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Published by Health Connect Partners, 2020-10-26 11:47:05

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Hospital Pharmacy
fallconference titlesponsor


BD CAN HELP YOU GET YOUR MEDICATION MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGIES ON THE SAME PAGE, AND YOUR TEAM DOING WHAT MATTERS MOST. At BD, we know medication management is incredibly complex. Aligning people, technologies and systems to get a single medication safely to a patient is daunting. But there’s a better way, one that enables IT professionals to get all the players, parts and processes on the same page. At the heart of it is the BD HealthSightTM Platform, our integrated approach that connects our medication management solutions with each other—and with the EMR. The result? Improved efficiency and greater visibility across your enterprise, so your clinicians can get back to what matters most: your patients. Discover medication management that takes less management. Discover BD.
Discover connected medication management by visiting bd.com/connected-tech
BD, the BD Logo and HealthSight are trademarks of Becton, Dickinson and Company or its affiliates. © 2020 BD. All rights reserved. 1910004695 (04/20) BD-17226


David Mason
Hospital Pharmacy
fallconference
This year has been unprecedented for all of us with so much in turmoil. Our hearts go out to everyone directly and indirectly impacted by the COVID-19 crisis. We would also like to acknowledge our amazing healthcare workers and first responders who are participating with us in our virtual conference. What you have done and continue to do is exceptional— you are the true heroes of this crisis.
For the past 14 years, Health Connect Partners has been focused on our mission of bringing providers and suppliers together, and each of you have been a part of our journey. The lasting friendships and meaningful connections made at our events have forged us into a strong community. It was because of this special community that we felt it was in the best interest of all of our providers in the healthcare setting, suppliers, and our employees to stay safe and healthy this year and move our events to a virtual setting. Despite the severe impact that this virus has caused on all of our businesses, we ultimately came up with a solution that allowed our loyal providers and suppliers to be able to connect safely.
We are delighted to welcome you—this time for our 2020 Fall Hospital Pharmacy Conference! We realize that the need for connection in our healthcare communities has never been greater, even though meeting together in person is not possible right now. We look forward to bringing even more providers and suppliers together for our fall virtual conference, which will allow you to connect face-to-face (virtually), develop business relationships, be inspired by thought-provoking education, and discover new technologies and products.
If you have questions at any time during this event, stop by the virtual help desk or call us at 615-449-6234. We are here for you and happy to help.
We are beyond grateful to all of you for your understanding and willingness to keep moving in a positive direction. We look forward to seeing you all at our spring 2021 events.
David, Nelson and Jason
Nelson Hendry
Jason Green
Special thanks to BD, our title sponsor, for their support of this unparalleled event.
3


An FDA-approved pegfilgrastim biosimilar.1
UDENYCA® is the
#1 prescribed pegfilgrastim
prefilled syringe*2
Visit UDENYCA.com to learn more.
Pegfilgrastim-cbqv (UDENYCA®) is National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) recommended3
*As of June 2020, the pegfilgrastim prefilled syringe (PFS) marketplace includes ZIEXTENZO® (pegfilgrastim-bmez), Fulphila® (pegfilgrastim-jmdb), and Neulasta® (pegfilgrastim).
References: 1. UDENYCA® (pegfilgrastim-cbqv) package insert. Redwood City, CA: Coherus BioSciences, Inc.; 2019. 2. IQVIA Monthly National Sales Perspective Data. 2020. 3. Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Hematopoietic Growth Factors V.2.2020. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Accessed April 22, 2020. To view the most recent and complete version of the guidelines, go online to NCCN.org. NCCN makes no warranties of any kind whatsoever regarding their content, use or application and disclaims any responsibility for their application or use in any way.
UDENYCA is a registered trademark of Coherus BioSciences, Inc. ZIEXTENZO is a registered trademark of Novartis AG.
Fulphila is a registered trademark of Mylan Institutional Inc. Neulasta is a registered trademark of Amgen Inc.
© 2020 Coherus BioSciences, Inc. All rights reserved. 0820-UDY-P433v3


titlesponsor
A big thank you
to our sponsors
5


Health Connect Partners’ Virtual Supplier Showcase provides a format for hospital decision makers to research, learn about, and connect with suppliers in a unique virtual space. Each virtual booth features the supplier organization and highlights their solutions, products, and technologies. This new platform is designed to give hospital providers and supplier organizations the ability to directly interact in a customized environment.
In addition to providing the platform, Health Connect Partners is focused on driving high- quality traffic to each Virtual Supplier Showcase booth—just like we do during our in-person Supplier Showcase events. The Virtual Supplier Showcase is open for visits any time during the conference dates and is a required stop on the way to the educational sessions.
Each provider executive will be encouraged to participate in a fun, interactive virtual experience allowing them to learn and request information along their journey through the Virtual Supplier Showcase. The more booths they check in at, the more entries they will have in the prize drawing.
Best of all—the Virtual Supplier Showcase platform allows provider executives to directly request information, and schedule meetings with suppliers through our virtual meeting platform. Providers have a choice of requesting a meeting during the Virtual Reverse Expo or selecting a specific date and time for an on-demand meeting outside of the Virtual Reverse Expo times.
Hospital Pharmacy
Find by company name...
TO VISIT
TO VISIT
BOOTHS VISITED
6
*To maximize this experience for everyone, only Providers and Supplier attendees from companies with a Virtual Showcase will be able to access the showcase area
Aisle 1
SKIP TO EDUCATION
TO VISIT
VISITED!
VISITED!
Unit Dose, Bar Coding, Pharmacy & Nursing Supply Experts!
VISITED!
TO VISIT
BOOTHS STILL TO VISIT
Hospital Pharmacy
VISITED!
TO VISIT
TO VISIT
Be sure to stop by our booth and learn more about our SmartPak product line.
Aisle 1
SKIP TO EDUCATION
suppliershowcase* OPEN DURING THE ENTIRE CONFERENCE
11 9
CHECK IN AT EACH BOOTH YOU VISIT TO BE ENTERED INTO THE PRIZE DRAWING Don’t miss the booths that are highlighted in Red


prize drawing
win!
a large Big Green Egg or a Peloton bike!
suppliershowcase sponsors
This event is one of the highlights of our conference, and is all about interaction and relationship building— so don’t miss out!
Remember, you will only be entered into the drawing if you check into all 20 of your assigned Showcases, so make sure you visit them all!
“You gotta be in it to win it!”


Unit Dose
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• 6 and 12-month Beyond-Use Dating
• 1-D and 2-D Bar Coding
• Flexible Label and Report Formatting
• Multiple Sizes and Shapes to Fit Your
Meds & Storage Needs
Scan QR Code for more information and pricing.
Simple. Reliable.
800.523.8966 MediDose.com
Unit Dose Done Right N 7.75 x 10.75.indd 1 6/1/20 2:06 PM
Unit Dose, Bar Coding, Pharmacy & Nursing Supply Experts!


Smart Thinking.
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Description
NDC
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Cefazolin 100 grams
66288-1100-1
1100
Cefazolin 300 grams
66288-1300-1
1300
Ceftriaxone 100 grams
66288-6100-1
6100
Vancomycin 100 grams
66288-7100-1
7100
Cefepime 100 grams
66288-8100-1
8100
SmartPak® provides a revolutionary delivery system for these essential drugs, offering faster, easier preparation more economically. It’s also safer. The SmartPak bag system is a convenient alternative
to using multiple glass vials. No glass means no breakage during handling. SmartPak saves time and labor with less waste. SmartPak — the smart choice for your pharmacy service.
www.samsonmt.com
Toll Free (877) 418-3600
PO BOX 2730, Cherry Hill, NJ 08034 Telephone (856) 751-5051 Fax (856) 751-5044
For more information visit pppmag.com/info


Ed Hardin
VP of Supply Chain Froedtert Health
Monday, October 26
10:00am—11:00am CT
A Pandemic Success Story
This session is an interview with executives from a hospital and a local shoe company, who collaborated to produce masks during the ongoing pandemic.
Health Connect Partner’s CEO will host an interview with Ed Hardin, from Froedtert Health in Wisconsin, and Jim Kass, of Allen Edmonds Shoe Company. The two professionals, who were brought together by the scarcity of PPE, will share their story of building a relationship whilst manufacturing masks that helped to protect many front-line workers.
Their story outlines the value of building relationships, which is the very ethos of Health Connect Partners—attendees being able to create new relationships while further strengthening existing ones.
This partnership between a healthcare provider and a shoe company would have been very unlikely at the beginning of the year, but because of COVID-19, the relationship could now be seen as a great example for other healthcare organizations and manufacturers to think about their friends and neighbors and what types of business are in their communities.
10


Building a Culture
of Engaged Employees
Susan Reilly Salgado, Ph.D.
Susan Reilly Salgado is a consultant, speaker, and thought leader whose expertise
lies at the intersection of organizational culture and customer experience. Susan leverages 20+ years of academic and professional experience to help clients build remarkable teams who can deliver remarkable customer experiences.
Susan’s work in this field began in the mid-1990s, when she was a regular
guest of Danny Meyer’s acclaimed restaurants in the Union Square Hospitality Group (USHG). Susan was inspired by
the consistently exceptional customer experiences she had across Danny’s many businesses, and set out to understand the secret of his success by studying the USHG restaurants for her doctoral dissertation. The result of her analysis was a model
that explained the impact of effective leadership on organizational culture.
learningobjectives
After attending this presentation,
Monday, October 26
10:00am—11:00am CT educationalsession
Susan’s consulting work and speaking engagements have allowed her to work with companies across more than 20 different industries, such as Delta Airlines, Hyatt Hotels, Goldman Sachs, Chanel, Cedars Sinai Hospital System, Chick-Fil-A, Sotheby’s, Condé Nast, and Coca Cola. In addition to her PhD from NYU-Stern School of Business, Susan holds a BS and an MBA from Lehigh University and has been an invited speaker at numerous universities. Susan has been a contributor for Inc. Magazine, has recorded a TEDx talk, co-founded the NYC chapter of Conscious Capitalism, and was named one of Fast Company’s 100 Most Creative People in Business.
Susan lives in NYC with her husband and daughter.
ONE
attendees will learn to:
• Keep employees connected to the ‘why’ behind their jobs to give their work meaning and help sustain motivation through trying times. In the medical field, there may be a greater sense of purpose now than workers previously experienced.
• Identify gratitude as a driving factor in keeping employees engaged and making them want to do their jobs. This becomes
even more important in times when employees have to make so many more sacrifices at home to make work ‘work.’
• Make employees feel seen and having their voices heard is a critical element of engagement. Inclusive decision-making and transparency around the rationale behind changes are particularly important in these trying times when
so much is in flux.
sponsoredby
11


We appreciate our courageous pharmacy partners who join with us to create healthier futures.
To learn more, visit amerisourcebergen.com


Our R&D approach focuses on the real-world challenges that patients face daily. We seek to develop medicines that make a meaningful difference to patients living with these diseases.
OUR THERAPEUTIC FOCUS
Chronic diseases, including: • Opioid dependence
• Alcohol dependence
• Schizophrenia
PATIENT SUPPORT
• Cancer
• Bipolar I disorder
We understand that patients and caregivers may need assistance accessing our commercial products.
At Alkermes, we offer:
• Product access support
• Transitions of care assistance
• Product fulfillment and ordering assistance program
Our team of dedicated coordinators is available to help patients with transitions to different settings of care, schedule an appointment with a new provider, and remind patients of their appointments.
For more information, please contact your Alkermes Account Director/Alkermes Representative
ALKERMES® is a registered trademark of Alkermes, Inc. ©2020 Alkermes, Inc. All rights reserved. OT-002105
13


Tuesday, October 27
10:00am—11:30am CT educationalsession
Elizabeth A. Shlom, PharmD, MBA, BCPS
Q&A Session 1
11:35am—11:50am CST
Q&A Session 2
5:00pm—5:15pm CST
• List medications with novel mechanisms of action that provide alternatives to current treatment regimens for specific diseases and disorders
• Describe the significance of breakthrough medications in treating acute and chronic diseases
• Discuss how breakthrough and first-in-class oncology medications are improving patient outcomes
TWO
New Drug Approvals: First-in-Class and Breakthrough Medications
learningobjectives
After attending this presentation,
Elizabeth (Liz) Shlom is Vice President of the Clinical Pharmacy Program at Acurity, Inc, based in New York City. Acurity was acquired by Premier Inc, in February 2020. Liz joined GNYHA Services (now Acurity) in 1995, when she was hired to start the Clinical Pharmacy Program. Over the years, Liz has provided the pharmacy members with monthly ACPE-accredited educational forums, a weekly newsletter, drug information research assistance, membership surveys and website-based publications.
Prior to coming to Acurity, Liz held positions as Assistant Director of Clinical Pharmacy Services at Bridgeport Hospital in Connecticut, Clinical Pharmacy Supervisor at St. Luke’s/Roosevelt Hospital in New York City, Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Pharmacokinetics at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and Clinical Staff Pharmacist at the Veterans Administration Hospital in San Francisco, California.
Liz received her Bachelor of Science
in Pharmacy and Doctor of Pharmacy degrees from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy & Sciences. She also received an MBA in Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Business from the Philadelphia College
of Pharmacy in May 2020. Liz is a past President and Chair of the House of Delegates of the New York State Council of Health-System Pharmacists. She is active in the American Society of Health- System Pharmacists where she is currently serving on the Council of Public Policy and is Chair of the Emerging Sciences Section Advisory Group.
attendees will be able to:
14
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QuVa was purpose-built to change 503B sterile compounding for the better and we are leading the way.
Your focus is on the highest standards of quality and improving patient care and safety, so ours is being your trusted ally—accountable to you for solutions that are pharma-grade.
As FDA compliance becomes more stringent and demanding, our ability to reliably supply the highest-quality, ready-to-administer medicines is more valuable than ever. It allows you to spend more time on patient care and less time worried about BUDs, waste, workload inefficiencies,
and compliance.
QuVa’s 503B expertise is unmatched, so whether you’re calling for a response or being called on for a solution, know that we are accountable, and in us, you always have an answer.
Visit QuvaPharma.com


Wednesday, October 28
10:00am—11:00am CT educationalsession
Q&A Session 1
11:05am—11:20am CST
Q&A Session 2
5:00pm—5:15pm CST
learningobjectives
After attending this presentation,
Lara Patriquin, M.D.
Lara is a physician, speaker, and teacher of mindfulness meditation and of Transformative Inquiry in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Her personal quest for well being is informed by her medical studies on the brain and on the nature of thought.
She lectures extensively in the medical and business communities about the value of clear and reliable practices that optimize key functions of the mind.
Inspired by her scientific knowledge and extensive contemplative practice, Lara’s clients are able to access a more creative, successful, and inspired version of themselves.
attendees will learn to:
• Understand how the mind reacts to stress
• Move from flight or flight reactivity to centered response
• Implement daily practices that will improve their resilience and joy
THREE
Healthy Minds: Habits for Resilience and Joy
16
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NOW AVAILABLE IN 7 DOSES
FULLY READY FULLY COVERED
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These highlights do not include all the information needed to
full prescribing information for VANCOMYCIN INJECTION, USP.
in 300 mL, 1.75 g vancomycin in 350 mL and 2 g vancomycin in 400 mL of liquid. (3)
------------------- CONTRAINDICATIONS -------------------
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VANCOMYCIN injection, for intravenous use Initial U.S. Approval: 1958
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EXCIPIENTS ThisformpualtaietinotnsowofhVoarnecqoumiryectihneInejnetcirtieion(n5,0U0SmPgis,n7no5ot0trmecgo,m1mg,en1n-.-25g,o1v.5er60omccinuurtweristehosrisagtparieindatitnbetaracatotverreniado.u(cs5e.a9tdh)meirnisisktroaftinofnu.sTionreredaucteiotnhseriskof syndrome”,acutekidneyinjury,hearingloss,neutropenia. (6.1)
HIGHLIGHTS OF PRESCRIBING INFORMATION
These highlights do not include all the information needed to mL of liquid. (3) Hypersensitivity to vancomycin (4)
full prescribing information for VANCOMYCIN INJECTION, USP.
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full prescribing information for VANCOMYCIN INJECTION, UInSiPti.al U.u.Ss.eAdpopn-ro-loy-v-ta-ol-:-tr1-e-9a-5-t8-o-r--p-r-e-v-entCiOnfNecTtRioAnsINtDhaICt aArTeIOprNoSven--o-r-s--tr-o•-n-U-g-sl-ye---t-h--i-s---fo--r-m--r-u-o-lua--t-tei-oonWf AaoRdRf mNViIanNnisGctorSamtAiyoNcnDiD.n(P5PI.RnR8jE)EecCtAiAoUn,TIUOSNPS -o-n-l-y---i-n-------- the patient and increases the risk of the development of drug
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----------------- INDICATIONS AND USAGE ----------------- • Ototox•icAitnye: stOhetotitcoxAicgitetyntsh:aCs onococumurirteadnt iaindmpiantiisietnrnatstionreocefeivaingcomyicnijnury in patients receiving concomitant piperacillin/tazobactam
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usedonlytotreatorpreventinfectionsthatareprovenorstro--n--g-l-y--------- DOSAGEANDADMINISTRATION -------------- Hypersensitivity to vancomycin (4)
necrosis. Monitor serum vancomycin concentrationssatrnadtiorennanld preparation instructions (2.1, 2.5)
Vancomycin Injection, USP is a glycopeptide antibacterial function. (5.3) indicatedinadultandpediatricpatients(1monthandolde•r)Sfeoprticemfmoiriare(1c.o1m)mendeddosesinpatientswithrenalimpairment(-2-.-4-)-----d--u-r-ingDOthSheArGapEy.F.OMRoMnSitoArNsDeSruTmREvNaGnTcoHmSyc--in---c-o-o-n-c-e--n-trations kidneyfunctioninpatients.(7.2)
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• Infectiv•veSEeEendfoucllarpdrietisc(r1ib.2in)g information for further important adVmainci-omyacnind Irnre•jenPcatililpoefnfur,ancUcitlSiloinPn/.TaAzsosbeascstmamen: tInocfreaausdeitdoryiyncfuiudnecnticioen omf aycubte kidney
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suspected to be caused by susceptible bacteria. (1.6) • Development of Drug-Resistant Bacteria: Prescribing Vanco-
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Vancomycin Injection, USP • Neutropenia: Periodically monitor leukocyte count. (5.7)
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500 mg vancomycin in 100 mL, 750 mg vancomycin in 150 mL, 1 g
diarrhea occurs. (5.5). • Phlebitis: To reduce the risk of local irritation and phlebitis
vancomycin in 200 mL, 1.25 g vancomycin in 250 mL, 1.5 g vancomycin Revised: 1/2020 other antibacte•riNalel udtruogpse,nVia:nPceormioydciicinalIlnynjemecotinointo,rUleSuPkoschyoteuldcdobuent. (5.7) administer Vancomycin Injection, USP by a secure intravenous
HIGHLITGoHTreSdOuFcePRthEeSCdReIBveINloGpmINeFnOt RoMfATdIrOugN-resistant bacteria and in 300 mL, 1.75 g vancomycin in 350 mL and 2 g vancomycin in 400 route of administration. (5.8) used only to treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly
administer Vancomycin Injection, USP by a secure intravenous
full prescribing information for VANCOMYCIN INJECTION, USP. ---------r-o-u--te--o--f-a-dmCinOisNtrTaRtioAnIN. (D5I.C8)ATIONS ------------------- mycin Injection, USP in the absence of a proven or strongly
other antibacterial drugs, Vancomycin Injection, USP should be
VANCOsMusYpCeINcteindjetoctbioenc, afoursiendtrbayvesnuosucseputsibele bacteria. (1.6) • Use this form• DuleavtieolnopomofenVtanocfoDmryucgin-nReInsjiesctcatinotn,BaUcStePriao:nPlyreisncribing Vantchoe- patient and increases the risk of the development of drug
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Not to be used during pregnancy. • For intravrerensotu, swuhseezoinlgy.,. DdoyosNponoet a,dmumritinicisastreiar,omraullsy.c. ular and chest pain
patients who requiEreXCthIePIeEnNtiTreS (500 mg, 750 mg, 1 g, 1.25 g, 1.5 resistant bacteria. (5.9) The common adverse reactions are anaphylaxis, “red man
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• Administer Vancomycin Injection, USP by intravenous infusion Xellia Pharmaceuticals USA, LLC at 1-833-295-6953 or FDA ded for use during pregnancy because it contains the excipients • Adult Paintifeunstiso:n2rgeadcivtiodnesd, eaitdthmerirnaiste0r.5Vgarnacmoms (y(gc)inevInejreyc6tiohno,uUrsSP over
syndrome”, acute kidney injury, hearing loss, neutropenia. (6.1)
over 60 minutes or greater to reduce the risk of infusion reactions at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.
polyethylene glycol (PEG 400) and N-acetyl D-alanine (NADA), or 1 g evaepryer1io2dhofur6rs0(2m2.2i2n)utes or greater and also prior to intravenous
(2.1)
which caused fetal malformations in animal reproduction • PediatricanPeastitiehnetsic(1a1gMeonontnst.h(a2n.1d, O5.l2d)er): 10 mg/kg per dose given
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otheravoaril1abglefvoerrmyu1l2athionusrsof(2v.a2n)comycin.(5.1,8.1)
• Pediatric Patients (1 Month and Older): 10 mg/kg per dose given ------------------- DRUGS INTERACTIONS -------------------
To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact
M
• Infective Endocarditis (1.2)
and renal function. Assessment of auditory function may be
•S
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some instances. (5.4)
a
Hypersensitivity to vancomycin (4) in 300 mL, 1.75 g vancomycin in 350 mL and 2 g vancomycin in 400
VANCOMYCIN injection, for intravenous use
Initial U.S. Approval: 1958 --------------- WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS ---------------
• Infusion Reactions: Hypotension, including shock and cardiac
full prescribing information for VANCOMYCIN INJECTION, USP. WARNING-: -R--IS--K--O--F--E-M--B--R-Y- O-CFEOTNATLRTAOINXIDCIICTAYTDIOUENSTO -------------------
arrest, wheezing, dyspnea, urticaria, muscular and chest pain VANCOMYCINinjection,forintravenoususe EXCIPIENTS and “red man syndrome” which manifests as pruritus and
Hypersensitivity to vancomycin (4)
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which caused erfyethael mmaaltfhoarmt iantvionlvsesintheanfiamcael, nrepcrkodauncdtiounpper torso maanyesthetic agents. (2.1, 5.2)
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polyeth•yFleonreingtrlyaycvoelno(PuEsGus4e00o)nlayn. dDoN-N-aocet taydl mDi-nailsatneirnoera(NllyA.DA), • Adult Patpienritiosd:d2ogf 6d0ivimdeindueteitsheor agsre0a.t5tegr ranmdsa(lgs)oepvreioryr t6ohinontutrarasvenous Xellia Pharmaceuticals USA, LLC at 1-833-295-6953 or FDA
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ded for use during pregnancy because it contains the excipients infusion reactions, administer Vancomycin Injection, USP over syndrome”, acute kidney injury, hearing loss, neutropenia. (6.1) studies. oIfvueusrse60omf vinauntceosmoyrcgirneaistenreteoedredudcueritnhge prpirsrekgonfainfcuys,iuousnsereac•tioPnesdia•trNicePpahtrioetnotxsic(1ityM: oSnytshsteaemnmdicOvldaenrc)o:o1m0ycmcing/kegxpoesrudroesemgaiyvernesult in
polyethylene glycol (PEG 400) and N-acetyl D-alanine (NADA), a period of 60 minutes or greater and also prior to intravenous To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, con-t-a--c-t-------------- DRUGS INTERACTIONS -------------------
otherava(2il.a1b)leformulationsofvancomycin.(5.1,8.1)
which caused fetal malformations in animal reproduction anesthetic agents. (2.1, 5.2) Xellia Pharmaceuticals USA, LLC at 1-833-295-6953 or •FADnAesthetic Agents: Concomitant administration of vancomycin
other available formulations of vancomycin. (5.1, 8.1)
----------o--r--1--g--eveINryD1IC2AhToIuOrsN(S2.A2N) D USAGE ----------------- at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. forreconmecmroesnidse.dMdoonsiteosrisnepruamtievnvatsncwcoitmhyrcecinacloimncpceanirtmraetiniotn(s2.a4n)drenal
the trea•tmPeantiteonft:s with Renal Impairment: See full prescribing information vancomycin. Monitor for
acute kidney injury (AKI) including acute renal failure, mainly Vancom•yPciendiaIntrjieccPtioaontnie, ntUsS(1PMioisnthaangdlyOcoldperp):ti1d0e magn/ktigbapcetredrioasl e given function. (5.3)
every 6ahcuoututersk(id2dn.n3e)y injury (AKI) including acute renal failure, mainly
• Adult Patients: 2 g divided either as 0.5 grams (g) every 6 h•oPuarstientdsuweithtoReinteaerlrsImtitpialirnmnepnhtr:ritStiseeofrullepsrsescorimbimngoninlyforamcautieontubular
studies. If use of vancomycin is needed during pregnancy, use • Nephrotoxicity: Systemic vancomycin exposure may result in and anesthetic agents has been associated with erythema and
------------------- DRUGS INTERACTIONS --------------•--P--ip-eracillin/Tazobactam: Increased incidence of acute kidney due to interstitial nephritis or less commonly ac•uSteeetufbuulllaprrescribing information for further important admini-
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vancomycin. Monitor for signs and symptoms of ototoxicity
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strationdaunridngprethpearaptioy.n iMnsotnruitcotrionsser(u2m.1, 2v.a5n)comycin concentrations
•BoneInfections(1.4) vancom•ycinin20a0nmdL,v1a.2n5cogmv-ayAncscisnsomcacyisactiecenodinmD2Dp5ia0remrhdLe,ata1o:.5vEgavvnaclunuoacamoteymcypincaintaielonntse.ifMonitor Revised:1/2020
and renal function. Assessment of auditory function may be •Lower-R--e-s-p-p-ir-ra-t-to-r-ry-TDraOcStAInGfeEctFioOnRsM(1S.5A)NDSTRENGTHS ------------- diarrheakiodcnceuyrsfu.n(5c.t5io)n. inpatients.(7.2)
XelliaPharmaceuticalsUSA,LLCat1-833-295-6953or-F--D--A---------------DRUGSINTERACTIONS-------------------
every 6 hoursa(t(21.3-38)00-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. • Anesthetic Agents: Concomitant administration of vancomycin • Anesthetic Agents: Concomitant administration of vancomycin
•PatientsawcuittheRkeidnnaelyIminpjauiryme(AnKt:IS)einecfluldllipnrgesacruibteingreinfafolrmfaailutioroen,mainly andanestheticagentshasbeenassociatedwitherythemaand
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and anesthetic agents has been associated with erythema and
---------e--v-e-r-y--6- hoINurDsI(C2A.3T)IONS AND USAGE ----------------- • Anesthetic Agents: Concomitant administration of vancomycin necrosis. Monitor serum vancomycin concentrations and renal
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administer Vancomycin Injection, USP by a secure intravenous
route of administration. (5.8)


Thursday, October 29
10:00am—11:00am CT educationalsession
Deborah Grimes, RN, JD, MSHQS
Deborah Grimes received a Bachelor
of Science in Nursing from UAB worked as a Registered Nurse for 10 years.
She graduated from the Birmingham School of Law with a Juris Doctor Degree.
Deborah worked at UAB Risk Management as a Healthcare Attorney. In 2004, she returned to Hospital Administration as
the Director of Joint Commission/Quality Resources. She was promoted to VP of Quality/Regulatory Affairs named Chief Compliance Officer for UAB Hospital. During this tenure she received a certification as a Healthcare Quality Professional, Certified Healthcare Compliance, completed leadership fellowship training with Momentum Inc. and graduated with a Masters in Science
FOUR
Q&A Session 1
11:00am—11:15am CST
What is the Business Case for Diversity and Inclusion?
Q&A Session 2
5:00pm—5:15pm CST
learningobjectives
After attending this presentation,
Degree in Quality and Patient Safety. Effective April 1, 2017 she was appointed as UAB Health System first Chief Diversity Officer and was named by Savoy magazine in 2019 as one of the Most Influential Women in Corporate America. In March
of 2020 she was hired as Ochsner Health’s first VP Chief of Diversity and Inclusion.
attendees will be able to:
• Increase awareness of the need to have inclusive leaders
• Have baseline knowledge of Diversity and Inclusion
• Identify major characteristics of an inclusive leader
• Understand the barriers to having an inclusive environment
18
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Friday, October 30
10:00am—11:00am CT educationalsession
Katrina K. Harper, PharmD, MBA, BCPS, DPLA Sr.
Q&A Session 1
11:05am—11:20am CST
Q&A Session 2
5:00pm—5:15pm CST
learningobjectives
After attending this presentation,
Katrina Harper has more than 20 years of healthcare experience in several clinical and leadership roles. Currently, as Clinical Pharmacy Director, she provides pharmaceutical/clinical expertise for
her internal team and Vizient Members. Katrina serves as a subject matter expert in the areas of medication safety, regulations, quality, and compliance.
Prior to joining Vizient, Katrina was a Pharmacy Manager for a community pharmacy chain, Director of Pharmacy of a cardiovascular specialty hospital, and Medication Safety Officer for a safety-net academic county hospital. She has served as chairperson and adjunct faculty for the ASHP accredited Pharmacy Technology program at a community college. Katrina is also a recipient of the Texas Society of Health-Systems Pharmacist’s Larry C.
Nesmith Pharmacist Recognition Award. Katrina holds a Doctorate of Pharmacy degree from Xavier University of Louisiana College of Pharmacy and a Master’s degree in Business Administration from The University of Texas at Arlington College of Business Administration. She is also a Board Certified Pharmacotherapy Specialist, a Board Certified Sterile Compounding Pharmacist and holds numerous other certifications.
This session will provide various perspectives regarding preparation and implementation of USP Chapter <800> requirements.
The speaker will share best practices and processes to mitigate workflow challenges regarding USP Chapter <800>.
attendees will learn to:
• Identify the intent of the USP Chapter <800> compounding requirements
• Summarize effectively an organization’s process to meet hazardous drug handling requirements
• Develop a recommended strategy for successful compliance and mitigating strategies for USP Chapter <800> requirements
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Monday, November 2
10:00am—11:15am CT educationalsession
Co-presenter
Q&A Session 1
11:20am—11:35am CST
Q&A Session 2
5:00pm—5:15pm CST
learningobjectives
After attending this presentation,
Ruchi Tiwari, PharmD, MS
Dr. Ruchi Tiwari is the System Director of Pharmacy for Population Health at Mount Sinai Health Partners since 2017. She is responsible for VBC & ACO pharmacy strategy and implementation and has developed clinical condition management, quality and cost reduction programs to support managing at-risk lives.
She completed her doctorate in pharmacy from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and her Masters in Health-System Administration from The Ohio State University and
a residency at from Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.
Ruchi has held several management and leadership positions across health-system management including, pharmacy clinical informatics, medication safety, performance improvement and consulting. She is passionate about growing the impact of pharmacist in ambulatory care!
attendees will be able to:
• Discuss the advances in digital health that may impact pharmacy practice
• Describe the impact of remote patient monitoring on the triple aim
• Discuss implementation of a pharmacist-managed remote patient monitoring program
• Apply consumer engagement and bot-based workflows to clinical workflows
SIX
Emerging Digital Health Applications for Ambulatory Pharmacy
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Co-presenter
Cathleen Mathew, PharmD, AAHVIP, CDE, AE
Co-presenter
Alexandra Ingber, MPH
Alexandra Ingber, MPH is the Associate Director for Pharmacy and Value/Efficiency at Mount Sinai Health Partners, holding multiple roles since joining the health system in 2017.
In her current role, she is responsible for supporting clinical operations for new pharmacist-driven programs impacting value based contracts and the accountable care organization. Alex focuses on quality improvement, improving efficiency, cost reduction, and innovation to streamline condition management operations.
Alex has a particular interest in operational efficiency, quantitative analytics and metric development, and population health management.
Cathleen Mathew is a Clinical Pharmacy Manager at Mount Sinai Health Partners who joined Mount Sinai Health System in 2018. Dr. Mathew is a manager on the population health pharmacy team who provides direction on clinical program development for primary care practices and care management workflows.
She is residency-trained ambulatory
care clinical pharmacist, and is a certified diabetes educator (CDE), a certified asthma educator (AE-C) and a certified HIV pharmacist (AAHIVP). She provides direct patient care for predominantly high risk patients in a primary care clinic.
Dr. Mathew has a strong interest in clinical operations, and supports the pharmacy team’s clinical program design and management including programs for hypertension, diabetes, COPD, medication adherence and other quality programs.
She recently supported as clinical program lead for Mount Sinai’s Connected Hearts Program, a remote patient monitoring program. Cathleen completed in Doctorate in pharmacy from Northeastern University.
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Tuesday, November 3
10:00am—11:00am CT educationalsession
Pharmacogenomics in Practice: Implementation and Outcomes
Q&A Session 1
11:00am—11:15am CST
Q&A Session 2
5:00pm—5:15pm CST
attendees will be able to:
• Describe the evidence base and guidelines for use of genetic information to guide treatment decisions for commonly used medications
• Explain the rationale and process for integrating genotyping into clinical practice to guide prescribing decisions
• Evaluate data documenting the impact of genotype-guided therapy on clinical outcomes
SEVEN
learningobjectives
After attending this presentation,
Larisa Cavallari, Pharm.D.
Larisa Cavallari is an Associate
Professor and Director of the Center for Pharmacogenomics at the University of Florida College of Pharmacy and director of the UF Health Precision Medicine Program. She received her Pharm.D. degree from the University of Georgia and completed a pharmacy practice residency at the VA Medical Center in Memphis, Tennessee and a fellowship in cardiovascular pharmacogenomics at UF.
Her research involves discovery of genetic associations with drug response, translation of pharmacogenetic evidence into clinical practice, and examination of outcomes with clinical pharmacogenetic implementation, and has been funded by the NIH, FDA, and American Heart Association.
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Wednesday, November 4
10:00am—11:00am CT educationalsession
Steve Rough
Steve Rough is Senior Vice President at Visante, Inc., where he leads consulting services to help hospitals and health systems, IDNs, health plans, and other pharmacy-related enterprises to optimize their business opportunities. He also currently serves as Adjunct Associate Professor and Academic Program Director for the Masters’ Degree in Health System Pharmacy Administration at the University of Wisconsin (UW) School of Pharmacy. Prior to that, for the past 17 years Steve served as Senior Director of Pharmacy
at UW Health. In this position he was responsible for all aspects of strategic, operational, clinical, programmatic and financial performance of the pharmacy enterprise, leading a team of over 550 FTE, with annual revenues of $1.3 billion and expenses of $500 million. This included five hospitals, sixteen retail pharmacies, 90 primary care and specialty clinics, infusion services, the system’s health insurance plan, and a pharmacy consolidated services center comprised of 13 business and operational programs. During his tenure at UW, he constructed an environment where learners, technicians, pharmacists, researchers and educators practiced in harmony at the top
Q&A Session 1
11:00am—11:15am CST
Q&A Session 2
5:00pm—5:15pm CST
learningobjectives
After attending this presentation,
of the skill sets, caring for patients in and between all care settings. He also served as Clinical Associate Professor at the UW School of Pharmacy, and as Program Director for the Health-System Pharmacy Administration Residency and Masters Program at UW Health and UW-Madison. Steve received his Bachelors and Masters degrees from UW Madison, and completed residency training in Pharmacy Practice and Pharmacy Administration at UW Hospital.
Steve has implemented progressive pharmacy services in many settings. He is credited with seven textbook chapters and over 40 publications in the professional literature on a variety of management and leadership- related topics, and is a sought-after speaker with more than 145 presentations on these topics to national audiences. His areas of practice interest and expertise include establishing high value pharmacy programs, specialty pharmacy growth and development, pharmacy business/financial performance and strategy, integration and alignment, benchmarking, leadership team development and optimization, and empowering pharmacists to care for patients.
attendees will learn to:
• Discuss industry benchmarking standards and how pharmacy leaders must understand and influence the use of these reports
• Explain limitations and challenges to pharmacy productivity monitoring
• Describe methods and metrics to assess pharmacy workload
• Identify meaningful strategies for demonstrating and advancing the overall effectiveness of pharmacy service
EIGHT
Pharmacy Benchmarking and Productivity: Leveraging Data to Demonstrate Value
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Thursday, November 5
10:00am—11:00am CT educationalsession
Mary-Haston Vest, PharmD, MS, BCPS
Mary-Haston Vest is a Clinical Manager with the UNC Health Department of Pharmacy, and Assistant Professor of Clinical Education with the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. She oversees Pharmacy Analytics and Outcomes Services, and leads the development of organizational approaches to integrate data analytics to effectively measure
and positively impact patient outcomes. Her team consists of pharmacists and analysts, who maintain over 150 recurring reports and dashboards for pharmacy services across the health care system, and complete over 700 data requests for pharmacy end users annually. The team also supports initiatives to implement new, innovative services, and evaluations to demonstrate the value of pharmacy services. The team has been recognized with an ASHP Best Practices Award.
Q&A Session 1
11:00am—11:15am CST
Q&A Session 2
5:00pm—5:15pm CST
• Describe team members and functions of embedded analytics resources within the department of pharmacy
• Understand the role of a pharmacy system data governance process
• Analyze how to leverage data to demonstrate the impact on operational and clinical outcomes
NINE
Transforming Data into Insight: Establishment of a Pharmacy Analytics and Outcomes Team
learningobjectives
After attending this presentation,
She earned her Doctor of Pharmacy at the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy, and PGY1/PGY2/MS in Health- System Pharmacy Administration at UNC Medical Center and the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. Mary-Haston is actively involved in state and national professional organizations, having
served on the ASHP Commission of Credentialing, and currently serving on an ASHP Section of Pharmacy Practice Leaders Advisory Group, and as Co-Chair of the North Carolina Association of Pharmacists Communications Committee.
attendees will learn to:
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Friday, November 6
10:00am—11:00am CT educationalsession
Jordan Messler, MD, SFHM, FACP
Jordan Messler, MD, SFHM, FACP is the Executive Director, Clinical Practice with Glytec. He trained in internal medicine
at Emory University in Atlanta, and subsequently served as an academic hospitalist at Emory University for several years after residency. He is the former medical director for the Morton Plant Hospitalist group in Clearwater, Florida (serving BayCare Health), where he continues to work as a hospitalist.
He is the current physician editor for the Society of Hospital Medicine’s (SHM) blog, The Hospital Leader.
Q&A Session 1
11:00am—11:15am CST
Q&A Session 2
5:00pm—5:15pm CST
32
learningobjectives
After attending this presentation,
In addition, he previously chaired SHM’s Quality and Patient Safety Committee and has been active in several of their national mentoring programs, including
Project BOOST and Glycemic Control. He has talked at national conferences on a variety of topics such as teamwork in the hospital, quality and patient safety, the history of hospitals and mentoring quality improvement projects.
attendees will learn to:
• Understand the prevalence and impact of diabetes and stress hyperglycemia in the hospital
• Recognize risk factors for worsened outcomes in patients with hyperglycemia and COVID-19
• Understand the impact of steroids on treatment of COVID-19 patients, including the management of steroids and hyperglycemia in the hospital
• Assess the role of technology in the hospital to assist management of IV insulin
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educational advisoryboard
Christina Cao, PharmD
Senior Corporate Director of Pharmacy
Victor Valley Global Medical Center Victorville, CA
Arash Dabestani, PharmD, MHA, FASHP, FABC
Senior Director of Pharmacy
NYU Langone Health New York, NY
Vincent Jackson, B.S., Pharm D.
Vice President, Pharmacy Service Group
HealthTrust Nashville, TN
Pharmacy Credit
SBH Health System Bronx, NY
Jonathan Lakamp, PharmD, BCPS
Chief Pharmacy Officer
Mercy Health Chesterfield, MO
Venita Papillion, PharmD, MBA
Division VP of Pharmacy
CHI St. Luke’s Health Houston, TX
Joseph Pinto, RPh, M.S., MHA, DPLA
Executive Director of Pharmacy Operations
Mount Sinai Health System New York, NY
Dawn Rana, RPh, D.Ph
Senior Director of Oncology Solutions
Vizient
San Antonio, TX
Meena Rupani, RPh
Director, Strategic Sourcing, Clinical Products
Trinity Health Livonia, MI
Rolla Sweis, PharmD, M.A., BCPS
VP of Hospital Operations
Advocate Christ Medical Center Oak Lawn, IL
Myra Thomas, RPh, MBA
AVP Pharmacy
Ochsner Medical Center New Orleans, LA
Over the past year, our Educational Advisory Board has volunteered their valuable time to help us create an outstanding agenda. We greatly appreciate their dedication and want to recognize this esteemed group for all their hard work.
Simply put, without their time and expertise, this event would not have been possible. Hospital Pharmacy Board Chair
Ruth Cassidy, B.S., PharmD, MBA FACHE
SVP, Clinical Support Services/Chief Pharmacy Officer
34
Educational Review Systems is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. Participants of the session who complete the evaluation and provide accurate NABP e-Profile information will have their credit for 10.5 contact hours (1.05 CEU) submitted to CPE Monitor as early as 14 days after the event and no later than 60 days after the event. Please know that if accurate e-Profile information is not provided within 60 days of the event, credit cannot be claimed after that time. The participant is accountable for verifying the accurate posting of CE credit to their CPE Monitor account within 60 days.


Developing high-quality, essential, live-saving medicines
Fresenius Kabi helps support health care providers with safety, flexibility and choice by offering a comprehensive portfolio of generic products in a wide variety of delivery platforms.
We leverage our 100-year history so that our customers can deliver therapies in ways that are safe, efficient, responsible and affordable.
We strive to ensure our customers and clinicians have the most accurate and transparent information so they can make informed, timely decisions on behalf of patients.
That’s How Fresenius Kabi Brings Confidence Within Reach.
Learn more about Fresenius Kabi at www.fresenius-kabi.com/us
©2020 Fresenius Kabi USA, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 1047-CORP-05-09/20


DAILY
8:00am—5:00pm CT
Session ONE Tuesday, November 10
Session TWO Wednesday, November 11
Session THREE Thursday, November 12
Session FOUR Tuesday, November 17
Session FIVE Wednesday, November 18
Session SIX Thursday, November 19
36


sponsored by


How to Prepare
• Schedule your Virtual System Test. If you have not done so already, contact us as soon as possible (615-449-6234) to schedule a meeting with our staff to ensure your system is ready for the Virtual Reverse Expo.
• Chrome is the ideal browser for the Virtual Reverse Expo platform.
• Disconnect VPN. Not doing so may prevent you from connecting to the
Virtual Reverse Expo platform.
• Check WiFi Speed. Streaming other devices during your virtual meetings
may impact speed.
• Check Microphone & Video Capability. Use of headphones is suggested.
• Check your Virtual Meeting Space. Make sure you’re satisfied with the
lighting level, camera angle, and items that appear in the background when you’re on camera.
Virtual Reverse Expo Day
• Early = On Time. Login to your Virtual Reverse Expo dashboard 15 minutes in advance of each meeting to prevent any lost meeting time due to technical issues.
• Focus on the Conversation. Contact information will appear on the screen but don’t worry about writing it down during your meeting—a summary email will be sent each day which will include contact information for all of your Virtual Reverse Expo meetings.
• Suppliers. Bring your best “elevator pitch” and a warm smile. Share your product or service and allow time for the Provider to share their needs— you may be able to meet them in a way you did not initially anticipate.
• Providers. Be honest about whether each product or service will meet your needs; if you express interest to a Supplier during a meeting, be prepared for and please respond to follow up communication from them.
System Requirements
• Desktop – Windows 10 & MacOS 10.7 Mojave 4th gen Intel Core i3, 4GB Ram
• Google Chrome (preferred)
• Firefox
• Microsoft Edge Chromium • Safari 11+
• Mobile – Android 7.0 • Google Chrome
• Mobile – iOS 12.2 • Safari 11+
• Networking – Recommended • Download 5.0 mb/s
• Open TCP port 443
• UDP port 3478
• Networking – Minimum • Download 1.2 mb/s
• Open TCP port 443
• Speakers & Microphone – Built-in or USB • Webcam – Built-in or USB
Remember: Where you build your best relationships, you’ll build your best business.
38
Tips for Success!


It’s been an unprecedented time in health care, especially in the surgical suite. But now, surgery volumes are returning and it’s critical that your patients have access to reliable, safe medications throughout their surgical experience.
From Pre-op relaxation to pain-free post anesthesia, patients and practitioners should have confidence in the safety
of their medications. SCA Pharma is committed to meeting that need.
We’ve been working during the surgical shutdown to prepare for this “new normal”. SCA Pharma has increased capacity to meet demand and enhanced our Buy-and-Ship portal to simplify ordering. We’ve also partnered with DoseID and Kit Check.TM Simply stated, you can:
x Easily order the required quantities, delivery method and concentration
x Track usage
x Manage inventory
x Deliver confidence to practitioners
and patients
SCA Pharma is here to help hospitals and surgical centers meet today’s OR needs. COVID has been unpredictable. Treating your surgical patients doesn’t have to be.
From PRE-OP To PACU,
We Deliver The Critical Medicines You Depend On.
To learn more visit us at SCAPharma.com.


Special thanks to each Provider for joining our
2020 Virtual Fall Hospital Pharmacy Reverse Expo
Please Note Registration is still open and this list is growing every day. The conference book will be updated weekly,
but in the meantime, please visit the Confirmed Provider page on our website to see a real-time list of Provider attendees.
Adirondack Health, Saranac Lake, NY, David Coriale, Director of Pharmacy
AdventHealth Corporate, Maitland, FL, Shara Hutchinson, PharmD MS BCPS, PHSO Corporate Pharmacy Manager AdventHealth Daytona Beach, Daytona Beach, FL, Marshall Hughey, Director of Pharmacy
AdventHealth Heartland Region, Sebring, FL, Sreenivas Challa, PharmD, Administrative Director of Pharmacy Services AdventHealth North Pinellas, Tarpon Springs, FL, George Malone, PharmD, Director of Pharmacy
AdventHealth Ocala, Ocala, FL, Carlette Norwood-Williams, PharmD, CPh, Director of Pharmacy
AdventHealth Orlando, Orlando, FL, Jennifer Sippel-Tompkins, Director of Pharmacy
AdventHealth Orlando, Orlando, FL, Zachary Hagen, Pharmacy Supply Chain Coordinator
Adventist Health (West Coast), Roseville CA, Mandy Kazminy, Pharmacy Manager
Advocate Good Samaritan Hospital, Downers Grove, IL, Megan Corrigan, Director of Pharmacy
Altru Hospital, Grand Forks, ND, Rosemary Kalenze, Outpatient Pharmacy Manager
Amita Health, Lisle, IL, William Pong, Pharm.D., MBA, System Director Pharmacy Services
AMITA Health Saint Joseph Medical Center, Joliet, IL, Nicole Costa, PharmD, Pharmacy Manager
AMITA Health-South, LaGrange, IL, David Tsang, Director of Pharmacy
AMITA Health-Southwest, Joliet, IL, Kim Janicek, Regional Director of Pharmacy
AnMed Health Medical Center, Anderson, SC, Jim Hammett, Manager, Pharmacy Dept
AnMed Health Medical Center, Anderson, SC, Jennifer Thompson, PharmD, MBA, Pharmacy Operations Manager Antelope Valley Hospital, Lancaster, CA, Daryl Malabute, Pharmacy Buyer
Antelope Valley Hospital, Lancaster, CA, Ross Bauman, Pharm.D., Executive Director of Professional Services
Antelope Valley Hospital, Lancaster, CA, Amber Miller, PharmD, BCPS, BCCCP, Clinical Pharmacy Coordinator
Antelope Valley Hospital, Lancaster, CA, Le Du, Assistant Director of Pharmacy
Archbold Medical Center, Thomasville, GA, Andrea Jarzyniecki, Pharm.D., BCPS, Director of Pharmacy
Archbold Medical Center, Quitman, GA, Felicia Blake, Pharmacy Manager
Archbold Medical Center, Thomasville, GA, April Workman, Pharmacy Procurement Coordinator/Buyer
Ardent, Nashville, TN, Nicolle Rychlick, Americas Division Director of Pharmacy
Ardent Health Services, Longview, TX, Robert Mayne, Texas Regional Director of Pharmacy
Arkansas Methodist Medical Center, Paragould, AR, Stan Carmack, Pharm.D., Director of Pharmacy
Arkansas Methodist Medical Center, Paragould, AR, Terri Jenkins, Pharmacy Buyer
Arkansas Methodist Medical Center, Paragould, AR, Sarah Newberry, Hospital Pharmacy Manager
Arrowhead Regional Medical Center, Colton, CA, Andrew Lowe, Pharm.D., Regional VP, Clinical Pharmacy
Ascension Health, Jacksonville, FL, Clyde Spence, PharmD, MBA, Senior Director of Pharmacy
Ascension Wisconsin Milwaukee- South, Milwaukee, WI, Christopher Dykstra, Regional Director of Pharmacy
Auburn Community Hospital, Auburn, NY, Koth Cassavaugh, Director of Pharmacy
Austin State Hospital, Austin, TX, Lisa Mican, Director of Pharmacy
Avera St. Luke’s Hospital, Aberdeen, SD, Alvin Haugen, PharmD, Pharmacy Director
Avita Health System, Galion, OH, Christian Nygaard, Pharmacy Business Manager
Ballad Health, Johnson City, TN, Rebecca Hoover, Multi-facility Director of Pharmacy- NW Market
Banner – University Medical Center Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ, Jeff Anderson, Pharm.D., BCPS, FACHE, Director of Pharmacy Banner Baywood Medical Center, Mesa, AZ, Jeremy Hall, Director of Pharmacy
Baptist Cancer Center, Memphis, TN, Alexander Quesenberry, PharmD. BCOP, Director of Pharmacy
Baptist Health Louisville, Louisville, KY, Celina Cummings, Director of Pharmacy
Baptist Health South Florida, Coral Gables, FL, Lisa Colodny, PharmD, MBA, Director of Pharmacy Services Supply Chain Baptist Healthcare System Inc., Louisville, KY, Nilesh Desai, MBA, BS, RPh, CPPS, Chief Pharmacy Officer
Baptist Hospital - Pensacola FL, Pensacola, FL, Rudy Seelmann, Director of Pharmacy
40


FERAHEME® provides established efficacy and safety profile, flexible scheduling
FERAHEME Delivers 1 Gram of Iron in Just 2 Infusions as early as 3 days apart
Flexible scheduling gives your patients the freedom to receive the iron they need as early as 3 days
3-8 DAYS
APART
volumes from 50 – 200mL
• Once diluted, Feraheme can be stored at room temperature for up to 4 hours or refrigerated for up to 48 hours
• Many of AMAG’s commercial supply chain partners are located within North America, and we currently have
Administration1:
• Feraheme only requires 2 infusions limiting the number of visits
• No pre-treatment or test dose is required
Dosing1:
• Feraheme infusions can be dosed as early as 3 days apart, allowing for a complete course of therapy in less than a week
123 • Feraheme can be diluted in a range of
Management of materials1:
1 GRAM 2 INFUSIONS
• Feraheme can be mixed with 0.9% NaCl (normal saline) or 5% dextrose
OF IV IRON (510 MG EACH)
adequate stock of all our products
FERAHEME® (ferumoxytol injection), for intravenous use Brief Summary:
Consult the package insert for complete prescribing information.
INDICATIONS AND USAGE: Feraheme is indicated for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in adult patients who have intolerance to oral iron or have had unsatisfactory response to oral iron, or who have chronic kidney disease (CKD).
CONTRAINDICATIONS: Feraheme is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to Feraheme or any of its components or have a history of allergic reaction to any intravenous iron product.
WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS, Serious Hypersensitivity Reactions: Fatal and serious hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis, presenting with cardiac/cardiorespiratory arrest, clinically significant hypotension, syncope, or unresponsiveness have occurred in patients receiving Feraheme. Other adverse reactions potentially associated with hypersensitivity have occurred (pruritus, rash, urticaria, and wheezing). These reactions have occurred following the first dose or subsequent doses in patients in whom a previous Feraheme dose was tolerated.
Patients with a history of multiple drug allergies may have a greater risk of anaphylaxis with parenteral iron products. Carefully consider the potential risks and benefits before administering Feraheme to these patients.
Only administer Feraheme as an intravenous infusion over at least 15 minutes and only when personnel and therapies are immediately available for the treatment of anaphylaxis and other hypersensitivity reactions. Closely observe patients for signs and symptoms of hypersensitivity including monitoring of blood pressure and pulse during and after Feraheme administration for at least 30 minutes and until clinically stable following completion of each infusion.
In a clinical study in patients with IDA, regardless of etiology, hypersensitivity reactions were reported in 0.4% (4/997) of subjects receiving Feraheme administered as intravenous infusion over at least 15 minutes. These included one patient with severe hypersensitivity reaction and three patients with moderate hypersensitivity reactions.
In clinical studies predominantly in patients with IDA and CKD, serious hypersensitivity reactions were reported in 0.2% (4/1,806) of subjects receiving Feraheme (administered as a rapid intravenous injection – prior method of administration no longer approved). Other adverse reactions potentially associated with hypersensitivity (e.g., pruritus, rash, urticaria or wheezing) were reported in 3.5% (63/1,806) of these subjects.
In the post-marketing experience, fatal and serious anaphylactic type reactions presenting with cardiac/ cardiorespiratory arrest, clinically significan t hypotension, syncope, and unresponsiveness have been reported. Elderly patients with multiple or serious co-morbidities who experience hypersensitivity reactions and/or hypotension following administration of Feraheme may have more severe outcomes.
Hypotension: Feraheme may cause clinically significant hypotension.
In a clinical study with Feraheme in patients with IDA, regardless of etiology,
moderate hypotension was reported in 0.2% (2/997) of subjects receiving Feraheme administered as intravenous infusion over at least 15 minutes.
In clinical studies in patients with IDA and CKD, hypotension was reported in 1.9% (35/1,806) of subjects, including three patients with serious hypotensive reactions, who had received Feraheme as a rapid intravenous injection (prior method of administration no longer approved).
Hypotension has also been reported in the post-marketing experience. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of hypotension following each Feraheme administration.
Iron Overload: Excessive therapy with parenteral iron can lead to excess storage of iron with the possibility of iatrogenic hemosiderosis. Regularly monitor the hematologic response during parenteral iron therapy. Do not administer Feraheme to patients with iron overload. In the 24 hours following administration of Feraheme, laboratory assays may overestimate serum iron and transferrin bound iron by also measuring the iron in the Feraheme complex.
Magnetic Resonance (MR) Imaging Test Interference: Administration of Feraheme may transiently affect the diagnostic ability of MR imaging. Conduct anticipated MR imaging studies prior to the administration of Feraheme. Alteration of MR imaging studies may persist for up to 3 months following the last Feraheme dose. If MR imaging is required within 3 months after Feraheme administration, use T1- or proton density-weighted MR pulse sequences to minimize the Feraheme effects; MR imaging using T2-weighted pulse sequences should not be performed earlier than 4 weeks after the administration of Feraheme. Maximum alteration of vascular MR imaging is anticipated to be evident for 1 – 2 days following Feraheme administration.
Feraheme will not interfere with X-ray, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), ultrasound or nuclear medicine imaging.
ADVERSE REACTIONS: The following serious adverse reactions are described elsewhere in the labeling: Serious Hypersensitivity Reactions, Hypotension, Iron Overload, Magnetic Resonance (MR) Imaging Test Interference.
Clinical Trial Experience: Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.
In clinical studies, 3,968 subjects were exposed to Feraheme. Of these subjects 31% were male and the median age was 54 years (range of 18 to 96 years).
The data described below reflect exposure to Feraheme in 997 patients exposed to a 1.02 g course of ferumoxytol administered as two 510 mg intravenous (IV) doses: 992 subjects (99.5%) received at least 1 complete dose of ferumoxytol and 946 subjects (94.9%) received 2 complete doses. The mean cumulative IV Iron exposure was 993.80 ±119.085 mg.
The safety of Feraheme was studied in a randomized, multicenter, double-blind clinical trial in patients with IDA (IDA Trial 3). In this trial, patients were randomized to two intravenous infusions of 510 mg (1.02 g) of Feraheme (n=997), or two intravenous infusions of 750 mg (1.500 g) of ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) (n=1000). Both intravenous irons were infused over a period of at least 15 minutes. Most patients received their second infusion of Feraheme and FCM 7(+1) days after
Dose 1.
The mean (SD) age of the study population (N=1997) was 55.2 (17.16) years. The majority of patients were female (76.1%), white (71.4%) and non-Hispanic (81.8%). The mean (SD) hemoglobin at baseline for all patients was 10.4 (1.5) g/dl.
Serious adverse events were reported in 3.6% (71/1997) of ferumoxytol- and FCM-treated patients. The most common (≥2 subjects) serious AEs reported in Feraheme-treated patients were syncope, gastroenteritis, seizure, pneumonia, hemorrhagic anemia, and acute kidney injury. In FCM-treated patients the most common (≥2 subjects) serious AEs were syncope,cardiac failure congestive, angina pectoris, and atrial fibrillation.
Adverse reactions related to Feraheme and reported by ≥ 1% of Feraheme-treated patients in IDA Trial 3 following administration of Feraheme 2 x 510 mg (N=997)
or ferric carboxymaltose 2 x 750 mg (N =1000) were headache (3.4% Feraheme, 3.1% ferric carboxymaltose), nausea (1.8, 3.4), dizziness (1.5, 1.6), fatigue (1.5, 1.2), diarrhea (1, 0.8), and back pain (1, 0.4).
In IDA Trial 3, adverse reactions leading to treatment discontinuation and occurring in ≥ 2 Feraheme-treated patients included arthralgia (0.3%), dyspnea (0.3%), flushing (0.2%), chest discomfort (0.2%), chest pain (0.2%), nausea (0.2%), back pain (0.2%), dizziness (0.2%) and headache (0.2%).
Across two clinical trials in patients with IDA (IDA Trial 1 and 2), patients were randomized to: two injections (rapid intravenous injection - prior method of administration no longer approved) of 510 mg of Feraheme (n=1,014), placebo (n=200), or five injections/infusions of 200 mg of iron sucrose (n=199). Most patients received their second Feraheme injection 3 to 8 days after the first injection. Adverse reactions related to Feraheme and reported by ≥ 1% of Feraheme-treated patients in these trials were similar to those seen in Trial 3.
In Trials 1 and 2, adverse reactions leading to treatment discontinuation and occurring in ≥ 2 Feraheme-treated patients included hypersensitivity (0.6%), hypotension (0.3%), and rash (0.2%).
In addition, a total of 634 subjects enrolled in and completed participation in a Phase 3 open label extension study. Of these, 337 subjects met IDA treatment criteria
and received Feraheme. Adverse reactions following this repeat Feraheme dosing were generally similar in type and frequency to those observed after the first two intravenous injections.
Across three randomized clinical trials in patients with IDA and CKD (CKD Trials 1, 2, and 3), a total of 605 patients were exposed to two injections of 510 mg of Feraheme and a total of 280 patients were exposed to 200 mg/day of oral iron for 21 days. Most patients received their second Feraheme injection 3 to 8 days after the first injection.
Adverse reactions related to Feraheme and reported by ≥ 1% of Feraheme-treated patients in the CKD randomized clinical trials following administration of Feraheme
2 x 510 mg (n=605) or oral iron (n=280) were nausea (3.1% Feraheme, 7.5% oral iron), dizziness (2.6, 1.8), hypotension (2.5, 0.4), peripheral edema (2, 3.2), headache (1.8, 2.1), edema (1.5, 1.4), vomiting (1.5, 5), abdominal pain (1.3, 1.4), chest pain (1.3, 0.7), cough (1.3, 1.4), pruritus (1.2, 0.4), pyrexia (1, 0.7), back pain (1, 0), muscle spasms (1, 1.4), dyspnea (1, 1.1), and rash (1, 0.4). Diarrhea (4%), constipation (2.1%) and hypertension (1%) have also been reported in Feraheme-treated patients.
In these clinical trials in patients with IDA and CKD, adverse reactions leading to treatment discontinuation and occurring in ≥ 2 Feraheme-treated patients included hypotension (0.4%), chest pain (0.3%), and dizziness (0.3%).
Following completion of the controlled phase of the trials, 69 patients received two additional 510 mg intravenous injections of Feraheme (for a total cumulative dose of 2.04 g). Adverse reactions following this repeat Feraheme dosing were similar in character and frequency to those observed following the first two intravenous injections.
Postmarketing Experience: Because adverse reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.
The following serious adverse reactions have been reported from the post-marketing experience with Feraheme: fatal, life-threatening, and serious anaphylactic-type reactions, cardiac/cardiorespiratory arrest, clinically significant hypotension, syncope, unresponsiveness, loss of consciousness, tachycardia/rhythm abnormalities, angioedema, ischemic myocardial events, congestive heart failure, pulse absent, and cyanosis. These adverse reactions have usually occurred within 30 minutes after the administration of Feraheme. Reactions have occurred following the first dose or subsequent doses of Feraheme.
See full Prescribing Information for Feraheme available at www.feraheme.com.
AMAG Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 1100 Winter Street. Waltham, MA 02451. PP-FRH-US-00102
WARNING: RISK FOR SERIOUS HYPERSENSITIVITY/ ANAPHYLAXIS REACTIONS
Fatal and serious hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis have occurred in patients receiving Feraheme. Initial symptoms may include hypotension, syncope, unresponsiveness, cardiac/cardiorespiratory arrest.
• Only administer Feraheme as an intravenous infusion over at least 15 minutes and only when personnel and therapies are immediately available for the treatment of anaphylaxis and other hypersensitivity reactions.
• Observe for signs or symptoms of hypersensitivity reactions during and for at least 30 minutes following Feraheme infusion including monitoring of blood pressure and pulse during and after Feraheme administration.
• Hypersensitivity reactions have occurred in patients in whom a previous Feraheme dose was tolerated.
1. Feraheme [package insert]. Waltham, MA: AMAG Pharmaceuticals, Inc; 2018. ©2020 AMAG Pharmaceuticals, Inc. All rights reserved. PP-FRH-US-00329 10/2020


providerattendees by facility
Please Note Registration is still open and this list is growing every day. The conference book will be updated weekly,
but in the meantime, please visit the Confirmed Provider page on our website to see a real-time list of Provider attendees.
Baptist Hospitals of Southeast Texas, Beaumont, TX, Brenna Johnson, PharmD, BCPS, Pharmacy Operations Manager
Baptist Hospitals of Southeast Texas, Beaumont, TX, Aily Powell, Director of Pharmacy
Baptist Medical Center - Jacksonville, Jacksonville, FL, Nicole Blackwelder, Director of Pharmacy
Baton Rouge General Medical Center Mid City, Baton Rouge, LA, Myra Black, RPh, Director of Outpatient and Specialty Pharmacy Baton Rouge General Medical Center Mid City, Baton Rouge, LA, Sundee Corban, Pharmacy Purchaser
Baxter Regional Medical Center, Mountain Home, AR, Tracy Fossler, PharmD, Director of Pharmacy
Beaumont Health, Southfield, MI, Heidi Pillen, Corporate Director of Pharmacy
Beaumont Hospital, Wayne, Wayne, MI, Richard Taylor, Director of Pharmacy
Beaumont Pharmacy Solutions, Madison Heights, MI, Scott Sterrett, Director of Pharmacy - Specialty & Home Infusion Beckley ARH Hospital, Beckley, WV, Leann Umberger, Director of Pharmacy
Beebe Healthcare, Lewes, DE, Justine Donohoe, RPh, Pharmacy Operations Manager
Benefis Health System, Great Falls, MT, Jamie Leonard, PharmD, Director of Pharmacy
Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital-Plymouth, Plymouth, MA, Kristina McGill, MS, RPh, Director of Pharmacy
Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital-Plymouth, Plymouth, MA, Daniel Trinh, Pharmacy Manager
Bibb Medical Center, Centreville, AL, Jennifer Guthrie, Dr., Director of Pharmacy
Bibb Medical Center, Centreville, AL, Kailee James, Pharmacy Buyer
Bon Secours Mercy St. Francis Health System, Greenville, SC, Roseann Becher, Director of Pharmacy
Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, Bhavesh Shah, R.Ph., BCOP, Senior Director of Specialty & Hematology/Oncology Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, Kelly Horton, Manager Pharmacy Operations and Purchasing
Brandywine Hospital, Coatesville, PA, Stephanie Goldman, Director of Pharmacy
Brandywine Hospital, Coatesville, PA, Reshma Patel, Pharmacy Manager
Broadlawns Medical Center, Des Moines, IA, Jarek Vetter, PharmD, Pharmacy Clinic Coordinator
Bronson Healthcare Group, Kalamazoo, MI, Troy Shirley, PharmD, MBA, System Director of Pharmacy
Bronson Healthcare Group, Kalamazoo, MI, Sandeep Mehta, Pharmacy Manager
Brookdale University Hospital, Brooklyn, NY, Maria Claudio, PharmD, BCPS, Associate Director of Pharmacy
Brookdale University Hospital, Brooklyn, NY, Johnny Ha, PharmD, Director of Pharmacy
Brookdale University Hospital, Brooklyn, NY, Sharon Yam, Assistant Director of Pharmacy
Brunswick Hospital Center, Amityville, NY, Adele Buatti-McHugh, MS, RPh, PMSP, Director of Pharmacy
CAMC Women and Children’s Hospital, Charleston, WV, Jennifer Gorrell, PharmD, Director of Pharmacy
Cancer Treatment Centers of America Phoenix, Goodyear, AZ, Debra Burnside, Pharmacy Purchasing Agent
Cancer Treatment Centers of America Phoenix, Goodyear, AZ, Cheri Andrew, Pharmacy Billing/Purchaser/ Buyer Specialist Cape Regional Medical Center, Cape May Court House, NJ, Richard Artymowicz, Pharm.D., Director of Pharmacy Services Capital Region Medical Center, Jefferson City, MO, Denis Hamilton, Pharm. D., Director of Pharmacy
Capitol Regional Medical Center, Tallahassee, FL, Michael Jackson, Pharm.D, MBA, Director of Pharmacy
Carilion Clinic, Roanoke, VA, William Lee, D.Ph, MPA, FASCP, Senior Director, Pharmacy System Innovations
Carilion Roanoke Memorial Hospital, Roanoke, VA, Ronald Spellman, RPh, Director, Pharmacy Compliance & Med Safety Carilion Roanoke Memorial Hospital, Roanoke, VA, Larry Mullins, BS, MBA, Pharmacy Director
Carilion Roanoke Memorial Hospital, Roanoke, VA, Clinton Atwater, PharmD, MSA, Pharmacy Manager
Carilion Roanoke Memorial Hospital, Roanoke, VA, Cheryl Boone, B.S. Pharm, MSHA, Pharmacy Manager
Carle Foundation Hospital, Urbana, IL, Linda Fred, Director of Pharmacy
Carle Foundation Hospital, Urbana, IL, Katie Koch, 340B Business Manager- Inpatient Pharmacy
CaroMont Health, Gastonia, NC, Mark Chaparro, PharmD, Director of Pharmacy
Carroll Hospital, Westminster, MD, Larry Siegel, PharmD, Director of Pharmacy
Carroll Hospital Center, Westminster, MD, Timothy Wu, PharmD, MBA, Pharmacy Operations Manager
CentraCare, St. Cloud, MN, Mary Phipps, PharmD, Senior Director of Pharmacy
Central Washington Hospital, Wenatchee, WA, Larry Pelham, RPh, MS, FASHP, Director of Pharmacy
Chatuge Regional Hospital, Hiawassee, GA, Karen Kelley, Director of Pharmacy
CHI Memorial Hospital Georgia, Fort Oglethorpe, GA, Carey Smith, Director of Pharmacy
CHI St. Lukes Health, Houston, TX, Venita Papillion, PharmD, MBA, Division VP of Pharmacy
Children’s Hospital of San Antonio, Irving, TX, Tina Collins, Director of Med Safety
42


Thanks for all you do
To all the healthcare workers on the front line in the fight against COVID-19, we thank you.
SEE YOU IN


providerattendees by facility
Please Note Registration is still open and this list is growing every day. The conference book will be updated weekly,
but in the meantime, please visit the Confirmed Provider page on our website to see a real-time list of Provider attendees.
Children’s National Health System, Washington, DC, Eric Balmir, BS, MS, PharmD., CIM, Chief of Pharmacy Christiana Care (Union Hospital), Elkton, MD, Jeffrey Baron, RPh., MBA/HCA, Director of Pharmacy Services CHRISTUS Health, Irving, TX, Joe Ybarra, PharmD, BCNSP, Director of Corporate Clinical Pharmacy
CHRISTUS Santa Rosa Hospital - Westover Hills, San Antonio, TX, David Chan, PharmD, MBA, Director of Pharmacy Claxton-Hepburn Medical Center, Ogdensburg, NY, Greg Guimond, RPh, Director of Pharmacy
College Medical Center, Long Beach, CA, Mary Range, Pharmacy Buyer
College Medical Center, Long Beach, CA, Marvin Finnefrock, Pharm D, Executive Vice President Pharmacy Columbia-St. Mary’s (Ascension), Milwaukee, WI, Virginia Mendoza, Pharmacy Operations Manager
Columbus Regional Healthcare System, Columbus, GA, Romina Anazagasty, Pharmacy Manager
Comanche County Memorial Hospital, Lawton, OK, Lisa Dodson, Clinical Pharmacy Coordinator
Community Hospital, Munster, IN, Elizabeth Clements, PharmD, Director of Pharmacy
Community Hospital, Munster, IN, Matthew Plassmeier, Medication Quality and Safety
Community Hospital Corporation, Plano, TX, Amanda Sherred, Corp Director of Pharmacy Clinical Integration Concord Hospital, Concord, NH, David DePiero, MS, RPh, Pharmacy Manager
Conway Medical Center, Conway, SC, Robert Gajewski, BS Pharmacy, Director of Pharmacy
Cottonwood Creek Behavioral Hospital, Boise, ID, Stephen Carlson, PharmD, Pharmacy Director
Covenant Health System, Lubbock, TX, Wesley Wells, Regional Director of Pharmacy, Regional Director of Pharmacy Covenant HealthCare, Saginaw, MI, Aaron Feinauer, Ambulatory Pharmacy Manager
Covenant Medical Inc. Harrison, Saginaw, MI, Terry Wernette, Rph, Director of Pharmacy
Cox Health North, Springfield, MO, Noelle Callaway, BS Pharm, Pharmacy Supervisor
CoxHealth, Springfield, MO, Louis Kynard, Pharm D., MBA, BCSCP, FAB, System Director of Pharmacy
CoxHealth, Barton Co, MO, Mica Henry, Pharmacy Manager
CoxHealth, Monett, MO, Scott Kaufman, Pharmacy Manager
CoxHealth, Bramspm MO, Lance Lake, RPh, Pharmacy Manager
CoxHealth, Springfield, MO, James Houpt, PharmD, MBA, BCPS, Director of Pharmacy Operations
Crestwood Medical Center, Huntsville, AL, Marshall Robbins, PharmD, Director of Pharmacy
Crystal Run Healthcare (23 Clinics), Middletown, NY, Theresa Dolson, PharmD, Director of Pharmacy
Dallas Medical Center (Prime Healthcare), Dallas, TX, Guinxe Gabriel, Pharm.D., MBA, Director of Pharmacy Danbury Hospital, Danbury, CT, Jamie Chadwick, Assistant Director of Pharmacy
Danbury Hospital, Danbury, CT, Louis Tuccitto, Director of Pharmacy
Deborah Heart & Lung Center, Browns Mills, NJ, Calethia Shockley, CPhT, Pharmacy Buyer
Deborah Heart and Lung Center, Browns Mills, NJ, Deborah Sadowski, RPh, MHA, Director of Pharmacy Services Delta Regional Medical Center, Greenville, MS, Odell Glenn, Director of Pharmacy
Doctors Hospital at Renaissance, Edinburg, TX, Gavino Garza, BS Pharm, Pharmacy Director
Doylestown Hospital, Doylestown, PA, Kathryn Schwartz, R.Ph, Pharmacy Operations Manager
Doylestown Hospital, Doylestown, PA, Christine Roussel, PharmD, BCOP, BCSCP, Director of Pharmacy Doylestown Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, Ryan Centafont, Pharmacy Clinical Manager
Duncan Regional Hospital, Duncan, OK, Dana Berryhill, DPh, Director of Pharmacy
East Alabama Medical Center, Opelika, AL, Laura Matthews, PharmD, Director of Pharmacy
East Alabama Medical Center, Opelika, AL, Dana Caypless, Manager of Pharmacy Purchasing & 340B Compliance East Alabama Medical Center, Opelika, AL, Kara Latham, Pharmacy Manager
East Jefferson General Hospital, Metairie, LA, Michael McKendall, M.S., PharmD, Director of Pharmacy
East Jefferson General Hospital, Gretna, LA, Lisa Boothby, PharmD, MBA, BCPS, Director of Pharmacy
East Ohio Regional Hospital, Martins Ferry, OH, Zachary Elerick, Director of Pharmacy
Eastern Niagara Hospital, Lockport, NY, Kaitlyn Reinhardt, Director of Pharmacy
El Camino Health, Mountain View, CA, Andre Rossi, Pharm. D., MSM, CCHP, Pharmacy Manager, Operation Services El Paso Children’s Hospital, El Paso, TX, Erika Estrada, PharmD, Director of Pharmacy
Elmhurst Hospital Center, Elmhurst, NY, Teresa Cortez, Procurement Pharmacy
Encompass Health, Brooksville, FL, John Sievers, Southeast Regional Director of Pharmacy
Erie County Medical Center, Buffalo, NY, Ashley Halloran, Director of Pharmacy
44


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providerattendees by facility
Please Note Registration is still open and this list is growing every day. The conference book will be updated weekly,
but in the meantime, please visit the Confirmed Provider page on our website to see a real-time list of Provider attendees.
Erlanger Health System, Chattanooga, TN, Benjamin Hammonds, Director of Pharmacy Operations
Erlanger Health System, Chattanooga, TN, Katie Duffy, Senior Director of Pharmacy
Ernest Health (25 Hospitals), Mechanicsburg, PA, Lisa Baird, Pharm.D., MS, MBA, National Director of Pharmacy Operations Exempla Good Samaritan Medical Center, Lafayette, Kim Tate, PharmD MHA, Director of Pharmacy
Flagler Hospital, St. Augustine, FL, Jacqueline Moncrief, Purchasing Coordinator
Flowers Hospital, Dothan, AL, Joe Dalton, RPh, Pharmacy Director
Freeman Health System, Joplin, MO, Jeffery Thompson, PharmD, Vice President of Pharmacy Services
Freeman Health System, Joplin, MO, Greg Cobble, RPh, D.Ph, Retail and Contract Pharmacy Director
Freeman Health System, Joplin, MO, Andrea Sneed, Director of Pharmacy Operations
Froedtert & The Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, Melanie Engels, Pharmacy Manager
Genesis Healthcare System, Zanesville, OH, Laura Kelso, RPh. MHA, Director of Pharmacy
Golisano Children’s Hospital of SW Florida, Fort Myers, FL, Diana Elnemr, Director of Pharmacy
Good Samaritan Hospital - San Jose, San Jose, CA, Mei Poon, Director of Pharmacy
Good Samaritan Hospital (CHI), Kearney, NE, Nicki Bohl, PharmD, Director of Pharmacy
Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center, West Islip, NY, James Alfiero, Director of Pharmacy
Good Samaritan Medical Center, Brockton, MA, Richard Bautz, PharmD, MBA-HM, DPLA, Director of Pharmacy
Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Hospital, Allentown, PA, Robert Shuminski, RPh, MBA, Director of Pharmacy
Greater Baltimore Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, Julia West, Assistant Director of Pharmacy
Gulf Coast Regional Medical Center (HCA), Panama City, FL, Christopher Jinks, PharmD, BCPS, BCCCP, Pharmacy Clinical Manager Hackensack UMC Mountainside, Montclair, NJ, Julia Ilyin, Director of Pharmacy
Harris Health System, Houston, TX, Rodney Baty, Sterile Product Manager
Harvard University Health Services, Cambridge, MA, Benedict DiRusso, Director of Pharmacy
Hays Medical Center, Hays, KS, Willy Cadoret, Director of Pharmacy
Haywood Regional Medical Center, Clyde, NC, Tracey Truesdale, PharmD, Clinical Pharmacy Manager
HCA MidAmerica Division, Shawnee, KS, Joseph Burwinkle, BS, MS, CSC Pharmacy Manager
Health Central Hospital, Ocoee, FL, Bhavna Patel-Pandya, Assistant Director of Pharmacy
HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital, Montgomery, AL, Clinton Peevy, Pharm.D., Director of Pharmacy
HealthTrust, Nashville, TN, Vincent Jackson, B.S., Pharm D., Vice President, Pharmacy Service Group
HealthTrust / ROi, St. Louis, MO, Jill Webb, Director, Pharmacy Contracting
HelenHayesHospital,West Haverstraw,NY,FrancineWeber,PharmD,MS,DirectorofPharmacyServices
Hemet Valley Medical Center, Hemet, CA, Phyllis Bennett-Mobley, Director of Pharmacy
Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI, Rox Gatia, Pharm.D., MHSA, BCPS, System Director of Pharmacy
Henry Ford Wyandotte Hospital, Wyandotte, MI, Gladys Dabaja, Pharm.D., Director of Pharmacy
Heywood Hospital, Gardner, MA, Martin Goldberg, RPh, MBA, Director of Pharmacy
Holyoke Medical Center, Holyoke, MA, Paul Barrett, PharmD, MPA, BCPS, FASHP, CPHQ, Director of Pharmacy
HonorHealth, Scottsdale, AZ, Carol Welch, PharmD, MS, Director of Pharmacy
Hospital for Joint Diseases (NYU), New York, NY, Matthew Tobin, Assistant Director of Pharmacy
Howard University Hospital, Washington, DC, Abimbola Ogunsunlade, RPh, MBA, Director of Pharmacy Services
Huntington Hospital, Pasadena, CA, Tommy Mai, Director of Pharmacy
Huntsville Hospital, Huntsville, AL, Michael McDaniel, RPh, MBA, FASHP, Executive Director of System Pharmacy
Huntsville Hospital, Huntsville, AL, Donna Huggins, RPh, Manager- Pharmacy Sterile Products
Huntsville Hospital, Huntsville, AL, Berkley Sykes, PharmD, Pharmacy Operations Manager
Huntsville Hospital, Huntsville, AL, Jack Adams, R.Ph., Pharmacy Director
Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, IN, Jon Brown, System Manager-Pharmacy Sourcing and Logistics
Inova Health System, Falls Church, VA, Meena Morgan, PharmD, MHA, Senior Director
Inova Health System, Falls Church, VA, Ana Ramon Albors, Narcotics & Regulatory Manager
Inspira Medical Center Vineland, Vineland, NJ, Sabrina Romean, RPh, JD, Director of Pharmacy
Intalere, St. Louis, MO, Greg Chavez, BS. RPh., Senior Director, Pharmacy Specialist
Intalere, St. Louis, MO, Stephanie Webber, Category Lead- Pharmacy
Intermountain Healthcare, Taylorsville, UT, DeVere Day, PharmD, Pharmacy Automation Manager
46


providerattendees by facility
Please Note Registration is still open and this list is growing every day. The conference book will be updated weekly,
but in the meantime, please visit the Confirmed Provider page on our website to see a real-time list of Provider attendees.
Jackson Hospital, Montgomery, AL, Thomas Cobb, Pharm.D., Director of Pharmacy
Jackson North Medical Center, North Miami Beach, FL, Luis Alfonso, Director of Pharmacy
Jackson Purchase Medical Center (LifePoint), Mayfield, KY, Cynthia Elliott, RPh, CDCES, Director of Pharmacy Jacobi Medical Center, Bronx, NY, Rosemarie Leighton, Director of Pharmacy
Jane Phillips Medical Center, Bartlesville, OK, Stephanie Burns, Inpatient Pharmacy Manager
Jennie Edmundson Hospital, Council Bluffs, IA, Amy Freeman, Pharmacy Buyer
JPS Health Network, Fort Worth, TX, Nicole Shoquist, PharmD, MBA, Chief Pharmacy Officer
JT Mather Hospital, West Islip, NY, Philip Bruno, Vice President Pharmacy Solutions
Kentucky Children’s Hospital, Lexington, KY, Kasandra Chambers, Associate Director of Pharmacy
Kettering Medical Center Network, Miamisburg, OH, Justin Boone, PharmD, Manager Strategic Pharmacy Sourcing Kindred Healthcare, Louisville, KY, Derek Szesny, PharmD, MPH, BCGP, Senior Director of Pharmacy Operations Kindred Hospital - Houston, Houston, TX, Nicholas Enow, PharmD, BCNSP, Director of Pharmacy
Kindred Hospital- Baldwin Park, Baldwin Park, CA, Olivia Yang, PharmD, MBA, Director of Pharmacy
Kindred Hospital Rancho, Rancho Cucamonga, CA, Oanh Nguyen, Director of Pharmacy
King’s Daughter Medical Center, Ashland, KY, Quyet Tran, Director of Pharmacy
King’s Daughters Medical Center, Ashland, KY, Tonya Pope, Pharmacy Purchasing/ Supervisor
Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, Ronald Levy, Director of Pharmacy
Knox Community Hospital, Mount Vernon, OH, Stephanie Lane, Pharmacy Coordinator
Lahey Hospital & Medical Center, Burlington, MA, Nancy Huff, PharmD, Chief Pharmacy Officer
Lake Huron Medical Center, Port Huron, MI, Tricia Millbrand, RPh, BCSCP, Director of Pharmacy
Lake Regional Health System, Osage Beach, MO, Tony Kauten, Director of Pharmacy
Lakeland Regional Medical Center - St. Joseph, St. Joseph, MI, Jason Lovero, Director of Pharmacy
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providerattendees by facility
Please Note Registration is still open and this list is growing every day. The conference book will be updated weekly,
but in the meantime, please visit the Confirmed Provider page on our website to see a real-time list of Provider attendees.
Landmark Medical Center, Woonsocket, RI, Ted Gorham, Director of Pharmacy
Mahaska Health, Oskaloosa, IA, Kirsten Dougherty, Director of Pharmacy
Main Line Health System, Media, PA, David Showalter, PharmD, MBA, System Director of Pharmacy
Marianjoy Rehabilitation Hospital, Wheaton, IL, Helen Afolarin, Pharm.D, MBA, Director of Pharmacy
Marshall Health, Huntington, WV, Jeffrey Fenerty, Director of Pharmacy
Maury Regional Medical Center and Affiliates, Columbia, TN, Jeff Binkley, PharmD, BCNSP, FASHP, Administrative Director of Pharmacy Mayers Memorial Hospital, Fall River Mills, CA, Keith Earnest, Pharm.D., Director of Pharmacy, Chief Clinical Officer
McAlester Regional Health Center, McAlester, OK, Larry Auld, Pharmacy Director
McBride Orthopedic Hosp./ Ortho Forum, Oklahoma City, OK, Timothy Anderson, RPh, MPH, Director of Pharmacy
McLane Children’s Hospital (Baylor S&W), Temple, TX, Chanin Wright, PharmD, Director of Pharmacy
McLeod Regional Medical Center, Florence, SC, Artie McKnight, RPh, Director of Pharmacy
Medical Center Hospital, Odessa, TX, Minh Hong, Director of Pharmacy
Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), Charleston, SC, Aaron Steele, Pharmacy Supply Chain Coordinator
Memorial Healthcare, Owosso, MI, Elias Ayoub, Director of Pharmacy
Memorial Hermann Cypress, Cypress, TX, Luisa Portugal, Pharmacy Director
Memorial Hospital at Gulfport, Gulfport, MS, Shaun Chastka, RPh, MBA, Director of Pharmacy
Memorial Hospital Chattanooga, Chattanooga, TN, Rodney Elliott, Pharmacy P.A./Technology/Coordinator
Mercy Health, Chesterfield, MO, Jonathan Lakamp, PharmD, BCPS, Chief Pharmacy Officer
Mercy Health System, Saint Louis, MO, Craig Campbell, RPh, Pharmacy System Performance Director
Mercy Hospital Jefferson, Crystal City, MO, Jennifer Lee-Moss, Pharmacy Operations Manager
Mercy Hospital of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, Jeff Lombardo, PharmD BCOP, Director of Pharmacy Business Development
Mercy Hospital Oklahoma City, Oklahoma City, OK, Shane Edmonson, Regional Executive Director of Pharmacy
Mercy Medical Center - CHS, Rockville Center, NY, Mark Macchia, PharmD, RPh, MBA, Director of Pharmacy
MercyOne Waterloo Medical Center, Waterloo, IA, John Hamiel, PharmD, Director of Pharmacy
Merit Health River Region, Vicksburg, MS, Lisa Wamsley, Director of Pharmacy
Merit Health Wesley, Hattiesburg, MS, Pam Miles, Pharm.D., Director of Pharmacy
Methodist Jennie Edmundson Hospital, Council Bluffs, IA, Melanie Ryan, PharmD, Pharmacy Director
Methodist Richardson Medical Center, Richardson, TX, Jabeen John, Director of Pharmacy
Middlesex Hospital, Middletown, CT, Jason Zybert, PharmD., Pharmacy Manager
Midland Memorial Hospital, Midland, TX, Diane Pham, Pharmacy Operational Manager
Mission Hospital Regional Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, David Dirig, RPh, PhD, MBA, Director, Pharmacy Services
Mississippi Baptist Medical Center, Jackson, MS, Benjamin Luk, Director of Pharmacy
Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, Philip Manning, Director of Specialty Pharmacy
Montefiore New Rochelle Hospital, New Rochelle, NY, Linda Rosen, Director of Pharmacy
Monument Health, Spearfish, SD, Tiffany Clendenen, Director of Pharmacy
Mosaic Life Care -Saint Joseph Medical Center, St. Joseph, MO, John Rawson, Director of Pharmacy
Moses Taylor Hospital, Scranton, PA, Michele Catalano-Musheno, Director of Pharmacy
Mount Sinai Beth Israel, New York, NY, Jason Babby, Assistant Director of Clinical Pharmacy Services
Mount Sinai Downtown Union Square, New York, NY, Alina Levitsky, Pharm.D., Ambulatory & Outpatient Infusion Pharmacy Manager Mount Sinai Health System, New York, NY, Joseph Pinto, R.Ph, M.S., MHA, DPLA, Executive Director of Pharmacy Operations
Mount Sinai Hospital System, New York, NY, Vincent Giambanco, RPh, MS, Pharmacy Lead Sourcing
Mountainview Regional Medical Center, Las Cruces, NM, Robert Bub, PharmD, Director of Pharmacy
Munson Healthcare, Cadillac, MI, Billy Evans, PharmD, Pharmacy Director
Munson Healthcare, Grand Rapids, MI, Justin Comeau, PharmD, Pharmacy Manager
Munson Medical Center, Traverse City, MI, Eric Warren, PharmD, MBA, BCPS, Pharmacy Purchasing Coordinator
Nemours Children’s Hospital, Orlando, FL, Angela Folger, Director of Pharmacy
Nemours Children’s Hospital, Orlando, FL, Odete Sousa, RPh, Pharmacy Operations Manager
New Milford Hospital, New Milford, CT, Gina Maurina, RPh, Director of Pharmacy
New York Presbyterian Health System, New York, NY, Timeka Russell, PhD., NYP Pharmacy Enterprise Director
New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY, Vickie Powell, BS, PharmD, MS, FASHP, Director of Pharmacy, Operations
48


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providerattendees by facility
Please Note Registration is still open and this list is growing every day. The conference book will be updated weekly,
but in the meantime, please visit the Confirmed Provider page on our website to see a real-time list of Provider attendees.
New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY, Patrice Dupart, Pharm.D., BCPS, MSHCM, VP of Pharmacy Services/ Apothecary-in-Chief North Kansas City Hospital, North Kansas City, MO, David Hitchcock, Pharmacy Operations Manager
North Mississippi Medical Center, Tupelo, MS, Patti Hawkins, PharmD, Director-Outpatient Services
North Mississippi Medical Center, Tupelo, MS, Helena Clark, PharmD, Pharmacy Mgr/Infusion/Home/Specialty/340B
North Mississippi Medical Center, Tupelo, MS, Wes Pitts, Pharm.D., BCPS, FASHP, FMSHP, Assistant Director of Pharmacy Northeast Georgia Health System, Gainesville, GA, Melissa Frank, Pharm.D., Director of Pharmacy
Northridge Hospital Medical Center, Northridge, CA, Blair Galbreath, PharmD, Director of Pharmacy
Norwalk Hospital, Norwalk, CT, Robert Bepko, Jr., BS. Pharm., MHA, Senior Director Network Pharmacy Services Norwalk Hospital, Norwalk, CT, Brian Depaoli, Registered Pharmacist, Pharmacy Manager
Nuvance Health, Norwalk, CT, Judy Huang, PhD, PharmD, BCPS, Clinical Pharmacists Supervisor Nuvance Health, Poughkeepsie, NY, Jennifer Farruggio, Corporate Pharmacy Buyer
Nuvance Health, Bethel, CT, Jessica McMahon, Manager of Pharmacy IT Systems
Nuvance Health, Norwalk, CT, Krista Katers, Clinical Pharmacy Coordinator
Nuvance Health Care System, Danbury, CT, Edward Bont, Manager- Pharmacy Purchasing & Contract Compliance
NYC Health and Hospitals - Metropolitan, New York, NY, Chike Igboechi, RPh; PhD, Director of Pharmacy
NYC Health and Hospitals - Metropolitan, New York, NY, Tracy Liu, PharmD, BCGP, Assistant Director of Pharmacy
NYC Health+Hospitals Correctional Health Serv, Astoria, NY, Rommel Babaan, Pharm.D., Director of Pharmacy Services NYC Health+Hospitals Correctional Health Serv, Astoria, NY, Danielle Petrocelli, Pharm.D., Director of Pharmacy
NYU Langone Health, New York, NY, Joshua Soliman, Associate Director, Pharmacy Operations
NYU Langone Health, New York, NY, Kenny Yu, Pharm. D., MBA, Director of Pharmacy, 340B Program and PBA
NYU Langone Health- Brooklyn, Brooklyn, NY, Gregory Filipowski, RPh, Director of Pharmacy
NYU Langone Hospital—Brooklyn, Brooklyn, NY, Jillian Johnson, Pharmacy Operations Manager/ Buyer
NYU Langone Hospital—Brooklyn, Brooklyn, NY, Deep Rana, Pharmacy Supervisor
NYU Langone Hospital—Brooklyn, Brooklyn, NY, Charles Wong, pharmacist, Associate Director of Informatics
NYU Winthrop Hospital, Mineola, NY, Brian Malone, BS, MS, RPh, Director of Pharmacy
Ochsner Health System, New Orleans, LA, Ryan Pepper, MBA, AVP Pharmacy Supply Chain
Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, LA, Myra Thomas, RPh, MBA, AVP Pharmacy
Ochsner Medical Center - Baton Rouge, Baton Rouge, LA, Heather Maturin, Director of Pharmacy
Ochsner Medical Center - New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, Neil Hunter, Director of Pharmacy Operations
Olean General Hospital, Olean, NY, Paul Green, Pharm.D., MHA, DPLA, BCPS, System Director of Pharmacy
Olive View - UCLA Medical Center, Sylmar, CA, Nadrine Balady-Bouziane, Pharm.D., Director of Pharmacy
Olympia Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, Annette Marquez, PharmD, Director of Pharmacy
Opelousas General Health System, Opelousas, LA, Troy Fusilier, Director of Pharmacy
Orlando Regional Medical Center, Orlando, FL, Mikko Isaac, Operations Manager
Orlando Regional Medical Center, Orlando, FL, Dominick Curry, PharmD, BCCCP, Pharmacy Supervisor
Our Lady of Lourdes, Camden, NJ, William Haigh, Director of Pharmacy
Our Lady of Lourdes Heart Hospital, Lafayette, LA, Joseph LeBlanc Jr., PharmD, MHA, MBA, DPLA, Pharmacy Manager
Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center, Baton Rouge, LA, Ashley Joseph, Manager, Inpatient Pharmacy
Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center, Baton Rouge, LA, Michael Mohundro, Pharm.D., Senior Director of Pharmacy Partners Cooperative, Atlanta, GA, Dan Alday, RPh, Clinical Contract Analyst
Peachford Hospital, Atlanta, GA, Marsha Shelton, Pharm D, Director of Pharmacy
Peninsula Regional Medical Center, Salisbury, MD, Kevin Johnson, PharmD, Pharmacy Supervisor
Penn Highlands Dubois, DuBois, PA, Francis Iorfido, Pharmacy Manager (Inpatient)
Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, Kimberly Cimarelli, Director, Inpatient Pharmacy Services Piedmont Athens Regional Medical Center, Athens, GA, Don Tyson, Director of Pharmacy
Piedmont Henry Hospital, Stockbridge, GA, Walter Williams, Pharm.D., Director of Pharmacy & Outpatient Infusion Center Piedmont Henry Hospital, Stockbridge, GA, Tabbetha Ethridge, Pharmacy Buyer
Piedmont Henry Hospital, Stockbridge, GA, Sherry Greer, Pharmacy Automation/ Analyst
Piedmont Henry Hospital, Stockbridge, GA, Stephanie Griffin, Assistant Pharmacy Buyer
Piedmont Henry Hospital, Stockbridge, GA, Christopher Bridgers, Pharmacy Operations Manager
50


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