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Published by Vero Beach 32963 Media, 2017-10-05 16:34:59

10/05/2017 ISSUE 40

VB32963_ISSUE40_100517_OPT

Coppola fishing pier will be
one of a ‘kind.’ P12
Bike lanes for
17th Street. P8
Vero church sued for

failure to repay loan. P4

For breaking news visit

MY VERO Man committed
for try to kidnap
BY RAY MCNULTY boy from school

Six months later, no one yet
arrested in Grove shooting

A man was shot multiple The waterfront behind Vero power plant at dawn. After Vero Electric is sold, will this someday be part of a new park? PHOTO BY GORDON RADFORD BY BETH WALTON
times in front of a crowd of Staff Writer
witnesses on the main drag in Vero to get electric sale contract next week
downtown Vero Beach and, six A stranger accused of try-
months later, no one has been BY LISA ZAHNER city hall by next Wednesday for last week gave the Indian ing to kidnap a 14-year-old
arrested. Staff Writer City Council members to con- River Shores Town Council an student from the campus of
sider at their Oct. 17 meeting. update on how the full sale Gifford Middle School last
How can that happen? Florida Power & Light and of Vero Electric’s assets and August was released from jail
It's bad enough that such a Vero’s attorney plan to have a FPL’s Regional Director of Sept. 26 but committed to a
violent crime would occur in draft of a formal contract for External Affairs Amy Brunjes CONTINUED ON PAGE 7 mental health facility.
so public a setting in the heart FPL to purchase Vero Electric at
of our small-town community. Records from the Aug. 25,
But for so much time to pass 2016, incident allege Nikro-
without the shooter being ap- muh Koondo was caught try-
prehended? ing to snatch a young boy
Shouldn’t someone have from the school at 45th Street
been locked up a long time and 25th Court where many
ago? island children attend middle
How is it possible that with school. A teacher and school
so many eyes observing the resource officer managed to
incident, when Andy Capak, thwart the potential kidnap-
co-owner of The Grove Bar, was ping.
gunned down shortly before 2
a.m. on March 31, no arrest has The boy and his friends told
been made? police they were walking to-
Well, police continue to ward the Indian River County
counsel patience. GoLine bus when a strange
“We believe we know who man wearing no shoes started
did it, and that was from Day following them and smiling
in their direction. The child
CONTINUED ON PAGE 2
CONTINUED ON PAGE 6
Hear, hear! Verizon signs on to Shores
cell tower; construction to start soon Vero woman seeks
to help Puerto Rico

BY LISA ZAHNER phone tower, and the project Council approves last big Shores subdivision. Page 9. PHOTO BY BRUCE CADY BY RAY MCNULTY
Staff Writer is now expected to get under- Staff Writer
way this month.
Indian River Shores resi- Let there be no doubt: Vero
dents eagerly awaiting better "You should see construc- Beach is Nicole Perez's home.
cell phone service have cause tion begin within the next
for hope: Verizon Wireless is two weeks," Town Manager But her house – the one she
now under contract to be on Robbie Stabe told the council grew up in – is in Puerto Rico,
the town's long-planned cell last Thursday. which she still affectionately

CONTINUED ON PAGE 3 CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

October 5, 2017 Volume 10, Issue 40 Newsstand Price $1.00 IRMC staffers
step up during
News 1-10 Faith 53 Pets 52 TO ADVERTISE CALL storm crisis. P24
Arts 19-22 Games 39-41 Real Estate 55-64 772-559-4187
Books 38 Health 23-27 St. Ed’s 28
Dining 46 Insight 29-42 Style 43-45 FOR CIRCULATION
Editorial 36 People 11-18 CALL 772-226-7925

© 2017 Vero Beach 32963 Media LLC. All rights reserved.

2 Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

NEWS

My Vero our checklist as recently as a week tectives want to solve this case. operator and his officers, saying, "We
ago," he continued. They don't want anyone to think it were on the scene in seconds."
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
"As long as we're following up, we're is possible they can shoot someone That aside, the more troubling
1 for the most part," Vero Beach Police not done. in front of multiple witnesses in Vero problem for detectives are the state-
Chief David Currey said last week. "We Beach and get away with it. They know ments taken from witnesses who, ap-
have the same person in mind now “You can't let external things drive the public is watching and that this sto- parently, offered differing accounts
that we had six months ago." your case. We've still got a couple of ry isn't going away. and descriptions of the shooter.
things we're working on, and we're
"We want to solve this case, but our moving toward an end. True, there are some nagging ques- Those conflicting statements, as
investigation is driven by leads to fol- tions about confused interactions much as anything, have prevented
low up, not some arbitrary schedule," "That doesn't mean we'll make an that night between 911 callers, the 911 police from making an arrest. And
Currey said. "I wish we had made an arrest next week," he added, "but we operator and police officers on the for good reason: Detectives, work-
arrest that night, or the next day, or a think we've done a thorough job." scene – communications lapses that ing closely with Assistant State Attor-
month later. But you just can't put a might've allowed the shooter to make ney Bill Long, want to make sure they
time on it. For the record: I'm not blaming the a clean getaway. have a can't-lose case before charging
police, who, in large part, are merely someone with the crime.
"We followed up with someone on playing the bad hand that they were Currey, though, denied the botched
dealt. communications between the 911 That makes sense – the last thing
anyone should want is for police to ar-
I have no doubt Currey and his de- rest the shooter, only for some defense
attorney to use conflicting testimony
from witnesses to convince a jury to
bring back a not-guilty verdict.

And, according to Currey, there are
some significant discrepancies.

"You have to look at all your state-
ments," Currey said. "We have mul-
tiple witnesses, so we have multiple
statements. You're hoping things
match up, and when they don't, it
makes it difficult."

Apparently, witnesses provided dif-
ferent descriptions of the shooter –
which isn't surprising, given the late
hour and the fact that the shooting
occurred outside a bar.

As someone who is married to an
ex-prosecutor and former assistant
public defender, I can't tell you how
many stories I've heard about the un-
reliability of eyewitness testimony.

I can tell you, however, that these
discrepancies in the witness state-
ments are a problem, especially since
there's a real chance some of those
giving their versions of what hap-
pened were (hard as it is to believe)
under the influence of alcohol at the
time.

"That's why we continue to work on
things," Currey said, adding that he's
reluctant to share too much informa-
tion about the case because police
believe the suspect still resides in the
area and "the bad guys could be lis-
tening, too."

Currey did say police do not have
any smartphone video of the shooting
– something that also would've been
helpful.

As for Capak, 31 at the time, who
was shot four times but survived, Cur-
rey said the 2003 St. Edward's School
graduate has cooperated with the in-
vestigation.

Asked when the victim was able to
identify the shooter, the chief declined
to answer.

However, in an interview in June,
Capak's sister, Janet, said her brother
didn't remember much about the in-
cident and she wasn't sure how much
help he was able to offer police.

"He remembers the gun going off,"

Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™ Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 3

NEWS

she told me then. "He said it felt like town invested in signal boosters for poured atop a deep foundation. The ficial Jose Guanch has said ordinance
he was shot with a blank, because he its public safety vehicles to enable main pole will go up first and then changes and variances previously
was still standing. He thinks that's them to communicate despite the the fiberglass branches will be added. granted would cover the tower with-
why the guy shot three more times – spotty, weak cell signal throughout out additional approvals.
because he didn't go down after the the Shores. Town officials have said the pole
first one." will take 60 to 90 days to construct The closest cell towers to the
The 115-foot “stealth tower,” which once all permits are in place. The Shores are a flagpole stealth tower
She said her brother's memory of will be camouflaged with branches Town Council said it would be avail- at Sea Oaks to the north and a tower
the shooter wasn't clear, "even though to look like a massive pine tree, will able to convene for any emergency atop the Village Spires condomini-
he was looking straight at the guy." be built on the Town Public Safety approvals needed to expedite the ums on Ocean Drive in Vero Beach to
Complex property on a concrete slab, process, but Stabe and Building Of- the south. 
She said her brother recalled see-
ing the shooter and his companions
in the bar and actually remembered
what they ordered, but once he began
to try to break up the fight, his mind
became fuzzy.

Capak, who refused to be inter-
viewed in June, could not be reached
for comment last week.

Currey, meanwhile, said he and his
detectives will meet with Long this
week to assess the status of the case.

"I do think we're coming close, fi-
nally, but there are still one or two loose
ends that still need to be tied up," Cur-
rey said.

"We're being methodical, thorough
and patient because we want to get this
right. That's what everyone should ex-
pect from us."

That's how something like this can
happen – even in Vero Beach. 

Shores cell tower Exclusively John’s Island
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
Located on a coveted, tree-lined street where privacy is paramount
Stabe said the town’s contractor, sits this beautiful 3BR+Study lakefront home. Enjoy 234’ of expansive,
Datapath Tower, would be working panoramic lake views throughout this 5,238± GSF residence with
to pull permits on Friday. Adding to desirable southern exposure. Sited on a cul-de-sac on .85± acres, features
the optimism, Stabe said that a lease include a voluminous living room with fireplace, island kitchen adjoining
agreement with a second major car- the family room with wet bar, dining area, study, bonus studio, private
rier, which he would not name, is in master suite, pool, outdoor living areas, new roof and a 2-car garage.
the works. 60 Dove Plum Road : $2,800,000

Last month, town officials voiced three championship golf courses : 17 har-tru courts : beach club : squash
major concerns over changing eco- health & fitness center : pickleball : croquet : vertical equity membership
nomic factors making it more chal-
lenging to negotiate viable leases 772.231.0900 : Vero Beach, FL : JohnsIslandRealEstate.com
with cell phone carriers. With the
smartphone market virtually satu-
rated, carriers big and small have
engaged in a global price war to pil-
fer customers – a practice that has
shriveled the dollars available to ink
pricey long-term leases for space on
cell towers.

Town Council members expressed
their wish that a deal with AT&T could
be nailed down soon, as the bulk of
local residents subscribe to either Ve-
rizon or AT&T cellular service. Stabe
said he would not be surprised if Ver-
izon and AT&T worked out some sort
of cooperative agreement to share
space and transmission capabilities
on the tower, as Datapath executives
have told him this is the trend.

The Shores Public Safety phones
and on-board computers operate off
of Verizon's signal. Years ago, when
the decade-long effort to get a tow-
er approved was bogged down, the

4 Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

NEWS

Vero church sued for failure to repay loan given by member

BY BETH WALTON when the church shut down – revenue especially somebody who just lost her and are only as secure as the church is,”
Staff Writer from a 2016 sale of the church building husband,” he later added. Lewis writes. “But think about it. How
– Mefford writes in a June 19 letter to secure is any investment these days?
It was November 2009, in the dark- the court, which attempted to explain A default judgment would give Bier- How many of us have put our faith in
est days of the Great Recession, when the circumstances of the loan and dis- mann the legal right to collect the the stock market or the real estate mar-
Lori Biermann and her late husband claim responsibility for repayment. funds she is due, the attorney said – if ket, only to see the value of our invest-
responded to their church’s call for she can find someone to collect from. ments turn into pennies on the dollar?
help. The couple loaned $40,000 to But a judge Thursday said Bier- In the meantime, our church has had
Vero Vineyard Christian Church to mann’s case can still go forward. Judge The judge’s order will permit her an exemplary record . . .”
help it through a rough patch, accept- Paul Kanarek said that the hand-writ- to go after the principals of the failed
ing the treasurer’s offer of a 120-month ten explanation filed by Valentino was organization, said Villafranco. “If the But Mefford says by the time he joined
repayment plan at 9 percent interest. a legally insufficient response. church distributed money improperly, the congregation in 2014, the finan-
or the personnel at the church did, cial situation was starkly different. Vero
The idea was that loans from the Corporations can only be represent- then they can be held liable,” he said. Vineyard had moved its congregation to
Biermanns and other congregants ed by a lawyer, he said, giving the now “But, it’s difficult.” 27th Avenue and the church’s debt was
would help the church bridge a cash- defunct church 20 days to retain coun- more massive than anticipated.
flow crisis, expand and increase its in- sel and file a response to Biermann’s In the 2009 solicitation, the then-
come enough to repay the money. suit. If it doesn’t, Kanarek warned, church treasurer explains funds were In his notice to the court, the minister
the next step will be to enter a default needed because a bank had called in says pastor Valentino prioritized his sal-
It didn’t work out that way. judgement on Biermann’s behalf. Vero Vineyard’s loan and $136,000 was ary over the church’s debts.
Today, Biermann finds herself needed to avoid foreclosure.
nearly $30,000 in the hole and facing “They took advantage of these peo- “Mr. Valentino was only present at
mounting legal fees as she sues to get ple,” said Biermann’s lawyer, Leonard “We did a significant amount of re- services on occasion,” Mefford recalls in
her money back. The church on 20th Villafranco outside of the courtroom. modeling here,” David Lewis wrote. the letter. He “would come in late, and
Street, where she raised so many of her “They preyed on their generosity and “Altogether, we invested over $450,000 after the offering was taken up would
prayers, has dissolved, and Tony Val- their love of God and [Biermann and her in the sanctuary, café, offices, Kids leave with the money as he and his wife
entino, pastor at the time of the loan, late husband] . . . loaned them a large Church, nursery and our music equip- were in possession of the church check-
resigned after “multiple moral failures” sum of money so that they could build ment and furnishings. Unfortunately, book and took care of the finances.”
were divulged, according to William their building and improve the church we had only raised around $300,000.”
Mefford, who took Valentino’s place. and then they didn’t pay them back.” Valentino could not be reached for
Valentino took with him $20,000 An information sheet attached to the comment, but Mefford notes he re-
“I think it’s terrible that a church letter addresses the question of whether signed in 2015.
would take advantage of parishioners, or not a parishioner’s loan to the church
is safe. “Church notes are not secured, The next year, the board put the

Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™ Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 5

NEWS

church’s building on the market. church, Overflow Church of Vero Beach. Mefford for her loss. In February 2017, In January, he told the widow that
Fearing legal action by the former This left just $1,000 for the widow. she released the pastor and his new the Overflow church was no longer
church from the outstanding debt. able to donate money to pay off Vero
pastor, the board decided to pay Val- “All we were required to do was liq- Vineyard’s debts.
entino first, getting him to agree to a uidate the assets and give everybody Mefford was not with Vero Vineyard
$20,000 settlement. It then paid its util- what was left and that’s what we did,” at the time of the loan but many of the The whole situation is a mess, Mef-
ity bill and a security deposit and the said Mefford, reached by phone. church’s parishioners followed him to ford said with a deep sigh. “There’s
first-month’s rent for Mefford’s new the Overflow Church. nothing that can be done.” 
Biermann, it seems, doesn’t blame

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6 Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

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School kidnap attempt Koondo ignored the command and a in the right car, said Sgt. Ross Partee, to mentor the kids, build relationships,
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 foot chase ensued. who supervises Indian River County try to be positive role models for them.
Sheriff’s Office School Resource Officer Everybody comes from a different
felt uncomfortable so he moved to the The patrol officer was able to ap- Program. If they see something abnor- background and not all the kids have
back of the crowd to distance himself prehend Koondo, who had no identi- mal, they can radio the school resource positive role models in their lives.”
from the stranger. He told his friends fication on him and gave officers fake officer for help.
to let the man pass, according to arrest names. A rapid ID fingerprint test al- School resource officers do things
affidavits filed with the court. lowed them to identify him. Partee was not at Gifford Middle like break up fights and respond when
School at the time of the alleged at- drugs or weapons are found campus,
“The male then begins to run af- The man, who had been running tempted kidnapping, but heard about he said. If a student commits a misde-
ter the juvenile and grab for him,” barefoot on hot pavement, asked for it from his colleagues. This case is a meanor offense, the responding officer
writes John Clark with the Indian River shoes before telling deputies that prime example of why it’s good to have is encouraged to take advantage of a cir-
County Sheriff’s Department. Koondo “someone took his kid and he was try- an officer on campus ready to react cuit court civil citation program, which
was saying he was there to get his kid ing to get his kid back,” according to immediately, he said. allows the child probation and avoids
and pointing at the boy. But, the child court records. any permanent blemish on their record.
had never seen the man before, Clark If administrators had to call 911,
wrote in a Aug. 25, 2016, affidavit. Officers allege he then said that Be- they would have to wait for law en- “These kids are young and they
yoncé was the mother of his child and forcement to arrive, Partee said. “A don’t always make good decisions,” he
“The child ran away and his friends she works at the jail. deputy is not always going to be just said. “We were all young once. We all
called a teacher who told the suspect around the corner. Sometimes, they made stupid decisions. We don’t want
to leave.” A detective then pointed out that could be a mile or two away.” to mess up the rest of their lives.”
Koondo, thought to be 22 at the time,
As the children ran toward a school was unlikely to have a 14-year-old There are 11 school resource officers Indian River County Judge Cyn-
resource officer who had responded to child. Koondo then responded he be- in Indian River County, Partee said. thia Cox found Koondo incompetent
the scene, the man then fled toward came a father when he was in fifth Every middle and high school has a to stand trial last month after he was
45th Street, the court documents note. grade, court documents state. regular law enforcement presence and evaluated by a court-appointed psy-
The school’s deputy then chased the officers start engaging with elemen- chologist.
suspect off school grounds. The child’s mother later reviewed tary kids in the fifth grade for DARE,
video of the incident and confirmed Drug Abuse Resistance Education. Koondo refuses to speak to jail staff,
Another deputy driving near the the man was a stranger to the family. mental-health professionals or his at-
area heard the school resource of- The school resource officers receive torney, she writes in the Sept. 15 order.
ficer’s call for help over the radio. He Indian River County School District training from the Florida Attorney He does not appear to understand the
saw a man wearing no shoes near the declined to comment on this story. It is General’s Office and work in several adversary nature of the legal process
3000 block of 45th Street and told him unknown how the suspect was able to ways to keep schools safe, Partee said. or to be capable of working coopera-
to stop running and get on the ground. get entry to the school grounds. “Our backbone is campus security, but tively with his attorney.
beyond that our goal is mentorship –
When school gets out and parents ar- “He exhibits strange behavior and
rive to pick up their children, teachers
work hard to make sure everyone gets

Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™ Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 7

NEWS

makes odd sounds,” she writes. “The co-op – the first apparently has been power supply contracts requiring Vero just waiting on the final documents.
defendant is unlikely to manifest ap- overcome and the campaign to clear to take electricity from three separate The FMPA hopes to conclude these
propriate courtroom behavior given the other is very much in the works. power plants, FMPA executives are in
his current mental state and unpre- the process of taking Vero’s exit pro- presentations and secure supportive
dictable behavior.” Brunjes said FPL came in with some posal on the road to the city councils votes of all the various boards by the
inducements that were attractive and utility authority boards of the mu- end of 2017 or early 2018, putting Vero
Koondo was ordered to the custody enough to OUC to facilitate a deal in nicipal utilities that need to approve and FPL on track for a closing date
of the Florida Department of Children which OUC will accept the lower $20 letting Vero out of its membership. somewhere between October and De-
and Families. There, he will be placed million penalty from Vero, and she cember 2018.
in a secure mental-health treatment said FPL has this side agreement with Throughout August and September,
program until further review.  OUC in writing. FMPA also called meetings with the The next FMPA board meeting
various bond-rating agencies to en- where the Vero sale will be discussed
Vero Electric sale City Manager Jim O’Connor con- sure that Vero’s exit and the assump- will be Oct. 19 at the co-op’s Orlando
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 firmed that he’s operating under that tion of Vero’s share of the risk and debt headquarters.
same information. “We have not re- – in exchange for the consideration
34,000 customers is progressing. ceived anything other than an email say- of $108 million paid to FMPA – would Mayor Laura Moss and City Man-
Outside the meeting, Brunjes said ing that OUC was very close to complet- pass muster with all the relevant ager O’Connor have been attending
ing the agreement with FPL, so we are bondholders and analysts, so the FM- these meetings on behalf of Vero and
there would be “no surprises” in the moving forward on the basis of the $20 PA’s credit rating would not fall due to both have reported that FMPA Presi-
document, that it would adhere to million buyout. I believe FPL would ad- having one less member. dent Jacob Williams and his staff have
the letter of intent already vetted by vise us if there was a concern,” O’Connor been very cooperative.
the council and the city’s Finance and said, referring to an Aug. 30 email from When Vero joined the FMPA, the city
Utilities commissions, with the ad- OUC Vice President Jan Aspuru. pledged the utility revenues from its Williams and his cohorts have made
dition of what she characterized as customers, in perpetuity, to back the it very clear that their continued dili-
“about 100 pages of legal detail.” In that email, Aspuru told O’Connor, bond debt accumulated by the FMPA gence to facilitate Vero’s exit is contin-
“I wanted to let you know that OUC has and its various electric generation proj- gent upon their time not being con-
Of the two big hurdles that stood in now reached agreement with FPL on ects and power entitlement contracts. sumed fighting what the FMPA saw as
the way of a closing – a dispute over all terms of the proposed energy sale regulatory assaults the past few years in
whether Vero owed Orlando Utilities agreement, which must now be submit- So far, FMPA officials have made Florida’s legislature, at the Florida Pub-
Commission $20 million or $50 mil- ted for approval by OUC’s Board once presentations to seven of the other 19 lic Service Commission or the Office of
lion in contract cancellation penal- the Termination and Settlement Agree- cities about the deal. the Auditor General.
ties, and Vero’s successful exit from ment with the City is agreed upon.”
the Florida Municipal Power Agency One city council, the elected lead- Pro-sale activists and lobbyists
As for Vero disentangling itself from ers of the municipality of Starke, has hired by Indian River County have
its 30-plus year relationship with the already approved Vero’s exit and the pushed mightily in the past for regula-
FMPA power co-op and its long-term FMPA notes in a schedule that they are tion of and fiscal accountability from
the FMPA and its leaders. 

8 Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

NEWS

State adding 7-foot-wide
bike lanes on 17th Street

BY RUSTY CARTER accommodate bike lanes. The widen-
Staff Writer ing required installation of new drain-
age structures, a new mast arm, and
If you have been wondering what is additional asphalt and concrete.”
going on along 17th Street between the
Alma Lee Loy Bridge and U.S. 1, where The impetus for the larger project
heavy concrete barriers have been can be traced back to the county’s Met-
lined up reducing the number of traffic ropolitan Planning Organization.
lanes, here is the answer: The Florida
Department of Transportation is wid- Adding bike lanes to local roads is a
ening the roadway to add bike lanes. priority for Phillip Matson, director of
the Metropolitan Planning Organiza-
The work, which will result in 7-foot- tion. He noted that as the county re-
wide bike lanes in each direction along paves roads, bike lanes will be added
that three-quarter-of-a-mile stretch, wherever feasible.
began in mid-August, and is expected
to be completed in fall 2018. Indian River County currently offers
fewer than 100 miles of bike lanes. The
The budget for the roadwork, ini- longest single stretch is along A1A on
tially bid at $1.6 million, has since the barrier island. 
nearly doubled to $3.06 million

Kathleen Dempsey, speaking for proj-
ect engineers The Corradino Group, ex-
plained the increase.

“Initially this was solely a milling
and resurfacing project,” Dempsey
wrote in an email. “Then the project
scope changed to include widening to

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Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™ Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 9

NEWS

Shores Council approves luxury subdivision called The Strand

BY STEVEN M. THOMAS “The timing is good,” said French. development company headquartered where she plans to build an ultra-
“Inventory of new homes on the island in St. Paul, Minn., for $16.5 million. luxurious modernist condo complex
Staff Writer is very low.” with 18 homes.
But when the real estate market
The Indian River Shores Town Coun- Patten’s property is the last large slowed to a crawl in the mid-2000s, Len- That left the western portion, which
cil last Thursday approved a concep- piece of development land that is fest’s Beachlen Development snapped has 620 linear feet of river frontage
tual plan for what likely will be the last available in Indian River Shores. it up in 2012 for $10.95 million. along the historic Jungle Trail that Pat-
large-scale residential development ten has now laid out as The Strand.
ever built in the well-to-do six-mile The tract – originally part of a 41.5- Three years ago, in October 2014, Dobbins said pricing for the new homes
stretch of the island. acre ocean-to-river parcel – was as- island businesswoman Katherine has not been decided on, but French
sembled from grove land in 2004 as the McConvey bought the oceanfront speculated the townhomes could start
The Patten Company, a national real real estate boom was ramping up and part of the tract, paying $7,250,000 in the $700,000-$800,000 range. 
estate development firm with offices in sold to McGough, a construction and for acreage on the east side of A1A
Naples and Boca Raton, plans 47 sub-
stantial single-family homes and 21
townhomes on a parcel that extends
from A1A to the Indian River Lagoon
just north of Palm Island Plantation.

“The community will have a coastal
contemporary style that should blend
with our existing neighbors,” said Pat-
ten Vice President of Acquisitions Kath-
erine Dobbins, who bird-dogged the
property and managed the purchase.

“We will be selling lots as well as fin-
ished homes and are actively seeking lo-
cal builders to join our preferred builder
program, so that we will be able to offer
several different models to buyers. We
hope to break ground in early 2018.”

Patten closed on the property June
30, paying $5 million for 34 acres of for-
mer grove land. The seller was Charles-
ton Estates Vero LLC, an entity of
Philadelphia billionaire Brook Lenfest,
whose company Beachlen Develop-
ment was active in Vero until recently.

Partners Clark French and Cindy
O’Dare of Premier Estate Properties were
the listing and selling agents on the deal.

When they got the listing, French and
O’Dare used a database company to
identify 4,000 builders and developers
who had pulled permits for residential
projects in Florida with construction
cost of $1 million or more, French said.

One of those companies was Patten,
which has built more than 600 com-
munities in 36 states and Canada, in-
cluding nearly 50 in Florida, according
to Dobbins.

“Vero has always been on our radar
as a strong market in Florida,” Dob-
bins said. Dobbins said the develop-
ment, which will be called The Strand,
represents “a once-in-a-lifetime op-
portunity” for Patten.

“It is extremely rare to find a large
parcel available in a developed and
high-end area like Indian River
Shores,” she wrote in an email to Vero
Beach 32963. “The recreational op-
portunities really make this project
special. There will be private beach
access across the street, boat docks
on the Indian River, biking and jog-
ging on the Jungle Trail as well as all of
the nearby shops and restaurants that
make this area so popular.”

10 Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

NEWS

Vero sends aid to Puerto Rico moved to Vero Beach nine years ago. the island’s infrastructure, she em- San Juan, but now she has organized
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 "It hurts," she added. "It hurts a lot barked on a campaign to collect an effort to get desperately needed
– from local and regional donors – supplies to her native Mayaguez, lo-
refers to as "my island." And it breaks to see people with no power, no gaso- supplies to be shipped to the storm- cated on the west end of the island.
her heart to see so many of the people line, no way to communicate, strug- ravaged island.
there suffering in the aftermath of gling to get food and water. They're "Everything has been going into
Hurricane Maria. saying it could take up to six months At first, Perez contributed what she San Juan, but there was no gas to get
to get electricity back, and it will take gathered to other local efforts to help it to other parts of the island," said
"We love it here, but not a day goes even longer to rebuild. Puerto Ricans desperate for food and Perez, who, along with her husband,
by when I don't think about the is- water, as well as items such as batter- Sergio Zeligman, owns Panda Con-
land and what's happening to all "As a mom, seeing children's hospi- ies, flashlights, first-aid/medical sup- tractors, a roofing and remodeling
those people," said Perez, a Puerto tals being evacuated because there's plies, blankets, toilet paper, diapers, business in Vero Beach. "I grew up
Rican native who attended the Uni- no fuel for the generators . . . that was baby formula, baby wipes, feminine in Mayaguez and we were getting so
versity of Florida and, after getting very difficult." hygiene products, insect repellent, many donations, so I was adamant
married and living in Miami, New toothbrushes, toothpaste, soap and that we get stuff to that side of the is-
York and suburban Kansas City, Seeing those images was so diffi- detergent. land."
cult, in fact, that Perez was moved
to action. The day after Maria blew Her early collections were sent to Relying on Facebook posts to ad-
through Puerto Rico, shredding vertise her efforts and using her fam-
ily's business as a drop-off site, Perez
coordinated with a friend at the His-
panic Chamber of Commerce in West
Palm Beach and learned there was
a collection hub at the Greenacres
Community Center.

So after she packed the donated
supplies in boxes – most of those who
contributed to her campaign are from
Indian River County – she had them
delivered Saturday to Greenacres
with help from Samuel Jan Homes, a
custom home builder based in Vero
Beach.

"They used their trailer and driver,"
Perez said.

The boxes were stacked on pallets,
which were placed in steel contain-
ers and loaded onto an 18 wheeler,
which transported the goods to the
Port of Miami on Monday.

The cargo ship carrying the sup-
plies was expected to arrive in San
Juan by mid-week.

From there, Mayaguez's mayor –
"He's good friends with my father,"
Perez said – will make sure the sup-
plies make the two-hour road trip
from Puerto Rico's capital to his
small city.

Perez said she didn't know how
many people the shipment would
help, but she's grateful that "so
many people understand the need
for this."

While she has family members liv-
ing in Puerto Rico, they were able
to evacuate before the hurricane
devastated the island. But some of
her friends weren't as fortunate –
she said last week that some of her
friends from Puerto Rico still hadn't
heard from their families on the is-
land.

"I left when I went to college at
UF, but I still feel connected," Perez
said. "There's something very special
about that island. Puerto Ricans can
leave Puerto Rico, but you can't get
Puerto Rico out of Puerto Ricans."

That's why, Perez added, her efforts
will continue.

"It's has been pretty much a full-
time job," she said, "but it's worth
it." 

Mary Grace, Nicholas, Elaine
and Melanie Coppola.

COLE COPPOLA FISHING PIER
WILL BE ONE OF A ‘KIND’

12 Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

PEOPLE

Elaine Coppola and Jackie Carlon. Bill Willis and Jason Wesley.

PHOTOS CONTINUED ON PAGE 14

Pasquale and Mary Lou Ciambriello. PHOTOS: DENISE RITCHIE Site of Cole Coppola Memorial Fishing Pier. David Vatland and Tom Tierney.

Cole Coppola fishing pier will be one of a ‘kind’

BY MARY SCHENKEL The pier project was spearheaded by ize friends, family, businesses, etc. any friend would love to have.”
Staff Writer the Coppola family’s close friend, at- “The wording is going to be in or- In between sets of toe-tapping music
torney Barry Segal, who worked with
Riverside Park was a sea of orange the City Council to get it approved by ange, which is Cole’s favorite color,” by the Tom Jackson Band, the Coppola
and pink, from the T-shirts and sneak- the Florida Inland Navigation District. said Dr. Coppola. “The engineers family recognized winners of the Most
ers worn by supporters of the Live Like came up with that themselves, which Creative, Largest Group Activity and
Cole Foundation, to the pool noodles “The pier is going to be 100-foot long, was pretty cool. Everybody is really Most Thoughtful acts of kindness, be-
carefully laid out in the shape of the T-shaped for fishing or for watching into the project which makes it very fore also distributing scholarships to
fishing pier being planned in partner- sunsets, romantic walks, watching exciting for us. It’s going to be awe- schools and organizations.
ship with the City of Vero Beach and the dolphins or manatees,” Dr. Cop- some.”
the Florida Inland Navigational Dis- pola explained. “They’re also going to John Carroll High School was award-
trict in memory of Nicholas “Cole” create an aquatic environment under- He said they have been working on ed $1,500 toward scholastic scholar-
Coppola. neath the pier. So FIND will pay for the initiative since forming the foun- ships and $500 each to four school
half and we will pay for the other half dation two years ago, but approvals sporting groups; St. Helen’s received
The unveiling of the Cole Coppola through the Live Like Cole Foundation took some time. The city will send it $1,500 in scholarships; the Vero Beach
Memorial Fishing Pier last Saturday from proceeds from the golf tourna- out to bid in October with a goal of Karate Association and the Indian Riv-
was the culmination of a week-long ment, sponsorships and donations completion by early next year. er Soccer Association Foundation each
Kindness Week campaign, which chal- that people have made to us.” received $1,000 scholarships; and the
lenged students at the schools he had As supporters gathered under the Gifford Youth Achievement Center was
attended – St. Helen’s School and John Pointing to the colorful noodles, nearby pavilions, Cole’s older sister given a dozen basketballs.
Carroll High School – to complete 22 Elaine Coppola noted that Segal, along Melanie, LLCF CEO, said she wanted
Acts of Kindness in one week. Dr. Nich- with Flynn Fidgeon and Ray Hengerer, people to know what a great person Additionally, in recognition of Oc-
olas and Elaine Coppola explained that had waded out into the lagoon to set up her brother was and how much he tober as Breast Cancer Awareness
22 represented their son’s football jer- the outline, adding, “I don’t know how loved the community. “He was my Month, Victor Basile, owner of Hope
sey number and the week commemo- they did it but it came out really well.” best friend; we were only a year apart. Imaging Center and a Live Like Cole
rated Cole’s Sept. 25 birthday and his My biggest goal in life is to make him board member, is donating 22 mam-
tragic Sept. 27, 2014 death, just two Adding to the fundraising efforts proud and to live like him every day - mographies to women who do not
days after his 16th birthday. are pier treads which people can pur- which means, giving back to those in have insurance.
chase for naming rights that can be need, lending a helping hand, sticking
used to commemorate or memorial- up for everyone, and being a person For more information or to purchase
pier planks visit livelikecole.org. 



14 Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

PEOPLE

PHOTOS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12
Will Cutter, Victoria Sarlo, Vero Beach Mayor Laura Moss and Melanie Coppola.

Coach Derek Gibson, Dr. Nicholas Coppola and IRC Commission Chairman Joe Flescher.

Lance Riddell, David Lloyd, Dr. Nicholas Coppola, Chris Capozza.

Jacob Rodolico with Stacey Rodolico.

Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™ Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 15

PEOPLE

Hunt for Hope targets inflammatory breast cancer

Lesa Heizmann, Margit Hollifield and Robyn Holt. Dr. Holly and Mike Hamilton. PHOTOS: DENISE RITCHIE Melissa Lovely with her daughter Selina Marinko. Christine and Tom Crowley with Chloe.

Front: Jane Olson and Sherrie Beuth. Front: Kathy Garfield, Mike Hamilton and James Hamilton. Melissa Schumacher, Cierra Flores,
Back: Kelly Beuth and Kourtney Beuth. Back: Patrick Hamilton and Devin Garfield. Dylan Gronley and Richard Hoch.

BY STEPHANIE LaBAFF
Staff Writer

Those pink-clad scavengers spotted
in Sebastian last Saturday afternoon
performing random acts of kindness
and even breaking out in song at lo-
cal businesses were hoping to rack up
points as participants in the fifth an-
nual Hunt for Hope Florida, an event
designed to raise awareness and fund
clinical research through the Inflam-
matory Breast Cancer Network Foun-
dation.

Dr. Holly Hamilton, owner of River-
side Family Dental in Sebastian, began
Hunt for Hope Florida in honor of her
friend, Dr. Lori Grennan, who lost her
battle with IBC four years ago. Gren-
nan founded the first Hunt for Hope in
Ohio while battling the disease, to pro-
vide funding to the IBC Network Foun-
dation, founded by IBC survivor Terry
Arnold. Since its inception Hunt for
Hope fundraisers have raised nearly $1
million nationwide, with 100 percent
of the proceeds funding IBC research.

Ironically, IBC was only briefly men-
tioned when Grennan attended medi-
cal school. At the time they were told,

CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15

“It’s so rare you’ll probably never see it,
so we’re really not going to cover it.”

Rare yes, but IBC is a highly aggres-
sive form of breast cancer that typical-
ly affects women under 40.

Because IBC progresses rapidly, it is
often not diagnosed until having al-
ready reached stage III or IV. By then
it has frequently spread to other areas
of the body, significantly reducing sur-
vival rates.

Hamilton said IBC statistics are
skewed, noting “most cases of IBC are
misdiagnosed and the cause of death
listed is usually from a complication
caused by IBC. So we really don’t know
how many women die of IBC each year.
Until recently, IBC didn’t even have its
own histology code.”

The Hunt for Hope participants
were tasked during the three-hour
hunt with visiting local venues to “Find
Clues and Fund a Cure,” completing
tasks and educating the community
through the use of the IBC Network
Foundation phone app.

Among other tasks, scavengers
brought back “H.O.P.E.” spelled out in
Scrabble letters; took pictures at the
Capt. Hiram’s Sandbar; performed
random acts of kindness; got Burger
King crowns after singing “I am a Sur-
vivor” to cashiers; took photos with
random bystanders; balanced Life
Savers on their tongues while singing
the ABC’s; sang the National Anthem;
crossed the playground monkey bars;
did the conga at Earl’s; hugged a man-
nequin; and took photos of their teams
in a porta-potty.

Spotlighting pink as the color of
the day in honor of October as Breast
Cancer Awareness month, pink jack-
ets, scarves, Halloween masks, mis-
matched socks, lipstick, eyepatches
and accessorized hair added points to
each team’s tally.

“This was a lot of fun. My wife’s
grandma died of cancer, so this was
important to us. It was good to get out
in the community and talk to every-
body. You wouldn’t believe the looks
people gave us,” said a tutu-clad, pink-
haired Kourtney Beuth.

Top honors went to the Indian River
Rugby Club, which earned more than
1,200 points; the most ever awarded,
according to Hamilton.

For more information visit theibcnet-
work.org. 

Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™ Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 17

PEOPLE

Shoe Guys have sole lotta love for Humane Society

Laura and Bobby Guttridge with Janet Winikoff. PHOTOS CONTINUED ON PAGE 18 Tucker the Shoe Guy. Shoe Guys will also compete this
year with a special four-legged Shoe
BY STEPHANIE LaBAFF PHOTOS: DENISE RITCHIE title by raking in roughly $5,000 Guy, Tucker. The gorgeous mixed-
Staff Writer through ticket sales, sponsorships breed canine was recently adopted
mals at the Humane Society and out and donations, shared, “It was a lot of from the Humane Society but has
Sixteen local gentlemen and one in the community – funding adop- fun and it supports the Humane So- graciously agreed to throw his paws
handsome canine are putting their tion services, cruelty prevention, di- ciety, which is our ‘pet’ cause. You’ve onto the runway in exchange for
best feet (and paws) forward to help saster relief and helping the animals got a great cause and you’ve got a belly rubs and dog biscuits. He un-
the Humane Society of Vero Beach who are in need, especially in un- great event. It’s fun for the guys and abashedly worked the crowd during
and Indian River County care for, derserved communities,” said Janet the women have a blast being served the Shoe Guy Reveal, garnering votes
and hopefully adopt out, homeless Winikoff, director of education. by men at their beck and call; all in with the mere wag of his tail.
animals. The Shoe Guys gathered at the name of giving to charity.”
Walking Tree Brewery last Monday “This is really about our cause, the To accommodate an anticipated
evening to get their walking orders as community and competition,” said 400 women at this year’s event, Jen-
participants in the third annual Wine Michael Mandel, executive direc- nifer Downes, assistant development
Women & Shoes event, scheduled for tor. “In terms of our cause, we’re the director, said the venue has been
Nov. 9. main shelter of Indian River County. moved to Sunjet Aviation. In addition
We’re the only open-admission shel- to the Shoe Guys, the event will fea-
This year’s Shoe Guys come from ter, which means we take in all ani- ture wine tastings from nine vendors,
all walks of life but with one thing mals regardless of how they come a Tito’s bar, savory bites, boutique
in common – a love of animals. The to us. Every dollar you raise as Shoe shopping, a Best-In-Shoe competi-
pumped-up lineup includes: Ryan Guys goes to these animals. We have tion, Glass Slipper auction, wine wall,
Bass, Nick Bruce, John D’Albora animals from all over the world. We Key to the Closet drawing, raffles and
IV, Dr. Alan Durkin, Chris Gurney, even have animals from Puerto Rico a fashion show featuring Seahorse
Bobby Guttridge, Lance Hickman, and South Korea in the shelter right Lane Boutique, Maldetti Toscani and
Michael Legg, Ron McCall III, Frank now.” Sara Campbell.
Mentzer, Michael Natale, Ryan Nor-
vig, Miguel Santiesteban, Chris Sulli- Challenging the men to de-throne For more information, visit hsvb.org
van, Ron Torperzer, Don Weston and Bobby Guttridge, crowned last year’s or winewomenandshoes.com/event/
Tucker the dog. top fundraiser, Mandel added, “This verobeach. 
is a competition to see who becomes
“Events like Wine Women & Shoes our King of Sole. What I want to know
help to support services for the ani- is who is going to de-throne the
King?”

Guttridge, who earned the 2016

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18 Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

PHOTOS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17 PEOPLE

Andrew and Carole Melasi with Michael Natale.

Lance Hickman with his son, Brennan.

Crystal Tumolo and Michael Mandel. Debbie Shephard with Ryan and Lindsay Bass.

-------- SPONSORS -------

BCM Storage  Florida Spine  Root Dental
JC Sports Complex  Arthur Labella
First Service  Weichert

Beverly Dillon, Realtor with Keller Williams
Vero Beach Firefighters Association
Natalie’s Orchid Island Juice
Treasure Coast Jazz Society

Debbie Thornton, Susie Wilson, Chris Sullivan and Susan Windham.

IRMC STAFFERS STEP UP
DURING IRMA BLOOD EMERGENCY

24 Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

HEALTH

IRMC staffers step up during Irma blood emergency

BY TOM LLOYD happen at the most inopportune
Staff Writer times. Like, for instance, just before,
during and immediately after a hur-
It won’t fit on a bumper sticker, but ricane.
“right anterior thoracotomies” hap-
pen. What will fit on a bumper sticker is
“I (heart)❤ IRMC Staffers,” and Welsh
So, too, do “peripheral cannula- Heart Center cardio-thoracic sur-
tions in the groin artery” and “con- geon Dr. Mark Malias and the Indian
gestive heart failures.” River Medical Center’s chief medical
officer, Dr. Kathy Grichnik, would
And sometimes all those things

Dr. Mark Malias and Chief Medical Officer Dr. Katherine Grichnik. PHOTOS: DENISE RITCHIE

Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™ Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 25

HEALTH

Grichnik says IRMC’s Patric Gibson, either Grichnik or Gibson. “The staff
director of laboratory services, was at IRMC took on this additional re-
the one who first sounded the alarm sponsibility,” says this talented sur-
about the platelet problem. geon, “and they rolled up their sleeves
and donated their time and blood.
After hearing from Gibson, Grichnik The staff at IRMC is accustomed to
had sent out an email blast to all IRMC putting the community needs above
employees on Thursday, Sept. 14. The their own. They responded here and
response caught her by surprise. made the difference.”

“We came in the next day and Patric There is still a persistent blood and
said that it was like a miracle,” Grich- blood platelet shortage nationwide
nik says. “All these people [within the and it is especially acute here in south
hospital] decided to donate” and Ma- Florida, so Malias, Grichnik and Gib-
lias’ patient was finally able to have son all urge county residents to step
his heart valve surgery on the 15th. up like the staff at IRMC did and do-
nate blood. 
If it’s possible, Malias seems even
more impressed by the response than

probably snap up a bumper sticker have his heart valve procedure on Fri-
like that and proudly display it on day, Sept. 8.
their office walls.
But with Hurricane Irma ap-
Why? It’s simple. When blood and proaching the Florida coast at the
blood platelet supplies at the hospi- time, a change of plans was required.
tal ran dangerously low during and
immediately after Hurricane Irma – As Malias recounts, “I suggested we
only two 500-milliliter bags of plate- try Tuesday, Sept. 12, because at the
lets remained for the 332-bed facil- time we didn’t know what impact the
ity – it was IRMC staff members who storm would have here. Then, that
stepped up and volunteered to donate Tuesday morning in pre-op holding,
blood for their patients. I was talking to him while the lights
were flashing on and off and he un-
The volunteerism was critical be- derstood why I’d put his procedure
cause, at the time of this acute short- off. The patient’s heart valve surgery
age, at least a dozen surgeries, many was postponed again, for another
requiring supplies of blood and plate- three days, but the blood and blood
lets on hand, were scheduled at the platelet shortage persisted.”
hospital.
Why are blood platelets so impor-
Malias, a rapidly rising star in car- tant? They help initiate clotting and
diac surgery circles, had a patient prevent excessive blood loss after sur-
with congestive heart failure who gery. They also take time to prepare.
needed an aortic valve procedure (a
right anterior thoracotomy with a As Grichnik explains, “giving a
peripheral cannulation in his groin platelet transfusion is not as easy as
artery), and that patient was already just going and donating blood, which
scheduled for the OR. might take an hour. Platelet donation
might take up to four hours because
The patient had been treated a they have to [process the blood] in a
month earlier by Welsh Heart Cen- separate way, called apheresis.”
ter’s electrophysiologist, Dr. Brett
Faulknier, for atrial fibrillation – a Apheresis involves more than just
quivering or irregular heartbeat that collecting blood from a donor. With
can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart an instrument that is essentially a
failure and other heart-related com- centrifuge, says CentralBloodBank.
plications. org, the components of whole blood
need to be separated and the plate-
The patient was originally slated to lets secured separately.

26 Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

HEALTH

B-3’s a charm: Vitamin may prevent miscarriages

BY MARIA CANFIELD Laurie Beebe.
Correspondent
PHOTOS: DENISE RITCHIE
In a 12-year study published in
the prestigious New England Jour-
nal of Medicine, researchers from
Australia report that many miscar-
riages and birth defects could be
prevented by a simple substance we
are all familiar with: vitamin B-3.

Lead researcher Sally Dunwood-
ie, from the Victor Chang Cardiac
Research Institute in Sydney, Aus-
tralia, says “the ramifications are
likely to be huge. This has the po-
tential to significantly reduce the
number of miscarriages and birth
defects around the world, and I do
not use those words lightly.”

Laurie Beebe, a registered and li-
censed dietitian living and working
in Vero Beach, is intrigued by the
study, though she said more studies
are needed to back up the findings.

The study traced the cause of cer-
tain types of birth defects to a defi-
ciency in a molecule called nicotin-
amide adenine dinucleotide (NAD).

Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™ Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 27

HEALTH

intake 14 milligrams of niacin per ficiencies used to be common in the suggests that it is probably best for
day. Vero’s Laurie Beebe says that south, as corn – which is lacking in women to start taking vitamin B-3
most research suggests the average niacin – was such a staple of south- very early on, even before they be-
American diet meets those require- ern diets, by itself and in recipes come pregnant. This will change
ments, but agrees an adequate in- such as cornbread. the way pregnant women are cared
take of niacin should be a special for around the world.”
focus in pregnancy, as the require- She says the inflamed skin caused
ment for pregnant women is higher by the deficiency, along with the ef- At the same time, the researchers
– 18 milligrams per day. fects of the sun, caused farmers to urge expectant mothers to consult
have red necks, which is where the with their doctors about taking B-3
In addition to possible problems now derogatory term “redneck” supplements, as it is not clear what
in pregnancy, a deficiency in niacin originated. exact doses are optimal for prevent-
can cause a disease called pellagra, ing miscarriage and birth defects.
which is characterized by inflamed Professor Robert Graham, execu-
skin, diarrhea, fatigue, depression tive director of the Victor Chang Laurie Beebe’s website can be
and dementia. In an interesting Institute, says “just like we now use found at mycoachlaurie.com; her
side note, Beebe said that niacin de- folic acid to prevent spina bifida, phone number is 618-616-7704. 
Professor Dunwoodie’s research

Niacin is found in foods such as chicken
breast, tuna, peanuts and mushrooms.

NAD plays a key role in regulating
metabolism, boosting cell survival
and repairing DNA when needed.

A NAD deficiency can be caused
by genetic factors, chronic diseases,
or lifestyle issues, such as an un-
healthy diet. A key element in the
production of NAD is niacin, more
commonly called vitamin B-3. It
is found in foods such as turkey,
chicken breast, tuna, peanuts and
mushrooms; it is also widely avail-
able as a dietary supplement.

Professor Dunwoodie and her
colleagues suggest that a sustained
intake of a B-3 supplement can help
prevent miscarriages and birth de-
fects such as spina bifida and other
malformations of the vertebrae,
cleft palate, and some heart and
kidney defects.

The significance of the finding
is amplified because other studies
have shown that a significant per-
centage of expectant mothers have
a vitamin B-3 deficiency during the
first trimester of their pregnancy, a
particularly important time for the
baby’s organ development.

The latest information from the
U.S. National Institutes of Health is
that the general population should

28 Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

ST. EDWARD’S

Enthusiasm runs high on St. Ed’s cross country team

BY RON HOLUB
Correspondent

Head coach Greg Garzon has grown Cross country coach Greg Garzon. Elise Mallon competes in a meet. Benjamin Oakes. PHOTOS: GORDON RADFORD
St. Ed’s cross country program to a
state of popularity and prominence gets them out of their comfort zone. It the boys. The pair finished 1-2 in a tri ning. Over the years I’ve gotten more
never seen before he arrived four gives them a little more ownership of meet at home last week. Ross clocked involved in structured running with a
years ago. This year he has 35 boys and their times. in for 5K at 17:23 and Botero at 18:32. school team.
girls on the team with a new assistant Ross was a state qualifier last year, fin-
coach introducing a batch of training “I’ve also been trying to differen- ishing 35th with a time of 17:33. “I came to St. Ed’s in ninth grade
ideas to help the runners slog through tiate in practice between our more and the first person I met was Mr. Gar-
days of relentless heat and humidity. elite athletes and the other runners Sophomore Elise Mallon and se- zon. I’ve been on the team ever since
out there just to have fun and work on nior Tea Tee are the top runners thus and I love it.”
“[Garzon] is very easy to get along physical fitness with their friends. I far on girls chart. They finished 2-3 at
with and our philosophies kind of fit,” also understand that it’s very easy to the meet last week. Elise Mallon has been at St. Ed’s
Carolyn De Palma told us. “He is very lose runners in this heat, so at least since pre-K. She had a similar pair of
open to any suggestions that I’ve had. once a week I try to add some fun De Palma has been working with role models when it came to running.
It’s just been a pleasure working with workouts and things they haven’t seen Mallon to get her times under the “My parents run every day and when
him and the team. It’s impressive to in a while. 24-minute range. I was in fourth grade I wanted to run
see how many kids came out for cross like them. I looked up to them and
country this year.” “The kids come to me after every So what motivates high school kids eventually developed a passion for it.
race regardless of where they place, or to go out for a practice run of up to five I’ve been running cross country for
De Palma grew up in New Jersey, where they are on the team, looking miles in 90-degree heat after a full day the school since sixth grade.
went to college in Pennsylvania, and for their times. To me that is amazing in the classroom? For at least two of
was living in Manhattan before mov- because they just want to improve and them, it all began at home. “I’ve always been really competi-
ing to Florida in 2015. She was a cross see what they can do better the next tive. My goal is to stay ahead of as
country runner in high school and a time.” “I used to live in Colorado where many people as I can, but there’s also
lacrosse player in college. Getting in- both of my parents were big runners,” an aspect to compete against my-
volved in coaching was an “automat- As for those elite runners, De Palma senior Ben Oakes said. “My dad was self. I time myself every time I run,
ic” goal when she got here and that identified senior Allan Ross and ju- a distance runner and my mom runs so competition is really a mixture of
was achieved last year as an assistant nior Tomas Botero as the leaders for every day in the morning. In middle both.” 
with the girls middle school lacrosse school I really started to enjoy run-
team. Expanding to cross country
this year was a natural with her back-
ground in that sport.

“I’ve brought in the idea of interval
training a little bit more,” De Palma
explained. “I believe in the past it’s
just been a case of getting your dis-
tance miles in -- which obviously has
its merits in cross country. A shorter
distance works on their speed and

12 Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

PEOPLE

Elaine Coppola and Jackie Carlon. Bill Willis and Jason Wesley.

PHOTOS CONTINUED ON PAGE 14

Pasquale and Mary Lou Ciambriello. PHOTOS: DENISE RITCHIE Site of Cole Coppola Memorial Fishing Pier. David Vatland and Tom Tierney.

Cole Coppola fishing pier will be one of a ‘kind’

BY MARY SCHENKEL The pier project was spearheaded by ize friends, family, businesses, etc. any friend would love to have.”
Staff Writer the Coppola family’s close friend, at- “The wording is going to be in or- In between sets of toe-tapping music
torney Barry Segal, who worked with
Riverside Park was a sea of orange the City Council to get it approved by ange, which is Cole’s favorite color,” by the Tom Jackson Band, the Coppola
and pink, from the T-shirts and sneak- the Florida Inland Navigation District. said Dr. Coppola. “The engineers family recognized winners of the Most
ers worn by supporters of the Live Like came up with that themselves, which Creative, Largest Group Activity and
Cole Foundation, to the pool noodles “The pier is going to be 100-foot long, was pretty cool. Everybody is really Most Thoughtful acts of kindness, be-
carefully laid out in the shape of the T-shaped for fishing or for watching into the project which makes it very fore also distributing scholarships to
fishing pier being planned in partner- sunsets, romantic walks, watching exciting for us. It’s going to be awe- schools and organizations.
ship with the City of Vero Beach and the dolphins or manatees,” Dr. Cop- some.”
the Florida Inland Navigational Dis- pola explained. “They’re also going to John Carroll High School was award-
trict in memory of Nicholas “Cole” create an aquatic environment under- He said they have been working on ed $1,500 toward scholastic scholar-
Coppola. neath the pier. So FIND will pay for the initiative since forming the foun- ships and $500 each to four school
half and we will pay for the other half dation two years ago, but approvals sporting groups; St. Helen’s received
The unveiling of the Cole Coppola through the Live Like Cole Foundation took some time. The city will send it $1,500 in scholarships; the Vero Beach
Memorial Fishing Pier last Saturday from proceeds from the golf tourna- out to bid in October with a goal of Karate Association and the Indian Riv-
was the culmination of a week-long ment, sponsorships and donations completion by early next year. er Soccer Association Foundation each
Kindness Week campaign, which chal- that people have made to us.” received $1,000 scholarships; and the
lenged students at the schools he had As supporters gathered under the Gifford Youth Achievement Center was
attended – St. Helen’s School and John Pointing to the colorful noodles, nearby pavilions, Cole’s older sister given a dozen basketballs.
Carroll High School – to complete 22 Elaine Coppola noted that Segal, along Melanie, LLCF CEO, said she wanted
Acts of Kindness in one week. Dr. Nich- with Flynn Fidgeon and Ray Hengerer, people to know what a great person Additionally, in recognition of Oc-
olas and Elaine Coppola explained that had waded out into the lagoon to set up her brother was and how much he tober as Breast Cancer Awareness
22 represented their son’s football jer- the outline, adding, “I don’t know how loved the community. “He was my Month, Victor Basile, owner of Hope
sey number and the week commemo- they did it but it came out really well.” best friend; we were only a year apart. Imaging Center and a Live Like Cole
rated Cole’s Sept. 25 birthday and his My biggest goal in life is to make him board member, is donating 22 mam-
tragic Sept. 27, 2014 death, just two Adding to the fundraising efforts proud and to live like him every day - mographies to women who do not
days after his 16th birthday. are pier treads which people can pur- which means, giving back to those in have insurance.
chase for naming rights that can be need, lending a helping hand, sticking
used to commemorate or memorial- up for everyone, and being a person For more information or to purchase
pier planks visit livelikecole.org. 



14 Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

PEOPLE

PHOTOS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12
Will Cutter, Victoria Sarlo, Vero Beach Mayor Laura Moss and Melanie Coppola.

Coach Derek Gibson, Dr. Nicholas Coppola and IRC Commission Chairman Joe Flescher.

Lance Riddell, David Lloyd, Dr. Nicholas Coppola, Chris Capozza.

Jacob Rodolico with Stacey Rodolico.

Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™ Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 15

PEOPLE

Hunt for Hope targets inflammatory breast cancer

Lesa Heizmann, Margit Hollifield and Robyn Holt. Dr. Holly and Mike Hamilton. PHOTOS: DENISE RITCHIE Melissa Lovely with her daughter Selina Marinko. Christine and Tom Crowley with Chloe.

Front: Jane Olson and Sherrie Beuth. Front: Kathy Garfield, Mike Hamilton and James Hamilton. Melissa Schumacher, Cierra Flores,
Back: Kelly Beuth and Kourtney Beuth. Back: Patrick Hamilton and Devin Garfield. Dylan Gronley and Richard Hoch.

BY STEPHANIE LaBAFF
Staff Writer

Those pink-clad scavengers spotted
in Sebastian last Saturday afternoon
performing random acts of kindness
and even breaking out in song at lo-
cal businesses were hoping to rack up
points as participants in the fifth an-
nual Hunt for Hope Florida, an event
designed to raise awareness and fund
clinical research through the Inflam-
matory Breast Cancer Network Foun-
dation.

Dr. Holly Hamilton, owner of River-
side Family Dental in Sebastian, began
Hunt for Hope Florida in honor of her
friend, Dr. Lori Grennan, who lost her
battle with IBC four years ago. Gren-
nan founded the first Hunt for Hope in
Ohio while battling the disease, to pro-
vide funding to the IBC Network Foun-
dation, founded by IBC survivor Terry
Arnold. Since its inception Hunt for
Hope fundraisers have raised nearly $1
million nationwide, with 100 percent
of the proceeds funding IBC research.

Ironically, IBC was only briefly men-
tioned when Grennan attended medi-
cal school. At the time they were told,

CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15

“It’s so rare you’ll probably never see it,
so we’re really not going to cover it.”

Rare yes, but IBC is a highly aggres-
sive form of breast cancer that typical-
ly affects women under 40.

Because IBC progresses rapidly, it is
often not diagnosed until having al-
ready reached stage III or IV. By then
it has frequently spread to other areas
of the body, significantly reducing sur-
vival rates.

Hamilton said IBC statistics are
skewed, noting “most cases of IBC are
misdiagnosed and the cause of death
listed is usually from a complication
caused by IBC. So we really don’t know
how many women die of IBC each year.
Until recently, IBC didn’t even have its
own histology code.”

The Hunt for Hope participants
were tasked during the three-hour
hunt with visiting local venues to “Find
Clues and Fund a Cure,” completing
tasks and educating the community
through the use of the IBC Network
Foundation phone app.

Among other tasks, scavengers
brought back “H.O.P.E.” spelled out in
Scrabble letters; took pictures at the
Capt. Hiram’s Sandbar; performed
random acts of kindness; got Burger
King crowns after singing “I am a Sur-
vivor” to cashiers; took photos with
random bystanders; balanced Life
Savers on their tongues while singing
the ABC’s; sang the National Anthem;
crossed the playground monkey bars;
did the conga at Earl’s; hugged a man-
nequin; and took photos of their teams
in a porta-potty.

Spotlighting pink as the color of
the day in honor of October as Breast
Cancer Awareness month, pink jack-
ets, scarves, Halloween masks, mis-
matched socks, lipstick, eyepatches
and accessorized hair added points to
each team’s tally.

“This was a lot of fun. My wife’s
grandma died of cancer, so this was
important to us. It was good to get out
in the community and talk to every-
body. You wouldn’t believe the looks
people gave us,” said a tutu-clad, pink-
haired Kourtney Beuth.

Top honors went to the Indian River
Rugby Club, which earned more than
1,200 points; the most ever awarded,
according to Hamilton.

For more information visit theibcnet-
work.org. 

Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™ Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 17

PEOPLE

Shoe Guys have sole lotta love for Humane Society

Laura and Bobby Guttridge with Janet Winikoff. PHOTOS CONTINUED ON PAGE 18 Tucker the Shoe Guy. Shoe Guys will also compete this
year with a special four-legged Shoe
BY STEPHANIE LaBAFF PHOTOS: DENISE RITCHIE title by raking in roughly $5,000 Guy, Tucker. The gorgeous mixed-
Staff Writer through ticket sales, sponsorships breed canine was recently adopted
mals at the Humane Society and out and donations, shared, “It was a lot of from the Humane Society but has
Sixteen local gentlemen and one in the community – funding adop- fun and it supports the Humane So- graciously agreed to throw his paws
handsome canine are putting their tion services, cruelty prevention, di- ciety, which is our ‘pet’ cause. You’ve onto the runway in exchange for
best feet (and paws) forward to help saster relief and helping the animals got a great cause and you’ve got a belly rubs and dog biscuits. He un-
the Humane Society of Vero Beach who are in need, especially in un- great event. It’s fun for the guys and abashedly worked the crowd during
and Indian River County care for, derserved communities,” said Janet the women have a blast being served the Shoe Guy Reveal, garnering votes
and hopefully adopt out, homeless Winikoff, director of education. by men at their beck and call; all in with the mere wag of his tail.
animals. The Shoe Guys gathered at the name of giving to charity.”
Walking Tree Brewery last Monday “This is really about our cause, the To accommodate an anticipated
evening to get their walking orders as community and competition,” said 400 women at this year’s event, Jen-
participants in the third annual Wine Michael Mandel, executive direc- nifer Downes, assistant development
Women & Shoes event, scheduled for tor. “In terms of our cause, we’re the director, said the venue has been
Nov. 9. main shelter of Indian River County. moved to Sunjet Aviation. In addition
We’re the only open-admission shel- to the Shoe Guys, the event will fea-
This year’s Shoe Guys come from ter, which means we take in all ani- ture wine tastings from nine vendors,
all walks of life but with one thing mals regardless of how they come a Tito’s bar, savory bites, boutique
in common – a love of animals. The to us. Every dollar you raise as Shoe shopping, a Best-In-Shoe competi-
pumped-up lineup includes: Ryan Guys goes to these animals. We have tion, Glass Slipper auction, wine wall,
Bass, Nick Bruce, John D’Albora animals from all over the world. We Key to the Closet drawing, raffles and
IV, Dr. Alan Durkin, Chris Gurney, even have animals from Puerto Rico a fashion show featuring Seahorse
Bobby Guttridge, Lance Hickman, and South Korea in the shelter right Lane Boutique, Maldetti Toscani and
Michael Legg, Ron McCall III, Frank now.” Sara Campbell.
Mentzer, Michael Natale, Ryan Nor-
vig, Miguel Santiesteban, Chris Sulli- Challenging the men to de-throne For more information, visit hsvb.org
van, Ron Torperzer, Don Weston and Bobby Guttridge, crowned last year’s or winewomenandshoes.com/event/
Tucker the dog. top fundraiser, Mandel added, “This verobeach. 
is a competition to see who becomes
“Events like Wine Women & Shoes our King of Sole. What I want to know
help to support services for the ani- is who is going to de-throne the
King?”

Guttridge, who earned the 2016

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18 Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

PHOTOS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17 PEOPLE

Andrew and Carole Melasi with Michael Natale.

Lance Hickman with his son, Brennan.

Crystal Tumolo and Michael Mandel. Debbie Shephard with Ryan and Lindsay Bass.

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Beverly Dillon, Realtor with Keller Williams
Vero Beach Firefighters Association
Natalie’s Orchid Island Juice
Treasure Coast Jazz Society

Debbie Thornton, Susie Wilson, Chris Sullivan and Susan Windham.

ROLE OF A LIFETIME:
THELEN NAMED MUSEUM’S
FILM CHIEF

20 Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

ARTS & THEATRE

Role of a lifetime: Thelen named Museum’s film chief

BY MICHELLE GENZ
Staff Writer

Just as she was settling into retire- wracking when the low-key Obluck ordinate, considering watching mov- Diane Thelen.
ment after 39 years with the same asked that his looming retirement be ies is escapist relaxation for most,
company, Diane Thelen found her- kept quiet for several months. That it’s because Obluck and Thelen have PHOTO BY: GORDON RADFORD
self immersed in a new career: film meant Thelen more than doubled managed to convince their audiences
series coordinator for the Vero Beach her research time and watched twice that their impressive body of knowl- though an audience might never sus-
Museum of Art. as many movies without being able edge is innate. It is not. Though both pect with his natural, off-the-cuff
to explain her cloistered state to her are lifelong film enthusiasts, prepar- manner. Thelen, on the other hand,
Thelen replaces founder and long- friends. ing for the before-and-after lectures has no choice but to read her lectures
time director Warren Obluck, who at each screening requires hours of at the podium. “I get too nervous,”
quietly announced his retirement “I was under a lot of stress, and act- study. “Warren studied very, very she says. “Before this I had never ex-
earlier this year. ing very peculiar,” she says with a hard. He was extremely conscien- perienced public speaking. I had nev-
laugh. “I had nobody I could talk to, tious. He would print out hundreds er held a microphone.”
It is just the latest change at the and I was a mess. I just told people I of pages of research and memorize
museum, which in the past year has was having trouble finding the right it to be prepared,” she says. “I pretty What Thelen mostly dealt with, in
installed a new executive director films. I was begging Warren to tell much limit my printouts to 50.” her four decades with a Princeton,
and a new curator and is currently people this is happening.” N.J.-based business consultancy,
searching for a director of education. Obluck also rehearsed his lectures, were ledgers and budgets. With a de-
But this time, the new face at the po- If that degree of anxiety seems in- gree in English from Douglass Col-
dium in the Leonhardt Auditorium lege, where she also studied French
had a preview of sorts: Thelen has and art, Thelen was executive secre-
been running two of the five series tary to top executives in the firm be-
per season over the past four years,
and also led a summer sci-fi series in
2016 in conjunction with the NASA
exhibit last summer.

For Thelen, her new life feels a little
like science fiction, unimaginably in-
tense in terms of preparation and in-
volving essential skills she has never
tested, including public speaking.

“It’s not in my nature to be in front
of all these people,” says Thelen,
whose idea of fun is an afternoon in
the quiet of her island condo watch-
ing movies to her heart’s content.

“I was always good on one-on-one
connections, but big parties and big
audiences, that’s not my cup of tea.”

Things were especially nerve-

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Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™ Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 21

ARTS & THEATRE

fore moving into the finance end of “There’s no turning back now.” themselves at a party chatting about film based on the unfinished novel of
the company, analyzing budgets and Along with myriad details of cast, a film Thelen had loaned him. “All of Irène Némirovsky, a popular author
reviewing expenses. a sudden, Warren asked me, ‘Diane, living in France at the time of the Nazi
direction and historical relevance, I want you to take over some of my occupation. The next week, it’s “The
And in her spare time, she watched Thelen also researches any impor- courses for me?’ I burst out laughing. Nazi Officer’s Wife,” a documen-
movies, a lifelong passion that began tant musical elements in a film. That First thing I knew I was interview- tary about Holocaust survivor Edith
as a little girl. When other kids were sensibility too was born of her child- ing with Marshall (Adams, the for- Hahn-Beer. The series also includes
watching Mickey Mouse, she says, hood. Her father, a meteorologist by mer director of education) and Cindy the 2015 Canadian film, “Remember,”
she was watching Fred Astaire and profession, played mandolin, and in (Gedeon, the retired executive direc- with Christopher Plummer; the Ger-
Ginger Rogers and other stars of the middle age learned the cello to play tor).” man film “The Harmonists,” about
generation before her in classic mov- with the Monmouth Symphony Or- a 1930’s vocal group; and “Frantz,” a
ies that aired every afternoon on TV. chestra. She is currently screening a series new film by the French director Fran-
she calls All About Eve: Females Be- çois Ozon.
Videocassettes were unheard of, Thelen played piano, and well into hind the Camera. Starting Nov. 7
and yet she saw the same movies so adulthood she and her father played is Secrets and Lies: Stories of Real “I have been looking forward my
many times that she could recite the duets. “We played together all the People during Wartime. The series whole life to being able to do some-
lines by heart. time, even after I was married. He opens with “Suite Française,” a 2014 thing like this,” Thelen says. 
was a shy man, and we communicat-
Today, with 250 movies in her Net- ed together through our music.” Polly Wales
flix queue, she also has access to perfectly imperfect
FilmStruck, a streaming service from Filmmakers often do the same
Turner Classic Movies to which the with their audiences. When Thelen
museum began subscribing last year. showed a film about two Israeli girls,
She also pores through film maga- she translated the “astonishing” He-
zines, including Sight and Sound, brew score for her series audience.
which reviews films from around the “One student went out and bought a
world. CD of the score,” she recalls.

“My film curiosity is insatiable,” While Thelen makes clear her
she wrote in a brief bio for the mu- tastes and interests are different
seum. “Warren assures me that this from Obluck’s, by the numbers, she is
‘obsessiveness’ is a good thing. I will clearly gaining a following. She broke
have to trust him on that.” records with two of her series last
year, with more than 350 attendees.
Unlike picking out movies for her
own pleasure, choosing films for the Each series includes five films
Vero museum’s audience has its own screened twice on Tuesdays, after-
peculiarities. Museum administra- noons and evenings.
tors set up guidelines when Obluck
first founded the program in 1999; “I’m starting to see the same peo-
the same rules still apply for Thelen, ple in the audience. And out in pub-
and they have not been updated – lic, people come up to me and say,
whether the audience has or not. ‘Aren’t you the film lady?’ I’ve had
conversations about movies in the TJ
“For every film I show, I have to toss Maxx dressing room. I’m pretty sure
out 10 or more,” says Thelen. Problem that didn’t happen to Warren.”
areas concern not only sex but vio-
lence, even animal cruelty. It was Obluck himself who first
approached her about helping him
While deferring to those sensibili- out with the fall film series. She had
ties, Thelen resists what she calls the signed up for every one of Obluck’s
“ostrich syndrome.” series since moving here in 2009,
choosing the afternoon screenings
Last year, in a series on genocide, because the post-film discussions
Obluck screened some films that tended to be longer and more engag-
were “pretty gritty,” Thelen says. ing, sometimes continuing as the
crowd filed out. “I’d be walking War-
And in a series on immigration, ren out the door, still talking about
Thelen screened a film that showed the movie.”
full male nudity.
In 2013, Thelen and Obluck found
When Obluck also included a film
with nudity, he jokingly told Thelen,

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22 Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

ARTS & THEATRE

Coming Up: ‘Norma’ night at the opera at Vero theaters

BY SAMANTHA BAITA The story is set in ancient Gaul, under 2 An exhibition of works by three 3 “Bodyscapes: Photography by
Staff Writer Roman occupation. The Druid high local artists will open at the First Allan Teger” is the intriguing ex-
priestess Norma has fallen in love
with a Roman official, Pollione, with Presbyterian Church of Vero Beach gal- hibit on display at Gallery 14 in Vero
whom she has secretly borne two
1 Opera lovers, wait no longer: The children. Norma is also the daughter lery this Sunday. Art lovers should avail Beach during October, Breast Can-
Live from Lincoln Center opera of the Druids’ leader, Oroveso. His
themselves of the opportunity to view cer Awareness Month. The show and
followers have gathered
season opens this Saturday at the Ma- in the sacred forest to the works, enjoy refreshments and chat sale will benefit Friends in Pink, to
wait for Norma, who
jestic and AMC theaters in Vero Beach will signal the start of a with the artists: Judy Burgarella, por- help defray the cost of breast cancer
planned revolt against
with Bellini’s mas- the Romans. When the traits; Fritz Van Eeden, abstracts; and treatment for those in need in Indian
Druids leave, Pollione
terpiece “Norma,” admits to the centu- Mary Segal, print-making. You will be River County. A former psychology
rion Flavio that he’s
widely regarded as ‘Norma.’ no longer in love with glad you did. The free reception is from professor and self-taught photogra-
Norma, but has fallen
a leading example of in love with the young 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., and the exhibition will pher, Teger is renowned throughout
acolyte Adalgisa, one of
the bel canto genre. Norma’s temple virgins. be on display through December. This the country for his award winning
Vulture critic Justin Davidson praises
Soprano Sondra mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato, in area is rich with excellent artistic talent photographs, which he stages, with
the role of Adalgisa, saying she “sings
Radvanovsky, one with exhilarating physicality, loos- and these three are among the best. a healthy dose of whimsy, using the
ing vocal lines that spring into the air
of opera’s most ac- like great cats.” “Norma” provides a body as a landscape and placing tiny
breathtaking, not-to-be-missed eve-
claimed Normas, ning of opera for lovers of bel canto. ‘Bodyscapes’ figures and objects thereon. Teger al-
Photography by Allan Teger.
received critical ways emphasizes that the photos are

accolades for her neither double exposures nor digital

opening night per- manipulations – simply nude bodies

formance, which with small toys and miniatures set on

Washington Post them, shot in one exposure. You will

critic Anne Midgette said “offered be surprised at how cleverly Teger

some magnificent singing in a deeply has composed his works, and it might

felt performance that conveyed emo- even take you a while to realize that

tion in the best, which is to say genu- ski slope is not what it seems. The

ine, sense.” And the Huffington Post Bodyscapes opening will take place

declared, “Ponselle, Milanov, Suther- this Friday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. The works

land, Callas … after last night, Radva- of other Gallery 14 artists will also be

novsky can add her name to the list.” on display. 

Join us for the
57th Season of the

A.E. Backus
Museum & Gallery

With The Best of the Best
Annual Juried Art Show
October 15 - November 17, 2017

Free Admission Open House
Sunday, October 15
12 NOON - 4:00 PM

Sponsored by Seacoast Bank

500 North Indian River Drive
Fort Pierce, FL 34950
772-465-0630

www.BackusMuseum.com

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IRMC STAFFERS STEP UP
DURING IRMA BLOOD EMERGENCY

24 Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

HEALTH

IRMC staffers step up during Irma blood emergency

BY TOM LLOYD happen at the most inopportune
Staff Writer times. Like, for instance, just before,
during and immediately after a hur-
It won’t fit on a bumper sticker, but ricane.
“right anterior thoracotomies” hap-
pen. What will fit on a bumper sticker is
“I (heart)❤ IRMC Staffers,” and Welsh
So, too, do “peripheral cannula- Heart Center cardio-thoracic sur-
tions in the groin artery” and “con- geon Dr. Mark Malias and the Indian
gestive heart failures.” River Medical Center’s chief medical
officer, Dr. Kathy Grichnik, would
And sometimes all those things

Dr. Mark Malias and Chief Medical Officer Dr. Katherine Grichnik. PHOTOS: DENISE RITCHIE

Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™ Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 25

HEALTH

Grichnik says IRMC’s Patric Gibson, either Grichnik or Gibson. “The staff
director of laboratory services, was at IRMC took on this additional re-
the one who first sounded the alarm sponsibility,” says this talented sur-
about the platelet problem. geon, “and they rolled up their sleeves
and donated their time and blood.
After hearing from Gibson, Grichnik The staff at IRMC is accustomed to
had sent out an email blast to all IRMC putting the community needs above
employees on Thursday, Sept. 14. The their own. They responded here and
response caught her by surprise. made the difference.”

“We came in the next day and Patric There is still a persistent blood and
said that it was like a miracle,” Grich- blood platelet shortage nationwide
nik says. “All these people [within the and it is especially acute here in south
hospital] decided to donate” and Ma- Florida, so Malias, Grichnik and Gib-
lias’ patient was finally able to have son all urge county residents to step
his heart valve surgery on the 15th. up like the staff at IRMC did and do-
nate blood. 
If it’s possible, Malias seems even
more impressed by the response than

probably snap up a bumper sticker have his heart valve procedure on Fri-
like that and proudly display it on day, Sept. 8.
their office walls.
But with Hurricane Irma ap-
Why? It’s simple. When blood and proaching the Florida coast at the
blood platelet supplies at the hospi- time, a change of plans was required.
tal ran dangerously low during and
immediately after Hurricane Irma – As Malias recounts, “I suggested we
only two 500-milliliter bags of plate- try Tuesday, Sept. 12, because at the
lets remained for the 332-bed facil- time we didn’t know what impact the
ity – it was IRMC staff members who storm would have here. Then, that
stepped up and volunteered to donate Tuesday morning in pre-op holding,
blood for their patients. I was talking to him while the lights
were flashing on and off and he un-
The volunteerism was critical be- derstood why I’d put his procedure
cause, at the time of this acute short- off. The patient’s heart valve surgery
age, at least a dozen surgeries, many was postponed again, for another
requiring supplies of blood and plate- three days, but the blood and blood
lets on hand, were scheduled at the platelet shortage persisted.”
hospital.
Why are blood platelets so impor-
Malias, a rapidly rising star in car- tant? They help initiate clotting and
diac surgery circles, had a patient prevent excessive blood loss after sur-
with congestive heart failure who gery. They also take time to prepare.
needed an aortic valve procedure (a
right anterior thoracotomy with a As Grichnik explains, “giving a
peripheral cannulation in his groin platelet transfusion is not as easy as
artery), and that patient was already just going and donating blood, which
scheduled for the OR. might take an hour. Platelet donation
might take up to four hours because
The patient had been treated a they have to [process the blood] in a
month earlier by Welsh Heart Cen- separate way, called apheresis.”
ter’s electrophysiologist, Dr. Brett
Faulknier, for atrial fibrillation – a Apheresis involves more than just
quivering or irregular heartbeat that collecting blood from a donor. With
can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart an instrument that is essentially a
failure and other heart-related com- centrifuge, says CentralBloodBank.
plications. org, the components of whole blood
need to be separated and the plate-
The patient was originally slated to lets secured separately.

26 Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

HEALTH

B-3’s a charm: Vitamin may prevent miscarriages

BY MARIA CANFIELD Laurie Beebe.
Correspondent
PHOTOS: DENISE RITCHIE
In a 12-year study published in
the prestigious New England Jour-
nal of Medicine, researchers from
Australia report that many miscar-
riages and birth defects could be
prevented by a simple substance we
are all familiar with: vitamin B-3.

Lead researcher Sally Dunwood-
ie, from the Victor Chang Cardiac
Research Institute in Sydney, Aus-
tralia, says “the ramifications are
likely to be huge. This has the po-
tential to significantly reduce the
number of miscarriages and birth
defects around the world, and I do
not use those words lightly.”

Laurie Beebe, a registered and li-
censed dietitian living and working
in Vero Beach, is intrigued by the
study, though she said more studies
are needed to back up the findings.

The study traced the cause of cer-
tain types of birth defects to a defi-
ciency in a molecule called nicotin-
amide adenine dinucleotide (NAD).

Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™ Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 27

HEALTH

intake 14 milligrams of niacin per ficiencies used to be common in the suggests that it is probably best for
day. Vero’s Laurie Beebe says that south, as corn – which is lacking in women to start taking vitamin B-3
most research suggests the average niacin – was such a staple of south- very early on, even before they be-
American diet meets those require- ern diets, by itself and in recipes come pregnant. This will change
ments, but agrees an adequate in- such as cornbread. the way pregnant women are cared
take of niacin should be a special for around the world.”
focus in pregnancy, as the require- She says the inflamed skin caused
ment for pregnant women is higher by the deficiency, along with the ef- At the same time, the researchers
– 18 milligrams per day. fects of the sun, caused farmers to urge expectant mothers to consult
have red necks, which is where the with their doctors about taking B-3
In addition to possible problems now derogatory term “redneck” supplements, as it is not clear what
in pregnancy, a deficiency in niacin originated. exact doses are optimal for prevent-
can cause a disease called pellagra, ing miscarriage and birth defects.
which is characterized by inflamed Professor Robert Graham, execu-
skin, diarrhea, fatigue, depression tive director of the Victor Chang Laurie Beebe’s website can be
and dementia. In an interesting Institute, says “just like we now use found at mycoachlaurie.com; her
side note, Beebe said that niacin de- folic acid to prevent spina bifida, phone number is 618-616-7704. 
Professor Dunwoodie’s research

Niacin is found in foods such as chicken
breast, tuna, peanuts and mushrooms.

NAD plays a key role in regulating
metabolism, boosting cell survival
and repairing DNA when needed.

A NAD deficiency can be caused
by genetic factors, chronic diseases,
or lifestyle issues, such as an un-
healthy diet. A key element in the
production of NAD is niacin, more
commonly called vitamin B-3. It
is found in foods such as turkey,
chicken breast, tuna, peanuts and
mushrooms; it is also widely avail-
able as a dietary supplement.

Professor Dunwoodie and her
colleagues suggest that a sustained
intake of a B-3 supplement can help
prevent miscarriages and birth de-
fects such as spina bifida and other
malformations of the vertebrae,
cleft palate, and some heart and
kidney defects.

The significance of the finding
is amplified because other studies
have shown that a significant per-
centage of expectant mothers have
a vitamin B-3 deficiency during the
first trimester of their pregnancy, a
particularly important time for the
baby’s organ development.

The latest information from the
U.S. National Institutes of Health is
that the general population should

28 Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

ST. EDWARD’S

Enthusiasm runs high on St. Ed’s cross country team

BY RON HOLUB
Correspondent

Head coach Greg Garzon has grown Cross country coach Greg Garzon. Elise Mallon competes in a meet. Benjamin Oakes. PHOTOS: GORDON RADFORD
St. Ed’s cross country program to a
state of popularity and prominence gets them out of their comfort zone. It the boys. The pair finished 1-2 in a tri ning. Over the years I’ve gotten more
never seen before he arrived four gives them a little more ownership of meet at home last week. Ross clocked involved in structured running with a
years ago. This year he has 35 boys and their times. in for 5K at 17:23 and Botero at 18:32. school team.
girls on the team with a new assistant Ross was a state qualifier last year, fin-
coach introducing a batch of training “I’ve also been trying to differen- ishing 35th with a time of 17:33. “I came to St. Ed’s in ninth grade
ideas to help the runners slog through tiate in practice between our more and the first person I met was Mr. Gar-
days of relentless heat and humidity. elite athletes and the other runners Sophomore Elise Mallon and se- zon. I’ve been on the team ever since
out there just to have fun and work on nior Tea Tee are the top runners thus and I love it.”
“[Garzon] is very easy to get along physical fitness with their friends. I far on girls chart. They finished 2-3 at
with and our philosophies kind of fit,” also understand that it’s very easy to the meet last week. Elise Mallon has been at St. Ed’s
Carolyn De Palma told us. “He is very lose runners in this heat, so at least since pre-K. She had a similar pair of
open to any suggestions that I’ve had. once a week I try to add some fun De Palma has been working with role models when it came to running.
It’s just been a pleasure working with workouts and things they haven’t seen Mallon to get her times under the “My parents run every day and when
him and the team. It’s impressive to in a while. 24-minute range. I was in fourth grade I wanted to run
see how many kids came out for cross like them. I looked up to them and
country this year.” “The kids come to me after every So what motivates high school kids eventually developed a passion for it.
race regardless of where they place, or to go out for a practice run of up to five I’ve been running cross country for
De Palma grew up in New Jersey, where they are on the team, looking miles in 90-degree heat after a full day the school since sixth grade.
went to college in Pennsylvania, and for their times. To me that is amazing in the classroom? For at least two of
was living in Manhattan before mov- because they just want to improve and them, it all began at home. “I’ve always been really competi-
ing to Florida in 2015. She was a cross see what they can do better the next tive. My goal is to stay ahead of as
country runner in high school and a time.” “I used to live in Colorado where many people as I can, but there’s also
lacrosse player in college. Getting in- both of my parents were big runners,” an aspect to compete against my-
volved in coaching was an “automat- As for those elite runners, De Palma senior Ben Oakes said. “My dad was self. I time myself every time I run,
ic” goal when she got here and that identified senior Allan Ross and ju- a distance runner and my mom runs so competition is really a mixture of
was achieved last year as an assistant nior Tomas Botero as the leaders for every day in the morning. In middle both.” 
with the girls middle school lacrosse school I really started to enjoy run-
team. Expanding to cross country
this year was a natural with her back-
ground in that sport.

“I’ve brought in the idea of interval
training a little bit more,” De Palma
explained. “I believe in the past it’s
just been a case of getting your dis-
tance miles in -- which obviously has
its merits in cross country. A shorter
distance works on their speed and



30 Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

INSIGHT COVER STORY

The paradox of fear
Crime is down, but many
Americans don’t feel safe

BY PATRIK JONSSON
Christian Science Monitor

As recently as five years ago, says
pizza shop owner Lisa Curtis, crime
was so bad in her Atlanta neighbor-
hood that newly planted rose bushes
would get dug up and carted away by
thieves.

So when a succession of gunshots
rang out in late August, leaving a lo-
cal rapper dead near her restaurant
door, the scene could well have served
as evidence of the growing “Ameri-
can carnage” described by President
Trump amid a rise in violent crime in
some U.S. cities in 2015 and 2016.

Yet where such criminal mayhem
may have once been routine on At-
lanta’s urban east side, today it is an
anomaly. The Zone 6 precinct has be-
come the city’s most peaceful corner,
according to an Atlanta Police De-
partment analysis, when it comes to
theft and violent crime.

That’s partly due to an influx of
wealthier residents, more effective
police crime-fighting strategies, im-
proving schools, and a blossoming
local economy that benefits a wide
swath of Atlantans.

Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™ Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 31

INSIGHT COVER STORY

Atlanta Police Officer Neil McCay patrols the city’s Zone 6. police departments, the vast majority
of which are seeing the positive im-
“Nothing changed, nobody is stay- On the other, surveys are finding worldviews and how those views can pacts of data-driven policing strate-
ing in and locking their doors,” says many Americans convinced that a gen- be influenced and manipulated by gies.
Ms. Curtis. “Everybody knows that eral crime threat against law-abiding Hollywood, the media, and politi-
this is about a few people – the same Americans is rising. That sentiment cians. Economic uncertainty, politi- And a large majority of Americans
ones who keep shooting each other has at times found an outlet in Presi- cal unrest, and a lack of civility also as a whole, at least by some measure-
and getting shot. If anything, [the dent Trump and Attorney General Jeff erode people’s feelings of safety. ments, feel relatively safe in their own
restaurant has] been busier as people Sessions, who together have painted surrounds. In findings that have been
have come out to show support.” scenes of worsening urban “war zones.” “The reason people so easily em- mirrored elsewhere, a Journal of Gen-
brace this idea that things are bad out eral Internal Medicine study found
To some observers, the killing of Ji- It’s a conundrum: While U.S. neigh- there … is because there is a level of only 8.7 percent of Americans over 50
bril Abdur-Rahman and the neighbor- borhoods, as a whole, are safer than discord. If we were all getting along regarded their immediate neighbor-
hood’s shocked but measured reaction at any time in the past 25 years, many and not distrusting our neighbor, we hood as unsafe; 68 percent considered
can be seen as part of a shifting “para- Americans remain convinced that wouldn’t be so easily persuaded by a it “very safe.”
dox of fear” in America. crime is a growing problem. short-term spike in crime into think-
ing that the sky is falling,” says North- “People hear rhetoric about crime,
On one hand, people became 62 per- Part of people’s outlook depends on eastern University criminologist they see crime on the evening news,
cent less likely to become the victim where they are viewing from: Rural James Alan Fox in Boston. but they know in their own minds that
of a violent crime between 1993 and Americans are far more likely to be- they are safer than they used to be,”
2014. The number of violent-crime vic- lieve the narrative of big crime in the Instead, “it doesn’t matter that the says Ames Grawert, a counsel in the
tims per 1,000 persons age 12 or older big city. homicide rate is half of what it was 25 Brennan Center’s Justice Program in
dropped from 29.3 to just 11.1 in that years ago – those are just numbers,” New York. That, he says, “is why, even
period, according to Bureau of Justice Urban residents, meanwhile, who adds Mr. Fox. “What matters if they think crime is going up in the
Statistics. see children riding their bikes and is you can turn United States, many feel like their
people walking dogs at night through neighborhood is safer than ever.”
And so far, 2017 is on track to have formerly high-crime neighborhoods,
the second-lowest violent crime rate are more likely to be aware of In fact, he adds, “cities have been
of any year since 1990, according to the gains. the principal beneficiary of crime
figures released this month by the declining – and that includes New
nonpartisan Brennan Center York City, which now has a lower
for Justice. murder rate than the nation as a
whole, where 20 years ago it was a
dangerous city.”

To be sure, a spike in violence in
Chicago, Baltimore, and Washington,
D.C., drove a national murder rate in-
crease in 2015 and 2016. But this year,
the rate appears once again to be tack-
ing downward – even in Chicago. The
murder rate is projected to fall by 2.5
percent in 2017, according to the Bren-
nan Center. If that holds true, it would
be the lowest since 2009.

Yet outsize crime fears clearly have
had political impact in the US – and
could extend to policy as the Trump
administration pushes for higher
mandatory minimum sentences for
drug offenses and scales back eth-
ics oversight of local police depart-
ments.

Trump ear-

Also play- on a televi- lier this
ing into the question sion set and see plenty year noted correctly
of perception versus reality, of crime. We are saturated with that “the murder rate in 2015
criminologists say, is our polarized crime.” experienced its largest single-year
Yet dig deeper and criminologists increase in nearly half a century.”
and political scientists suggest that (Criminologists point out that even
rising crime is not top of mind for po- with that spike, the murder rate was
litical strategists nor, necessarily, U.S. still well below 1990s levels.)
His statement, as well as speeches
by Mr. Sessions, feed into a broader
narrative of how the rise in inner-

CONTINUED ON PAGE 34

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34 Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

INSIGHT COVER STORY

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 31 while, the reality was that U.S. violent est Americans have ever been – that
crime fell by 19 percent between 2008 wouldn’t get you very far politically,”
city murder rates in 2015 and 2016 and 2015, according to the FBI. says Clemson University political sci-
were part of a longer-term trend that entist Dave Woodard.
to some suggested America, in the At the same time, many Americans
Obama era, was coddling criminals intrinsically understand that violence is Some of the concern about threats
while over-focusing on rogue cops and being curtailed by a plethora of broader in the rural U.S., at least, may be jus-
corrupt police departments. factors, some not yet fully understood, tified, though perhaps the object of
says American University criminologist their concern is misplaced. A 2013
“Trump’s approach was to make Joseph Young, who studies the conse- Annals of Emergency Medicine study
America scared again, and he did,” quences of political violence. found that the personal risk of injury
says Professor Fox. death – including violent crime and
“We have seen sustained economic accidents – is more than 20 percent
Ahead of Election Day, 57 percent growth and we’ve also seen a lot of in- higher in the countryside than it is in
of respondents to a Pew survey said ner cities invigorated and gentrified, large urban areas.
crime has gotten worse in the U.S. which in turn has squeezed prob-
since 2008, including 78 percent of lems into other places,” says Professor In other words, while homicide risks
Trump supporters and 37 percent of Young. Police, he notes, have also be- remain higher in cities, people are
Hillary Clinton supporters. Mean- come far more adept in mapping Big safer in cities than in rural areas when
Data to target high-crime zones in near accidents are also factored in.
Ryan and Melissa Weaver, Agency Owners real-time, which in turn leads to bet-
Ryan Weaver Insurance Inc. is a locally owned ter community-relations as police pay In terms of the decline in crime so
and operated independent agency. Located in the more attention to what is driving local far this year, conservatives point out
CenterState Bank Building, just off of Miracle Mile complaints. that gun crimes have declined in the
and across from Classic Car Wash in Vero Beach. U.S. even as gun ownership and lib-
That suggests to some that the stok- eralized gun-carry laws have expand-
Serving Vero Beach for over 10 years! ing of fears about crime is political. ed. And others are quick to credit
All lines of commercial or personal insurance available. “If the president said this is the saf- Trump’s law-and-order rhetoric for
the projected downtick.

But whether the Trump administra-
tion has really driven the agenda is a
far different question, says Professor
Woodard. In fact, Woodard says he is
consulting for a Republican statewide
campaign in South Carolina, and
crime has not been a top strategy topic.
“I don’t sense that most of the voting
populace feels like we’re in a violent pe-
riod – quite the opposite,” he says.

On the policy front, two weeks ago,
the Republican-led Congress balked
at a Sessions plan to expand civil as-
set forfeiture, a controversial pro-
gram that allows police to seize the
assets of suspects who have not been

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Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™ Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 35

INSIGHT COVER STORY

convicted of a crime. And from state version programs and making it easier you can … incarcerate your way out vested in that. There are strong Repub-
to state, one of the few areas of politi- for former convicts to get jobs and re- of,” says Grawert. lican voices like [Sen.] Chuck Grassley
cal bipartisanship has been around build their lives. flatly saying, ‘Crime isn’t out of con-
criminal justice reforms. “There’s a growing consensus that trol.’ That’s a big reason why the fear-
“There’s been a growing view on we can have a safer and freer society, mongering rhetoric hasn’t been as suc-
Georgia, a ruby-red state, has led the the left and right since the 1990s that with a better criminal justice system, cessful as one might fear.” 
way by introducing strong prison di- crime and violence aren’t problems and there are people on both sides in-

36 Vero Beach 32963 / October 5, 2017 Your Vero Beach Newsweekly ™

INSIGHT OPINION

The largest nation in the world without a state of its own

BY DICK KERR

Last week, the Kurds in Iraq over- pendence. The current president of Iraqi probably will have no alternative to losing The vote for the referendum may move
whelmingly voted in favor of declaring Kurdistan is Massoud Barzani. some territory to the Kurds. them a bit closer to independence but
independence, and creating an inde- they have a long way to go.
pendent state in northern Iraq. Iraq tried without success to get the The U.S. now supports the Kurds
referendum cancelled fearing further because of their active role in the fight Nevertheless, the Kurds will not back
Although only the Kurds in Iraq partici- Kurdish autonomy from the central against the Islamic State. That support off from their goal of independence and
pated in the Iraqi government. Turkey and Iran were likely will fade as the fight against the they will chose their allies and enemies
particularly concerned about the vote Islamic State grinds to an end, con- based on their support of that goal.
Vote, it had important implications for as it threatened control of a sizeable cerns about stability in Iraq grow, and
the 25 to 30 million Kurds that live in the portion of their territory. the U.S. focuses on maintaining good Kerr, an island resident, is former dep-
area known as Kurdistan. relations with Turkey. uty director of the Central Intelligence
Turkey has the greatest reason for con- Agency and writes a periodic column
Kurdistan encompasses territory in cern having fought an active Kurdish in- If the world were fair and just, the on international affairs for Vero Beach
southeastern Turkey, Northern Iraq, surgency in their country for years. Syria Kurds would have their own country. 32963. 
northeast Syria and northwestern Iran.

The Kurds have been fighting for in-
dependence for generations. They had
a large delegation at the Paris Peace
Conference at the end of WWI and were
encouraged by the British that indepen-
dence was in the offing as the Ottoman
empire was divided up.

Colonel Lawrence, “Lawrence of Ara-
bia”, the translator for the Arabs at the
Conference, actually presented a map
which included a Kurdish state based
on tribal boundaries rather than im-
perial interests. But like others seek-
ing independence the Kurds lost out to
the great powers seeking control of the
Middle East.

The Barzani tribe has provided the
spokesman for Kurdish independence
for generations. A member of the tribe
represented the Kurds at the Peace
Conference and Mustafa Barzani led
the Kurds from the 1940s to his death
in 1979.

He led revolts against the Iraqi govern-
ments sometime allying himself with
Iran, the Soviet Union, the U.S. and any-
one that would support Kurdish inde-

ARTHRITIS, PART I TYPES OF ARTHRITIS • Maintain a healthy weight
The four most common types of arthritis are de- • Strengthen your muscles around the joint for
Arthritis affects 53 million adults and 300,000 generative, inflammatory, infectious and meta- added support
children in the U.S, and is the leading cause bolic arthritis. • Take over-the-counter (OTC) pain relievers or
of disability in America. Striking males and fe- • Degenerative Arthritis (a.k.a. Osteoarthri- anti-inflammatory medicines (clear with your
males of all ages and races, it is more common tis) doctor first)
in women. Risk increases with age. Degenerative arthritis, also known as osteoar- • Use assistive devices
SYMPTOMS OF ARTHRITIS thritis or degenerative joint disease, is caused • Use hot and cold therapies
Joint symptoms can include: by wear-and-tear, breakdown and eventual loss
• Swelling of the cartilage of the joints. The most common If joint symptoms are severe and limited mobil-
• Pain form of arthritis, osteoarthritis usually affects ity affects your quality of life, joint replacement
• Stiffness the hands, feet, spine, and large weight-bearing may be necessary.
• Decreased range of motion joints, such as the hips and knees.
Symptoms can be mild, moderate or severe and When your cartilage (the rubber-like padding To help prevent osteoarthritis:
may come and go. For some, symptoms last for that covers and protects the ends of long bones • Avoid injury and repetitive movements
years and worsen over time. People with severe at the joints) wears away, bone rubs against • Maintain a healthy weight
arthritis often experience chronic pain so bad bone, causing pain, swelling and stiffness. • Stay active
they can no longer perform activities of daily Eventually, joints can lose strength and pain be-
living, such as walking or climbing stairs. comes chronic. Risk factors for degenerative ar- • Inflammatory Arthritis (such as Rheuma-
While the term arthritis usually refers to joint thritis include excess weight, family history, age toid Arthritis and Psoriatic Arthritis)
pain or joint disease, some types of arthritis and previous injury such as an anterior cruciate If you are in good health, your immune system
may have systemic involvement that can affect ligament [ACL] tear. eradicates an infection and prevents disease by
the heart, eyes, lungs, kidneys and skin. Some- If joint symptoms are mild or moderate: producing inflammation. But, if your immune
times permanent arthritic joint changes are • Avoid excessive repetitive movements system runs askew, it can erroneously inflame
visible—such as knobby finger joints. In some • Balance activity with rest and attack your joints, causing joint erosion, or
cases, however, changes are invisible, discern- • Get regular physical activity damage your internal organs, eyes and other
able only on X-ray. parts of your body.

Your comments and suggestions for future topics are always
welcome. Email us at [email protected]

© 2017 VERO BEACH 32963 MEDIA, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


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