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Published by jgarrison, 2021-11-08 08:25:59

The Voice Quarter 1 2021

The Voice Quarter 1 2021

Keywords: Georgia Military College Augusta

The Voice

START HERE…
GO ANYWHERE

1

Title IX

The academic and administrative policy of
the College subscribes to the

nondiscrimination provision of Title IX of
the Education Amendments of 1972, which

states: “No person in the United States
shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from
participation in, be denied the benefits of,
or be subject to discrimination under any
educational program or activity.” The Dean

of Students at each campus is a deputy
Title IX Coordinator. **For the Eastern

Region, (Augusta, Fort Gordon and
Sandersville), contact Dean Montgomery in
Room 180, via phone at 706-993-1109, and

via email at [email protected]**

2

GMC MISSION
The Mission of Georgia Military College

is to produce educated citizens and
contributing members of society in an

environment conducive to the
development of the intellect and

character of its students.

3

Executive
Director Reid -
Senior leader of
Augusta Campus

Dean
Montgomery -
Dean of Students
& Assistant
Executive Director

4

Dean Hendricks -
Academic Dean

Mrs. Simpkins -
Registrar

5

Voter Registration Day

Shelthema Johnson and
Deonte Calloway of the
New Georgia Project
came to the GMC-
Augusta Campus on
September 28th, to
register students to vote
on Voter Registration
Day. First observed in
2012, it is a nonpartisan
civic holiday
celebrating democracy.

The New Georgia Project has volunteers
throughout the CSRA (Central Savannah River
Area) with tables set up to recruit voters on this
important national day. Shelthema and Deonte
registered 22 new voters today at GMC-Augusta!
Shelthema shared, “Voting is important as laws
are implemented at the local level, and voting
gives us a chance to have a voice

6

on different resources allocated within the city.”
Deonte advised that, “One of the programs
implemented recently is a rent relief grant. We
want to push programs like this forward.”

Nationalvoterregistration.org says, “According
to U.S. Census data from 2020, as many as 1 in
4 eligible Americans are not registered to vote.
Every year, millions of Americans find
themselves unable to vote because they miss a
registration deadline, don’t update their
registration, or aren’t sure how to register.
National Voter Registration Day wants to make
sure everyone has the opportunity to vote.”
#VoteReady
To learn more about Georgia Military College and
initiatives designed to educate, and help our
students grow into civic-minded individuals,
please visit: www.gmc.org or contact Sabrina or
Takara at our Front Desk at: 706-993-1114.To
learn about the New Georgia Project, register,
engage, or donate, visit: newgeorgiaproject.org or
contact them at: (404) 996-6621. To learn more
about National Voter Registration Day, visit:
Nationalvoterregistrationday.org

7

Hospice Seeks Volunteers

During the past few
weeks, Georgia Military
College’s Augusta Campus
hosted a variety of area
hospice providers,
including St. Joseph’s,
Heartland Hospice and
Trinity. As our Pre-Nursing
Program is our 2nd most popular program, this
outreach is a perfect fit for our student body. In
addition to an interest from our medically-minded
students, they often seek out opportunities to
volunteer, fulfilling a portion of GMC’s mission, to
“produce educated citizens and contributing
members of society poured in! “Hours are never
wasted, the job is to provide companionship to
help patients transition.

8

It’s a great way to get involved and give to the
community,” said a volunteer student. To learn
more about Georgia Military College’s Augusta
Campus, our volunteer opportunities, and the
character-based education that we provide to
every student, please visit our website at:
www.gmc.edu or contact our Front Desk
Administrative Assistants, Sabrina and Takara, at:
706-993-1114.

· For more information about St. Joseph’s Hospice,
please visit their website at: www.stjoecare.com
or contact them at: 706-922-7480

· For more information about Heartland Hospice,
please visit their website at:
www.promedicahospice.org or contact them at:
706-860-7374

· For more information about Trinity Hospice,
please visit their website at: www.lhcgroup.com
or contact them at: 706-729-6000

9

The Alliance for Social Justice

GMC’s Augusta Campus has a wide array of
student organizations, including the Alliance for
Social Justice. The mission, is to “build an
Inclusive unified community of marginalized and
ally voices on the Augusta-GMC campus to
create a collective platform committed to raising
awareness of global and local social justice

10

Issues. Also, to foster an environment that grants
members are heard, recognized, and respected.”
To that end, Jordan Johnson, Richmond County’s
Commissioner was invited to speak to students,
faculty and staff. Commissioner Johnson has
dedicated himself to serving his Augusta
community, and communities across the state,
through activism, youth advocacy, community
organizing, and political action. A proud member
of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity Incorporated,
Johnson serves as Vice Chair of the Augusta
Commission's Public Services Committee,
Co-Chair of the Augusta Homeless Taskforce, and
is the Commission Liaison to the Richmond
County Board of Education. He truly believes
every citizen can make a difference, every
student in the room can get involved and
Instigate change. We must “organize, activate,
legislate” to make a better tomorrow.

11

A Butterfly poem by: Madeline Brown

A butterfly
A simple little butterfly

So angelic, a
Butterfly

So harmless, a
Butterfly

That flaps their colorful wings, a
Butterfly

Does not know what it means
To me, a
Butterfly

Such a symbolic creature, a
Butterfly

Reminds me of my meme
Meme,

12

She was so simple,
Meme

She was so angelic,
Meme

She was so harmless,
Meme

She had true colors,
Meme

I know what it means
To me, meme
The butterfly

13

Focus On Recovery
Mr. Christian Frazier is a Certified Peer Specialist
in Addictive Diseases, Forensic Peer Mentor,
Certified Yoga Instructor, Counselor, Educator
and more. He is also the Executive Director at
Focus on Recovery Augusta (FOR Augusta). FOR
Augusta is an independent non-profit recovery
community organization (RCO) completely free
to those that use it. According to Christian, “27
million Americans are actively addicted making
addiction part of our social fabric as every
household knows someone who has struggled
with addiction.” Top killers in the United States
involve addiction, inability to manage our
mental health and emotions. In 2020, about
93,000 Americans died of an overdose that were
all deemed to be preventable.

14

Georgia Military College thanks Mr. Frazier
and FOR Augusta for the education they
provided to our students, faculty and staff
and for the invaluable services that they
provide to the CSRA. Kofi Annan, the former
secretary-general of the United Nations and
a recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize said,
“Knowledge is power. Information is
liberating. Education is the premise of
progress, in every society, in every family.”

To learn more about FOR Augusta, please
visit www.foraugusta.org or contact them
at: 706-945-0290.

To learn more about Georgia Military
College’s Augusta Campus and the many
resources that we offer to our student body,
please visit www.gmc.edu or contact us at:
706-993-1114.

15

Thrill Hill By: Levi Lape

Thrill Hill
The foot goes up, the foot goes down

The gravel crunches
A twig snaps

The foot goes up, the foot goes down
Down the dusty path

An easy calm breeze blowing
From across the way

The foot goes up, the foot goes down
The brow begins to sweat

Each step burning even more than the last
The cool breeze only a distant memory of the

past
The foot goes up, the foot goes down

This hill is no thrill

16

To a Colorful Butterfly by Ayanna Harris

What other way to profess my love?

I’ve gotten down on my knees to thank the

heavens above.

For you, my most precious, but yet sacred

treasure,

A woman’s beauty who has no measure.

Each day we share is a wonderful surprise,

I can spend an eternity staring into your eyes.

I promise to love you

for every moment of forever,

and when everything else crumbles,

I will never.

I knew the day you noticed me,

that we were somewhere meant to be.

I knew our fate was set because

I truly believe

you are the one for me.

17

Sandersville’s
Corner:

With much 18
appreciation to
Professor Shimon
Moore

Do Your Part

by Brianna Earle

Remember the days of being able to
go out in public without a smothering

mask over your mouth and nose?
When you could go anywhere in
public and not have to worry about

getting a deadly virus? The
Coronavirus has taken so much from
us just in the past year or so. It has
taken what this country's foundation is
built on and that is freedom. It’s as if a
nuclear bomb was dropped on us and
we are still fighting to recover from it,

But, it just keeps getting worse.

19

It has taken loved ones, friends, co-workers,
pets, jobs, everything.
The second we

think it is getting better another strain comes
out and leaves us hopeless. This

has been very difficult for all of us, but
that is why we need to stick together.

We all need to be doing our part,
whether that is making sure to wear
your mask, getting the vaccine, or just
not going out in public when you are

not feeling the best. It is going to
spread continuously, but if we take
precautions we could be saving lives.
I know everyone wants their lives to go

20

back to normal, the way it was just a
few years ago but the harsh reality is
that it’s not going to happen anytime soon.

We need to stop thinking that it
will never happen to us, that we will
never get the virus, because no one is
safe from it. Until we face that fact,

nothing will ever change, which
means people will continue to walk
around like they are invincible, when
they are not. If we would all choose to
do our part it would be a safer country for

everyone.

21

Elena Nicholson

I recently conducted a survey on the effects
social media has on mental health for my
English 101 class. Although, it was originally
for another paper I was writing, I feel like this
is a topic that needs to be shared between more
than just me and my professor. Although, the

participants were those of a younger
generation, the results may be seen throughout all
generations. Out of the forty-nine responses,

forty people said that social media has affected
their mental health in a variety of ways.

One of the more common responses was that
social media would make them feel insecure. I

22

believe that while social media can affect
mental health, it also creates bad habits. I

personally have had several negative
experiences with social media that have both
affected my mental health and caused me to
create some bad habits. One of those being I
get very insecure when it comes to posting and
I tend to compare myself and my life to what
others post on social media. This is a habit I
have been trying to break for a while now, but

it is very hard to look at peoples' pages,
especially those that are successful, and not
compare yourself to that. I hold myself to
incredibly high standards, and while I am fully

content with myself and my life, there is
always that little part of me that will

continuously strive for something more.

23

Gavin Keenan

The assignment for this paper was to find a
topic that you are passionate about and write

about it. If I am being perfectly honest I
struggled to come up with a topic. It’s not that
I’m not passionate about anything, there are

plenty of things that I am passionate about.
Sometimes it’s hard to write down on paper for
other people to read. I’m unsure why that is but
I do have an idea of what it may be. The reason
it’s difficult to express my own ideas on paper

is perhaps because throughout all of my
education, teachers and the assignments that
they give have a pre-determined opinion. Sure,
in some cases with compare and contrasting
argumentative essays, you can pick one side or
the other, but your argument is essentially

provided to you. The same applies with other
types of writing where all you do as a student is
paraphrase what you read and create a summary.

Even when teachers say they want you to
develop your own opinion,

24

I have still found that they tend to lead you to

one central idea . They will give you a starting

point and what you have to say supports the

same central idea that every other student in your

class says. I’m not saying that teachers are

brainwashing students or pushing their beliefs

onto their students, but there just really isn't any

assignment that is commonly given like this one.

This is the first time I’ve used “I” in a paper

since most likely elementary school. Generating

my own ideas for school is something that I, and

probably many other students, are not

accustomed to. You may jump to the conclusion

that I am saying that the papers I have had to

write and the lack of personal opinion I as a

student am required to put into is killing my

creativity. I wouldn’t say that at all. I am still

very creative. I am a seventeen year old who still

tinkers with Legos and builds things. Even

though everyday I am a day closer to being an

adult, I am still truly a kid with a wild

imagination and creativity. To sum things up, I

think due to lack of experience and being told an

opinion expressing my own is 25

difficult. More so on paper. This does not
mean that I do not have an opinion, or
that I am a push over either, I can voice
my opinion with no problem, but on
paper it can be a challenge.

26

The Effects of COVID on students
By Johnathan Cole Langford

I remember the days before COVID. Everyone
would go about their day doing whatever they
wanted to do and however they wanted to do.
There was no worry about being too close to
other people. I was in school, and everything was
going great. I was fishing competitively, going to
church on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Sunday, and
going to church events, and hanging with my
friends. And then it all began. All over the news
you would see news of this new virus spreading,
and it possibly coming to the U.S. Then, next you
hear all this stuff about America shutting down
travel and then the virus coming to The States,
and all this other alarming news. Then, the day
came. We were told to stay home from school and

that we would be doing online until this

27

virus blows over. They said it would be a few
weeks to a month, but little did they know, they

were not going to be in control. Soon after
everyone was stuck at home, the virus seemed to
keep spreading and there did not to seem to be an

end in sight. We eventually had to keep doing
online school until the end of the school year and
the seniors had to walk across a stage while it was

filmed for families to see. This pandemic had a
lasting impact on the world and on the students.

As the rise of alcohol, pornography, and
depression rose in the midst of this pandemic, and

all these things being things that don’t need to
rise. Friends couldn’t see friends for a while unless
it was through a screen. People hardly saw a new
face as they were either locked in their house or

saw people with masks as they got what they
needed for their family at the store. However, this
is not the main reason I write today. Students in

the schools had some of the roughest times.
School became harder as you couldn’t just walk up

to a teacher and ask a question. Students didn’t

28

feel motivated to do schoolwork and began to
fail classes. This pandemic was not only causing
failing grades, but also depression. You could not

just text your friend and say to meet up at a
certain place because everything was closed. This
caused depression for people who wanted to see

their friends and for those who felt alone.
Furthermore, people were losing their lives due to
this pandemic, which caused further depression

and pain. The students during this time were
taking some heavy hits, some worse than others,
and still having to take school classes. As summer

came, we began to have limited freedom. We
could go see our friends, but you did not feel like
you could be the same since there was a fear of
COVID, and until this day there is still that lasting
impact on how we are as it is a year later. After the
summer, it was back to school. But, it still was not
the same. We were going every other day which

was still tough to get all the information for a
week in two to three days. Still struggling with

tackling school, we still had to worry about

29

avoiding the virus because if you got it, you would
be out for two weeks to quarantine, and as we got
back to school every day that became
detrimental. You would be at home trying to
teach yourself the skills for that class, putting
more pressure on the student. Some students
wanted to give up on trying at school due to all
the struggle surrounding the virus and schools
operating. This would even affect some students
from moving to the next grade. To conclude,
students have had to experience various
hardships due to the COVID virus. Some suffered
from depression, some from school grades
dropping, and some had other reasons. But, the
main point is that this virus had a lasting impact
on the students and how they went about their
lives during the beginning of the virus and even
now as we still fight it today. Some students still
might need help as they still may suffer from

30

depression that has stayed with them from
the beginning of this horrible virus. The good part
to look forward to, is that students are having a
better time as their lives have started to return to
normal.

31

How COVID-19 Affected Swimmers
By: Tyler Collins

When COVID-19 hit and quarantine began, it
was a terrible time for everyone, especially
swimmers. Pools shut down and there was
nowhere to train. Swimming is not like any other
sport, because if you miss a week of practice, you
don’t have the same feel for the water. Taking time
off of training is detrimental to a swimmer’s career

as an athlete, and taking time off is what
quarantine was all about. We had to wait 6 months
to actually swim. We did morning Zooms with the

team and tied a bungee cord to the side of our
pools in our backyards to “swim.”

Unfortunately, those who didn’t have a pool
couldn’t participate and lost all feeling for the
water. When you don’t swim for 6 months, you
forget how to swim completely. Lots of people left
the team because of this situation. It is an awful
feeling after all the years you train and lose all the
progress you gained. 3 months after the Zoom
calls, we finally got back into the pool and started
to swim again. However, there were still obstacles

such as wearing a mask, staying 6 feet

32

apart, and the fear of getting COVID-19. We
couldn't swim with everyone that we used to swim

with because of the COVID-19 regulations. We
had to split my swim group up into 3 different
sections. We had 2 people in each lane, one on
each side of the pool, and we couldn’t really
communicate with each other because the person is
too far away, or if you talk to the swimmer next to
you, you get yelled at. 3 months after “seeing”
everyone again, we were able to host swim meets,
but these meets were different from the ones we
used to have. They were not big and no spectators
were allowed to come inside to cheer you on. The
echo of the cheering is what motivates swimmers
to push to do better and finish their races. It was
depressing that there was no outside motivation
from the stands. At meets they were very strict. For
example, some people got kicked out of the high
school state championship meet for not wearing a
mask, even though they were soaking wet and just
got out of the pool. Eventually, the COVID-19
regulations got better, and we were able to go
mask-free at practice and started seeing everyone
again like old times. We were finally able to feel a

sense of normalcy again.

33

I hope that we are able to experience the true
excitement of a swim meet again. As this season
starts, I am looking forward to achieving my best
times in the pool and am hopeful for what this year

will bring.

34

Dear You

By Ashley Young

Dear You,
You are enough
That heartbreak you endured, didn’t break you
That test you failed didn’t define your intelligence
That hill you thought you’d never climb, you’re now on

top of
You’re not broken, you don’t need to be fixed
Those losses you underwent only made room for the

blessings truly meant for you
It’s okay to grieve what is no longer present
Make it your mission to transcend beyond your limits
Believe in yourself because that’s the only thing that

counts
If you’re reading this, know that I was compelled to tell

you that I believe in you
So do me a favor and believe in you too.

35

How the Idea of Identity Shaped My
Life by Roman Wood

I think that “Identity” is an interesting word. I
mean, it’s a measure of your personality, your
history, and your reputation. So, in that case, it’s
what makes you, you. But, because it’s who we
are, it also can affect how we interact with the
world and how we might be perceived, by both
others and ourselves. I’m certain that most of us
have wrestled with our identity at one point or
another. I know I have. I might not be a
psychology student, but I have observed the
effects of identity on both myself and others.
Throughout my time at school, I’ve recognized
how both my identity and personality have shifted.
I remember being relatively social and bubbly
until for some odd reason, I retracted far into my
shell. For as long as that lasted, I felt like an
imposter with my peers saying that I was smart, all
because it seemed to them that I focused on class
instead of talking to other people. Certainly, I was

36

in the tougher and more difficult classes, but I
was not a highly performing student, though that
was likely due to my preference to doodle instead
of study. I have seen friends in similar positions,
believing themselves to not be smart despite being
in programs such as the International
Baccalaureate program or Advanced Placement
courses. To that end, we started adopting these
personas that would get us through our classes as
juxtaposed with who we felt that we were. This
dissonance led a lot of us to have more fun with
different forms of escapism such as video games,
books, and social media. That said, despite this
feeling of being an imposter in day-to-day life, I
do find it interesting how that has held up against
time spent online. With a mask, we’ve become
bolder in a way. On the internet, I’ve noticed that
I’m considerably more comfortable confronting
people, as are they. Certainly, there is little fear of
retribution for both sides, but I do think that
usernames are interesting as they provide yet
another form of escapism. The lack of reputation
starting out is enticing. You’re free to craft your
own little character for your username.

37

Unlike how with narrative-based media, you
live vicariously through another fictional character,

in this instance you can embody a character of
your creation. It is similar to character creation in

various tabletop role-playing games such as
Dungeons & Dragons or Pathfinder. These all
have in common the idea of creating a character to
embody, which some people do online, either for
the sake of having fun or to help improve their
confidence. Earlier, the idea of a lack of reputation
regarding an identity was brought up, specifically
in the context of usernames and online handles. I
have also noted this change in person, changing
how I interacted with people between the transition
of middle school to high school, and now high
school to college. Nobody knows who I am, which
is a liberating experience. Nothing is expected of
me, so I’m free to work at my own pace and level
of difficulty. All I have to contend now with is how
I view my own identity and use that to push myself

forward.

38

The Impact

by Sasha Sullivan

I was only seventeen when I’d seen

The impact a pandemic can have on a teen

We will only be out of school for two weeks

But we never got to go back to our seats

I had all this extra time, and I didn’t know what to do

So, I decided to clean up poo

You may be wondering why I chose to do such a
thing

But, the nursing home’s calling and I was desperate
for some cha-ching

I got to learn their everyday routines

Before I became a working machine

My coworkers kept quitting because this virus was
too new

But at the end of the day there was only one thing I

could do

39

As the number of cases were on the rise
I knew it was time to say my goodbyes
Covid started out with only a few and quickly grew
It didn’t stop til’ all the faces were new
It’s been almost two years since the virus tore

through
And this experience made me realize, this is the

career I want to pursue

40

The Ever Expanding Universe

By Samantha Zundel

Throughout the history of the world, ancient
civilizations have had a good understanding of the
night sky. The ancient astronomers (those who
studied the night sky) and astrologers (those who
looked for glimpses into the future in the night
sky) would chart the stars, organizing them into
constellations, such as Orion, the hunter.

Humanity figured out that the earth was round
pretty early on. Aristophanes measured the
circumference of the globe, by counting how
many steps it took to travel from Aswan, Egypt, to
Alexandria, Egypt. He found an angle knowing
that the sun was directly overhead in Aswan on
the summer solstice at high noon, that a stick in
the ground in Alexandria’s shadow at the same
time showed the sun was 7.2 degrees off from

41

overhead. His math showed that the world was
far larger than people had thought, in the range of
24000-29000 feet in circumference. Ptolemy III of
Egypt, was an astronomer in his own right. He
spent his entire life creating an accurate model of
the solar system, given that it was a geocentric
universe, and that the planets experience
retrograde motion. The model that he created
shows that planets experience retrograde motion
because while they orbit the earth, Mars, Jupiter
and Saturn are also in epicycle, meaning that they
appear to orbit something that is orbiting the
earth. He died a proud man that had explained
the sky to the best of his ability with the
knowledge he had. During the age of
enlightenment, Copernicus, a Cardinal for the
Catholic church was the first to introduce the
heliocentric model. He ordered that it be
published upon his death, because the Catholic

42

church executed everyone that differed in
thought from them. Galileo was the first to point
a telescope at the night sky and was in and out of
house arrest for the rest of his life. He was
imprisoned for saying the moon had craters, the
sun was imperfect, Jupiter had moons, and
publishing books on that heliocentric solar
system. There are two reasons for the size, color,
and brightness of the stars we see. Size and
distance have a lot to do with color, apparent size,
and brightness. Stars that are farther away seem
darker, and smaller. Closer ones are larger and
brighter. Two different stars of different sizes at
the same location; the one that is larger will shine
brighter, and larger in the earth’s sky. Some stars
also appear to have color. All stars shine different
colors, but most appear white because they are
too “small” to an earth-bound observer to be able
to see the color. In addition, the stars in a
constellation might appear to be close together,
but in reality, some can be hundreds of light years
past the others, because humans only have

43

depth perception for up to a mile. The universe is
enormous, and our understanding is so limited.
We have named the stars and the planets, the
nebulae, and the galaxies, but there is so much
more we do not understand. We know that the
universe is vast, yet we do not know how vast it is.
The universe is expanding, and we still do not
have tools that will allow us to measure the
approximate size. An ever-expanding universe
with millions of stars and tens of millions of
planets is enough to make a being as small as
humanity feel insignificant. To not be at the
center of the universe just makes us feel smaller.
Our place in the universe changes on a day-to-day
basis, as we learn more about the stars and
planets around us.

44

Quarter 1 President’s
& Dean’s List

45

Dean’s List:

ABRAMS, FAZON
AGUILAR, ALEX
ANDERSON, NADIA
ASCHERMANN, SHARON
BAKER, ERIK
BEASLEY, ALLIE
BELL, GARY
BERRY ZIETAH
BLAIR, DESTINY
BLOUNT, PHYLICIA
BROWN, RICHARD
BYNE AMELIA
CAO, LEMANH KHANG
CARRASCO, MARY
CARROLL, ALEXA
CARTWRIGHT, TYLER
CHAMBERS, APRIL
CHISHOLM, RUEBEN

46

CLIETT, HAILIE
CLIMONS, GABREIL
COGGINS, HAYLEIGH
COLLINGTON, AKQUA
COLSH, BAILEY GRACE
COOPER, OTHELLO
CORLEY, EMMA
CORREA, AMANDA
CROSE, AUBREYANNA
DAVIS, MARK
DAVIS, TAYLOR
DEQUZMAN, CAMILLE
DETCHEMENDY, EDWARD
DUNBAR, TIFFANY
DUNHAM, LAUREN
ELLINGTON, KWANJALIN
FORAKER, HANNAH
FRANK, KARA
GAMBLE, RODERICA
GARRISON, MARY

47

GHEESLING, IVEY
GIANGRANDE, JAKE
GOULDER, ASHLYN
GRUBBS, ASIA
HERRERA, REBECA S.
HERRERA, REBECA N.
HILDERBRANDT, VICTORIA
HOBBS, MADISON
HOCKENBERRY, MADISON
HOHNEKE, GABRIEL
HUGGINS, BRYAN
HYATT, PATRICK
JENKINS, KATELYN
JENKINS, TEONDRA
JONES, BROOKLYN
JONES, GABRIEL
KENNEDY, DALLAS
KEY, SAVANNAH
KOONTZ-LOPEZ, TOMAS
KRIDNER, KYLE

48

LA PAN, AMBER

President’s List:

BARNES, TRAVIS
BROADWAY, TYLER
BROWN, TOSHA
BUCHANAN, EMILY
CLARKE, PIERREISNA
CORDOVA, NATALIE
CROFT, MCKENNA
DIXON, COLEETA
ESQUILIN, ESMERALDA
ESTRADA, PAOLA
FOLDEN, LAINEY
FREEMAN, BROOKE
GADSON, JEREMIAH
GERMAIN, JOSEPH
GLOVER, HEATHER
GRINER, TAYLOR

49

HALLIDAY, NICHOLAS
HAMLIN, HANNAH
HARPER, ASHLEY
HAWKINS-GYAKARI, ROSELYN
HILL, GRACE
HOWE, EMERY
LACHMAN, LAUREN
LANGFORD, JOHATHAN
LAWRENCE, NECO
MARTIN, ERYN
MAYS, SARAH
MCFEELY, EMILY
MIETTUNEN, EMILEE
MURRAY, DAVIS
NIKOLAEVA, ALINA
OLIVE, CORDELIA
PATTERSON, JESSICA
PELLOT-VELEZ, NAARA
ROGERS, CHIQUITA
SAUNDERS, JESSICA

50


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