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Published by info, 2018-12-13 15:48:23

Mahi Tahi Journal

Written by ED professionals, for ED professionals

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT NZ DECEMBER 2018

MAHI TAHI

HAWAIKI SUBMARINE PGF MONIES FOR EDA’S
CABLE - A $445M
CONNECTION INCLUSIVE GROWTH -
THE NEXT STEP
FIND YOUR EDGE

EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTORS

Dr David Wilson, Chair of Economic Development Editor in Chief
NZ and CEO of Northland Inc. LINDA STEWART

A FIRST EDITION Executive Editor
HEATHER WARWICK
Welcome to EDNZ’s first edition of ‘Mahi
Tahi’, a journal written by economic Contributors
development professionals, for VAUGHAN COOPER
economic development professionals.
The journal has been inspired by feedback received LUKE BEEHRE
at the recent Mahi Tahi Conference. Delegates at the PATRICK MCVEIGH
conference told us that one of the best features of LINDA STEWART
the conference was the opportunity to share best DR DAVID WILSON
practice and that they were keen to do this on a more STUART TRUNDLE
regular basis. SUSAN HOUSTON
The Mahi Tahi journal enables that sharing with the
help of the team at MartinJenkins who have elected to MARY JENSEN
sponsor the journal. KYLIE HAWKER-GREEN
EDNZ hopes that this will be the first of many editions
over the coming years and encourages you to consider MILES DALTON
what winning stories, and even war stories with great FLETCHER TABUTEAU
outcomes, you might like to share through the journal. NERIA BREWERTON
We thought it appropriate to focus the first edition on
the many wonderful initiatives acknowledged at the PAM FORD
recent EDNZ Gala Awards Dinner. MINISTRY OF SOCIAL

2 MAHI TAHI DEVELOPMENT

Production Manager
SUSAN HOUSTON

Head of Design
SUSAN HOUSTON

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING
CONTRIBUTIONS TO MAHI TAHI PLEASE
CONTACT SUSAN HOUSTON
0272044715
[email protected]
The Orchard Business and Events Hub
35 Walton Street, whangarei 0110

06 IN THIS ISSUE

A $445 38

CONNECTION CONNECTING THE
DOTS

18

MONIES FOR EDA’S

CONTENTS

04 MEET THE WINNERS 32 A LIFE OF SERVICE
12 DIGMYIDEA 34 WAIKATO SMARTS
14 SHED TO STOCK EXCHANGE 42 THE NEXT STEP
44 PROJECT 1000
20 FIND YOUR EDGE 46 EXTENSION 350

22 TRIPARTITE BUSINESS 3MAHI TAHI
28 NZ AGRIFOOD WEEK

WINNING MOMENTS

MEET THE
WINNERS

THIS YEAR’S EDNZ
AWARD WINNERS WERE
ACKNOWLEDGED AT A GALA
DINNER HELD IN PAIHIA,
NORTHLAND AS PART OF
‘MAHI TAHI 2018’.

Linda Stewart, CEO of Central Economic Development Agency

CELEBRATING SUCCESS
IS IMPORTANT. EACH
OF THE PROJECTS
ACKNOWLEDGED
ARE IN SOME WAY
INNOVATIVE AND
BEST PRACTICE.

Fletcher Tabuteau, David Wilson, Te Ngaronoa Mahanga, Neria Brewerton

4 MAHI TAHI

WINNING MOMENTS

From left to right back row: Luke Beehre, Vaughan Cooper, David Wilson, Fletcher Tabuteau, Stuart Trundle, Miles Dalton, Toro Waaka, Linda
Stewart, Kylie Hawker Green, Annie Aranui, Mary Jensen, Linda Nelson Caie, Heather Warwick, Neria Brewerton, Jane Finlayson

Winners of to deliver great
this year’s outcomes. The stories
awards and practice that lie
hailed behind the winning
from large to small initiatives are told in
organisations, from the following pages,
local, to regional and along with contact
central agencies, details for each project
from smaller rural should you wish to
communities to the know more.
metropolis that is
Auckland. What they Mahi Tahi Conference 2018
all had in common
was an element of
innovation and sharp
process that combined

5MAHI TAHI

A $445M CONNECTION

HAWAIKI
CABLE -
A $445M
CONNECTION

A 15,000km super fibre optic cable is
connecting NZ with Australia, the US and
Pacific. It is expected to future-proof NZ’s
internet capacity for the next 25 years.

Vaughan Cooper, GM, Northland Inc

It would be reasonable to state
that the greater the distance,
the greater the opportunity
for telecommunications as
a means to address isolation.
This is true with connecting
“New Zealand Inc” to the rest
of the world and equally true
in terms of regional economic
development - connecting
remote and rural communities
to the rest of the country as
well as the world. Northland
Inc saw this as an opportunity
at all levels – Northland as a
region will benefit from regional

6 MAHI TAHI

NORTHLAND INC HELPED INVESTORS
NAVIGATE THE LOCAL POLITICAL
LANDSCAPE ...

economic development through Submarine cables are the
increased employment in the backbone of this international
IT service/support industry as traffic, which is highly content
well as IT cluster development, driven and thus remains centred
NZ’s economy will benefit from on the content providers.
greater diversity and competition
in the market and possibly most In this context, submarine cables
significantly, NZ will be raised race against the growing demand,
firmly in the view of the biggest either by upgrading existing
data centre clients in the world – cables or by building new ones.
Google, Amazon.
Not all regions are alike however,
Access to the latest and our projections showed that
technologies enables the Australasian to US market
a design with higher was under-served, and that a
capacity, lower costs new player had merged: Hawaiki
and upgrade possibilities that the Submarine Cable LP (‘Hawaiki’).
aging cables cannot match.

7MAHI TAHI

A $445M CONNECTION

WHO IS Hawaiki was an investment proposal to build
HAWAIKI? a high capacity fibre optic cable system
between Australia (Coogee Beach, Sydney),
Headquartered in Auckland, New New Zealand (Mangawhai Heads), American
Zealand, Hawaiki is a New Zealand Samoa (Tafuna), Hawaii (Kapolei) and the US
registered bandwidth supplier West coast (Pacific City in Oregon State).
in the Pacific submarine cable
market, and owner and developer of the Pacific islands: the system design also
Hawaiki submarine cable system. provided the ability to install optical branching
units and cable branches to connect a number
It’s goal is to significantly contribute to the of Pacific Islands to the main trunk. A branch
development of Australia, New Zealand connecting American Samoa was planned
and Pacific Islands’ economies by providing along with other branches to New Caledonia,
future-proof capacity and direct access to Fiji and Tonga (Vava’u).
the US market. Hawaiki is an independent
provider of international capacity, The Transpacific capacity provided by the
without alignment to any traditional cable is in excess of 43Terabits per second.
telecommunications operator. The Transpacific capacity available to New
Zealand more than doubled when Hawaiki
8 MAHI TAHI was commissioned.

A $445M CONNECTION

Hawaiki is financed THE MISSING
through a combination LINK WAS
of capacity pre-sales, SUBMARINE CABLE
equity investment, and DIVERSITY WITH
bank debt. Capacity pre-sales DIRECT ACCESS TO
contracts have been executed THE UNITED STATES,”
with Research and Network HAWAIKI CEO RÉMI
Advanced Network NZ (REANZ), GALASSO
Amazon and other customers. All
equity investors are NZ - based: The government’s current
Sir Eion Edgar, Malcom Dick, investment initiatives in
and Remi Galasso. Bank debt urban and rural broadband
is through a senior loan facility infrastructure will be greatly
from the French bank Natixis. enhanced by further competition
in the market driving lower prices.
For New Zealand Inc’s benefit,
the requirement was to provide At a minimum Hawaiki delivers
diversity of landing sites so that significantly enhanced service
New Zealand has diversity in the (such as no data cap) for the
market. This is a two-fold benefit same price, which in turn will
– firstly in terms of providing drive greater uptake, innovation
competition to help address the and efficiencies for business.
market pricing, and secondly
to be attractive to host data
processing centres (supporting
the post production film industry
and attracting admin support
/ head office facilities for
international companies). For
example, XERO can be based in
NZ rather than in the USA.

9MAHI TAHI

A $445M CONNECTION

THE BENEFITS Northland has the necessary land-based
OF HAWAIKI infrastructure to support this project -
Mangawhai Heads is a natural landing site
In 10 years’ time our appetite for facilitating easy access to major terrestrial
bandwidth will be heightened by backhaul fibre cables between Northland
innovations we’re not yet capable of and Auckland.
dreaming about. As a commenter
said recently on one of the world’s most- During the construction phase, Hawaiki
read blogs, “once people get fatter pipes engaged certain Northland resources and
they usually manage to fill them”. The skills. However, following commissioning,
promise of technologies such as 3D the project is not expected to have a
printing – allowing end users to print direct significant impact on job creation,
spare parts rather than needing to order employment or GDP within the region.
them – are likely to result in growth for Nonetheless Hawaiki has the potential
many SMEs, creating yet more demand to be a catalyst for data centres and
for bandwidth as files are shared, saved Spark investment and development in
to the cloud and transferred around the other technology based activities within
world. Northland.

Fibre offers SMEs capabilities that were Data warehouses of significant scale (like
once only available to large corporations, Google, Amazon, etc.) have previously
and at a fraction of the cost. At the very indicated that they will not consider
least, it helps businesses save money coming to unless there is diversity of
but it will also open up new markets and secure submarine cables – which this
change others beyond recognition. project provides.

Whangarei City was the first City to There has been significant work already
have completed its ultra-fast broadband undertaken (including current feasibility
network which is funded through the reports) for the design and construction of
government’s UFB initiative. Landing an a Tier 4 Data Centre in Northland.
international connection at Mangawhai
Heads shows a coordinated and
collaborative effort by local and central
government to make a step change in
the regional economy of Northland.

10 MAHI TAHI

A $445M CONNECTION

NORTHLAND INC WAS
RECIPIENT OF THE
EDNZ AWARD FOR
INWARD INVESTMENT

There is also keen interest in countries with ONCE PEOPLE GET FATTER
green energy – both for powering the cable PIPES THEY USUALLY MANAGE
and for providing energy for data centres TO FILL THEM”.
(large power users).
11MAHI TAHI
This is where NZ has a significant competitive
advantage over Australia (whose electricity is
predominately coal and gas) in attracting significant
data warehouse facilities.

The ability to store and handle large amounts of
data, in a politically stable country, also opens up a
number of opportunities for Northland to underpin
the development of new digital technologies,
research capability and businesses.

For more information on the Hawaiki Project
contact Vaughan Cooper, Northland Inc

E|[email protected]

DIGMYIDEA

DIGMYIDEA -

inspiring more Māori to engage in
the digital economy

DIGMYIDEA IS PROOF THAT
YOU CAN SET HIGH TARGETS AND
REACH THEM

All Māori who have an interest in Now in its third year, the competition has
technology have the potential to grown from strength to strength. More than
become successful entrepreneurs 200 entries were received this year, twice the
and the DIGMYIDEA Māori Innovation number submitted the year before, with each
Challenge is designed to help them on the winning idea receiving a business startup
journey. support package worth $10,000.

Māori are the second largest ethnic group in It’s proof that you can set high targets and reach
New Zealand after European New Zealanders. them.
There are more than 720,000 people in New
Zealand who identify as Māori, making up DIGMYIDEA won the ‘Best Practice Award for
nearly 16 per cent of the national population. Innovation’ at the Economic Development New
Zealand Awards. The competition also received
DIGMYIDEA quite simply aims to entice more international recognition this October, winning
Māori into the thriving technology sector. a bronze award for ‘Excellence in Economic
Development’ at the 2018 International
The competition is unique as it targets an Economic Development Council (IEDC) awards,
untapped part of the New Zealand economy announced in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
– namely Māori innovation. It is the only
competition that connects with Māori who have This Innovation Challenge is always evolving.
an idea which has the potential to become a A series of new activations were trialled this
successful business. year to raise further awareness and support
participants including an ideation weekend –
Auckland’s economic growth agency, Auckland Te Huinga Auaha and a Marae-based school
Tourism, Events and Economic Development holiday programme.
(ATEED), delivers DIGMYIDEA as part of its focus
to create quality jobs for all Aucklanders.

12 MAHI TAHI

DIGMYIDEA

THOUSANDS OF YEARS AGO OUR
TŪPUNA TRANSFORMED OUR WORLD

THROUGH INNOVATION.
WE BUILT WAKA AND STARTED THE
JOURNEY TO AOTEAROA USING THE

STARS TO NAVIGATE.
WHEN WE ARRIVED WE HAD TO

INNOVATE TO SURVIVE
CARVING FISH HOOKS FROM BONES

DIGMYIDEA is open to all Māori This would further enhance DIGMYIDEA, taking
residing in Aotearoa/New Zealand. it from being an annual competition to becoming
The Challenge is divided into two a programme of activity able to support more
age categories: Rerenga o te Kora (15 businesses in an ongoing capacity.
to 24 years) and Muranga o te Ahi (25 years
and above). School engagement is crucial to Currently, ten DIGMYIDEA finalists compete in a
attract younger entrants and a long lead time dragon’s den-styled mentoring weekend called
is really important for getting a good number a DIGIwānanga and that number could increase
of quality ideas. significantly with involvement from other agencies.

DIGMYIDEA is supported by the Ministry of To find out more about the DIGMYIDEA Māori
Youth Development, He Kai Kei Aku Ringa Innovation Challenge you can contact:
(HKKAR); a Crown Māori Economic Growth
Strategy and Te Wānanga o Aotearoa. Neria Brewerton, ATEED Māori Economic
Development [email protected]
ATEED is continually looking to expand or 021 083 29771
DIGMYIDEA and encourage greater
nationwide interest by partnering with other
economic development agencies to deliver the
competition more effectively throughout New
Zealand.

Fletcher Tabuteau, David Wilson and Neria Brewerton

13MAHI TAHI

FROM SHED TO STOCK EXCHANGE

GREAT IDEAS
FROM SHED TO
STOCK
EXCHANGE

Enterprise Great Lake Taupō “The Taupō district is poised to
are passionate advocates for maintain long-term sustainable
innovation and have for many growth, and we have a tight and
years delivered a number of nimble strategy in place to shape
workstreams to support start-ups and and define our role in escalating these
entrepreneurs. The Taupō economy opportunities to better the lives of all
is growing steadily, with record who live here.”
numbers of jobs, business units and
population. One of the six strategic pillars, entitled
‘Great ideas grow from shed to stock
“Our economy has recorded GDP exchange’ defines the outcome for this
growth figures well above the national work as;
average for the past five years, and
we predict this trend will continue for “Taupō is a fertile and supportive
the foreseeable future,” said General
Manager of Enterprise Great Lake innovation environment where
Taupō, Kylie Hawker-Green.
entrepreneurs can take an idea and
“We are seeing our population
steadily increase as the Taupō district successfully turn it into a business reality.
is proving a popular choice for those
wishing to exit the city and seek an Start-ups are attracted to the region
improved work/life balance.”
by our low-cost/high-support model.

Our innovation culture and access to

incubation and rapid-growth resources

result in widespread start-up success.”

Enterprise Great Lake Taupō (EGLT) offer
extensive one-on-one support delivered
by their team of three business advisors
who have worked with more than 60
locals in their start-up/innovation journey
in the past twelve months. Some of the
tactics and interventions they deliver are;

14 MAHI TAHI

FROM SHED TO STOCK EXCHANGE

Engine Room: A ‘support group’ for Offering alternate sessions
start-ups. Regular events with invited between education and
guest speakers who both inspire and inspiration, with some of the
educate those who are just starting out, inspiring speakers sharing their
rapidly growing, recently relocated to personal journeys from the germination
Taupō or just recidivist innovators or of an idea into a global entity like Beany,
entrepreneurs! Average 30 guests at Marcomm, Eye-fly and Thirst Bats.
each session and an active Facebook
group with 128 members. Educational They balance the narrative by also
speakers have included specialists in inviting speakers who talk about their
venture capital, business planning, failures, their challenges and how many
intellectual property, franchising, HR, ‘bad’ ideas they chased before landing on
communication, rapid expansion pinch the good one!
points, philanthropy and exporting.
In between meetings, EGLT share
information and ideas through the
Facebook group and e-newsletters and
hold an annual celebration where they
showcase success stories from within
the group.

Tech Talk: Taupō hosted their first official
NZ Tech Week event in May 2018, with
over 200 people attending.

They had eight guest speakers, who each
presented on topics pertaining to tech
and innovation and received universally
positive audience feedback with requests
to hold these kinds of events more often.

15MAHI TAHI

FROM SHED TO STOCK EXCHANGE

They promoted the event to a Bring your great idea to Taupō: Earlier this
wide audience, as a free, all ages year, EGLT ran a ‘Bring your great idea to
evening and actively encouraged Taupō’ marketing campaign with Newshub.
parents to bring their teenage
children. The audience demographic was The USP for this campaign was highlighting
a refreshing mix of primary school aged Taupō’s competitive advantages as well as
children through to a contingent who lifestyle benefits.
arrived en-masse from one of the local
retirement complexes – and everything Taupō is already home to many dynamic
in between. Feedback from the event and innovative start-ups, entrepreneurs
confirmed that the audience enjoyed and high-growth businesses who are
learning more about technological trading successfully in a national and
advances across a variety of sectors, they global context.
liked the punchy ‘pecha kucha’ style of the
presentations and were impressed with Lower overhead models in smaller centres
what was happening in tech in Taupō. such as Taupō means more money can be
Our event was one of the largest Tech spent on R&D rather than on paying rent!
Week events for the Waikato region, and
reinforced that there is a lot of interest in It may be that you have a great idea and
this sector in the Taupō district. a well-developed business plan/product,
but can’t get to a place that you can actually
Kloud Collective: A new initiative for this take the big leap of faith, quit your job and
year, EGLT have rented a permanent desk turn it into a business due to the high cost
at Taupō’s only co-working space. They of living and business in a bigger centre.
make that space available, at no charge,
to some of the start-ups/high growth The team at EGLT then committed to
businesses who need to get themselves supporting their entrepreneurship journey
into an office environment to work on in many ways, including free co-working
their business, not just in their business. spaces, access to funding through various
Co-working provides a great opportunity channels, the ‘Engine Room’ entrepreneur
for these entrepreneurs to network with / innovation / remote-worker group,
other people, share ideas and challenges, one-on-one support, specialist mentors,
and focus on their business development training and development programme,
in a fresh environment. business events and access to successful
local entrepreneurs for ongoing advice
OUR VISION IS FOR A and support.

VIBRANT AND PROSPEROUS They invited interested persons to register
their ‘great idea’ and are now working with
DISTRICT WHERE TALENT AND more than 30 individuals to help them
develop their concept and ideally relocate
BUSINESS THRIVE their start-up to Taupō.

16 MAHI TAHI

FROM SHED TO STOCK EXCHANGE

Film Bay of Plenty: EGLT has recently signed a three- The Taupō district is already benefiting
year agreement with Film Bay of Plenty to promote from the work undertaken by Anton
the region as a location for international feature Steel and his team at Film BOP, with a
films, as well as providing training and pathways number of feature films now considering
for those wanting to work in the film industry. This new including the Taupō region as a location
partnership is a key initiative to leverage Taupō’s natural for multi-week film shoots in 2019;
advantages to create economic benefit for the district. hosting a number of international film
scouts from a variety of major film
Film Bay of Plenty is a Regional Film office, charged with production companies; helping develop
growing, supporting and strengthening the film industry more film friendly permitting and consent
in the Bay of Plenty. They have three key streams of processes; supporting and connecting
work. Firstly, they ‘connect’ national and international the local film industry; and delivery of
productions with our people, place and infrastructure. career pathway information events.
Secondly, they ‘create’ a film friendly environment where
productions thrive; and thirdly, they ‘celebrate’ the “Our vision is that Taupō is a vibrant and
stories that find their home here. prosperous district, where both talent
and business thrive,” said Mrs Hawker-
Green. “I’m really excited to see what next
year will bring as we have new businesses
opening in our district almost every day
and a rapid influx of Auckland refugees’
oving to our district and bringing with
them new businesses, new ideas, new
energy and new money. It’s a good time
to be investing in growth across our
district and we truly feel poised for a
sustained upswing.”

For more detail contact: [email protected]
greatlakeptaupo.biz

17MAHI TAHI

PGF MONIES FOR EDA’S

PGF MONIES
FOR EDAS

Fletcher Tabuteau, Parliamentary Under Secretary New Zealand’s regions define this
for Regional Economic Development country. Our unique character – our
DNA – is found in our farms, our
THIS GOVERNMENT IS forests, our towns, and especially
COMMITTED TO WORKING in our people. The Provincial Growth Fund
IN PARTNERSHIP WITH (PGF) was negotiated by New Zealand First
REGIONS AND IS CURRENTLY and established by the coalition government
DEVELOPING A STRATEGY , to unlock potential in these places and
THAT WILL DELIVER TARGETED deliver a sustainable, productive and inclusive
SUPPORT ...’ economy.

18 MAHI TAHI We know we cannot and should not do this
important work on our own. Through the
PGF, central government is partnering with
regions, and putting its shoulder into the hard
work already happening to ensure our regions
thrive.

On 18 October 2018 I had the privilege of
speaking at the Economic Development New
Zealand (EDNZ) conference in the beautiful
Bay of Islands. I spoke about the importance
of collaboration between councils, businesses,
iwi and communities to drive meaningful
regional growth. Already working in this
space, Economic Development Agencies are
essential partners in the work the PGF seeks
to do.

To support this continuing partnership, the
PGF is investing $985,000 in EDNZ to build
the capability of economic development
practitioners in the provinces. This investment
over three years will help EDNZ develop and
upskill those working on the ground to grow
regional economies in the identification,
development and delivery of transformational
projects.

PGF MONIES FOR EDA’S

THE FUND WANTS TO BE A
PARTNER, NOT A PATRON.

This investment will contribute to the EDAs already help businesses and
formation and delivery of a professional investors navigate the regulatory
development programme as well an environment in their regions. Having an
online repository for best practice in-depth knowledge of each environment
economic development resources. as it applies to the unique character of their
region, is what earns these agencies the role of
When it comes to delivering growth, EDAs ‘trusted partner’ for business, communities and
already know the value of partnership. The Government alike.
agencies act as a hub, connecting various
“spokes” within their regions and propelling As a member of this Government and in my
everyone forward by facilitating groups to work role as Under-Secretary for Regional Economic
together. With unique insight and perspective, Development, I appreciate we cannot do
EDAs are also instrumental in the development everything and we cannot know everything, but
of economic strategies for their regions and nor do we need to. Regions and communities
articulating growth priorities with regional hold their own knowledge and expertise and
action plans. our regional economic development approach is
finding the best way to support this.
And it is this insight and perspective that has
the PGF looking to EDAs to play a central role in I strongly believe that Economic Development
making investment connections. Agencies are passionate advocates of regional
development and sustainability. They hold the
The Fund wants to be a partner, not a patron ability to significantly boost regional economic
and for regions to have “skin in the game”. This growth through planning, strategy, and most
is a co-investment model to create growth that importantly, building partnerships.
is truly sustainable.
This Government is committed to working
Harnessing and amplifying the skills and in partnership with regions and is currently
expertise of EDA staff on the ground will developing a strategy that will deliver targeted
mean EDAs can improve the speed at which support to enhance their contribution to regional
we can connect regional partners, private outcomes.
sector businesses and investors to ensure
the Government’s considerable investments It is by ensuring we are all working towards the
through the PGF, can truly power-up our same goal that we will see our regions grow in a
regions for transformational change. way that benefits not only local people but the
country as a whole.

By Fletcher Tabuteau, Parliamentary Under
Secretary for Regional Economic Development

19MAHI TAHI

ACHIEVE YOUR DREAMS

FIND YOUR
EDGE

How do you achieve an affordable,
recognised Masters or Diploma that enables ‘
on the job’ learning? Read on ...

In the busy and rapidly changing world of Here’s a taste of what’s to come:
economic development it can be hard to find
the time or the right programmes for your • The subjects you’ve identified you want to
own professional growth. This fast moving study, delivered by the country’s leading
world means the need has never been greater subject matter experts
for continuous learning and development. EDNZ
has recognised this issue and with funding • Subjects delivered as micro-credentials –
from the Provincial Growth Fund is working to the latest trend sweeping the education
ensure those responsible for regional economic world as a system of verifying both existing
development are actively encouraged and knowledge and new learning
supported to increase their skills and ability.
• Online learning options enabling ‘at your own
EDNZ is pleased to announce that it has pace’, ‘in your own time’ learning
partnered with Capable NZ to deliver a
flexible, customised programme for economic • Opportunities to connect, share and hear
development professionals. Capable NZ is a case studies from each other through Peer-
tertiary provider known for its specialisation to-Peer learning
in work-based learning, recognition of prior
learning and the creation of independent • Work based, applied assessments that
learning pathways. In collaboration with EDNZ, validate your knowledge and skills and
it is currently developing a tailored, state-of- ensure your learning is in work, by work
the-art continuous professional development through work and for work
programme for economic development
professionals for an early 2019 launch. • Pathways to an NZQA specialist Economic
Development qualification as well as a
Master’s degree

20 MAHI TAHI • Pathways to an NZQA specialist ED
qualification as well as a Master’s degree

THIS SUITE OF
EDUCATIONAL
OPPORTUNITIES AND
TOOLS MAKES UP
ONE OF THE MOST
INNOVATIVE AND
FLEXIBLE PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMMES EVER
CREATED IN AOTEAROA

This suite of educational opportunities and
tools makes up one of the most innovative
and flexible professional development
programmes ever created in New Zealand.

It is designed to grow our individual and collective
professional skills without having to take lengthy
periods of time off work.

Our vision for this programme is that it will take
you and your work to a new level and increase
your capacity to make a positive impact in your
community. Together we’ll build a better New
Zealand.

If you have any questions or comments about the
programme or have an interesting project or story
you would like to share through one of the peer-
to-peer learning sessions, then please contact
the project co-coordinator Michael Simmons at:
[email protected]

21MAHI TAHI

A TRIPARTITE PARTNERSHIP

TRIPARTITE, THE BENCHMARK
FOR INTERNATIONAL CITY TO
CITY RELATIONSHIPS

THE SUCCESS OF THE PROGRAMME DEVELOPED Tens of millions in export deals have
been achieved, and great business
FOR THE TRIPARTITE ECONOMIC SUMMIT – relationships forged, since Auckland
GUANGZHOU 2017 SAW AUCKLAND COUNCIL WIN became part of a historic three-way
THE ‘BEST PRACTICE INTEGRATED STRATEGIC alliance between long-term ‘sister’ cities
PLANNING’ AWARD, AND THE COVETED ‘2018 Auckland, Los Angeles and Guangzhou.
PREMIER AWARD’ AT THIS YEAR’S ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT NEW ZEALAND AWARDS. When it was signed in 2014, the Tripartite
Economic Alliance was thought to be a world
22 MAHI TAHI first. It had a focus on increasing trade and
investment between the three cities and
their regions, as well as enjoying the civic
and cultural activities.

The Tripartite has evolved into a new
benchmark for how global cities can engage
and collaborate, deepen trade ties and
economic engagement.

Auckland Council’s Tripartite programme
is driven by a collaborative approach – the
Mayor providing political and civic leadership;
the Global Partnerships & Strategy team
leading the partner city relationship; and
Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic
Development (ATEED) – a CCO and the
region’s economic growth agency – leading
the business programme.

The success of the programme developed for
the Tripartite Economic Summit – Guangzhou
2017 saw Council win the ‘Best Practice
Integrated Strategic Planning’ Award, and
the coveted ‘2018 Premier Award’ at this
year’s Economic Development New Zealand
awards.

A TRIPARTITE PARTNERSHIP

This was hot on the heels of a global Jane Finlayson, Head of Business, ATEED
accolade in the prestigious International
Economic Development Council awards 23MAHI TAHI
– bronze for ‘Excellence in Economic
Development’.

Pam Ford, General Manager Economic
Development at ATEED, has watched
Auckland’s Tripartite programme grow and
flourish since the agreement was signed,
including from her frontline role leading
the Auckland and Guangzhou business
programmes before her elevation to her
current position.

She says the secret to the Auckland
programme’s success is commitment and
effective collaboration between Council,
central government, and industry.

“Ultimately, Tripartite has always been about
making connections, and Council’s approach
has been to develop a comprehensive
programme that allows our world-class
businesses to springboard into two massive
markets,” says Pam Ford.

And while Auckland Council has led the
programme, it has had a huge amount of help
from key partners.

“From the outset, we knew it would be
crucial to tap into the help that our central
government ‘NZ Inc’ partner agencies including
NZTE and MFAT can provide in overseas
markets, and that the trade specialists within
the consulates in LA and China would be
important allies as well.

A TRIPARTITE PARTNERSHIP

“The success of the Guangzhou programme THE TRIPARTITE
was in many ways because it was the CREATES A PLATFORM AND
culmination of everything we had ESSENTIALLY OPENS DOORS
learned from our involvement in the two TO MEANINGFUL AND
previous summits, and about how to maximise SUBSTANTIVE ECONOMIC,
opportunities.” TRADE AND INVESTMENT

In November 2017, Mayor Phil Goff led Along with a range of summit
Auckland’s nearly 100 business delegates from sessions in Guangzhou, ATEED
more than 70 organisations to the summit in developed an Auckland Showcase
Guangzhou. It was the largest trade mission Event to put the spotlight on
Auckland had ever sent overseas. Auckland as a business and investment
destination, and feature Auckland food and
Participating businesses represented the beverages, including wines from Matakana
education, urban design and planning, tourism, Estate who was a sponsor at the event.
food and beverage, biomedicine and health,
digital and creative, and innovation sectors. It included a contemporary Māori
performance and brands promoting
It was the culmination of months of hard work Auckland business ventures. Designer Kiri
from various parts of Council and its partners. Nathan led a roopu of eight Māori fashion
designers who each presented three pieces.
“We held a number of pre-summit workshops
to help the delegate companies increase their The show built awareness of Auckland’s
knowledge of doing business in China, and dynamic Māori economy and its creative
ensure they were able to get the most out of sector, and really wowed the audience of
the connections created through the summit. influential business people,” says Pam Ford.
The sessions and delegation were supported
by our commercial partners BNZ, NZTE and The designer group was then invited to
Huawei.” Guangzhou Fashion Week and visited
potential fabric suppliers. While the
“That meant our delegates were in the best business outcomes from the programme
possible position to hit the ground running tend to be a slow burn, with results in
in Guangzhou, and make the most of the years, not months, the post-summit survey
opportunities created through the business showed the companies that went expect the
programme and through the support of our summit will add to the millions of dollars in
partners on the ground in China.” deals for them.

24 MAHI TAHI

Left to Right: Phil Goff, Mayor Auckland, Wen Guohui, Mayor of Guangzhou

That was a similar situation to the first It attracted about 700 delegates, including
two summits. But while on the sur- more than 150 in Mayor-led delegations from
face the focal points in the alliance’s Los Angeles and Guangzhou.
first four years have been the sum-
mits – held in Los Angeles in 2015, Auckland About 300 formal business match meetings
in 2016, and Guangzhou – the reality is the were held at the summit’s BNZ Business
programme has basically been ongoing. Activation Lounge, along with many more
informal connections made between
“The Tripartite creates a platform and businesses.
essentially opens doors to meaningful and
substantive economic, trade and investment The summit focused on five sectors where
opportunities for Auckland-based Auckland has world-leading companies and
businesses, entrepreneurs, and investors,” expertise, significant opportunity for growth,
says Pam Ford. and is globally competitive: advanced materials
(such as composites); high-value foods; new
When Los Angeles hosted the first summit media (entertainment/digital); smart data; and
about six months after the agreement urban design.
was signed, then Mayor, Len Brown
headed Auckland’s 43-organisation strong The direct foreign investment generated by the
delegation. Auckland summit has been estimated at more
than $30 million.
It was Auckland’s turn next, and the
event the city delivered in May 2016 was The fact that Prime Minister John Key, three
the culmination of a year’s planning and New Zealand Government ministers, and
engagement with industry organisations senior Chinese trade official Madam Li Xiaolin
and officials in all three tripartite cities. attended and spoke, showed the level of
credibility achieved by the summit.

25MAHI TAHI

A TRIPARTITE PARTNERSHIP

26 MAHI TAHI Signing Ceremony: Left to right: Phil Goff, Mayor of Auckland, Wen Guohui, Mayor of

The success of the alliance to date saw the three
partner cities reaffirm their commitment to it,
at the Guangzhou summit. However, with great
partnerships and connections established,
it was decided that staging one-off summits was no
longer required - the wide-ranging programme around
the alliance will be undertaken off the back of already
existing events.

The Tripartite’s second phase began for Auckland
with a great example of the way forward - a 14-strong
delegation to the Select LA Investment Summit in May.

The targeted delegation, led by Deputy Mayor Bill
Cashmore, was provided with exclusive opportunities
for networking, workshops, business matching, and site
visits.

IT CAN’T REALLY BE OVER-
STATED HOW MUCH WE HAVE
GAINED FROM A WELL-DESIGNED
STRATEGIC PROGRAMME, AND
THROUGH COLLABORATION WITH
OUR VALUED PARTNERS. THE
LONG-TERM OUTCOMES, IN BOTH
DEALS AND JOBS CREATED, WILL
BE FANTASTIC.”

of Guangzhou, Jeff Corell, Deputy Mayor of Los Angeles

Its first outcome was a US$20m investment agreement
announced between Auckland-based HMI Technologies/
Ohmio – which went as part of the delegation – and Heshan
Industrial City Management Committee in China which
allows an Ohmio plant to be established in Heshan for
making autonomous vehicles, and an artificial intelligence
transport research centre.

Pam Ford expects the ongoing Tripartite programme to
continue to provide huge benefits for the region.

“It can’t really be over-stated how much we have gained
from a well-designed strategic programme, and through
collaboration with our valued partners. The long-term
outcomes, in both deals and jobs created, will be fantastic.”

27MAHI TAHI

NZ AGRIFOOD WEEK

NZ AGRI FOOD
WEEK

– driving the discussion The world’s population is growing and
of New Zealand as a food is estimated to hit nine billion by 2050,
producing nation meaning the world will need to produce
as much food in the next 40 years as was
Manawatu is a prime food producing region produced in the past 8,000 years. New Zealand
will play a vital role in meeting some of this
28 MAHI TAHI demand.

Global challenges like climate change, labour
shortages and the need to balance increased
food production, while reducing environmental
footprints, are forcing food producers
to implement technology and different
employment methods in order to meet demands
and expectations from consumers and their
future workforce.

New Zealand AgriFood Week, in association with
ASB, is held in Manawatu in March annually, in
the lead up to Central Districts Field Days. The
week offers a series of events that are focused

NZ AGRIFOOD WEEK

MANAWATU’S POSITION
AT THE FOREFRONT OF
AGRIFOOD IS ENVIABLE.
WE ARE HOME TO MORE
THAN 2500 SCIENTISTS,
RESEARCHERS, ACADEMICS
AND FOODHQ ...

on food, agriculture and technology, and its Linda Stewart, CEO of CEDA at launch of NZAFW
purpose is to connect thought leaders, decision
makers and future leaders from across the 29MAHI TAHI
agrifood value chain to drive transformation
and shape the future of food production and
farming.

CEDA sets the strategic direction
and manages the key partnerships,
several events and content for New
Zealand AgriFood Week as part of our
agriculture sector development.

Headline events in 2019 include ASB Perspective
2025, a boardroom style discussion between
female leaders across the primary industries;
AgResearch Future Feeders, focused on the
future of food and the workforce required to
meet this demand; Plate of Origin, a national
restaurant competition connecting chefs,
regional food producers and consumers
through one dish, the AgTech Hackathon,
which connects tech experts, farmers and

OUR PARTNERS RECOGNISE THAT
BY WORKING TOGETHER WE CAN
UNLOCK GREATER POTENTIAL IN FOOD
DEVELOPMENT AND CONTINUE TO
BUILD THE REGION AND NEW ZEALAND’S
REPUTATION ON A GLOBAL STAGE.”

high school students to develop solutions For 2019, the theme ‘Food for Who?’
to on-farm problems and the Ballance encapsulates the broad scope of the
Farm Environment Awards Horizons discussion during the week’s events, as we
Region. explore topics such as who New Zealand
is and should be feeding, what Manawatu’s
“The week is about identifying the role is within that, who is sustaining traditional
opportunities, challenges and future industry and who is evolving it.
trends. It provides the environment
for local and central government, Each event and the lineup of industry expert
producers, growers, researchers and speakers has been shaped in partnership
consumers to work together to ensure with leading-edge thinkers across the primary
Manawatu is leading the thinking in industries. Many of these have since become
product development, innovation and key sponsors and partners, including ASB,
the sustainability of agriculture and food AgResearch, Plant and Food Research, FoodHQ,
production, for the benefit of New Zealand,” NZTE, Massey University, Fonterra and The
says Central Economic Development Factory.
Agency’s Chief Executive Linda Stewart.
“Our partners recognise that by working
“Manawatu’s position at the forefront together we can unlock greater potential in
of agrifood is enviable. We are home to food development and continue to build the
more than 2500 scientists, researchers, region and New Zealand’s reputation on a
academics and FoodHQ, who are all global stage.”
working hard to advance our knowledge
and capabilities in agriculture, food From scientists to students, researchers,
production and more. farmers and food producers, agribusiness
and service providers, there is something for
This work happens alongside our everyone. Attendees are some of the brightest
boutique and large-scale food producers, minds and change makers working across
manufacturers and our distribution industries and we know it’s the connections,
and logistics hub, which gets all of these conversations and collaboration within the
products around New Zealand and the week that is of most value to them.
world.”

30 MAHI TAHI

Minister Damien O’Connor, MInister for Agriculture at the launch of NZAFW

“The week is also about talent attraction OUR PARTNERS
and increasing tertiary and secondary RECOGNISE THAT
students’ awareness of the opportunities BY WORKING
in the primary industries, but it is a TOGETHER WE CAN
two-way conversation. Our events provide a UNLOCK GREATER
platform for those starting out in their careers POTENTIAL IN FOOD
to bring new ideas and approaches to work DEVELOPMENT AND
and discuss them with current leaders and CONTINUE TO BUILD
decision makers. It’s this blend of ideas and THE REGION AND
dialogue that makes New Zealand AgriFood NEW ZEALAND’S
Week so unique.” REPUTATION ON A
GLOBAL STAGE.”
New Zealand AgriFood Week is held between
March 11 to 16, 2019 in Manawatu.

To attend, connect or for more information
please contact CEDA Events Senior

Tessa Lyons, [email protected]

31MAHI TAHI

HONOURING A LIFE

HONOURING A

LIFE OF SERVICE

Retiring CEO, Stuart Trundle, recieves Honorary Life Membership
of EDNZ and takes the opportunity to share his thoughts on the
future ...

Of the many awards and accolades “The decision-making processes that drive
delivered at the conference, one economic development, particularly regional
was particularly reflective of the economic development, have to move away from
growing significance of economic the Wellington-centric model to the regions they
development in New Zealand, and in particular impact,” Stuart says.
its regions. An Honorary Membership of
EDNZ was conferred upon Stuart Trundle, “This has to be supported by investment – useful
who has overseen economic development investment - in the very ecosystem that drive
in the Taranaki region for over two decades. regional growth. It’s not simply a case of targeted
funding for specific projects that meet certain
During his illustrious career, Stuart has helped criteria, it’s about establishing a new model of co-
Taranaki make great strides up countless investment that will distribute funding differently.
league tables, diversify its economy into Stuart also called for the regions to work
interesting new areas, such as major events together, elevating the conversation beyond local
and international film, and both conceive and government boundaries.
pioneer the combined economic development
and regional tourism agency model that “Too often we’re working down political lines,
has gained significant traction nationwide. whether that’s as a CCO or through majority
funding from local authorities. This makes it
Stuart’s commitment to economic harder to attract equity shareholdings from central
development in New Zealand is such that government, or working more closely with business
given the soapbox for what many expected partners, who could provide the transformational
to be a valedictory address, Stuart used funding into the regional development equation.”
the opportunity to focus on the future, and
issued a challenge to both the sector and One area Stuart highlighted that could see
Hon Fletcher Tabuteau, Parliamentary Under- rapid gains was information and technology
Secretary of Regional Economic Development management, where an integrated national
who presented the Honorary Membership approach could see huge benefits by leveraging
award, to push for devolution of economic economies of scale and offering a better user
investment to the regions. experience through strategic information sharing.
“Technology is now at a point that we need to
leverage it in the best way possible. Duplicating
systems and structures in every EDA across New
Zealand just isn’t sensible.”

32 MAHI TAHI

Fletcher Tabuteau presents Honorary Life Membership to retiring CEO, Stuart

“Using appropriate firewalls, consolidated When it comes to change Stuart is walking the talk.
management structures and standardised
learning, will enable us to manage our He retires as Venture Taranaki’s Chief Executive at
clients and projects as they move and the end of February 2019, to be replaced by former
grow beyond a single region, offering major Ministry of Primary Industries Deputy Secretary
efficiencies when it comes to delivering Justine Gilliland. But just as certain as changes is
technology as both a tool and a platform, and the likelihood of Stuart continuing his to make a
helpusmakethemostofemergingtechnologies.” contribution to the industry, and the region, he has
passionately advocated for more than two decades.
Stuart acknowledges that this will be seen as a
brave proposition, but as he looks to call time THE DECISION-MAKING
on a profession he’s had a big impact on, feels PROCESSES THAT DRIVE
it’s one whose time has come. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT,
PARTICULARLY REGIONAL
“Yes this is an uncomfortable conversation but ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT,
it’s one that we, as a sector, need to have. There HAVE TO MOVE AWAY FROM THE
are many reasons why we can avoid it, but now WELLINGTON-CENTRIC MODEL
more than ever we need to embrace a rapidly TO THE REGIONS THEY IMPACT,”
changing landscape with agility and innovative
thinking,” Stuart said.

Change is inevitable and it’s a fact of life for
those we serve. As economic development
practitioners we can’t be left behind if we are
to remain of value to our communities.”

33MAHI TAHI

BACK TO SCHOOL

‘WAIKATO SMARTS’ - A
WINNING FORMULA

What could success look
like for Secondary School
Employer Partnerships (SSEP)
in ten years’ time?

Ideally there would be little or no youth
unemployment, no skills shortages and
employers/educators would move freely
between industry and schools.

Pie in the sky? Four years of SSEP in the
Waikato has convinced the Smart Waikato
Trust (SWT) that the above vision is
achievable.

In those four years SWT has researched best
practice partnerships between schools and
employers globally, piloted and measured
the impact of the initiative with 5 schools
and their employer partners, and achieved
further widespread collaboration with 22
secondary schools; around 140 educators
and 150 employers.

Over 4000 Year 9 and 10 students have
experienced SSEP. This year 2300 students
are engaged – 46 percent of these are Māori.

SWT received recognition at the 2018 EDANZ
awards for Best Practice in Collaboration
with Business, Iwi and Community for SSEP.

34 MAHI TAHI

BACK TO SCHOOL

Chief Executive, Mary Jensen, believes HOW DOES SSEP WORK?
collaboration forms the basis of all economic
and social development in our communities. Each school nominates one or two subject
She acknowledges that in a global setting, areas at Year 9 or 10 level to introduce SSEP
we are a very small nation, with small regions, and (maths, English, science, technology or business
even smaller towns and our young people are very studies). Smart Waikato identifies and on-
vulnerable in this fast-changing world. “Young people boards a range of businesses representing key
and their schools need to be better connected to industries in the region that support those sub-
their communities and supported by them to develop ject areas. Employers include representatives
a stronger sense and understanding of the world of primary industries, healthcare, information
around them and what their options are.” communication technology, engineering, trades
or business sectors. Teachers and employers
work together to create classroom and work-
place activities linking curriculum to the busi-
ness context.

RESULTS OF SSEP

Quantitative and qualitative data is collected
at the end of each school year from students,
teachers and employer partners to measure the
impact of SSEP.

SO WHAT IS SECONDARY SCHOOL Results from student survey data shows SSEP is
EMPLOYER PARTNERSHIPS (SSEP)? having a substantial positive impact on students’
attitudes toward their learning, increasing their
SSEP has been developed by Smart Waikato Trust to awareness of local industry and opportunities
help address future workforce skills gaps by introducing and raising aspirations for their future.
students to key local industries, supporting informed
career decisions and enabling a smoother transition be- From an economic development perspective,
tween school and employment. with skills shortages in key industries on the rise,
it will become increasingly important to retain
youth in the region to support labour market
demands. 62 percent of students said they are
more likely to stay in Waikato when they leave
school as a result of participating in SSEP.

The SSEP provides a framework that brings together
education and the local business community. The
partnerships are typically 3-year formal relationships
between secondary schools and employers who link into
school faculties at Year 9/10, supporting contextualised
learning in the classroom and introducing students to a
wide range of careers.

35MAHI TAHI

BACK TO SCHOOL

WHAT’S NEXT FOR SSEP?

The positive impact of SSEP on students, teachers and
employers has been well substantiated over the past three
years. Embedding SSEP in the existing 22 secondary schools
and engaging the remainder in the programme remains a
priority. However, attention is also now focussed upon building
upon the SSEP platform into the next stage of integration into the
senior school and education-to-employment transitions.
By working with employers to develop cadetships, apprenticeships
and other entry level jobs providing career stepping stones into
their organisations, these can be fed back into the schools through
SSEP partnership networks. The development of workplace
opportunities that connect with the tertiary sector will ensure
ongoing work-related formal training and development for young
employees. With continued support and a commitment to building
on the platform of SSEP the regions will have a strong foundation
for a sustainable skills pipeline. In specific areas where employers
are less engaged with communities and youth are more disengaged,
Smart Waikato will take a greater role in co-ordinating more
intensive activity to develop more employable rangatahi and more
employment opportunities. In effect, Smart Waikato is building
and supporting the region’s social and economic infrastructure,
enabling economic development.

36 MAHI TAHI

BACK TO SCHOOL

Smart Waikato Trust encourages other I AM SO PROUD OF
regions to join SSEP, saying “together we LINDA NELSON CAIE AND
can create a national platform for genuine HER TEAM HERE AT SMART
collaboration between education and WAIKATO. THE SHEER
industry that inspires our students of SCALE OF COLLABORATION
today as they transition into our workforce THAT THEY HAVE ACHIEVED
of tomorrow.” THROUGH THE SSEP IS
AN ABSOLUTE CREDIT TO
Smart Waikato Trust is available to offer THEM”. MARY JENSEN, CEO
their expertise to help build capabilities in OF SWT
other regions to achieve this.

SSEP is financially supported by MBIE, the
Mercury-Waikato Tainui iwi partnership,
Waikato Regional EDA, DV Bryant Trust,
Glenice and John Gallagher Foundation,
SKYCITY Hamilton Community Trust and
Waikato Farmers Trust.

For more info visit www.smartwaikato.
co.nz or www.smartnz.nz

Linda Nelson Caie (left) Mary Jensen

37MAHI TAHI

CONNECTING THE DOTS

CONNECTING

THE DOTS -

BRINGING A COMMUNITY TOGETHER

“The important thing is to go in with a completely open mind. What you think the issues might be are not necessarily
what the community thinks. The issues that are identified may be real or perceived. The solutions could be simple or
complicated. What is important is that you allow the process to lead you, that you follow the threads that emerge, and
sometimes you will come up with a solution that really helps the local business community” Heather Warwick, CEO

In 2018, Enterprise North ENC Business Support The ENC team interviewed
Canterbury (ENC) won Manager, Miles Dalton, was a range of businesses
the Best Practice in one of those leading the operating around Culverden
Primary Research Award project: “Every year we are and the Amuri Basin as well
for a project that brought a tasked with exploring the as businesses thinking of
business needs in one of our establishing themselves in
community together. ‘The rural communities. In this the area, key community
case we were looking at the representatives, iwi, and
Community Connector town of Culverden which is in Maori business interests
the middle of the dairy farms (particularly Ngāi Tahu
Project’, successfully reduced of the Amuri Basin, between farming).
Christchurch and Kaikoura.
staff turnover in a rural The process starts very
simply: we ask questions,”
community, decreased explains Dalton.

wider issues of isolation in

a remote area and followed

a development model that

enabled a community to

identify its own needs and

lead the solution.

38 MAHI TAHI

CONNECTING THE DOTS

THE PROCESS
STARTS VERY
SIMPLY: WE ASK
QUESTIONS

From this they were able to ascertain ‘themes’ around is-
sues to be addressed. The next step was to research the
themes and work out whether what was perceived was ac-
tually real and to look at other areas with similar themes to
see if there were any easy answers.

The research conducted by ENC referred to a number of
local and national studies, and brought in experts from
other fields to contribute. All of this information was dis-
tilled to five action points which were taken back to the
community for discussion. Most of the findings were easily ad-
dressed by ENC, but there was one key finding that needed extra
resources.

Staff turnover proved a significant problem in the Amuri Basin,
and ENC’s research revealed that was because a high number of
workers and their partners were experiencing varying degrees
of social isolation. Part of this was due to working conditions on
some dairy farms, but much of it was around people simply not
having the know-how or confidence to connect with the commu-
nity in a meaningful way.

39MAHI TAHI

CONNECTING THE DOTS
STAFF TURNOVER PROVED A
SIGNIFICANT PROBLEM DUE TO A HIGH
NUMBER OF WORKERS AND THEIR
PARTNERS EXPERIENCING ISOLATION

Fletcher Tabuteau, Miles Dalton, Heather Warwick, David Wilson

40 MAHI TAHI

CONNECTING THE DOTS

Local community stalwart, Kirsty Clark, Although the Community Connector
was employed as the first Community role was to be a community-wide
Connector. She would work with resource, the Amuri business
community groups, volunteers and community provided the seed
community champions in the Amuri Basin to funding to make it happen. Further
proactively connect people to the community. funding was provided by the Ministry of
Social Development and the Department
As well as connecting people to existing groups of Internal Affairs. A governance group
and activities, Kirsty’s role of talking to isolated was established to provide direction, and
people and discerning their needs would see ENC stepped up as temporary employer.
her identify new groups or activities needed,
she would then assist in establishing those. The role has been highly successful in
addressing community issues. As well as
Kirsty set out, going door to door to make sure addressing isolation in the community, Kirsty
that everyone knew what was available and to has instigated a number of projects that have
remind people they were entitled and welcome added to the tapestry of activities available
to be active members in their community. in the area. The Department of Internal
Affairs has stated that it uses this project as
an example of ‘community led development’.

ENC passed the ownership of the project to
Connect Hurunui Incorporated (a local not-
for-profit organisation), and the success of
the role led them to establish similar roles for
two other areas in the Hurunui District.

Contact: Miles Dalton
DDI: 03 327 5732 | M: 021 570 141
|E : m i l e s @ e n t e r p r i s e n c . c o . n z

41MAHI TAHI

INCLUSIVE GROWTH - THE NEXT STEP

THE INCLUSIVE
GROWTH JOURNEY -

The next step

Mahi Tahi 2018 gave all This part of the event will include
conference delegates a a keynote presentation from Traci
sense of the challenges that Houpapa, Chair of the Federation of
lie ahead if ‘inclusive growth’ Maori Authorities (FOMA), an in-depth
is to become a reality within Aotearoa. coverage of Social procurement from a
presenter who has played a pivotol role
EDNZ believes that New Zealand’s EDAs in developing practice in the UK and
and their local government partners Europe and some insights into current
are uniquely placed to promote and developments with participatory
support the progress of that agenda. budgeting (a concept that is about to be
enshrined in New York’s City Charter).
That realisation has imbued EDNZ with a
real sense of commitment to advancing The second purpose is to discuss
the inclusive growth journey within this and ideally decide on the
country. establishment of a NZ based
inclusive growth network that
The next step in NZ’s inclusive growth can take the inclusive growth agenda
movement will involve a collaboration forward. This will be the main theme of
between EDNZ, the Local Government the afternoon.
Think Tank (LGTT) and the Royal Society
of the Arts (the Australasian arm of a Early responses to the proposed
major UK think tank which has been event have been encouraging with
leading work on inclusive growth). numerous local government agencies
and EDA’s demonstrating interest.
This coalition will present a one day
action-orientated event on inclusive EDNZ sees this as an important step
growth. This will take place on 19 March, in strengthening our unique role in
at the Wharewaka on Wellington’s contributing to the well-being of NZ’s
harbour foreshore. communities.

The event has a two fold purpose. Places at the summit are limited,
The first is to bring delegates up-to- invitations will be sent early in the New
date with current developments in the Year. Should you not receive an invite
research on, and practice of, inclusive please register your interest in attending
growth internationally. the event by contacting Susan Houston
E|[email protected]
42 MAHI TAHI

INCLUSIVE GROWTH - THE NEXT STEP

43MAHI TAHI

PROJECT 1000

PROJECT A NEW INITIATIVE TO CREATE
1000 JOBS AND GET HAWKE’S BAY
PEOPLE OFF BENEFITS AND
Project 1000 is a key action under INTO EMPLOYMENT RECEIVED
Matariki HBREDS (Hawke’s Bay’s A COMMENDATION FOR BEST
regional economic development PRACTICE COLLABORATION
and social inclusion strategies AT THE RECENT ECONOMIC
and action plan). It brings together DEVELOPMENT AWARDS.
businesses, iwi, local authorities,
training providers, and central “I’ve been impressed with creativity and heart
government to support the creation of the businesses, iwi and hapu involved to
of 1000 new jobs for Hawke’s Bay job- step up and make opportunities available,
seekers. Project 1000 is about new and providing support to make things work.
jobs across all industry sectors with an And equally I’m inspired by the success
emphasis on the booming horticulture stories that have come from the people who
sector toward 2020. have gained employment.

To date more than 700 people have been “Approximately 700 people are now working.
placed into jobs through Project 1000 This was made possible by the collaboration
across a broad range of collaborative and commitment from our Hawke’s Bay
initiatives in a range of industries. partners to make a difference to our
community,” says Ms Aranui.
Annie Aranui, East Coast Regional
Commissioner at the Ministry of Social Examples of Project 1000 job creation include:
Development (MSD) says that Project (more details included at the end of this press
1000 is making a difference, and release)
changing people’s lives.
• A three-way partnership with MSD and
44 MAHI TAHI Mr Apple Longview packhouse to support
10 single parents back into the workforce.
Collectively this group had 167 years on
the benefit and 24 dependent children.
Six of the women from this group are
returning in supervisory roles with
Longview this coming season.

PROJECT 1000

• The Rangatahi mā, Kia eke initiative is Carolyn Neville, CEO of Business Hawke’s
a partnership between the Ministry of Bay says that Project 1000 helps people to
Social Development, the Hastings District build work skills they can take into future
Council, Hawke’s Bay District Health jobs.
Board, EIT, Oranga Tamariki and Te Puni “Developing transferrable skills that you
Kōkiri that offers an opportunity for young can apply to different roles and different
people aged 16-24 years who are having industries is so important. It lays the
difficulty finding work to be employed foundation for being able to secure lifelong
in valuable project work to develop work work, career growth and a better standard
and life-skills and on the job training of living.
while contributing to the community. “We have many businesses in Hawke’s
Luke Maton was offered a data entry role Bay reporting staff shortages, so having
with Hastings District Council, that he has a programme that helps people get into
successfully turned into full time contract work and start building life and work skills,
tidying up HDC’s cemetery records and will be of great benefit to the business
databases. Luke says he has grown in community,” says Mrs Neville.
his role and feels recognised and valued. “There’s more work to do, and we are looking
for more businesses and organisations to
• The Ngāti Pahāuwera iwi partnership with partner with, so please get in touch,” says
MSD, established in 2015 to leverage off their Ms. Aranui.
own partnerships and networks to place
whanau into sustainable jobs including Annie Aranui and Toro Waaka
farming and agriculture, silviculture,
conservation and pest management. To 45MAHI TAHI
date 209 people have been placed into jobs
through the iwi partnership as part of the
Matariki strategy. Deano Biddle was one
of the early placements made through the
partnership. He and his son Jordan were
initially employed on a temporary contract
scrub-cutting and weed spraying at Pihanui
Station and then saw an opportunity
to secure a further 12 month contract
completing farm maintenance and fencing.
The father, son and crew completed more
than 50 kilometres of fencing as part of
that contract. Jordan Biddle was named
winner of the Ahuwhenua Young Maori
Farmer Award in 2017 and is proving to be
a great role model for young Māori.

EXTENSION 350

EXTENSION
350

A farmer-led, farmer-focused
programme that is lifting
profitability, environmental
sustainability and wellbeing
on Northland farms, is
transforming Northland’s
pastoral sector.

Northland is taking a ‘two heads Northland’s pastoral sector contributes
are better than one’ approach substantially to its Gross Domestic
as part of Extension 350 Product, not just economically,
(E350), an extension project but also strategically and socially.
that will involve 350 farmers over a However, studies and ongoing industry
five - and-a half-year period and is benchmarking painted a picture of the
designed to help them share knowledge sector tending to underperform relative
and gain access to specialist advice. to its resource base and other regions in
New Zealand. The message was clear; it
In 2016 the Tai Tokerau Regional Growth was time for change. However, helping to
Study identified significant economic pull a region up by the bootstraps would
and investment opportunities to grow require new thinking and a multi-agency,
employment and incomes in Northland. collaborative approach.
Home to iconic attractions such as the
Poor Knights Islands Marine Reserve, Tane Off the back of the Growth Study
Mahuta and the Bay of Islands, Northland findings, Northland Inc connected with
was already known around the world as the Northland Agricultural Forum whose
a visitor destination with enviable natural project, the Regional Economic Vitality
beauty. However, the study identified Extension Initiative (REVEI), was in the
Northland was also among New Zealand planning stages.
regions with significant untapped
economic potential.

46 MAHI TAHI

EXTENSION 350

HOW EXTENSION
350 WORKS

With Northland Inc’s assistance, this Over the course of the programme
was granted business case funding and
a comprehensive plan developed by there will be a total of 10 clusters
Nimmo-Bell Consultants. The findings of
this, coupled with on-farm pilot extension - three sheep and beef, and seven
programmes already underway in the
region, indicated there was significant dairy - with farmers from Helensville
potential to not only increase the profit
on farms, but also to address the reality to the top of the north. The focus is
of achieving a triple bottom line. From
here, with multi sector support and to help shift both individual farmers
collaboration between central and
local government, industry and farmer and the region’s farming community
representation, E350 an ambitious
project that could potentially transform towards better performance.
the pastoral sector, was included in the
Tai Tokerau Northland Economic Action Each cluster is facilitated by a farm
Plan. adviser who works with five mentor
farmers, five target farms, and 25
associate farmers. Support is provided
to each cluster by representatives from
Dairy NZ, or Beef+Lamb New Zealand.

Diagram showing made up of Extension 350 clusters

47MAHI TAHI

EXTENSION 350

E350 Project Lead Luke Beehre says Farm adviser Tafi Manjala says
the model is well suited to bring collaboration is vital. “We don’t always
about change among the 350 farmers agree, and the conversations can be
engaged in the project. “We know that very interesting, but at the end of the
farmers learn best from other farmers, and day it’s about what is best for that business.”
that a farmer-focused, farmer-led model
is effective. The relationship (triangle) Target farmers say E350 is not always easy;
between mentor, target and consultant is it can take them outside of their comfort
effective, robust and enduring.” zones and traditional methods of working,
but they all agree it is worth it. Tangiteroria
“The project is helping Northland farmers target farmer Graham Beatty said he has
to better understand their farming business had some challenging conversations with
and the opportunities available to grow the support team at times but adds that “at
and improve. When you’re focussed on the the end of the day you don’t turn that kind
day-to-day running of your business, it can of support down”. New systems are in place
be hard to see things with fresh eyes,” says on the farm across the three ‘planks’ that are
Luke. fundamental to Extension 350 – increasing
profitability, environmental sustainability
Every new target farm’s journey starts and farmer wellbeing – and Graham and the
with a whole farm assessment carried support team are seeing real results.
out by their dedicated team, typically the
farm adviser, mentor, and a Dairy NZ or THE
Beef+Lamb New Zealand representative. CHALLENGES
Each support team returns to their target AND
farm for up to 20 on farm meetings over LEARNINGS
the duration of the extension programme
to review goals, analyse results, challenge As expected, E350 experienced some key
practice and thinking, offer support to the learnings and challenges since it launched.
farmers through their journey of change,
work through challenges, and celebrate Initial project timelines around cluster set-
wins. In between meetings the target up were ambitious. After setting up the
farmer implements the changes on the first year’s clusters, the lead in time was
farm, and regular reporting keeps them increased for the following two years to
accountable and on track. The project enable m ore time for farmer recruuitment
is further supported by development and additional time for farm advisers to bed
of individual farm environment plans, down relationship with the target team.
focussed off farm workshops, field days
and networking opportunities.

48 MAHI TAHI

EXTENSION 350

Target farmer Lachie McLean and his mentor farmer Dave Robinson on Lachie’s Waipu dairy farm

It also ensured that the target farms The variety of farmers in Northland
were able to hit the ground running with has proven to be both a blessing and a
preparation work carried out prior to challenge in terms of engagement. Some
the start of their first E350 season. The have seen the opportunity and taken full
timelines for works scheduled to be carried advantage with their involvement – others
out both in and on the project were also can see the benefits but struggle with the
ambitious. Setting up project plans, managing ongoing engagement required or being
meetings and project documentation all involved. A variety of skill sets has been
proved to require more time than initially a cause of this; many Northland farms
imagined. do not have Internet; some farmers have
low or no computer skills whereas others
Part of this saw project team staffing levels are well ahead of the game. Where we
increased from 0.6FTE to 2.2FTE for the aim to have all farmers providing regular
most intensive portion of the project. The reporting, these discrepancies add to the
cross-agency structure of the steering group challenges.
proved to be important with each agency
requiring a different approach and varied “AT THE END OF
level of engagement. The initial set up
included one person at each agency, however THE DAY YOU
with turnover of steering group members,
membership changed to a position held DON’T TURN
within the applicable agency.
THAT KIND

OF SUPPORT

DOWN”.

49MAHI TAHI

EXTENSION 350

Target farmers Doug Booth
(left) and Peter McCraith on the
McCraighs far north sheep and beef
farm

RELATIONSHIP E350 has the independence of a standalone
WITH project; one that does not miss opportunities
NORTHLAND INC to engage where people’s (potential) bad
experiences with industry organisations
E350 is co-located within The Orchard could influence decisions to engage
business & events hub in Whangarei,
another EDNZ award - winning Because profitability equals choices,
Northland Inc initiative. There are involvement in the project aims
numerous benefits to being under the to give farmers the flexibility to
umbrella of the regional development agency. make decisions that support longer
Not only is E350 able to access expertise from term goals for on-farm improvements,
the five other workstreams that Northland debt repayment, managing succession or
Inc manages; but gained direct access to improving their livelihood.
government as well as connections to other
strategically important agencies both around Now almost two years into the extension
the region and, from the projects that sit programme, Luke says; “The success of
within the Economic Action Plan. this programme relies on flexibility and
adaptation. No two farms are the same.
The direct relationship with Northland Inc What is known is that farmers learn better
also allows access to tools and resources of an from farmers, people who have walked
‘independent’ organisation, so while Dairy NZ, the walk. Mistakes are treated as learning
Beef+Lamb NZ and MPI are involved, E350 has opportunities and the pathway for every
the independence of a standalone project; one farm involved in this project has evolved
that does not miss opportunities to engage accordingly.”
where people’s (potential) bad experiences
with industry organisations could influence
decisions to engage.

50 MAHI TAHI


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