5 mg/kg.
Add 5 mL of No-Indicator Buffer Solution to S3, and 5 mL of Iodine Value Between 30 and 33.
Buffered Indicator Solution to S4. Lead Not more than 0.1 mg/kg.
Peroxide Value Not more than 10 meq/kg.
Add 20 mL of a 1 to 1 mixture (v/v) prepared from spectro- Residual Catalyst (as F) Not more than 0.5 mg/kg.
grade chloroform and n-heptane to each of the four separators, Unsaponifiable Matter Not more than 1.0%.
shake for 15 min on a mechanical shaker, and allow the phases to Water Not more than 0.1%.
separate for 45 min. Drain all except the last few drops of the
lower (aqueous) phases, and discard. Hand-shake the organic
phases with 25 mL each of 0.05 N sulfuric acid for 30 s, and allow
the phases to separate for 30 min. Drain all except the last few
drops of the lower (organic) phases through dry Whatman No. 40
(or equivalent) paper, and collect the aqueous filtrates in separate
small glass-stoppered containers.

14 / Cocoa Butter Substitute / Monographs FCC IV, Supplement 3

TESTS temperature at 110°, maintain the detectors at 200°, and hold the
column oven initially at 70° for 2 min followed by a linear
Color (AOCS-Wesson) Determine as directed under Color temperature gradient at 5°/min for 22 min at a temperature be-
(AOCS-Wesson), Appendix VII. tween 70° and 180° and a final hold at 180° for 10 min or until the
Free Fatty Acids (as oleic acid) Using the diglyceride fraction column is clean.
under Glycerides (below), proceed as directed under Free Fatty
Acids, Appendix VII, except add 2 mL of phenolphthalein TS, and Standard Curve Chromatograph aliquots of each Standard
titrate with the appropriate normality of sodium hydroxide. Use Preparation as directed under Procedure. Measure the peak areas
the following equivalence factor (e) in the formula given in the for each Standard Preparation. Plot a standard curve using the
procedure: concentration, in mg/kg, of each Standard Preparation versus its
corresponding peak area, and draw the best straight line.
Free fatty acids as oleic acid, e = 28.2.
Procedure Insert the Assay Preparation into the inlet liner
Glycerides Determine as directed under Total Monoglycerides, of the gas chromatograph, immediately sealing the base of the
Appendix VII, except save all three elution fractions to determine inlet and the lower lip of the glass tubing with a silicone O-ring
the percentages of Monoglycerides, Diglycerides, and Triglycer- (Applied Science Laboratories, Inc., or equivalent) previously
ides. heated at 200° for 2 h to remove volatile impurities. Immediately
close the inlet liner with the septum and septum liner. Allow the
Note: Use toluene instead of benzene. carrier gas to flow through the Assay Preparation, chromatograph
as directed under Chromatographic System, and record the chro-
The diglyceride fraction also contains free fatty acids, the per- matograms. Using the peak area of hexane eluting from the Assay
centage of which is determined under Free Fatty Acids. Calculate Preparation at the same time as the Standard Preparation, read
the percentage of Glycerides, which is the sum of Monoglycer- directly from the Standard Curve the concentration, C, of hexane,
ides, Diglycerides, and Triglycerides, by the following formulas: in mg/kg, of the Assay Preparation. Calculate the quantity, in mg/
kg, of hexane in the sample by the formula
TG = T + D + M,
25C/W,
T = WT100/WU,
in which W is the weight, in mg, of the sample introduced into the
D = (WD100/WU) – F, gas chromatograph.
Iodine Value Determine as directed under Iodine Value, Appen-
M = WM100/WU, dix VII.
Lead Determine as directed for Method II in the Atomic Ab-
in which TG is the percent of total glycerides; T is the percent of sorption Spectrophotometric Graphite Furnace Method under the
triglycerides; D is the percent of diglycerides; M is the percent of Lead Limit Test, Appendix IIIB, using a 5-g sample.
monoglycerides; WT is the weight, in g, of triglycerides; WU is the Peroxide Value Determine as directed in Method II under
weight, in g, of the sample taken; WD is the weight, in g, of Peroxide Value, Appendix VII; however, after adding the saturated
diglycerides; F is the percent of free fatty acids; and WM is the solution of potassium iodide, mix for 1 min, add 200 mL of water,
weight, in g, of monoglycerides. and titrate with 0.05 N sodium thiosulfate, adding starch TS as the
Hexane endpoint is approached, and continue the titration until the blue
starch color has just disappeared. Perform a blank determination
Standard Preparation Using a micropipet, transfer 34 µL (see General Provisions), and make any necessary correction.
of hexane into 45 g of cold-pressed cottonseed oil (that has not Proceed with the calculation shown in the appendix.
been extracted with hexane), and dissolve. As directed under Residual Catalyst Transfer a 30-g sample, accurately weighed,
Procedure, analyze aliquots of 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, and 5.0 mg; the into a 250-mL distillation flask having a side arm and a trap.
aliquots correspond to 2, 5, 10, and 100 mg/kg, respectively, of Connect the flask with a condenser, and fit it with a thermometer
residual hexane in a 25-mg sample. and a capillary tube. Both of these should reach nearly to the
bottom of the flask so that they extend into the liquid during the
Assay Preparation Pack the lower half of 8.5-cm × 9.5-mm distillation. Add 0.2 g of silver sulfate, three boiling beads, and 25
(od) borosilicate glass tubing (inlet liner) with glass wool that has mL of 1:1 aqueous dilution of sulfuric acid to the flask. Connect a
been heated at 200° for 16 h to expel volatiles. Transfer a 25-mg dropping funnel or a steam generator to the capillary tube. Distill
sample, accurately weighed, into the glass tubing, and cover it until the temperature reaches 135°. Then, through the capillary,
with a small plug of treated glass wool. add water from the funnel, or introduce steam, as necessary, to
maintain the temperature as close to 135° as possible until 250 mL
Chromatographic System Use a suitable gas chromato- of distillate has been collected in a beaker. Cool the distillate. Add
graph that is equipped with independent dual flame-ionization 3 mL of 30% hydrogen peroxide to remove any sulfites, let stand
detectors and contains a 0.6-m × 6.35-mm (od) stainless-steel U- for 5 min, and evaporate the distillate in a dish containing 15 mL
tube packed with Porapak P or equivalent. Use helium as the of saturated calcium hydroxide suspension. Ash the residue at
carrier gas at a flow rate of 60 mL/min, hydrogen as the fuel gas at 600° for 4 h. Using the ashed residue as the sample, proceed as
a flow rate of 52 mL/min for each flame, and air as the scavenger directed in Method I under Fluoride Limit Test, Appendix IIIB,
gas for both flames at a flow rate of 500 mL/min. To ensure that beginning with “. . . and 30 mL of water in a 125-mL distillation
the relative standard deviation does not exceed 2.0%, chromato- flask having a side arm and trap.” The total volume of sodium
graph a sufficient number of replicates of each Standard Prep-
aration, and record the areas as directed under Procedure (see
Chromatography, Appendix IIA).

Insert the Assay Preparation into the chromatograph, and
subject it to the following operating conditions: Maintain the inlet

FCC IV, Supplement 3 Monographs / Curdlan / 15

fluoride TS required for the solutions from both Distillate A and Lead Not more than 0.5 mg/kg.
Distillate B should not exceed 0.75 mL. Loss on Drying Not more than 10%.
Unsaponifiable Matter Determine as directed under Unsapon- Microbial Limits
ifiable Matter, Appendix VII.
Water Proceed as directed under Water Determination, Appen- Aerobic Plate Count Not more than 1000 CFU per g.
dix IIB. However, in place of 35 to 40 mL of methanol, use 50 mL E. coli Negative in 1 g.
of a 1:1 chloroform:methanol mixture to dissolve the sample. Nitrogen Not more than 0.3%.
pH (1% aqueous suspension) Between 6.0 and 7.5.
Packaging and Storage Store in well-closed containers. Residue on Ignition Not more than 6%.

This is a new monograph: TESTS

Curdlan Assay
Sample Solution Transfer about 100 mg of the sample,
beta-1,3-glucan
accurately weighed, into a 100-mL volumetric flask, and dissolve
CH2OH CH2OH CH2OH in about 90 mL of 0.1 N sodium hydroxide. Add 0.1 N sodium
O OO O O OH hydroxide to volume, and mix well. Transfer 5 mL of the solution
OH into a 100-mL volumetric flask, add water to volume, and mix
OH OH n OH well. Add 1 mL of a 5:100 solution of reagent-grade phenol and 5
OH OH mL of sulfuric acid TS to 1 mL of the solution, shake vigorously,
and cool in ice-cold water. Prepare a blank and a Reference
OH Standard Solution in the same manner, using 0.1 mL of water and
100 mg of reagent-grade glucose, respectively.
(C6H10O5)n
Procedure Determine the absorbance of the Sample Solu-
CAS [54724-00-4] tion and the Reference Standard Solution in 1-cm cells, at 490 nm,
with a suitable spectrophotometer, using the blank solution to zero
DESCRIPTION it.

Curdlan occurs as a white to nearly white powder. It is a high- Calculation Calculate the content of Curdlan in the sam-
molecular-weight polymer of glucose (β-1,3-glucan), produced ple, in percent, using the following equation:
by pure culture fermentation of a carbohydrate by a nonpatho-
genic and nontoxigenic strain of Agrobacterium biobar 1 (for- Curdlan content (%) = (A/AR) × (0.9 × WR/W) × 100,
merly Alcaligenes faecalis var. myxogenes) or Agrobacterium
radiobacter. Curdlan consists of β-(1,3)-linked glucose residues in which A is the absorbance of the Sample Solution; AR is the
and has the unusual property of forming an elastic gel when its absorbance of the Reference Standard Solution; 0.9 is the molecu-
aqueous suspension is heated to a temperature above 54°. It is lar weight of anhydrous glucose divided by the molecular weight
insoluble in water but soluble in alkaline solutions. of glucose; WR is the weight, in mg, of the glucose standard used
as reference; and W is the weight, in mg, of the sample.
Functional Use in Foods Firming agent; gelling agent; stabi- Gel Strength
lizer; thickener.
Procedure Place 200 mg of the sample into the tube of a
REQUIREMENTS Potter-Elvehjem homogenizer, add 10 mL of water, and homog-
enize at about 1500 g for 5 min. Transfer the suspension into a 16-
Identification mm × 150-mm test tube, de-aerate in vacuum for 3 min, and heat
A. Add 5 mL of sulfuric acid TS to 10 mL of a 2% aqueous in a boiling water bath for 10 min to form a gel. Cool in running
water, let stand for 30 min, then remove the gel from the test tube.
suspension of the sample, heat in a boiling water bath for 30 min, Cut the gel accurately at distances of 20 mm and 30 mm from the
and cool. Neutralize the mixture with barium carbonate, and bottom to obtain a section 10 mm long. Determine the gel strength
centrifuge it at 900 g for 10 min. Add 1 mL of the supernatant to 5 using a Rheo Meter Model CR-200D (Sun Scientific Co., Ltd.,
mL of hot alkaline cupric tartrate TS. A copious red precipitate of Japan; Load cell: 1000 g; set to a measurement mode 4) or an
cuprous oxide is formed. equivalent instrument capable of uniaxial compression and hav-
ing a load cell sensitivity of 500 to 1000 g. Use a cylindrical
B. Heat a 2% aqueous suspension of the sample in a boiling stainless steel plunger having a 0.5-cm diameter. Lower the
water bath for 10 min and cool. A firm gel forms. plunger into the gel at 250 mm/min. The resulting force–time
curve is recorded and used for gel strength calculation.
C. Suspend 0.2 g of the sample in 5 mL of water, add 1 mL of
3 N sodium hydroxide, and shake. The sample dissolves. Calculation Calculate gel strength by the following equa-
Assay Not less than 80% (calculated as anhydrous glucose). tion:
Gel Strength (2% aqueous suspension) Not less than 600 g/
cm2. Gel strength (g force/cm2) = f/0.196 cm2,

in which f is the force on the force–time curve that shows a sharp
yielding downward trend associated with rupture of the gel, and
0.196 is the area, in cm2, of the plunger.

16 / gamma-Cyclodextrin / Monographs FCC IV, Supplement 3

Lead Determine as directed for Method II in the Atomic Ab- Cyclodextrin is freely soluble in water and very slightly soluble in
sorption Spectrophotometric Graphite Furnace Method under the ethanol.
Lead Limit Test, Appendix IIIB.
Loss on Drying Determine as directed under Loss on Drying, Functional Use in Foods Stabilizer; emulsifier; carrier; formu-
Appendix IIC, drying in a vacuum for 5 h at 60º. lation aid.
Microbial Limits
REQUIREMENTS
Aerobic Plate Count Determine as directed in chapter 3
of the FDA Bacteriological Analytical Manual, Eighth Edition, Identification The infrared absorption spectrum of the sample
1998. exhibits relative maxima (that may vary in intensity) at the same
wavelengths (or frequencies) as those shown in the respective
E. coli Determine as directed in chapter 4 of the FDA spectrum in the section on Infrared Spectra, using the same test
Bacteriological Analytical Manual, Eighth Edition, 1998. conditions as specified therein.
Nitrogen Determine as directed for Method II under Nitrogen Assay Not less than 98.0% as gamma-Cyclodextrin on the
Determination, Appendix IIIC, using a 1-g sample. anhydrous basis.
pH Determine as directed under pH Determination, Appendix Iodine Reaction A clear brown solution is formed.
IIB, using a 2% aqueous suspension. Lead Not more than 1 mg/kg.
Residue on Ignition Determine as directed for Method I under Optical Rotation [α]2D5°: Between +174° and +180° in a 1%
Residue on Ignition, Appendix IIC, using a 1-g sample. solution.
Reducing Sugars (as glucose) Not more than 0.5%.
Packaging and Storage Store in airtight containers. Residue on Ignition Not more than 0.1%.
Volatile Organic Compounds Not more than 20 mg/kg.
This is a new monograph: Water Not more than 11.0%.

gamma-Cyclodextrin TESTS

γ-Cyclodextrin; gamma-CD; Cyclooctaamylose; Cyclomalto- Assay
octaose Sample Solution Transfer 1.0 g, accurately weighed, into a

OH OH 100-mL flask, dilute to volume with water, and mix.
OH O OH Chromatographic System Determine as directed under
OCH O
OHO CH2OH 2 OH O Chromatography, Appendix IIA, but use a liquid chromatograph
OH equipped with a differential refractometer detector, a 7.8-mm id ×
OH OH OH OH CH OH OH OO 30-cm column packed with 25-µm silver bonded to sulfonated
O 2 OH CH2OH divinyl benzene–styrene copolymer (Aminex HPX-42A, Bio-Rad
HOH2C HOH Laboratories, or equivalent). Maintain the column at a constant
O 2C temperature of 65° ± 10°, and the flow rate at 0.3 to 1.0 mL/min.
O Use water as the mobile phase.
HOH HOH2C O OH
OH Procedure Inject about 20 µL of the Sample Preparation
O 2C into the chromatograph, record the chromatogram, and measure
O the responses for all peaks.

O Calculation Calculate the content of gamma-Cyclodextrin
O OH in the sample by the peak area percentage method using the
OH following formula:

O A = (B/C) × 100,

(C6H10O5)8 Formula wt 1297 in which A is the percentage of gamma-Cyclodextrin in the
CAS: [17465-86-0] sample, B is the peak area of gamma-Cyclodextrin in the chro-
matogram, and C is the sum of the areas of all peaks recorded in
DESCRIPTION the chromatogram.
Iodine Reaction Place 0.2 g of the sample in a test tube, and
Gamma-Cyclodextrin is a nonreducing cyclic saccharide consist- add 2 mL of a 0.1 N iodine solution. Heat the mixture in a water
ing of eight α-1,4-linked D-glucopyranosyl units manufactured by bath, and allow to cool at room temperature.
the action of cyclomaltodextrin glucanotransferase on hydrolyzed Lead Reflux about 5 g of the sample, accurately weighed, with
starch followed by purification of the gamma-Cyclodextrin. It 30 mL of nitric acid for 1 h. Remove the reflux condenser, and
occurs as a white or almost-white crystalline solid. Gamma- attach a condenser to the flask. Continue to heat, and collect the
distilled nitric acid. Allow the residue to cool, add 20 mL of water,
and allow to cool again. Add 2 mL of orthophosphoric acid, dilute
to 100 mL with water, and determine the lead content of the

FCC IV, Supplement 3 Monographs / Enzyme Preparations / 17

solution as directed under Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometric 100 mm ST 29/32
Graphite Furnace Method, Method I, in Appendix IIIB.
Optical Rotation Proceed as directed under Optical (Specific) 60 mm 14
Rotation, Appendix IIB. 20 12
Reducing Sugars (as glucose) Transfer about 1 g of the sample,
accurately weighed, into a 250-mL Erlenmeyer flask, dissolve in 210 mm
10 mL of water, and add 25 mL of alkaline cupric citrate TS, and
cover the flask with a small beaker. Boil gently for exactly 5 min, 68° TS 29/32
and cool rapidly to room temperature. Add 25-mL of 10% acetic 4 14
acid solution, 10.0 mL of 0.1 N iodine, 10 mL of dilute hydro-
chloric acid TS, and 3 mL of starch TS, and titrate with 0.1 N 9
sodium thiosulfate to the disappearance of the blue color. Calcu-
late the content of reducing substances (as D-glucose) (R) by the 95 mm
equation
50 mm
%R = [(V1N1 – V2N2) × 2.7]/W,
180
in which V1 and N1 are the volume, in mL, and the normality,
respectively, of the iodine solution; V2 and N2 are the volume, in FIGURE 1 Bleidner Apparatus.
mL, and the normality, respectively, of the sodium thiosulfate
solution; 2.7 is an empirically determined equivalence factor for Revision: Classifications and reactions added for ␣-
D-glucose; and W is the sample weight, in g. Acetolactatedecarboxylase; Aminopeptidase, Leucine;
Residue on Ignition Proceed as directed under Residue on and Lysozyme; Heavy Metals (as Pb) specification and
Ignition (Sulfated Ash), Method I (for Solids), Appendix IIC. determination deleted from Additional Requirements.
Volatile Organic Compounds Dissolve 50 g of the sample in
about 700 mL of water in a 1-L round-bottom flask, and add a Enzyme Preparations
magnetic stirrer. Attach the flask to the lower part of a Bleidner
apparatus (see Figure 1), and connect a 100-mL round-bottom DESCRIPTION
flask containing about 70 mL of hexane and a few boiling stones
to the other side of the apparatus. Fill the Bleidner apparatus with Enzyme Preparations used in food processing are derived from
equal amounts of water and hexane, and place a reflux condenser animal, plant, or microbial sources (see CLASSIFICATION, below).
on the top. Heat both flasks with heating mantels to boiling. Using They may consist of whole cells, parts of cells, or cell-free
the magnetic stirrer, stir the contents of the 1-L flask well. Keep extracts of the source used, and they may contain one active
the content of the two flasks boiling for 8 h. After cooling, remove component or, more commonly, a mixture of several, as well as
the 100-mL flask, transfer the contents to a 100-mL volumetric food-grade diluents, preservatives, antioxidants, and other sub-
flask, and fill that flask to volume with hexane. stances consistent with good manufacturing practice.

Analyze the hexane solution as directed under Gas Chroma- The individual preparations usually are named according to
tography, Appendix IIA, with the following conditions: The gas the substance to which they are applied, such as Protease or
chromatograph is equipped with a flame ionization detector and a
30-m × 0.32-mm (id) column with a stationary phase consisting of
0.25-µm, cross-bonded, 95% dimethyl 5% diphenyl polysiloxane
(JBW Scientific DB-5.625, or equivalent). Set the injector to
280°, and hold the temperature at 70° for 4 min, and then increase
it to 250° at intervals of 10° per min. Use nitrogen gas as a carrier
flowing at 70 mL per min. The detection is FID at 280°.

Calculate the area(s) under the peak for each volatile organic
compound, and convert it to mg/kg gamma-Cyclodextrin using
the response factor 8-cyclohexadecen-1-one. The response factor
is determined from a calibration curve using 8-cyclohexadecen-1-
one concentrations of 0.1 to 6 mg/100 mL hexane.
Water Proceed as directed under Water Determination using
the Karl Fischer Titrimetric Method, Appendix IIB.

Packaging and Storage Store in tight containers in a dry place.

18 / Enzyme Preparations / Monographs FCC IV, Supplement 3

Amylase. Traditional names such as Malt, Pepsin, and Rennet also Phospholipase A2 Obtained from porcine pancreatic tissue.
are used, however. Produced as a white to tan powder or pale- to dark-yellow liquid.
Major active principle: phospholipase A2. Typical application:
The color of the preparations—which may be liquid, semi- hydrolysis of lecithins.
liquid, or dry—may vary from virtually colorless to dark brown.
The active components consist of the biologically active proteins, Rennet, Bovine Aqueous extracts made from the fourth stom-
which are sometimes conjugated with metals, carbohydrates, and/ ach of bovine animals. Clear, amber to dark-brown liquid or white
or lipids. Known molecular weights of the active components to tan powder. Major active principle: protease (pepsin). Typical
range from approximately 12,000 to several hundred thousand. application: manufacture of cheese. Similar preparations can be
made from the fourth stomach of sheep or goats.
The activity of enzyme preparations is measured according
to the reaction catalyzed by individual enzymes (see below) and is Rennet, Calf Aqueous extracts made from the fourth stomach
usually expressed in activity units per unit weight of the prep- of calves. Clear, amber to dark-brown liquid or white to tan
aration. In commercial practice (but not for Food Chemicals powder. Major active principle: protease (chymosin). Typical
Codex purposes), the activity of the product is sometimes also application: manufacture of cheese. Similar preparations can be
given as the quantity of the preparation to be added to a given made from the fourth stomach of lambs or kids.
quantity of food to achieve the desired effect.
Trypsin Obtained from purified extracts of porcine or bovine
Additional information relating to the nomenclature and the pancreas. White to tan, amorphous powders soluble in water but
sources from which the active components are derived is provided practically insoluble in alcohol, in chloroform, and in ether. Major
in the General Tests section under Enzyme Assays, Appendix V. active principle: trypsin. Typical applications: baking; tenderizing
of meat; production of protein hydrolysates.
Functional Use in Foods Enzyme (see discussion under CLAS-
SIFICATION, below). Plant-Derived Preparations

CLASSIFICATION Amylase Obtained from extraction of ungerminated barley.
Clear, amber to dark-brown liquid or white to tan powder. Major
Animal-Derived Preparations active principle: β-amylase. Typical applications: production of
alcoholic beverages and sugar syrups.
Catalase (bovine liver) Partially purified liquid or powdered
extracts from bovine liver. Major active principle: catalase. Bromelain The purified proteolytic substance derived from the
Typical application: manufacture of certain cheeses. pineapples Ananas comosus and Ananas bracteatus L. White to
light-tan, amorphous powder. Soluble in water (the solution is
Chymotrypsin Obtained from purified extracts of bovine or usually colorless to light yellow and somewhat opalescent) but
porcine pancreatic tissue. White to tan, amorphous powders practically insoluble in alcohol, in chloroform, and in ether. Major
soluble in water but practically insoluble in alcohol, in chloro- active principle: bromelain. Typical applications: chillproofing of
form, and in ether. Major active principle: chymotrypsin. Typical beer; tenderizing of meat; preparation of precooked cereals;
application: hydrolysis of protein. production of protein hydrolysates; baking.

Lipase, Animal Obtained from two primary sources: (1) edible Ficin The purified proteolytic substance derived from the latex
forestomach tissue of calves, kids, or lambs, and (2) animal of Ficus sp., which include a variety of tropical fig trees. White to
pancreatic tissue. Produced as purified edible tissue preparations off-white powders completely soluble in water. (Liquid fig latex
or as aqueous extracts. Dispersible in water; insoluble in alcohol. concentrates are light brown to dark brown.) Major active prin-
Major active principle: lipase. Typical applications: manufacture ciple: ficin. Typical applications: chillproofing of beer; tender-
of cheese; modification of lipids. izing of meat; conditioner of dough in baking.

Lysozyme Obtained from extracts of purified chicken egg Malt The product of the controlled germination of barley. Clear,
whites. Generally prepared and used in the hydrochloride form as amber to dark-brown liquid preparations or white to tan powder.
a white, odorless powder. Major active principle: lysozyme. Typi- Major active principles: (1) α-amylase and (2) β-amylase. Typical
cal application: antimicrobial in food processing. applications: baking; manufacture of alcoholic beverages; manu-
facture of syrups.
Pancreatin Obtained from porcine or bovine (ox) pancreatic
tissue. White to tan, water-soluble powder. Major active princ- Papain The purified proteolytic substance derived from the
iples: (1) α-amylase, (2) protease, and (3) lipase. Typical applica- fruit of the papaya Carica papaya L. (Fam. Caricaceae). Produced
tions: preparation of precooked cereals, infant foods, protein as a white to light-tan, amorphous powder or a liquid. Soluble in
hydrolysates. water (the solution is usually colorless or light yellow and
somewhat opalescent) but practically insoluble in alcohol, in
Pepsin Obtained from the glandular layer of hog stomach. chloroform, and in ether. Major active principles: (1) papain and
White to light-tan, water-soluble powder; amber paste; or clear (2) chymopapain. Typical applications: chillproofing of beer;
amber to brown aqueous liquids. Major active principle: pepsin. tenderizing of meat; preparation of precooked cereals; production
Typical applications: preparation of fish meal and other protein of protein hydrolysates.
hydrolysates; clotting of milk in manufacture of cheese (in combi-
nation with rennet).

FCC IV, Supplement 3 Monographs / Enzyme Preparations / 19

Microbially Derived Preparations Carbohydrase (Bacillus subtilis containing a Bacillus mega-
terium α-amylase gene) Produced as an off-white to brown,
␣-Acetolactatedecarboxylase (Bacillus subtilis containing a amorphous powder or liquid by controlled fermentation using the
Bacillus brevis gene) Produced as a brown liquid by controlled modified Bacillus subtilis. Soluble in water (the solution is
fermentation using the modified Bacillus subtilis. Soluble in usually light yellow to dark brown) but practically insoluble in
water (the solution is usually a light yellow to brown). Major alcohol, in chloroform, and in ether. Major active principle: α-
active principle: decarboxylase. Typical application: preparation amylase. Typical applications: preparation of starch syrups, al-
of beer. cohol, beer, and dextrose.

Aminopeptidase, Leucine (Aspergillus niger var., Aspergillus Carbohydrase (Bacillus subtilis containing a Bacillus stearo-
oryzae var., and other microbial species) Produced as a light-tan thermophilus α-amylase gene) Produced as an off-white to
to brown powder or as a brown liquid by controlled fermentation brown, amorphous powder or a liquid by controlled fermentation
using Aspergillus niger var., Aspergillus oryzae var., or other using the modified Bacillus subtilis. Soluble in water (the solution
microbial species. The powder is soluble in water (the solution is is usually light yellow to dark brown) but practically insoluble in
usually light yellow to brown). Major active principles: (1) ami- alcohol, in chloroform, and in ether. Major active principle:
nopeptidase, (2) protease, and (3) carboxypeptidase activities in maltogenic amylase. Typical applications: preparation of starch
varying amounts. Typical applications: preparation of protein syrups, dextrose, alcohol, beer, and baked goods.
hydrolysates, development of flavors in processed foods.
Carbohydrase (Candida pseudotropicalis) Produced as an off-
Carbohydrase (Aspergillus niger var., including Aspergillus white to tan, amorphous powder or a liquid by controlled fermen-
aculeatus) Produced as an off-white to tan powder or a tan to tation using Candida pseudotropicalis. Soluble in water (the
dark-brown liquid by controlled fermentation using Aspergillus solution is usually light yellow to dark brown) but insoluble in
niger var. (including Aspergillus aculeatus). Soluble in water (the alcohol, in chloroform, and in ether. Major active principle:
solution is usually light yellow to dark brown) but practically lactase. Typical applications: manufacture of candy and ice
insoluble in alcohol, in chloroform, and in ether. Major active cream; modification of dairy products.
principles: (1) α-amylase, (2) pectinase (a mixture of enzymes,
including pectin depolymerase, pectin methyl esterase, pectin Carbohydrase (Kluyveromyces marxianus var. lactis) Pro-
lyase, and pectate lyase), (3) cellulase, (4) glucoamylase (amylo- duced as an off-white to tan, amorphous powder or a liquid by
glucosidase), (5) amylo-1,6-glucosidase, (6) hemicellulase (a controlled fermentation using Kluyveromyces marxianus var.
mixture of enzymes, including poly(galacturonate) hydrolase, lactis. Soluble in water (the solution is usually light yellow to dark
arabinosidase, mannosidase, mannanase, and xylanase), (7) brown) but insoluble in alcohol, in chloroform, and in ether.
lactase, (8) β-glucanase, (9) β-D-glucosidase, (10) pentosanase, Major active principle: lactase. Typical applications: manufacture
and (11) α-galactosidase. Typical applications: preparation of of candy and ice cream; modification of dairy products.
starch syrups and dextrose, alcohol, beer, ale, fruit juices, choc-
olate syrups, bakery products, liquid coffee, wine, dairy products, Carbohydrase (Mortierella vinaceae var. raffinoseutilizer)
cereals, and spice and flavor extracts. Produced as an off-white to tan powder or as pellets by controlled
fermentation using Mortierella vinaceae var. raffinoseutilizer.
Carbohydrase (Aspergillus oryzae var.) Produced as an off- Soluble in water (pellets may be insoluble in water) but practically
white to tan, amorphous powder or a liquid by controlled fermen- insoluble in alcohol, in chloroform, and in ether. Major active
tation using Aspergillus oryzae var. Soluble in water (the solution principle: α-galactosidase. Typical application: production of
is usually light yellow to dark brown) but practically insoluble in sugar from sugar beets.
alcohol, in chloroform, and in ether. Major active principles: (1)
α-amylase, (2) glucoamylase (amyloglucosidase), and (3) lac- Carbohydrase (Rhizopus niveus) Produced as an off-white to
tase. Typical applications: preparation of starch syrups, alcohol, brown, amorphous powder or a liquid by controlled fermentation
beer, ale, bakery products, and dairy products. using Rhizopus niveus. Soluble in water (the solution is usually
light yellow to dark brown) but practically insoluble in alcohol, in
Carbohydrase (Bacillus acidopullulyticus) Produced as an off- chloroform, and in ether. Major active principles: (1) α-amylase
white to brown, amorphous powder or a liquid by controlled and (2) glucoamylase. Typical application: hydrolysis of starch.
fermentation using Bacillus acidopullulyticus. Soluble in water
(the solution is usually light yellow to dark brown) but practically Carbohydrase (Rhizopus oryzae var.) Produced as a powder or
insoluble in alcohol, in chloroform, and in ether. Major active a liquid by controlled fermentation using Rhizopus oryzae var.
principle: pullulanase. Typical applications: hydrolysis of amylo- Soluble in water but practically insoluble in alcohol, in chloro-
pectins and other branched polysaccharides. form, and in ether. Major active principles: (1) α-amylase, (2)
pectinase, and (3) glucoamylase (amyloglucosidase). Typical
Carbohydrase (Bacillus stearothermophilus) Produced as an applications: preparation of starch syrups and fruit juices, veg-
off-white to tan powder or a light-yellow to dark-brown liquid by etable purees, and juices; manufacture of cheese.
controlled fermentation using Bacillus stearothermophilus. Sol-
uble in water but practically insoluble in alcohol, in ether, and in Carbohydrase (Saccharomyces species) Produced as a white to
chloroform. Major active principle: α-amylase. Typical applica- tan, amorphous powder by controlled fermentation using a num-
tions: preparation of starch syrups, alcohol, beer, dextrose, and ber of species of Saccharomyces traditionally used in the manu-
bakery products. facture of food. Soluble in water (the solution is usually light

20 / Enzyme Preparations / Monographs FCC IV, Supplement 3

yellow) but practically insoluble in alcohol, in chloroform, and in Microbacteruim arborescens, Streptomyces rubiginosus var., or
ether. Major active principles: (1) invertase and (2) lactase. Streptomyces murinus) Produced as an off-white to tan, brown,
Typical applications: manufacture of candy and ice cream; mod- or pink, amorphous powder, granules, or a liquid by controlled
ifications of dairy products. fermentation using any of the above-named organisms. The
products may be soluble in water but practically insoluble in
Carbohydrase (Trichoderma longibrachiatum var.; formerly alcohol, in chloroform, and in ether, or if immobilized, may be
reesei) Produced as an off-white to tan, amorphous powder or a insoluble in water and partially soluble in alcohol, in chloroform,
liquid by controlled fermentation using Trichoderma longibrachi- and in ether. Major active principle: glucose (or xylose) isomer-
atum var. Soluble in water (the solution is usually tan to brown) ase. Typical applications: manufacture of high-fructose corn
but practically insoluble in alcohol, in chloroform, and in ether. syrup and other fructose starch syrups.
Major active principles: (1) cellulase (2) β-glucanase, (3) β-D-
glucosidase, (4) hemicellulase, and (5) pentosanase. Typical Glucose Oxidase (Aspergillus niger var.) Produced as a yellow
applications: preparation of fruit juices, wine, vegetable oils, beer, to brown solution or as a yellow to tan or off-white powder by
and baked goods. controlled fermentation using Aspergillus niger var. Soluble in
water (the solution is usually light yellow to brown) but prac-
Carbohydrase and Protease, Mixed (Bacillus licheniformis tically insoluble in alcohol, in chloroform, and in ether. Major
var.) Produced as an off-white to brown, amorphous powder or a active principles: (1) glucose oxidase and (2) catalase. Typical
liquid by controlled fermentation using Bacillus licheniformis var. applications: removal of sugar from liquid eggs; deoxygenation of
Soluble in water (the solution is usually light yellow to dark citrus beverages.
brown) but practically insoluble in alcohol, in chloroform, and in
ether. Major active principles: (1) α-amylase and (2) protease. Lipase (Aspergillus niger var.) Produced as an off-white to tan,
Typical applications: preparation of starch syrups, alcohol, beer, amorphous powder by controlled fermentation using Aspergillus
dextrose, fish meal, and protein hydrolysates. niger var. Soluble in water (the solution is usually light yellow)
but practically insoluble in alcohol, in chloroform, and in ether.
Carbohydrase and Protease, Mixed (Bacillus subtilis var. in- Major active principle: lipase. Typical application: hydrolysis of
cluding Bacillus amyloliquefaciens) Produced as an off-white lipids (e.g., fish oil concentrates and cereal derived lipids).
to tan, amorphous powder or a liquid by controlled fermentation
using Bacillus subtilis var. Soluble in water (the solution is Lipase (Aspergillus oryzae var.) Produced as an off-white to
usually light yellow to dark brown) but practically insoluble in tan, amorphous powder or a liquid by controlled fermentation
alcohol, in chloroform, and in ether. Major active principles: (1) using Aspergillus oryzae var. Soluble in water (the solution is
α-amylase, (2) β-glucanase, (3) protease, and (4) pentosanase. usually light yellow) but practically insoluble in alcohol, in
Typical applications: preparation of starch syrups, alcohol, beer, chloroform, and in ether. Major active principle: lipase. Typical
dextrose, bakery products, fish meal; tenderizing of meat; prep- applications: hydrolysis of lipids (e.g., fish oil concentrates);
aration of protein hydrolysates. manufacture of cheese and cheese flavors.

Catalase (Aspergillus niger var.) Produced as an off-white to Lipase (Candida rugosa; formerly Candida cylindracea) Pro-
tan, amorphous powder or a liquid by controlled fermentation duced as an off-white to tan powder by controlled fermentation
using Aspergillus niger var. Soluble in water (the solution is using Candida rugosa. Soluble in water but practically insoluble
usually tan to brown) but practically insoluble in alcohol, in in alcohol, in chloroform, and in ether. Major active principle:
chloroform, and in ether. Major active principle: catalase. Typical lipase. Typical applications: hydrolysis of lipids, manufacture of
applications: manufacture of cheese, egg products, and soft dairy products and confectionery goods, development of flavor in
drinks. processed foods.

Catalase (Micrococcus lysodeikticus) Produced by controlled Lipase (Rhizomucor (Mucor) miehei) Produced as an off-white
fermentation using Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Soluble in water to tan powder or a liquid by controlled fermentation using Rhizo-
(the solution is usually light yellow to dark brown) but practically mucor miehei. Soluble in water (the solution is usually light
insoluble in alcohol, in chloroform, and in ether. Major active yellow to dark brown) but practically insoluble in alcohol, in
principle: catalase. Typical application: manufacture of cheese, chloroform, and in ether. Major active principle: lipase. Typical
egg products, and soft drinks. applications: hydrolysis of lipids; manufacture of cheese; removal
of haze in fruit juices.
Chymosin (Aspergillus niger var. awamori, Escherichia coli K-
12, and Kluyveromyces marxianus, each microorganism con- Phytase (Aspergillus niger var.) Produced as an off-white to
taining a calf prochymosin gene) Produced as a white to tan, brown powder or as a tan to dark-brown liquid by controlled
amorphous powder or as a light-yellow to brown liquid by con- fermentation using Aspergillus niger var. Soluble in water but
trolled fermentation using the above-named genetically modified practically insoluble in alcohol, in chloroform, and in ether. Major
microorganisms. The powder is soluble in water but practically active principles: (1) 3-phytase and (2) acid phosphatase. Typical
insoluble in alcohol, in chloroform, and in ether. Major active applications: soy protein isolate production; phytic acid removal
principle: chymosin. Typical application: manufacture of cheese; from plant materials.
preparation of milk-based desserts.
Protease (Aspergillus niger var.) Produced by controlled fer-
Glucose Isomerase (Actinoplanes missouriensis, Bacillus coagu- mentation using Aspergillus niger var. The purified enzyme
lans, Streptomyces olivaceus, Streptomyces olivochromogenes, occurs as an off-white to tan, amorphous powder. Soluble in water

FCC IV, Supplement 3 Monographs / Enzyme Preparations / 21

(the solution is usually light yellow) but practically insoluble in Cellulase Hydrolysis of β-1,4-glucan bonds in such polysac-
alcohol, in chloroform, and in ether. Major active principle: charides as cellulose, yielding β-dextrins.
protease. Typical application: production of protein hydrolysates.
Chymosin (calf and fermentation derived) Cleaves a single
Protease (Aspergillus oryzae var.) Produced by controlled bond in kappa-casein.
fermentation using Aspergillus oryzae var. The purified enzyme
occurs as an off-white to tan, amorphous powder. Soluble in water Ficin Hydrolysis of polypeptides, amides, and esters (espe-
(the solution is usually light yellow) but practically insoluble in cially at bonds involving basic amino acids, leucine, or glycine),
alcohol, in chloroform, and in ether. Major active principle: yielding peptides of lower molecular weight.
protease. Typical applications: chillproofing of beer; production
of bakery products; tenderizing of meat; production of protein ␣-Galactosidase Hydrolysis of terminal nonreducing α-D-
hydrolysates; development of flavor in processed foods. galactose residues in α-D-galactosides.

Rennet, Microbial (nonpathogenic strain of Bacillus cereus) ␤-Glucanase Hydrolysis of β-1,3- and β-1,4-linkages in β-D-
Produced as a white to tan, amorphous powder or a light-yellow to glucans, yielding oligosaccharides and glucose.
dark-brown liquid by controlled fermentation using Bacillus
cereus. Soluble in water but practically insoluble in alcohol, in Glucoamylase (Amyloglucosidase) Hydrolysis of terminal α-
chloroform, and in ether. Major active principle: protease. Typical 1,4- and α-1,6-glucan bonds in polysaccharides (starch, glycogen,
application: manufacture of cheese. etc.), yielding glucose (dextrose).

Rennet, Microbial (Endothia parasitica) Produced as an off- Glucose Isomerase (Xylose isomerase) Isomerization of glu-
white to tan, amorphous powder or a liquid by controlled fermen- cose to fructose, and xylose to xylulose.
tation using nonpathogenic strains of Endothia parasitica. The
powder is soluble in water (the solution is usually tan to dark Glucose Oxidase β-D-glucose + O2 → D-glucono-δ-lactone +
brown) but practically insoluble in alcohol, in chloroform, and in H2O2.
ether. Major active principle: protease. Typical application: man-
ufacture of cheese. ␤-D-Glucosidase Hydrolysis of terminal, nonreducing β-D-
glucose residues with the release of β-D-glucose.
Rennet, Microbial (Rhizomucor (Mucor) sp.) Produced as a
white to tan, amorphous powder by controlled fermentation using Hemicellulase Hydrolysis of β-1,4-glucans, α-L-arabinosides,
Rhizomucor miehei, or pusillus var. Lindt. The powder is soluble β-D-mannosides, 1,3-β-D-xylans, and other polysaccharides,
in water (the solution is usually light yellow) but practically yielding polysaccharides of lower molecular weight.
insoluble in alcohol, in chloroform, and in ether. Major active
principle: protease. Typical application: manufacture of cheese. Invertase (β-fructofuranosidase) Hydrolysis of sucrose to a
mixture of glucose and fructose (invert sugar).
REACTIONS CATALYZED
Lactase (β-galactosidase) Hydrolysis of lactose to a mixture of
Note: The reactions catalyzed by any given active glucose and galactose.
component are essentially the same, regardless of the
source from which that component is derived. Lysozyme Hydrolysis of cell-wall polysaccharides of various
bacterial species leading to the breakdown of the cell wall most
␣-Acetolactatedecarboxylase Decarboxylation of α-aceto- often in Gram-positive bacteria.
lactate to acetoin.
Maltogenic Amylase Hydrolysis of α-1,4-glucan bonds.
Aminopeptidase, Leucine Hydrolysis of N-terminal amino
acid, which is preferably leucine, but may be other amino acids, Lipase Hydrolysis of triglycerides of simple fatty acids, yield-
from proteins and oligopeptides, yielding free amino acids and ing mono- and diglycerides, glycerol, and free fatty acids.
oligopeptides of lower molecular weight.
Pancreatin
␣-Amylase Endohydrolysis of α-1,4-glucan bonds in poly- α-Amylase Hydrolysis of α-1,4-glucan bonds.
saccharides (starch, glycogen, etc.), yielding dextrins and oligo- Protease Hydrolysis of proteins and polypepticles.
and monosaccharides. Lipase Hydrolysis of triglycerides of simple fatty acids.

␤-Amylase Hydrolysis of α-1,4-glucan bonds in polysaccha- Pectinase
rides (starch, glycogen, etc.), yielding maltose and β-limit Pectate lyase Hydrolysis of pectate to oligosaccharides.
dextrins. Pectin depolymerase Hydrolysis of 1,4-galacturonide

Bromelain Hydrolysis of polypeptides, amides, and esters bonds.
(especially at bonds involving basic amino acids, leucine, or Pectin lyase Hydrolysis of oligosaccharides formed by
glycine), yielding peptides of lower molecular weight.
pectate lyase.
Catalase 2H2O2 → O2 + 2H2O. Pectinesterase Demethylation of pectin.

Pepsin Hydrolysis of polypeptides, including those with bonds
adjacent to aromatic or dicarboxylic L-amino acid residues, yield-
ing peptides of lower molecular weight.

Phospholipase A2 Hydrolysis of lecithins and phosphatidyl-
choline, producing fatty acid anions.

22 / Enzyme Preparations / Monographs FCC IV, Supplement 3

Phytase declared representations for enzyme activity:1 Acid Phosphatase
3-Phytase myo-Inositol hexakisphosphate + H2O → Activity, α-Amylase Activity (Nonbacterial); Bacterial α-Amy-
lase Activity (BAU); Catalase Activity; Cellulase Activity; Chy-
1,2,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate + orthophosphate motrypsin Activity; Diastase Activity (Diastatic Power); α-Galac-
Acid Phosphatase Orthophosphate monoester + H2O → an tosidase Activity, β-Glucanase Activity; Glucoamylase Activity
(Amyloglucosidase Activity); Glucose Isomerase Activity; Glu-
alcohol + orthophosphate. cose Oxidase Activity; β-D-Glucosidase Activity; Hemicellulase
Activity; Invertase Activity; Lactase (Neutral) (β-Galactosidase)
Protease (generic) Hydrolysis of polypeptides, yielding pep- Activity; Lactase (Acid) (β-Galactosidase) Activity; Lipase Ac-
tides of lower molecular weight. tivity; Lipase/Esterase (Forestomach) Activity; Maltogenic Amy-
lase Activity; Milk-Clotting Activity; Pancreatin Activity; Pepsin
Pullulanase Hydrolysis of 1,6-α-D-glycosidic bonds on amylo- Activity; Phospholipase Activity; Phytase Activity; Plant Proteo-
pectin and glycogen and in α- and β-limit dextrins, yielding linear lytic Activity; Proteolytic Activity, Bacterial (PC); Proteolytic
polysaccharides. Activity, Fungal (HUT); Proteolytic Activity, Fungal (SAP);
Pullulanase Activity; and Trypsin Activity.
Rennet (Bovine and calf) Hydrolysis of polypeptides; specific- Lead A Sample Solution prepared as directed for organic com-
ity may be similar to pepsin. pounds meets the requirements of the Lead Limit Test, Appendix
IIIB, using 5 µg of lead ion (Pb) in the control.
Trypsin Hydrolysis of polypeptides, amides, and esters at Microbial Limits:
bonds involving the carboxyl groups of L-arginine and L-lysine,
yielding peptides of lower molecular weight. Coliforms Proceed as directed in chapter 4 of the FDA
Bacteriological Analytical Manual, Eighth Edition, 1998.
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
Salmonella sp. Proceed as directed in chapter 5 of the
Enzyme preparations are produced in accordance with good FDA Bacteriological Analytical Manual, Eighth Edition, 1998.
manufacturing practices. Regardless of the source of derivation,
they should cause no increase in the total microbial count in the Packaging and Storage Store in tight containers in a cool, dry
treated food over the level accepted for the respective food. place.

Animal tissues used to produce enzymes must comply with
the applicable U.S. meat inspection requirements and must be
handled in accordance with good hygienic practices.

Plant material used to produce enzymes or culture media
used to grow microorganisms consist of components that leave no
residues harmful to health in the finished food under normal
conditions of use.

Preparations derived from microbial sources are produced by
methods and under culture conditions that ensure a controlled
fermentation, thus preventing the introduction of microorganisms
that could be the source of toxic materials and other undesirable
substances.

The carriers, diluents, and processing aids used to produce
the enzyme preparations shall be substances that are acceptable
for general use in foods, including water and substances that are
insoluble in foods but removed from the foods after processing.

Although limits have not been established for mycotoxins,
appropriate measures should be taken to ensure that the products
do not contain such contaminants.

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS 1Because of the varied conditions under which pectinases are
employed, and because laboratory hydrolysis of a purified pectin
Assay Not less than 85.0% and not more than 115.0% of the substrate does not correlate with results observed with the natural
declared units of enzyme activity. substrates under use conditions, pectinase suppliers and users
Lead Not more than 5 mg/kg. should develop their own assay procedures that would relate to the
Microbial Limits: specific application under consideration.

Coliforms Not more than 30 per g.
Salmonella sp. Negative in 25 g.

TESTS

Assay The following procedures, which are included in the
General Tests under Enzyme Assays, Appendix V, are provided for
application as necessary in determining compliance with the

FCC IV, Supplement 3 Monographs / Ethoxyquin / 23

Revision: Description, Assay Limit, and Assay Test into a 50-mL volumetric flask. Dissolve in n-hexane, dilute to
modified; Heavy Metals (as Pb) specification and volume with the same solvent, and mix.
determination deleted; Lead, p-Phenetidine, and p-
Phenetidine-Related Impurities specifications and Sample Preparation Transfer 500 mg of sample, accu-
determinations added. rately weighed, into a 25-mL volumetric flask, dissolve in n-
hexane, dilute to volume, and mix.
Ethoxyquin
Procedure Inject 1-µL aliquots of the Standard Prep-
6-Ethoxy-1,2-dihydro-2,2,4-trimethylquinoline aration and the Sample Preparation into a gas chromatograph
equipped with a split injector, a flame-ionization detector, and a
CH3 25-m fused silica capillary column coated with a 2-µm film of 7%
cyanopropyl-7% phenyl-85% methyl-1% vinylpolysiloxane (CP-
C2H5O CH3 Sil 19 CB, Chrompack Middelburg, or equivalent). Maintain the
column at 100°, raising the temperature at 8°/min to a final
C14H19NO N CH3 temperature of 300°. Set the injector temperature to 270°and the
INS: 324 H detector temperature to 270°. Use a mixture of helium and meth-
ane, at a split ratio of 1:100, as the carrier gas, flowing at 120 mL/
Formula wt, monomer 217.31 min. Run the chromatogram for 27 min.
CAS: [91-53-2]
Calculate the quantity, in %, of p-phenetidine in the sample
DESCRIPTION taken by the formula

Ethoxyquin occurs as a clear yellow to red liquid that may darken 100 × [25C × (rU/rS)/W],
with age without affecting its antioxidant activity. It is a mixture
consisting predominantly of the monomer (C14H19NO). It also in which C is the concentration, in mg/mL, of p-phenetidine in the
contains dimers and other polymers of C14H19NO. Its specific Standard Preparation, rU is the p-phenetidine peak area response
gravity is about 1.02, and its refractive index is about 1.57. from the Sample Preparation, rS is the peak area response of p-
phenetidine from the Standard Preparation eluting at about 7
Functional Use in Foods Antioxidant. min, and W is the weight, in mg, of sample in the Sample Prep-
aration.
p-Phenetidine-Related Impurities Calculate the quantity, in
%, of related impurities by the formula

100 – (% Assay + % p-phenetidine).

REQUIREMENTS Packaging and Storage Store in tightly closed carbon steel or
black iron (not rubber, neoprene, or nylon) containers or in
Identification A solution of 1 mg of sample in 10 mL of polypropylene or polyethylene drums or lined drums in a cool,
acetonitrile exhibits a strong fluorescence when viewed under dark place. Prolonged exposure to sunlight causes polymeri-
short-wavelength ultraviolet light. zation.
Assay Not less than 91.0% of C14H19NO.
Lead Not more than 2 mg/kg.
p-Phenetidine Not more than 3.0%.
p-Phenetidine-Related Impurities (low-boiling monomers and
high-boiling dimers, trimers, and oligomers of Ethoxyquin) Not
more than 8.0%.

TESTS

Assay Transfer about 200 mg of sample, accurately weighed,
into a 150-mL beaker containing 50 mL of glacial acetic acid, and
immediately titrate with 0.1 N perchloric acid in glacial acetic
acid, determining the endpoint potentiometrically. Perform a
blank determination and make any necessary correction (see
General Provisions). Each mL of 0.1 N perchloric acid is equiv-
alent to 21.73 mg of C14H19NO.
Lead Determine as directed for Flame Atomic Absorption
Spectrophotometric Method under the Lead Limit Test, Appendix
IIIB, using a 10-g sample.
p-Phenetidine

Standard Preparation Transfer 6 mg of 98% p-pheneti-
dine, available from Aldrich Chemical Co., accurately weighed,

24 / FD&C Blue No. 1 / Monographs FCC IV, Supplement 3

Revision: Entire monograph rewritten to reflect U.S. Total Color Not less than 85.0%.
FDA regulations regarding certified FD&C color Uncombined Intermediates and Products of Side Reactions
additives. The noncertified color additive, commonly
referred to as Brilliant Blue FCF, is not permitted for use o-, m-, and p-Sulfobenzaldehydes Not more than 1.5%,
in food in the United States. combined.

FD&C Blue No. 11 N-Ethyl, N-(m-sulfobenzyl)sulfanilic Acid Not more than
0.3%.
Brilliant Blue FCF;2 CI 42090;2 Class: Triphenylmethane Volatile Matter (at 135°) and Chlorides and Sulfates (as
sodium salts) Not more than 15.0% in combination.
C C2H5 SO3Na Water-Insoluble Matter Not more than 0.2%.
SO3 N CH2
SO3Na TESTS
C37H34N2O9S3Na2 N CH2
INS: 133 C2H5 Formula wt 792.86 FDA-certifiable color additives are batch certified by the United
CAS: [3844-45-9] States Food and Drug Administration using analytical chemistry
methods developed for this purpose by the FDA. The color
DESCRIPTION additive regulations are described in Title 21, Parts 70 to 82, of the
United States Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR Parts 70 to
FD&C Blue No. 1 is principally the disodium salt of ethyl[4-[p- 82). The batch certification process is described in 21 CFR Part
[ethyl(m-sulfobenzyl)amino]-α-(o-sulfophenyl)benzylidene]- 80. Current certification analytical methods are available from the
2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene](m-sulfobenzyl) ammonium hy- Office of Cosmetics and Colors, Colors Certification Branch
droxide inner salt, with smaller amounts of the isomeric disodium (HFS-107), U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 200 C Street,
salts of ethyl[4-[p-[ethyl(p-sulfobenzyl)amino]-α-(o-sulfophe- S.W., Washington, DC 20204.
nyl)benzylidene]-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene](p-sulfobenzyl)
ammonium hydroxide inner salt and ethyl[4-[p-[ethyl(o-sul- Packaging and Storage Store in well-closed containers.
fobenzyl)amino]-α-(o-sulfophenyl)benzylidene]-2,5-cyclohex-
adien-1-ylidene](o-sulfobenzyl) ammonium hydroxide inner salt. Revision: Entire monograph revised to reflect U.S. FDA
regulations regarding certified FD&C color additives.
Functional Use in Foods Color. The noncertified color additive, commonly referred to as
Indigotine, is not permitted for use in food in the United
REQUIREMENTS States.

Identification The visible absorption spectrum of a sample of FD&C Blue No. 21
FD&C Blue No. 1 dissolved in 0.04 N aqueous ammonium
acetate has a wavelength maximum of 630 nm, with an ab- Indigotine;2 Indigo Carmine;2 CI 73015;2 Class: Indigoid
sorptivity of 0.164 L/(mg·cm).
Arsenic (as As) Not more than 3 mg/kg. NaO3S OH SO3Na
Chromium (as Cr) Not more than 0.005%. C CC N Formula wt 466.36
Manganese (as Mn) Not more than 0.01%. C16H8N2O8S2Na2 NC
Ether Extracts3 (combined) Not more than 0.4%. INS: 132 HO CAS: [860-22-0]
Lead (as Pb) Not more than 10 mg/kg.
Leuco Base Not more than 5%. DESCRIPTION
Subsidiary Colors Not more than 6.0%.
FD&C Blue No. 2 is principally the disodium salt of 2-(1,3-
1To be used or sold in the United States, this color additive must dihydro-3-oxo-5-sulfo-2H-indol-2-ylidene)-2,3-dihydro-3-oxo-
be batch certified by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The 1H-indole-5-sulfonic acid, with smaller amounts of the disodium
monograph title is the name of the color additive only after batch salt of 2-(1,3-dihydro-3-oxo-7-sulfo-2H-indol-2-ylidene)-2,3-
certification has been completed. dihydro-3-oxo-1H-indole-5-sulfonic acid and the sodium salt of
2-(1,3-dihydro-3-oxo-2H-indol-2-ylidene)-2,3-dihydro-3-oxo-
2Generic designations; not synonyms for certified batches of 1H-indole-5-sulfonic acid.
color additive.
Functional Use in Foods Color.
3Not required for certification in the United States.

FCC IV, Supplement 3 Monographs / FD&C Green No. 3 / 25

REQUIREMENTS Revision: Entire monograph revised to reflect U.S. FDA
regulations regarding certified FD&C color additives.
Identification The visible absorption spectrum of a sample of The noncertified color additive, commonly referred to as
FD&C Blue No. 2 dissolved in 0.04 N aqueous ammonium Fast Green FCF, is not permitted for use in food in the
acetate has a wavelength maximum of 610 nm, with an ab- United States.
sorptivity of 0.0478 L/(mg·cm).
Arsenic (as As) Not more than 3 mg/kg. FD&C Green No. 31
Ether Extracts3 (combined) Not more than 0.4%.
Lead (as Pb) Not more than 10 mg/kg. Fast Green FCF;2 CI 42053;2 Class: Triphenylmethane
Mercury (as Hg) Not more than 1 mg/kg.
Subsidiary and Isomeric Colors C2H5 SO3Na
N CH2
Disodium Salt of 2-(1,3-Dihydro-3-oxo-7-sulfo-2H-indol- SO3 C2H5
2-ylidene)-2,3-dihydro-3-oxo-1H-indole-5-sulfonic Acid Not HO C N CH2
more than 18%.
C37H34N2O10S3Na2 SO3Na
Sodium Salt of 2-(1,3-Dihydro-3-oxo-2H-indol-2-ylidene)- INS: 143
2,3-dihydro-3-oxo-1H-indole-5-sulfonic Acid Not more than Formula wt 808.86
2%. CAS: [2353-45-9]
Total Color Not less than 85%.
Decomposition Products DESCRIPTION

Isatin-5-sulfonic Acid Not more than 0.4%. FD&C Green No. 3 is principally the inner salt disodium salt of N-
5-Sulfoanthranilic Acid Not more than 0.2%. ethyl-N-[4-[[4-[ethyl[(3-sulfophenyl)methyl]amino]phenyl](4-
Volatile Matter (at 135°) and Chlorides and Sulfates (as hydroxy-2-sulfophenyl)methylene]-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-
sodium salts) Not more than 15% in combination. ylidene]-3-sulfobenzenemethanaminium hydroxide, with smaller
Water-Insoluble Matter Not more than 0.4%. amounts of the isomeric inner salt disodium salt of N-ethyl-N-[4-
[[4-[ethyl[(3-sulfophenyl)methyl]amino]phenyl](4-hydroxy-2-
TESTS sulfophenyl)methylene]-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene]-4-sulfo-
benzenemethanaminium hydroxide; of N-ethyl-N-[4-[[4-[ethyl
FDA-certifiable color additives are batch certified by the United [(4-sulfophenyl)methyl]amino]phenyl](4-hydroxy-2-sulfophe-
States Food and Drug Administration using analytical chemistry nyl)methylene]-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene]-4-sulfobenzene-
methods developed for this purpose by the FDA. The color methanaminium hydroxide; and of N-ethyl-N-[4-[[4-[ethyl[(2-
additive regulations are described in Title 21, Parts 70 to 82, of the sulfophenyl)methyl]amino]phenyl](4-hydroxy-2-sulfophe-
United States Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR Parts 70 to nyl)methylene]-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene]-3-sulfobenzene-
82). The batch certification process is described in 21 CFR Part methanaminium hydroxide.
80. Current certification analytical methods are available from the
Office of Cosmetics and Colors, Colors Certification Branch Functional Use in Foods Color.
(HFS-107), U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 200 C Street,
S.W., Washington, DC 20204.

Packaging and Storage Store in well-closed containers.

REQUIREMENTS

Identification The visible absorption spectrum of a sample of
FD&C Green No. 3 dissolved in 0.04 N aqueous ammonium
acetate has a wavelength maximum of 625 nm, with an ab-
sorptivity of 0.156 L/(mg·cm).
Arsenic (as As) Not more than 3 mg/kg.
Chromium (as Cr) Not more than 0.005%.
Ether Extracts3 (combined) Not more than 0.4%.

1To be used or sold in the United States, this color additive must
be batch certified by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The
monograph title is the name of the color additive only after batch
certification has been completed.

2Generic designations; not synonyms for certified batches of
color additive.

3Not required for certification in the United States.

26 / FD&C Red No. 3 / Monographs FCC IV, Supplement 3

Lead (as Pb) Not more than 10 mg/kg. Revision: Entire monograph revised to reflect U.S. FDA
Leuco Base Not more than 5%. regulations regarding certified FD&C color additives.
Mercury (as Hg) Not more than 1 mg/kg. The noncertified color additive, commonly referred to as
Subsidiary Colors Not more than 6%. Erythrosine, is not permitted for use in food in the
Total Color Not less than 85%. United States.
Uncombined Intermediates and Products of Side Reactions
FD&C Red No. 31
Sum of 3- and 4-[[Ethyl(4-sulfophenyl)amino]methyl]ben-
zenesulfonic Acid, Disodium Salts Not more than 0.3%. Erythrosine;2 CI 45430;2 Class: Xanthene

Sum of 2-, 3-, and 4-Formylbenzenesulfonic Acids, Sodium II
Salts Not more than 0.5%. NaO O O

2-Formyl-5-hydroxybenzenesulfonic Acid, Sodium Salt C
Not more than 0.5%. II
Volatile Matter (at 135°) and Chlorides and Sulfates (as
sodium salts) Not more than 15.0% in combination. COONa
Water-Insoluble Matter Not more than 0.2%.

TESTS C20H6O5I4Na2 Formula wt 879.86
INS: 127 CAS: [16423-68-0]
FDA-certifiable color additives are batch certified by the United
States Food and Drug Administration using analytical chemistry DESCRIPTION
methods developed for this purpose by the FDA. The color
additive regulations are described in Title 21, Parts 70 to 82, of the FD&C Red No. 3 is principally the monohydrate of 9-(o-carboxy-
United States Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR Parts 70 to phenyl)-6-hydroxy-2,4,5,7-tetraiodo-3H-xanthen-3-one
82). The batch certification process is described in 21 CFR Part disodium salt, with smaller amounts of lower iodinated fluor-
80. Current certification analytical methods are available from the esceins.
Office of Cosmetics and Colors, Colors Certification Branch
(HFS-107), U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 200 C Street, Functional Use in Foods Color.
S.W., Washington, DC 20204.

Packaging and Storage Store in well-closed containers.

REQUIREMENTS

Identification The visible absorption spectrum of a sample of
FD&C Red No. 3 dissolved in 0.05% aqueous ammonium hy-
droxide has a wavelength maximum of 527 nm, with an ab-
sorptivity of 0.110 L/(mg·cm).
Arsenic (as As) Not more than 3 mg/kg.
Ether Extracts3 (combined) Not more than 0.2%.
Lead (as Pb) Not more than 10 mg/kg.
Subsidiary Colors

Monoiodofluoresceins Not more than 1.0%.
Other Lower Iodinated Fluoresceins Not more than 9.0%.
Total Color Not less than 87.0%.
Uncombined Intermediates and Products of Side Reactions
2-(2',4'-Dihydroxy-3',5'-diiodobenzoyl)benzoic Acid Not
more than 0.2%.
Sodium Iodide Not more than 0.4%.
Triiodoresorcinol Not more than 0.2%.
Unhalogenated Intermediates, Total Not more than 0.1%.

1To be used or sold in the United States, this color additive must
be batch certified by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The
monograph title is the name of the color additive only after batch
certification has been completed.

2Generic designations; not synonyms for certified batches of
color additive.

3Not required for certification in the United States.

FCC IV, Supplement 3 Monographs / FD&C Red No. 40 / 27

Volatile Matter (at 135°) and Chlorides and Sulfates (as REQUIREMENTS
sodium salts) Not more than 13% in combination.
Water-Insoluble Matter Not more than 0.2%. Identification The visible absorption spectrum of a sample of
FD&C Red No. 40 dissolved in 0.04 N aqueous ammonium
TESTS acetate has a wavelength maximum of 500 nm, with an ab-
sorptivity of 0.052 L/(mg·cm).
FDA-certifiable color additives are batch certified by the United Arsenic (as As) Not more than 3 mg/kg.
States Food and Drug Administration using analytical chemistry Lead (as Pb) Not more than 10 mg/kg.
methods developed for this purpose by the FDA. The color Subsidiary Colors
additive regulations are described in Title 21, Parts 70 to 82, of the
United States Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR Parts 70 to Disodium Salt of 6-Hydroxy-5-[(2-methoxy-5-methyl-4-
82). The batch certification process is described in 21 CFR Part sulfophenyl)azo]-8-(2-methoxy-5-methyl-4-sulfophenoxy)-2-
80. Current certification analytical methods are available from the naphthalenesulfonic Acid Not more than 1.0%.
Office of Cosmetics and Colors, Colors Certification Branch
(HFS-107), U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 200 C Street, Higher Sulfonated Subsidiary Colors (as sodium salts) Not
S.W., Washington, DC 20204. more than 1.0%.

Packaging and Storage Store in well-closed containers. Lower Sulfonated Subsidiary Colors (as sodium salts) Not
more than 1.0%.
Revision: Entire monograph revised to reflect U.S. FDA Total Color Not less than 85.0%.
regulations regarding certified FD&C color additives. Uncombined Intermediates and Products of Side Reactions
The noncertified color additive, commonly referred to as
Allura Red AC, is not permitted for use in food in the 4-Amino-5-methoxy-o-toluenesulfonic Acid Not more than
United States. 0.2%.

FD&C Red No. 401 Disodium Salt of 6,6'-Oxybis(2-naphthalenesulfonic Acid)
Not more than 1.0%.
Allura Red AC;2 CI 16035;2 Class: Monoazo
Sodium Salt of 6-Hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic Acid Not
OH CH3 more than 0.3%.
Volatile Matter (at 135°) and Chlorides and Sulfates (as
NN SO3Na sodium salts) Not more than 14.0% in combination.
Water-Insoluble Matter Not more than 0.2%.
OCH3
TESTS
SO3Na Formula wt 496.43
C18H14N2O8S2Na2 CAS: [25956-17-6] FDA-certifiable color additives are batch certified by the United
INS: 129 States Food and Drug Administration using analytical chemistry
methods developed for this purpose by the FDA. The color
additive regulations are described in Title 21, Parts 70 to 82, of the
United States Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR Parts 70 to
82). The batch certification process is described in 21 CFR Part
80. Current certification analytical methods are available from the
Office of Cosmetics and Colors, Colors Certification Branch
(HFS-107), U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 200 C Street,
S.W., Washington, DC 20204.

Packaging and Storage Store in well-closed containers.

DESCRIPTION

FD&C Red No. 40 is principally the disodium salt of 6-hydroxy-
5-[(2-methoxy-5-methyl-4-sulfophenyl)azo]-2-naphthalenesul-
fonic acid.

Functional Use in Foods Color.

1To be used or sold in the United States, this color additive must
be batch certified by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The
monograph title is the name of the color additive only after batch
certification has been completed.

2Generic designations; not synonyms for certified batches of
color additive.

28 / FD&C Yellow No. 5 / Monographs FCC IV, Supplement 3

Revision: Entire monograph revised to reflect U.S. FDA Ethyl or Methyl 4,5-Dihydro-5-oxo-1-(4-sulfophenyl)-4-[(4-
regulations regarding certified FD&C color additives. sulfophenyl)hydrazono]-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxylate, Disodium
The noncertified color additive, commonly referred to as Salt Not more than 1%.
Tartrazine, is not permitted for use in food in the United
States. Sum of 4,5-Dihydro-5-oxo-1-phenyl-4-[(4-sulfophenyl)azo]-
1H-pyrazole-3-carboxylic Acid, Disodium Salt, and 4,5-Dihydro-
FD&C Yellow No. 51 5-oxo-4-(phenylazo)-1-(4-sulfophenyl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carbox-
ylic Acid, Disodium Salt Not more than 0.5%.
Tartrazine;2 CI 19140;2 Class: Pyrazolone
4-Aminobenzenesulfonic Acid, Sodium Salt Not more than
NaO3S N NC C COONa 0.2%.

HO C N 4,5-Dihydro-5-oxo-1-(4-sulfophenyl)-1H-pyrazole-3-car-
boxylic Acid, Disodium Salt Not more than 0.2%.
N
Ethyl or Methyl 4,5-Dihydro-5-oxo-1-(4-sulfophenyl)-1H-
C16H9N4O9S2Na3 SO3Na pyrazole-3-carboxylate, Sodium Salt Not more than 0.1%.
INS: 102 Formula wt 534.37
CAS: [1934-21-0] 4,4'-(1-Triazene-1,3-diyl)bis[benzenesulfonic acid], Di-
sodium Salt Not more than 0.05%.
DESCRIPTION
4-Aminoazobenzene Not more than 75 µg/kg.
FD&C Yellow No. 5 is principally the trisodium salt of 4,5- 4-Aminobiphenyl Not more than 5 µg/kg.
dihydro-5-oxo-1-(4-sulfophenyl)-4-[4-sulfophenyl-azo]-1H- Aniline Not more than 100 µg/kg.
pyrazole-3-carboxylic acid. Azobenzene Not more than 40 µg/kg.
Benzidine Not more than 1 µg/kg.
Functional Use in Foods Color. 1,3-Diphenyltriazene Not more than 40 µg/kg.
Volatile Matter (at 135°) and Chlorides and Sulfates (as
REQUIREMENTS sodium salts) Not more than 13% in combination.
Water-Insoluble Matter Not more than 0.2%.
Identification The visible absorption spectrum of a sample of
FD&C Yellow No. 5 dissolved in 0.04 N aqueous ammonium TESTS
acetate has a wavelength maximum of 428 nm, with an ab-
sorptivity of 0.053 L/(mg·cm). FDA-certifiable color additives are batch certified by the United
Arsenic (as As) Not more than 3 mg/kg. States Food and Drug Administration using analytical chemistry
Ether Extracts3 (combined) Not more than 0.2%. methods developed for this purpose by the FDA. The color
Lead (as Pb) Not more than 10 mg/kg. additive regulations are described in Title 21, Parts 70 to 82, of the
Mercury (as Hg) Not more than 1 mg/kg. United States Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR Parts 70 to
Total Color Not less than 87%. 82). The batch certification process is described in 21 CFR Part
Uncombined Intermediates and Products of Side Reactions 80. Current certification analytical methods are available from the
Office of Cosmetics and Colors, Colors Certification Branch
4,4'-[4,5-Dihydro-5-oxo-4-[(4-sulfophenyl)-hydrazono]- (HFS-107), U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 200 C Street,
1H-pyrazol-1,3-diyl]bis[benzenesulfonic Acid], Trisodium Salt S.W., Washington, DC 20204.
Not more than 1%.
Packaging and Storage Store in well-closed containers.
4-[(4',5-Disulfo[1,1'-biphenyl]-2-yl)hydrazono]-4,5-
dihydro-5-oxo-1-(4-sulfophenyl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxylic Acid,
Tetrasodium Salt Not more than 1%.

1To be used or sold in the United States, this color additive must
be batch certified by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The
monograph title is the name of the color additive only after batch
certification has been completed.

2Generic designations; not synonyms for certified batches of
color additive.

3Not required for certification in the United States.

FCC IV, Supplement 3 Monographs / Grape Skin Extract / 29

Revision: Entire monograph revised to reflect U.S. FDA Sodium Salt of 4-Aminobenzenesulfonic Acid Not more
regulations regarding certified FD&C color additives. than 0.2%.
The noncertified color additive, commonly referred to as
Sunset Yellow FCF, is not permitted for use in food in Sodium Salt of 6-Hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic Acid Not
the United States. more than 0.3%.

FD&C Yellow No. 61 Disodium Salt of 6,6'-Oxybis[2-naphthalenesulfonic Acid]
Not more than 1%.
Sunset Yellow FCF;2 CI 15985;2 Class: Monoazo
Disodium Salt of 4,4'-(1-Triazene-1,3-diyl)bis[benzenesul-
OH fonic Acid] Not more than 0.1%.

NaO3S NN Sum of the Sodium Salt of 6-Hydroxy-5-(phenylazo)-2-naph-
thalenesulfonic Acid and the Sodium Salt of 4-[(2-Hydroxy-1-
C16H10N2O7S2Na2 SO3Na naphthalenyl)azo]benzenesulfonic Acid Not more than 1%.
INS: 110 Formula wt 452.37
CAS: [2783-94-0] Sum of the Trisodium Salt of 3-Hydroxy-4-[(4-sulfophe-
nyl)azo]-2,7-naphthalenedisulfonic Acid and Other Higher Sul-
DESCRIPTION fonated Subsidiaries Not more than 5%.
Volatile Matter (at 135°) and Chlorides and Sulfates (as
FD&C Yellow No. 6 is principally the disodium salt of 6-hydroxy- sodium salts) Not more than 13% in combination.
5-[(4-sulfophenyl)azo]-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid. The tri- Water-Insoluble Matter Not more than 0.2%.
sodium salt of 3-hydroxy-4-[(4-sulfophenyl)azo]-2,7-naphtha-
lenedisulfonic acid may be added in small amounts. TESTS

Functional Use in Foods Color. FDA-certifiable color additives are batch certified by the United
States Food and Drug Administration using analytical chemistry
REQUIREMENTS methods developed for this purpose by the FDA. The color
additive regulations are described in Title 21, Parts 70 to 82, of the
Identification The visible absorption spectrum of a sample of United States Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR Parts 70 to
FD&C Yellow No. 6 dissolved in 0.04 N aqueous ammonium 82). The batch certification process is described in 21 CFR Part
acetate has a wavelength maximum of 484 nm, with an ab- 80. Current certification analytical methods are available from the
sorptivity of 0.054 L/(mg·cm). Office of Cosmetics and Colors, Colors Certification Branch
Arsenic (as As) Not more than 3 mg/kg. (HFS-107), U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 200 C Street,
Ether Extracts3 (combined) Not more than 0.2%. S.W., Washington, DC 20204.
Lead (as Pb) Not more than 10 mg/kg.
Mercury (as Hg) Not more than 1 mg/kg. Packaging and Storage Store in well-closed containers.
Total Color Not less than 87%.
Uncombined Intermediates and Products of Side Reactions Revision: Assay and Lead specification corrected;
Arsenic and Pesticides specifications and determinations
4-Aminoazobenzene Not more than 50 µg/kg. deleted.
4-Aminobiphenyl Not more than 15 µg/kg.
Aniline Not more than 250 µg/kg. Grape Skin Extract
Azobenzene Not more than 200 µg/kg.
Benzidine Not more than 1 µg/kg. Enocianina
1,3-Diphenyltriazene Not more than 40 µg/kg.
1-(Phenylazo)-2-naphthalenol Not more than 10 mg/kg. CAS: [11029-12-2]

1To be used or sold in the United States, this color additive must DESCRIPTION
be batch certified by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The
monograph title is the name of the color additive only after batch Grape Skin Extract occurs as a red to purple powder or liquid
certification has been completed. concentrate. It is prepared by aqueous extraction of grape marc
remaining from the pressing of grapes to obtain juice. Extraction
2Generic designations; not synonyms for certified batches of is effected with water containing sulfur dioxide. After concen-
color additive. tration by vacuum evaporation, the sugar content is reduced by
fermentation; further concentration removes most of the alcohol.
3Not required for certification in the United States. The primary color components are anthocyanins such as the
glucosides of malvidin, peonidin, petunidin, delphinidin, or
cyanidin. Other components naturally present are sugars, tar-
trates, malates, tannins, and minerals. Alcohol or sulfur dioxide
may be added. The powder may contain an added carrier such as

30 / DL-Isoleucine / Monographs FCC IV, Supplement 3

maltodextrin, modified starch, or gum. In acid solution, Grape Revision: Identification test corrected; Heavy Metals
Skin Extract is red; in neutral to alkaline solution, it is violet to (as Pb) specification and determination deleted.
blue.
DL-Isoleucine
Functional Use in Foods Color.
DL-2-Amino-3-methylvaleric Acid
REQUIREMENTS
H3C H O
Identification Transfer 1 g of sample and 1 g of potassium H3C OH
metabisulfite to a 100-mL volumetric flask, dissolve in about 50
mL of pH 3.0 Citrate–Citric Acid Buffer (see Assay, below), and H NH2
dilute to volume with the same buffer. The red color due to
anthocyanins is bleached. C6H13NO2 Formula wt 131.17
Assay The color strength (CS) expressed as the absorbance of a CAS: [443-79-8]
1% solution in pH 3.0 Citrate–Citric Acid Buffer in a cell of 1-cm
pathlength shall not be less than 90% of the color strength as DESCRIPTION
represented by the vendor.
Lead Not more than 5 mg/kg. A white, crystalline powder. It is soluble in water, but is prac-
tically insoluble in alcohol and in ether. It melts with decom-
TESTS position at about 292°. The pH of a 1:100 solution is between 5.5
and 7.0. It is optically inactive.
Assay
pH 3.0 Citrate–Citric Acid Buffer Add 0.1 M sodium Functional Use in Foods Nutrient; dietary supplement.

citrate, dropwise, to 0.1 M citric acid until a pH of 3.0 is reached, REQUIREMENTS
as determined by a glass electrode.
Identification Heat 5 mL of a 1:1000 solution with 1 mL of
Procedure Transfer about 0.2 g of sample, accurately triketohydrindene hydrate TS (ninhydrin TS). A bluish purple
weighed, to a 100-mL volumetric flask, dissolve in about 25 mL color is produced.
of pH 3.0 Citrate–Citric Acid Buffer, and dilute to volume with Assay Not less than 98.5% and not more than 101.5% of
the same buffer. Remove any undissolved material by filtration or C6H13NO2, calculated on the dried basis.
centrifugation. Adjust the pH to 3.0, and determine the absor- Lead Not more than 10 mg/kg.
bance of the clarified solution at 525 nm in a cell with a 1-cm Loss on Drying Not more than 0.3%.
pathlength. The color strength expressed as the absorbance of a Residue on Ignition Not more than 0.1%.
1% solution in a cell of 1-cm pathlength is calculated as
TESTS
CS = absorbance at 525 nm/sample weight in g.
Assay Dissolve about 250 mg, accurately weighed, in 3 mL of
Lead A Sample Solution prepared as directed for organic com- formic acid and 50 mL of glacial acetic acid, add 2 drops of
pounds meets the requirements of the Lead Limit Test, Appendix crystal violet TS, and titrate with 0.1 N perchloric acid to the first
IIIB, using 10 µg of lead ion (Pb) in the control. appearance of a pure green color or until the blue color disappears
completely. Perform a blank determination (see General Pro-
Packaging and Storage Store liquid Grape Skin Extract with visions), and make any necessary correction. Each mL of 0.1 N
aseptic packaging or in high-density polyethylene containers at 4° perchloric acid is equivalent to 13.12 mg of C6H13NO2.
to 14°. Store powdered Grape Skin Extract in fiber drums at room Lead A Sample Solution prepared as directed for organic com-
temperature. pounds meets the requirements of the Lead Limit Test, Appendix
IIIB, using 10 µg of lead ion (Pb) in the control.
Loss on Drying, Appendix IIC Dry at 105° for 3 h.
Residue on Ignition, Appendix IIC Ignite 1 g as directed in the
general method.

Packaging and Storage Store in well-closed containers.

FCC IV, Supplement 3 Monographs / Lanolin, Anhydrous / 31

Revision: Identification test corrected; Heavy Metals Revision: Arsenic and Heavy Metals (as Pb)
(as Pb) specification and determination deleted. specifications and determinations deleted.

L-Isoleucine Lanolin, Anhydrous

L-2-Amino-3-methylvaleric Acid Wool Fat

H3C H O INS: 913
H3C OH
DESCRIPTION
H NH2
A purified, yellowish white, semisolid, fatlike substance extracted
C6H13NO2 Formula wt 131.17 from the wool of sheep. It is insoluble in water, but mixes with
CAS: [73-32-5] about twice its weight of water without separation. It is soluble in
chloroform and in ether.
DESCRIPTION
Functional Use in Foods Masticatory substance in chewing
Crystalline leaflets or a white, crystalline powder. It is soluble in gum base.
25 parts of water, slightly soluble in hot alcohol, and soluble in
diluted mineral acids and in alkaline solutions. It sublimes be- REQUIREMENTS
tween 168° and 170°, and melts with decomposition at about
284°. The pH of a 1:100 solution is between 5.5 and 7.0. Acid Value Not more than 1.12.
Iodine Value Between 18 and 36.
Functional Use in Foods Nutrient; dietary supplement. Lead Not more than 3 mg/kg.
Loss on Heating Not more than 0.5%.
REQUIREMENTS Melting Range Between 36° and 42°.

Identification Heat 5 mL of a 1:1000 solution with 1 mL of TESTS
triketohydrindene hydrate TS (ninhydrin TS). A reddish purple or
bluish purple color is produced. Acid Value Determine as directed for Acid Value, Method I,
Assay Not less than 98.5% and not more than 101.5% of under Fats and Related Substances, Appendix VII.
C6H13NO2, calculated on the dried basis. Iodine Value Determine by the Modified Wijs Method, Appen-
Lead Not more than 10 mg/kg. dix VII.
Loss on Drying Not more than 0.3%. Lead Prepare a Sample Solution as directed in the general
Residue on Ignition Not more than 0.2%. method under Chewing Gum Base, Appendix IV. This solution
Specific Rotation [α]2D0°: Between +38.6° and +41.5° after meets the requirements of the Lead Limit Test, Appendix IIIB,
drying; or [α]2D5°: Between +38.2° and +41.1° after drying. using 10 µg of lead ion (Pb) in the control.
Loss on Heating Heat a 5-g sample on a steam bath, with
TESTS frequent stirring, to constant weight.
Melting Range Determine as directed for Melting Range or
Assay Dissolve about 250 mg, accurately weighed, in 3 mL of Temperature, Appendix IIB.
formic acid and 50 mL of glacial acetic acid, add 2 drops of
crystal violet TS, and titrate with 0.1 N perchloric acid to the first Packaging and Storage Store in well-closed containers, pref-
appearance of a pure green color or until the blue color disappears erably at a temperature not exceeding 30°.
completely. Perform a blank determination (see General Pro-
visions), and make any necessary correction. Each mL of 0.1 N
perchloric acid is equivalent to 13.12 mg of C6H13NO2.
Lead A Sample Solution prepared as directed for organic com-
pounds meets the requirements of the Lead Limit Test, Appendix
IIIB, using 10 µg of lead ion (Pb) in the control.
Loss on Drying, Appendix IIC Dry at 105° for 3 h.
Residue on Ignition, Appendix IIC Ignite 1 g as directed in the
general method.
Specific Rotation, Appendix IIB Determine in a solution con-
taining 4 g of a previously dried sample in sufficient 6 N hydro-
chloric acid to make 100 mL.

Packaging and Storage Store in well-closed containers.

32 / Lemongrass Oil / Monographs FCC IV, Supplement 3

Revision: Angular Rotation changed to reflect until the addition product dissolves, and then continue the heating
commercial standards; Heavy Metals (as Pb) and intermittent shaking for another 30 min. When the liquids
specification and determination deleted. have separated completely, add enough of the sodium bisulfite
solution to raise the lower level of the oily layer within the
Lemongrass Oil graduated portion of the neck of the flask. Calculate the per-
centage, by volume, of the citral by the formula
DESCRIPTION
100 – (V × 10),
A volatile oil prepared by steam distillation of freshly cut and
partially dried cymbopogon grasses indigenous to tropical and in which V is the number of mL of separated oil in the graduated
subtropical areas. Two types of Lemongrass Oil are commercially neck of the cassia flask.
available. The East Indian type, also known as Cochin, Native, Angular Rotation Determine in a 100-mm tube as directed
and British Indian Lemongrass Oil, is usually a dark yellow to under Optical Rotation, Appendix IIB.
light brownish red liquid having a pronounced heavy lemonlike Refractive Index, Appendix IIB Determine with an Abbé or
odor. The West Indian type, also known as Madagascar, Guate- other refractometer of equal or greater accuracy.
mala, or other country of origin Lemongrass Oil, is light yellow to Solubility in Alcohol Proceed as directed in the general
light brown in color and has a lemonlike odor of a lighter char- method, Appendix VI. East Indian type: 1 mL dissolves in 3 mL
acter than the East Indian type oil. Lemongrass Oils are soluble in of 70% alcohol, usually with slight turbidity; West Indian type:
mineral oil, freely soluble in propylene glycol, but practically yields a cloudy solution with 70%, 80%, 90%, and 95% alcohol.
insoluble in water and in glycerin. The East Indian variety dis- Specific Gravity Determine by any reliable method (see Gen-
solves readily in alcohol, but the West Indian oil yields cloudy eral Provisions).
solutions. Steam-Volatile Oil Proceed as directed for Volatile Oil Content
under Essential Oils and Flavors, Appendix VI, using 25.0 mL of
Functional Use in Foods Flavoring agent. the oil prepared as directed in the Assay.

REQUIREMENTS Packaging and Storage Store in a cool place in full, tight,
preferably glass, aluminum, tin-lined, or other suitably lined
Labeling Indicate whether it is the East Indian or West Indian containers, or in black iron unlined drums. If stored in glass
type. containers, avoid exposure to light.
Identification The infrared absorption spectrum of the sample
exhibits relative maxima (that may vary in intensity) at the same Revision: Identification test corrected; Heavy Metals
wavelengths (or frequencies) as those shown in the respective (as Pb) specification and determination deleted.
spectrum under Infrared Spectra, using the same test conditions
as specified therein. DL-Leucine
Assay Not less than 75.0%, by volume, of aldehydes as citral.
Angular Rotation Between –10° and 0°. DL-2-Amino-4-methylvaleric Acid
Refractive Index Between 1.483 and 1.489.
Solubility in Alcohol Passes test. H3C O
Specific Gravity East Indian type: between 0.894 and 0.904; H3C
West Indian type: between 0.869 and 0.894. OH
Steam-Volatile Oil Not less than 93.0%, by volume. H NH2

C6H13NO2 Formula wt 131.17
CAS: [328-39-2]

TESTS DESCRIPTION

Assay Mix 50.0 mL of the sample with 500 mg of tartaric acid, Small, white crystals or a crystalline powder. It is freely soluble in
shake for 5 min, and filter. Dry the filtered oil over anhydrous water, slightly soluble in alcohol, and insoluble in ether. It melts
sodium sulfate, and then pipet 10.0 mL of the clear, treated oil into with decomposition at about 290°. The pH of a 1:100 solution is
a 150-mL cassia flask. between 5.5 and 7.0. It is optically inactive.

Note: Retain the remaining oil for the Steam-Volatile Functional Use in Foods Nutrient; dietary supplement.
Oil test.
REQUIREMENTS
Add 75 mL of a 30% solution of sodium bisulfite, stopper the
flask, and shake until a semisolid to solid sodium bisulfite addi- Identification Heat 5 mL of a 1:1000 solution with 1 mL of
tion product has formed. Allow the mixture to stand at room triketohydrindene hydrate TS (ninhydrin TS). A reddish purple or
temperature for 5 min, then loosen the stopper, and immerse the bluish purple color is produced.
flask in a water bath heated to between 85° and 90°. Maintain the
water bath at this temperature, shaking the flask occasionally,

FCC IV, Supplement 3 Monographs / Maltitol / 33

Assay Not less than 98.5% and not more than 101.5% of Saponification Value Between 238 and 258.
C6N13NO2, calculated on the dried basis. Solubility in Alcohol Passes test.
Lead Not more than 10 mg/kg. Specific Gravity Between 1.030 and 1.057.
Loss on Drying Not more than 0.3%.
Residue on Ignition Not more than 0.1%. TESTS

TESTS Acid Value Determine as directed for Acid Value under Essen-
tial Oils and Flavors, Appendix VI.
Assay Dissolve about 400 mg, accurately weighed, in 3 mL of Angular Rotation Determine in a 100-mm tube as directed
formic acid and 50 mL of glacial acetic acid. Add 2 drops of under Optical (Specific) Rotation, Appendix IIB.
crystal violet TS, and titrate with 0.1 N perchloric acid to the first Refractive Index, Appendix IIB Determine with an Abbé or
appearance of a pure green color or until the blue color disappears other refractometer of equal or greater accuracy.
completely. Perform a blank determination (see General Pro- Saponification Value Determine as directed for Saponification
visions), and make any necessary correction. Each mL of 0.1 N Value under Essential Oils and Flavors, Appendix VI, using 1.5 g
perchloric acid is equivalent to 13.12 mg of C6H13NO2. accurately weighed.
Lead A Sample Solution prepared as directed for organic com- Solubility in Alcohol Proceed as directed in the general
pounds meets the requirements of the Lead Limit Test, Appendix method, Appendix VI. One mL dissolves in 4 mL of 95% ethanol,
IIIB, using 10 µg of lead ion (Pb) in the control. sometimes with slight turbidity. The age of the oil has an adverse
Loss on Drying, Appendix IIC Dry at 105° for 3 h. effect upon solubility.
Residue on Ignition, Appendix IIC Ignite 1 g as directed in the Specific Gravity Determine by any reliable method (see Gen-
general method. eral Provisions).

Packaging and Storage Store in well-closed containers. Packaging and Storage Store in full, tight, glass, aluminum,
tin-lined, or other suitably lined containers in a cool place pro-
Revision: Solubility in Alcohol and Specific Gravity tected from light.
changed to reflect commercial standards; Heavy Metals
(as Pb) specification and determination deleted. Revision: Description corrected; Assay limit of D-
maltitol revised; entire Identification, Assay, and
Lovage Oil Reducing Sugars tests provided.

DESCRIPTION Maltitol

The volatile oil obtained by steam distillation of the fresh root of D-Maltitol; Hydrogenated Maltose; α-D-Glucopyranosyl-1,4-D-
the plant Levisticum officinale L. Koch syn. Angelica levisticum, glucitol
Baillon (Fam. Umbelliferae). It is a yellow greenish brown to
deep-brown liquid having a strong characteristic aromatic odor CH2OH CH2OH
and taste. It is soluble in most fixed oils and slightly soluble, with
opalescence, in mineral oil, but it is relatively insoluble in glyc- O OH
erin and in propylene glycol.
CH2OH
Note: This oil becomes darker and more viscous under
the influence of air and light. HO OH O OH

Functional Use in Foods Flavoring agent. OH OH

REQUIREMENTS C12H24O11 Formula wt 344.31
INS: 965 CAS: [585-88-6]
Identification The infrared absorption spectrum of the sample
exhibits relative maxima (that may vary in intensity) at the same DESCRIPTION
wavelengths (or frequencies) as those shown in the respective Maltitol occurs as a white, crystalline powder containing small
spectrum under Infrared Spectra, using the same test conditions amounts of sorbitol and related polyhydric alcohols. It is very
as specified therein. soluble in water and slightly soluble in ethanol.
Acid Value Between 2.0 and 16.0.
Angular Rotation Between –1° and –5°. Functional Use in Foods Sweetener; humectant; stabilizer.
Refractive Index Between 1.536 and 1.554 at 20°.
REQUIREMENTS
Identification Prepare a mixture of n-propyl alcohol, ethyl
acetate, and water (70:20:10) as the Developing Solvent. Dissolve

34 / Mentha Arvensis Oil, Partially Dementholized / Monographs FCC IV, Supplement 3

USP Maltitol Reference Standard in water to obtain a Standard 50C × (rU/rS),
Solution having a concentration of 2.5 mg/mL. Prepare the Test
Solution by diluting Maltitol with water to obtain a solution in which C is the concentration, in mg/mL, of USP Maltitol
containing, on the anhydrous basis, about 2.5 mg of Maltitol per Reference Standard in the Standard Preparation, and rU and rS are
mL. Apply separately 2 µL each of the Standard Solution and the the peak responses of Maltitol obtained from the Assay Prep-
Test Solution to a thin-layer chromatographic plate coated with a aration and the Standard Preparation, respectively.
0.25-mm layer of chromatographic silica gel. Allow the spots to Chloride Determine as directed for Chloride Test under Chlo-
dry, and develop the plate in a developing chamber containing the ride and Sulfate Limit Tests, Appendix IIIB. Any turbidity pro-
Developing Solvent until the solvent front has moved about 17 duced by a 10.0-g sample does not exceed that shown in a control
cm. Remove the plate from the chamber, mark the solvent front, containing 1.5 mL of 0.01 N hydrochloric acid.
and allow the solvent to evaporate. Spray the plate with sodium Lead Determine as directed for Flame Atomic Absorption
metaperiodate solution (1:500), air-dry for 15 min, and spray with Spectrophotometric Method under the Lead Limit Test, Appendix
a 1-in-50 solution of 4,4'-tetramethyldiaminodiphenylmethane in IIIB, using a 10-g sample.
a mixture of acetone and glacial acetic acid (4:1): The principal Nickel Determine as directed under the Nickel Limit Test, Ap-
spot obtained from the Test Solution corresponds in Rf value and pendix IIIB, using a 20.0-g sample.
color to that obtained from the Standard Solution. Reducing Sugars Dissolve 21 g of the sample in 35 mL of
Assay Not less that 92.0% and not more than 100.5% of D- water in a 400-mL beaker and mix. Add 25 mL of cupric sulfate
maltitol as C12H24O11 calculated on the anhydrous basis. TS and 25 mL of alkaline cupric tartrate TS. Cover the beaker
Chloride Not more than 0.005%. with a watch glass, heat the mixture at such a rate that it comes to
Lead Not more than 1 mg/kg. a boil in approximately 4 min and boils for exactly 2 min. Filter
Nickel Not more than 2 mg/kg. the precipitated cuprous oxide through a tared, sintered-glass
Reducing Sugars Not more than 0.1% (as glucose). filter crucible previously washed with hot water, ethanol, and
Residue on Ignition Not more that 0.1%. ether and dried at 100° for 30 min. Thoroughly wash the collected
Sulfate Not more than 0.01%. cuprous oxide on the filter with hot water, then with 10 mL of
Water Not more than 1.0%. ethanol and finally with 10 mL of ether, and dry at 100° for 30
min. The weight of the cuprous oxide does not exceed 50 mg.
TESTS Residue on Ignition Determine as directed for Method I (for
solids) under Residue on Ignition, Appendix IIC, igniting a 2-g
Assay sample.
Mobile Phase Use degassed water. Sulfate Determine as directed for Sulfate Test under Chloride
Standard Preparation Dissolve an accurately weighed and Sulfate Limit Tests, Appendix IIIB. Any turbidity produced by
a 10.0-g sample does not exceed that shown in a control con-
quantity of USP Maltitol Reference Standard in water, and dilute taining 2.0 mL of 0.01 N sulfuric acid.
quantitatively with water to obtain a solution having a known Water Determine as directed for the Karl Fischer Titrimetric
concentration of about 10.0 mg/mL. Method under Water Determination, Appendix IIB.

Assay Solution Transfer about 0.7 g of the sample, ac- Packaging and Storage Store in well-closed containers.
curately weighed, to a 50-mL volumetric flask, dilute to volume
with water, and mix. Angular Rotation corrected to reflect commercial
standards; Heavy Metals (as Pb) specification and
Chromatographic System Use a liquid chromatograph determination deleted.
equipped with a refractive index detector that is maintained at a
constant temperature and a 9-mm × 30-cm column packed with a Mentha Arvensis Oil, Partially Dementholized
strong cation-exchange resin, about 9 µm in diameter, consisting
of sulfonated cross-linked styrene–divinylbenzene copolymer in Cornmint Oil, Partially Dementholized
the calcium form (Aminex HPX-87c, or equivalent). Maintain the
column temperature at 85° ± 0.5°, and the flow rate of the Mobile DESCRIPTION
Phase at about 0.5 mL/min. Chromatograph the Standard Prep-
aration, and record the peak responses as directed under Pro- The portion of oil remaining after the partial removal of menthol,
cedure. Replicate injections show a relative standard deviation not by freezing operations only, from the oil of Mentha arvensis var.
greater than 2.0%. piperascens Holmes (forma piperascens Malinvaud). It is a color-
less to yellow liquid having a characteristic minty odor. It is
Procedure Separately inject suitable portions (about 20 soluble in most fixed oils, in mineral oil, and in propylene glycol.
µL) of the Assay Preparation and the Standard Preparation into It is insoluble in glycerin.
the chromatograph, record the chromatograms, and measure the
responses for the major peaks. The elution pattern includes the Functional Use in Foods Flavoring agent.
higher molecular weight hydrogenated polysaccharides, followed
by three individual peaks representing maltotriitol, maltitol, and
sorbitol. The principal peak is maltitol, which elutes at about
twice the retention time of the void volume, and the retention time
for sorbitol is about 1.7 relative to maltitol. Calculate the quantity,
in mg, of D-maltitol in the portion of the sample taken by the
formula

FCC IV, Supplement 3 Monographs / Pectins / 35

REQUIREMENTS Revision: Correction made to Degree of Amide
Substitution and Total Galacturonic Acid in the Pectin
Identification The infrared absorption spectrum of the sample Component; Heavy Metals (as Pb) specification and
exhibits relative maxima (that may vary in intensity) at the same determination deleted.
wavelengths (or frequencies) as those shown in the respective
spectrum in the section on Infrared Spectra, using the same test Pectins CAS: [9000-69-5]
conditions as specified therein.
Assay Not less than 40.0% and not more than 60.0% of total INS: 440
alcohols, calculated as menthol (C10H20O).
Angular Rotation Between –30° and –10°. DESCRIPTION
Refractive Index Between 1.458 and 1.465 at 20°.
Solubility in Alcohol Passes test. Pectins consist mainly of the partial methyl esters of polygalac-
Specific Gravity Between 0.888 and 0.908. turonic acid and their sodium, potassium, calcium, and am-
Total Esters Between 5.0% and 20.0%, calculated as menthyl monium salts. Pectin is obtained by extraction in an aqueous
acetate (C12H22O2). medium of appropriate edible plant material, usually citrus fruits
Total Ketones Between 30.0% and 50.0%, calculated as men- or apples. No organic precipitants shall be used other than
thone (C10H18O). methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol. In some types, a portion of
the methyl esters may have been converted to primary amides by
TESTS treatment with ammonia under alkaline conditions. It usually
occurs as a white, yellowish, light grayish, or light brownish
Assay Proceed as directed under Total Alcohols, Appendix VI, powder. It dissolves in water, forming an opalescent, colloidal
using about 1.5 g of the acetylated oil, accurately weighed, for the dispersion. It is practically insoluble in ethanol. The commercial
saponification. Calculate the percentage of alcohol, as menthol, in product is normally diluted with sugars for standardization
the sample by the formula purposes. In addition to sugars, pectins may be mixed with
suitable food-grade salts required for pH control and desirable
A × 7.813(1 – 0.0021E)/(B – 0.021A), setting characteristics.

in which A is the number of mL of 0.5 N alcoholic potassium Note: The following REQUIREMENTS and TESTS apply to
hydroxide consumed in the saponification; B is the weight, in g, of the Pectins as supplied, whether standardized or not,
the acetylated oil taken; and E is the percentage of esters, as except for specifications covering amide substitution
menthyl acetate, determined as directed under Total Esters below. and the weight percent of total galacturonic acid in the
Angular Rotation Determine in a 100-mm tube as directed Pectin component, in which cases the test procedures
under Optical (Specific) Rotation, Appendix IIB. provide for removing the sugars and soluble salts before
Refractive Index, Appendix IIB Determine with an Abbé or analysis of the Pectin component.
other refractometer of equal or greater accuracy.
Solubility in Alcohol Proceed as directed in the general Functional Use in Foods Gelling agent; thickener; stabilizer;
method. One mL dissolves in 2.5 to 4 mL of 80% alcohol and may emulsifier.
become hazy upon further dilution.
Specific Gravity Determine by any reliable method (see Gen- REQUIREMENTS
eral Provisions).
Total Esters Weigh accurately about 10 g, and proceed as Labeling Indicate the presence of sulfur dioxide if the residual
directed under Ester Determination, Appendix VI, using 99.15 as concentration is greater than 10 mg/kg.
the equivalence factor (e) in the calculation. Identification
Total Ketones Weigh accurately about 1 g, and proceed as
directed for ketones under Aldehydes and Ketones—Hydrox- A. To a 1:100 aqueous solution of the sample add an equal
ylamine Method, Appendix VI, using 77.12 as the equivalence volume of alcohol. A translucent, gelatinous precipitate is formed
factor (e) in the calculation. (most gums will not form such a precipitate).

Packaging and Storage Store in full, tight containers in a cool B. To 5.0 mL of a 1:100 aqueous solution of the sample add
place protected from light. 0.1 mL of a 0.125 M solution of calcium chloride or calcium
acetate (equivalent to 10 mg of calcium per g of sample) and 1 mL
of 1 N sodium hydroxide, and allow to stand at room temperature
for 15 min. A gel or semi-gel forms (tragacanth and other gums
will not form such a precipitate).

C. Acidify the gel formed from Identification Test B with 1
mL of 2.7 N hydrochloric acid, and shake well. If necessary,
continue adding the acid dropwise until the mixture is acid to
litmus. A voluminous, colorless, gelatinous precipitate forms,
which, upon boiling, becomes white and flocculent (pectic acid).

36 / Pectins / Monographs FCC IV, Supplement 3

Acid-Insoluble Ash Not more than 1.0%. wet with about 2 mL of ethanol in a 50-mL beaker. Dissolve the
Arsenic (as As) Not more than 3 mg/kg. Pectin in 25 mL of 0.125 M sodium hydroxide. Let the solution
Degree of Amide Substitution and Total Galacturonic Acid in stand for 1 h, with agitation, at room temperature. Transfer
the Pectin Component Not more than 25% of total carboxylic quantitatively the saponified Pectin solution to a 50-mL volu-
groups. metric flask, and dilute to volume with distilled water. Transfer
Lead Not more than 5 mg/kg. 25.0 mL of the diluted Pectin solution to a distillation apparatus,
Loss on Drying Not more than 12.0%. and add 20 mL of Clark’s solution, which consists of 100 g of
Methanol, Ethanol, and Isopropanol Not more than 1.0% magnesium sulfate heptahydrate and 0.8 mL of sulfuric acid and
total. distilled water to a total of 180 mL. The distillation apparatus
Sodium Methyl Sulfate Not more than 0.1%. consists of a steam generator connected to a round-bottom flask to
Sulfur Dioxide Not more than 0.005%. which a condenser is attached. Both steam generator and the
Total Galacturonic Acid in Pectin Component Not less than round-bottom flask are equipped with heating mantles. Start the
65.0%, calculated on the ash-free, dried basis. distillation by heating the round-bottom flask containing the
sample. Collect the first 15 mL of distillate separately in a meas-
TESTS uring cylinder. Then start the steam supply and continue dis-
tillation until 150 mL of distillate has been collected in a 200-mL
Acid-Insoluble Ash Determine as directed in the general beaker. Quantitatively combine the distillates, titrate with 0.05 M
method, Appendix IIC. sodium hydroxide to pH 8.5, and record the volume required, in
Arsenic A Sample Solution prepared as directed for organic mL, as SB.
compounds meets the requirements of the Arsenic Test, Appendix
IIIB. Perform a blank determination using 20 mL of distilled
Degree of Amide Substitution and Total Galacturonic Acid in water. Record the required volume, in mL, as BB. Record acetate
the Pectin Component Weigh 5 g of the sample to the nearest ester titer (SB – BB) as V4.
0.1 mg, and transfer to a suitable beaker. Stir for 10 min with a
mixture of 5 mL of 2.7 N hydrochloric acid, and 100 mL of 60% Calculate the degree of amidation (as the percent of total
ethanol. Transfer to a fritted-glass filter tube (30- to 60-mL carboxyl groups) by the formula
capacity), and wash with six 15-mL portions of the same hydro-
chloric acid–60% ethanol mixture, followed by 60% ethanol until 100 × [V3/(V1 + V2 + V3 – V4)].
the filtrate is free of chlorides. Finally, wash with 20 mL of
ethanol, dry for 2.5 h in an oven at 105°, cool, and weigh. Transfer Calculate the mg of galacturonic acid by the formula
exactly one-tenth of the total net weight of the now ash-free, dried
sample (representing 0.5 g of the original unwashed sample) to a 19.41 × (V1 + V2 + V3 – V4).
250-mL conical flask, and moisten the sample with 2 mL of
ethanol. Add 100 mL of recently boiled and cooled distilled water, The mg of galacturonic acid obtained in this way is the
stopper, and swirl occasionally until a complete solution is content of one-tenth of the weight of the washed and dried
formed. Add 5 drops of phenolphthalein TS, titrate with 0.1 N sample. To calculate the percent galacturonic acid on a moisture-
sodium hydroxide, and record the results as the initial titer (V1). and ash-free basis, multiply the number of mg obtained by 1000/x,
in which x is the weight, in mg, of the washed and dried sample. If
Add exactly 20 mL of 0.5 N sodium hydroxide, stopper, the pectin is known to be of the nonamidated type, only V1 and V2
shake vigorously, and let stand for 15 min. Add exactly 20 mL of need to be determined, and V3 may be regarded as zero in the
0.5 N hydrochloric acid, and shake until the pink color disappears. formula for calculating mg of galacturonic acid.
Titrate with 0.1 N sodium hydroxide to a faint pink color that Lead A Sample Solution prepared as directed for organic com-
persists after vigorous shaking; record this value as the saponi- pounds meets the requirements of the Lead Limit Test, Appendix
fication titer (V2). IIIB, using 10 µg of lead ion (Pb) in the control.
Alternatively, use the following procedure:
Quantitatively transfer the contents of the conical flask into a
500-mL distillation flask fitted with a Kjeldahl trap and a water- (Note: Use deionized water throughout this procedure.)
cooled condenser, the delivery tube of which extends well beneath
the surface of a mixture of 150 mL of carbon dioxide-free water Diluted Standard Lead Solution (2 µg Pb/mL) Immedi-
and 20.0 mL of 0.1 N hydrochloric acid in a receiving flask. To the ately before use, pipet 0.10 mL of a certified commercially
distillation flask add 20 mL of a 1:10 sodium hydroxide solution, available 1000 ppm (1000 µg/mL) Pb stock solution into a 50-mL
seal the connections, and then begin heating carefully to avoid volumetric flask containing 30 mL of water and 4 mL of 20% v/v
excessive foaming. Continue heating until 80 to 120 mL of hydrochloric acid and 4 mL of 0.1 M EDTA. Dilute to volume
distillate has been collected. Add a few drops of methyl red TS to with water, and mix.
the receiving flask, titrate the excess acid with 0.1 N sodium
hydroxide, and record the volume required, in mL, as SA. Perform Control Lead Solution (0.4 µg Pb/mL) Pipet 5.0 mL of the
a blank determination on 20.0 mL of 0.1 N hydrochloric acid, and Diluted Standard Lead Solution into a 25-mL volumetric flask
record the volume required, in mL, as BA. Record the amide titer containing 10 mL of water, 2 mL of 20% v/v hydrochloric acid,
(BA – SA) as V3. and 2 mL of 0.1 M EDTA. Dilute to volume with water, and mix.

Transfer exactly one-tenth of total net weight of the dried Standard Lead Blank Solution Add 30 mL of water, 4 mL
sample (representing 0.5 g of the original unwashed sample), and of 20% v/v hydrochloric acid, and 4 mL of 0.1 M EDTA into a 50-
mL volumetric flask. Dilute to volume with water, and mix.

Sample Preparation Transfer 2.0 g of the sample into a
clean 100-mL glass beaker, add 25 mL of nitric acid (70% v/v),
cover with a watch glass, and heat at low to moderate heat on a hot

FCC IV, Supplement 3 Monographs / Pectins / 37

plate in a fume hood for 2 h. Remove watch glass, and continue to and I refer to methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol, respectively; VS
heat until the sample is dry with no visible fumes. Add 0.5 mL of is the volume, in mL, of the corresponding alcohol in the Standard
nitric acid, and heat to dryness. Cool to room temperature and add Alcohol Solution; RS is the ratio of the peak area of the cor-
2 mL of 20% v/v hydrochloric acid and 2 mL of 0.1 M EDTA. responding alcohol in the Standard Alcohol Solution to that of n-
Transfer quantitatively to a 25-mL volumetric flask, then dilute to propanol in Internal Standard Solution; RU is the ratio of the peak
volume with water, and mix. area of the corresponding alcohol in the Sample Solution to that of
n-propanol in the Internal Standard Solution; and 0.791, 0.7893,
Procedure Set up the inductively coupled plasma emission and 0.7855 are the densities, in g/mL, for methanol, ethanol, and
spectrometer according to manufacturer’s instructions, using the isopropanol, respectively. Calculate the percent methanol, eth-
Pb emission line at 220.35 nm. Calibrate the instrument using the anol, and isopropanol present in the sample by the following
Standard Lead Blank Solution and the Diluted Standard Lead formula:
Solution. Then analyze the Sample Preparation and the Control
Lead Solution. The sample passes the test if the lead concentration (1000T)/W,
found in the Sample Preparation is equal to or less than that in the
Control Lead Solution. in which W is the sample weight, in mg.
Loss on Drying, Appendix IIC Dry at 105° for 2 h. Sodium Methyl Sulfate
Methanol, Ethanol, and Isopropanol The alcohols are con-
verted to their nitrite esters, and their levels are determined by Mobile Phase Prepare a 0.04 M potassium hydrogen
headspace gas chromatography. phthalate solution by transferring 16.4 g of potassium hydrogen
phthalate into a 2-L volumetric flask, dilute to volume with water,
Internal Standard Solution Dissolve 50 mg of n-propanol and mix. Filter the solution through a 0.45-µm pore-size filter
in 1 L of water. (Millipore, or equivalent).

Sample Solution Dissolve 100 mg of the sample in 10 mL Standard Preparation Transfer 10.0 mg of anhydrous so-
of water, and as necessary, use sodium chloride as a dispersing dium methyl sulfate into a 100-mL volumetric flask, dilute to
agent. volume with Mobile Phase, and mix.

Standard Alcohol Solution Using a micropipet, transfer 50 Assay Preparation Suspend about 1 g of the sample, ac-
mg each of methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol into a tared, 10- curately weighed, in 10.0 mL of 50% (v/v) ethanol solution. Stir
mL beaker. Transfer the mixture, quantitatively, into a 1000-mL for 30 min using a Teflon-coated stirring bar. Allow the sus-
volumetric flask, dilute to volume with water, and mix. pension to precipitate, and filter. Evaporate a 1.0-mL aliquot to
dryness using reduced pressure (10 mm Hg), and heat at 60°.
Sodium Nitrite Solution Dissolve 250 g of sodium nitrite in Redissolve the residue in 1.0 mL of the Mobile Phase.
1000 mL of water.
Chromatographic System Use a high-performance liquid
Chromatographic System Use a suitable gas chromato- chromatograph equipped with a refractive index detector and a
graph equipped with a flame-ionization detector. Use a 90-cm × 4- 25-cm × 4.6-mm column packed with Nucleosil 10SB (or equiv-
mm (id) glass column, with the first 15 cm packed with Chro- alent) and maintained at 40°. Set the flow rate at 1 mL/min.
mopack (or equivalent) and the remainder packed with Porapak R
120- to 150-mesh (or equivalent). The operating conditions of the System Suitability Three replicate injections of the Stan-
gas chromatograph are as follows: the injection port temperature dard Preparation show a relative standard deviation of not more
is 250°, and the column temperature is 150° isothermal. Use than 4.0% for the response factor of the sodium methyl sulfate
nitrogen as the carrier gas with a flow rate of 80 mL/min. peak obtained using the formula

Procedure Weigh 200 mg of urea, and place it in a 25-mL (AS/CS),
amber-glass vial (Reacti-Flasks or equivalent). Purge with ni-
trogen for 5 min, add 1 mL of saturated oxalic acid solution, close in which AS is the peak area response of the Standard Preparation,
with a rubber stopper, and swirl. Add 1 mL of Sample Solution and CS is the concentration, in mg/mL, of sodium methyl sulfate
and 1 mL of Internal Standard Solution, and simultaneously start in the Standard Preparation.
a stopwatch (t = 0). Swirl the vial, and recap it with an open screw
cap fitted with a silicone rubber septum. Swirl the vial until t = 30 Procedure Inject 20 µL of the Standard Preparation fol-
s. At t = 45 s, inject through the septum 0.5 mL of Sodium Nitrite lowed by the Assay Preparation. Determine the peak area in the
Solution. Swirl until t = 70 s, and at t = 150 s, withdraw through chromatograms for the Standard Preparation and Assay Prep-
the septum 1.0 mL of the headspace using a pressure lock syringe aration. Calculate the quantity in percent of sodium methyl
(Precision Sampling Corporation, or equivalent). Inject the 1.0 sulfate in the sample by the formula
mL into the injection port of the gas chromatograph. Repeat this
procedure, but use 1 mL of the Standard Alcohol Solution instead (CSAU)/(ASW),
of the Sample Solution.
in which CS is the concentration, in mg/mL, of sodium methyl
Calculation Quantify the total methanol, ethanol, and sulfate in the Standard Preparation; AU and AS are the peak area
isopropanol present in 1 mL of the Sample Solution taken by the responses obtained from the Assay Preparation and Standard
following formula: Preparation, respectively; and W is the weight, in g, of the sample
taken.
T = VMS (RMU/RMS) 0.791 + VES (REU/RES) 0.7893 Sulfur Dioxide Determine as directed in the general method,
+ VIS (RIU/RIS) 0.7855, Appendix X, using the following method under Sample Intro-
duction and Distillation: Transfer about 20 g of the sample,
in which T is the total amount, in mg, of methanol, ethanol, and accurately weighed, into flask C, and add 20 mL of ethanol to
isopropanol in 1 mL of the Sample Solution; the subscripts M, E, moisten the sample. Add 400 mL of water, swirling vigorously to


Click to View FlipBook Version
Previous Book
[Planning Committee on Achieving Research Synergies for Food/Energy/ Environment Challenges] IMPLEMENTING THE NEW BIOLOGY Decadal Challenges Linking Food, Energy, and the Environment
Next Book
[Food_and_Agriculture_Organization_] The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2006