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Driver Handbook HR10-02 Revised 2019-09-16

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Published by angela, 2019-09-16 14:57:10

Driver Handbook HR10-02 Revised 2019-09-16

Driver Handbook HR10-02 Revised 2019-09-16

DRIVER HANDBOOK

HR-10-02

Issue Date: September 16, 2019
Supersedes: July 9, 2018



Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 1 of 89

Contents

NOTES .......................................................................................................................................................... 4 
BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING TERMINAL LOCATIONS.............................................................................. 5 
MISSION STATEMENT ................................................................................................................................ 6 
INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................................................... 7 
WELCOME.................................................................................................................................................... 8 
SAFETY POLICY .......................................................................................................................................... 9 
OUR EXPECTATIONS ............................................................................................................................... 10 
CUSTOMER SERVICE............................................................................................................................... 11 
ORIENTATION FOR NEW BUDDY MOORE DRIVERS ............................................................................ 12 
POSITION DESCRIPTION – FLATBED DIVISION .................................................................................... 16 
POSITION DESCRIPTION – FLATBED DIVISION ACKNOWLEDGEMENT ............................................ 18 
POSITION DESCRIPTION – VAN DIVISION ............................................................................................. 19 
POSITION DESCRIPTION – VAN DIVISION ACKNOWLEDGEMENT ..................................................... 21 
MINIMUM HIRING STANDARDS ............................................................................................................... 22 

DRIVER EVALUATION ........................................................................................................................... 22 
DRIVER QUALIFICATION ...................................................................................................................... 22 
DRIVER TRAINING................................................................................................................................. 22 
SAFETY ...................................................................................................................................................... 23 
RESPONSIBILITIES................................................................................................................................ 23 
SAFE DRIVING ....................................................................................................................................... 23 
DRIVER SAFETY REGULATIONS ......................................................................................................... 24 
GENERAL SAFETY RULES ................................................................................................................... 25 
SAFE DRIVING PROCEDURES............................................................................................................. 25 
DRIVING IN EXTREME WEATHER AND ROAD CONDITIONS............................................................ 30 
INJURIES/ACCIDENTS .............................................................................................................................. 36 
OFF-DUTY INJURIES ............................................................................................................................. 36 
ON-THE-JOB INJURIES ......................................................................................................................... 36 
BACK SAFETY AND PROPER LIFTING TECHNIQUES ....................................................................... 36 
PUSHING VS PULLING .......................................................................................................................... 37 
SLIP, TRIP, AND FALL PROTECTION PROCEDURES ........................................................................ 38 
THREE-POINT CONTACT – ENTERING AND EXITING EQUIPMENT ................................................ 38 
NO JUMPING POLICY............................................................................................................................ 38 
5TH WHEEL PIN PULL POLICY .............................................................................................................. 38 
ACCIDENTS/VIOLIATIONS/CITATIONS................................................................................................ 38 
ACCIDENT DETERMINATION – Preventable or Non-Preventable ....................................................... 39 
PROGRESSIVE DISCIPLINARY PROCESS FOR PREVENTABLE ACCIDENTS................................ 43 
REMEDIAL TRAINING ............................................................................................................................ 44 

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 2 of 89

CITATIONS/INSPECTIONS........................................................................................................................ 45 
DRIVER DISQUALIFICATION .................................................................................................................... 46 

MEDICAL DISQUALIFICATION.............................................................................................................. 46 
NOTIFICATION OF LOSS OF DRIVER LICENSE ................................................................................. 46 
LOSS OF A DRIVER LICENSE .............................................................................................................. 46 
CARGO CLAIMS, LOSS PREVENTION, AND CONTROL ........................................................................ 47 
OPERATIONS............................................................................................................................................. 49 
CUSTOMER RELATIONS/PROFESSIONAL BEHAVIOR...................................................................... 49 
EMPLOYEE, DISPATCH, AND MANAGEMENT RELATIONS .............................................................. 49 
DRIVER MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL............................................................................................. 49 
COMMUNICATION ................................................................................................................................. 49 
ON-TIME APPOINTMENTS .................................................................................................................... 50 
CHANGES............................................................................................................................................... 50 
LOADING DELAYS ................................................................................................................................. 50 
DISPATCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES ........................................................................................ 50 
SECURING CARGO/EQUIPMENT......................................................................................................... 50 
SHIPPER LOAD AND COUNT ............................................................................................................... 50 
IN-TRANSIT SECURITY ......................................................................................................................... 51 
HIJACKING AND CARGO THEFT.......................................................................................................... 51 
TERMINAL-TO-TRUCK COMMUNCIATION .......................................................................................... 51 
ARRIVING AT STOP OFF/DESTINATION ............................................................................................. 51 
REQUIRED PAPERWORK ..................................................................................................................... 52 
TRACTOR/TRAILER CHECK-IN PROCEDURES.................................................................................. 52 
OUT OF ROUTE MILES.......................................................................................................................... 52 
FUEL STOPS .......................................................................................................................................... 52 
BACK CHARGES .................................................................................................................................... 52 
THEFT OF COMPANY PROPERTY....................................................................................................... 53 
DRIVER LOGS ........................................................................................................................................ 53 
SUBMITTING PAPERWORK.................................................................................................................. 54 
BILLS OF LADING (BOL’s) SHOWING LOAD TIMES ........................................................................... 54 
EQUIPMENT............................................................................................................................................... 55 
PROPER USE OF EQUIPMENT ............................................................................................................ 55 
REPAIRS AND TIRES............................................................................................................................. 56 
EQUIPMENT RED TAG POLICY............................................................................................................ 56 
INSPECTION PROCEDURE .................................................................................................................. 57 
LEGAL REQUIREMENTS ....................................................................................................................... 57 
FOR SAFETY DURING A TRIP .............................................................................................................. 58 
CHECK CRITICAL ITEMS WHEN YOU STOP....................................................................................... 58 

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 3 of 89

PROPER PRE & POST TRIP INSPECTION SEQUENCE ..................................................................... 59 
VEHICLE MAINTENANCE ...................................................................................................................... 60 
RECORDKEEPING ................................................................................................................................. 60 
SUBSTANCE ABUSE POLICY................................................................................................................... 61 
GENERAL STATEMENT......................................................................................................................... 61 
SUBSTANCE ABUSE POLICY ............................................................................................................... 61 
CONDUCTING DRUG TESTING............................................................................................................ 62 
DISCIPLINE............................................................................................................................................. 62 
EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM ................................................................................................. 62 
ALCOHOL/DRUG PROHIBITIONS AND REFUSALS ............................................................................ 63 
EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL AND DRUGS ON THE BODY ....................................................................... 63 
PROGRESSIVE DISCIPLINARY PROCESS ............................................................................................. 65 
GENERAL EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION .............................................................................................. 66 
GENERAL STATEMENTS ...................................................................................................................... 66 
CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION............................................................................................................ 69 
EMPLOYEE BENEFITS .......................................................................................................................... 70 
WAGE AND SALARY PROGRAM .......................................................................................................... 72 
RULES OF CONDUCT............................................................................................................................ 73 
RESIGNATION........................................................................................................................................ 76 
EMPLOYEE ACKNOWLEDGEMENT FORM – DRIVER HANDBOOK...................................................... 78 
OWNER/OPERATOR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT FORM – DRIVER HANDBOOK ...................................... 79 
VEHICLE ASSIGNMENT AGREEMENT .................................................................................................... 80 
DRUG AND ALCOHOL POLICY ACKNOWLEDGEMENT......................................................................... 81 
REVISION HISTORY .................................................................................................................................. 82 
EMPLOYEE ACKNOWLEDGEMENT FORM – DRIVER HANDBOOK...................................................... 84 
OWNER/OPERATOR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT FORM – DRIVER HANDBOOK ...................................... 85 
VEHICLE ASSIGNMENT AGREEMENT .................................................................................................... 86 
DRUG AND ALCOHOL POLICY ACKNOWLEDGEMENT......................................................................... 87 
POSITION DESCRIPTION – FLATBED DIVISION ACKNOWLEDGEMENT ............................................ 88 
POSITION DESCRIPTION – VAN DIVISION ACKNOWLEDGEMENT ..................................................... 89 

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 4 of 89
NOTES

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 5 of 89

BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING TERMINAL LOCATIONS

Corporate Office, Brokerage, and Flatbed Division

P.O. Box 10047  Birmingham, Alabama 35202-0047
925 34th Street North  Birmingham, Alabama 35222

1-877-366-6566

Van Division
P.O. Box 469 pp, Alabama 36467-0469
1118 Highway 84 East  Opp, Alabama 36467

1-800-241-1468

254 West Covington Avenue  Attalla, Alabama 35954
256-442-6928

P.O. Box 72166 Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35407-2166
320 Bear Creek Cutoff Road  Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35405

205-759-9204

5530 Airport Road  Anderson, South Carolina 29662
1-866-759-9204

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 6 of 89
MISSION STATEMENT

SAFETY is priority at Buddy Moore Trucking. We strive to continually meet or exceed all regulatory
requirements while taking a proactive approach. This enables us to effectively reduce the risk of incidents.

Buddy Moore Trucking is committed to providing our employees, customers, and community with a safe
and healthy work environment, on and off the roadway.

Buddy Moore Trucking will, when possible, continue to provide late model, well maintained equipment
that maximizes efficiency and productivity.

BOTTOM LINE: To hire the most safety conscious drivers available. Provide the best equipment available.
Provide the most efficient, knowledgeable support group available.

Cary E. Moore, President Buddy Moore Trucking

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 7 of 89

INTRODUCTION

This Driver Handbook has been revised to comply with current federal and state laws affecting the trucking
industry and employment practices. It is not a contract or an agreement of employment for a definite period
of time; rather, it is a summary of Company policies, work rules, and the benefits you enjoy as an employee.
From time to time, conditions or circumstances may cause the Company to change, amend, or delete some
of the policies and benefits contained in this handbook. When such changes are made, the Company may
notify you of the new or revised policy and its effective date. However, the Company reserves the rights to
change, delete, or add to these policies and procedures without notice.

Descriptions of various fringe benefits (such as group insurance) are summaries only. Should the
descriptions in this handbook differ with any formal agreement or document involved, the formal agreement
or plan document shall be considered correct.

All employees are employed at will. This means that either the employee or the Company is free to terminate
the employment relationship at any time and at either party’s discretion. No supervisor or other Company
representative has the authority to alter the at-will employment relationship, and you should never interpret
such person’s remarks as a guarantee of continued employment.

Please take the time to read and become familiar with these policies. By understanding these policies and
what is expected of you, you will feel more comfortable and be better equipped to perform your duties
satisfactory.

We have an “open door” philosophy and want all employees to feel free to voice their work-related concerns
or problems. We will be pleased to meet with any employee to discuss problems or suggestions for
improvements in working conditions. It is important to address problem issues early. If your supervisor
cannot help to solve your problem, you may make an appointment to speak with the President.

Many of the Company’s policies and employee benefits have been treated only briefly in this booklet. If you
have any questions or want more information, the Vice President, Administration, or other office personnel
will be happy to help you with questions or problems.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 8 of 89

WELCOME

Welcome to Buddy Moore Trucking, Inc. We are pleased that you have chosen to become a part of our
team of professional drivers. Our company is successful because of quality professionals like you who are
either an independent contractor or a company driver. As a professionally licensed driver, you will be called
upon to consistently pick up and deliver our customer’s freight with sustained, safe operational excellence.
Together we will create conditions of opportunity and growth.

This policy manual will assist you with specific company policies, safety regulations, and expectations of
professional conduct. Our intent is to convey the policies in clear, unambiguous terms. This policy manual
applies to all company drivers and owner/operators unless otherwise specified. Your Dispatcher and the
entire Buddy Moore Trucking staff are here to support you in your mission of reaching each destination in
a safe and timely manner. If you have any questions, or seek clarity to any policy or procedure, you are
encouraged to work through your Dispatcher first, however, the Company maintains an open-door policy
and you are welcome to speak with any management or staff member.

THANK YOU for joining our Company.

The Buddy Moore Trucking Management Team

SAFETY STARTS WITH YOU …
BE ALERT, STAY ALERT
BE SAFE, STAY SAFE

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 9 of 89

SAFETY POLICY

It is the policy of Buddy Moore Trucking to conduct all operations with a maximum degree of safety,
to furnish each of our employees a place of employment which is free from recognized hazards, to
abide by all Federal, State, and local regulations as they pertain to our company, to support and
enforce a drug free workplace, and to protect the public from any hazards which results from our
company’s operations.

To accomplish this, we are assigning the risk responsibility and accountability for safety to all employees
within their individual area of operation. Employees are responsible for preventing the occurrence of
accidents or conditions that could lead to occupational injuries.

If you have any questions or suggestions regarding job safety, talk it over with your supervisor or safety
director.

Safety is priority … anything pertaining to safety will get prompt attention.

Let’s work together to keep you, and all of us, safe.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 10 of 89

OUR EXPECTATIONS

CUSTOMER SERVICE
Your personal conduct in dealing with our valued Customers and their associates must always be respectful
and courteous. Should you have a customer problem that you cannot resolve to the customer’s satisfaction;
refer the matter to your supervisor.

PAPERWORK

Delivery paperwork must be turned in or sent in after each delivery. This is important to ensure the customer
pays for the load delivery and the Company will not have to delay paying you.

DEPENDABILITY

On-time deliveries and pickups are required! Plan your trip to allow yourself enough time to safely deliver
and pick up on time.

COMMUNICATION

Notify your dispatcher immediately about any unexpected delays in delivering or picking up your loads. This
will ensure proper communication with the Customer.

ACCIDENTS

If an accident should occur, contact the Safety personnel immediately. Take pictures of any and all damage.

OVERAGES, SHORTAGES & DAMAGES (OS&D’S)

Always check your bills before leaving a Customer to verify there is a legible signature on the bills and to
verify no Overages, Shortages, or Damages are noted. If there are OS&D’s call the claims personnel to
report the information before leaving the customer.

REFUELING

You must use the Company’s designated refueling locations unless prior approval from your dispatcher has
been given.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 11 of 89

CUSTOMER SERVICE

What do customers really want?

CONTROL
Customers need to feel they are in control. They want things to come out their way; they do not want to be
at the mercy of the carrier.

GOALS
Customers need to feel they are reaching their goals: price and on-time deliveries.

SELF-IMAGE
Customers need to feel good about themselves as they go about their jobs. Not having any problems with
their carrier can help them accomplish this.

FAIRNESS
Customers need to feel they are being treated fairly, and they will get equal service whether they are a
large or small shipper.

FRIENDLINESS
Customers want friendly service. A smile says, “thank you” and “please.”

UNDERSTANDING
Customers want to know what is going on. If they call about a delivery time, they don’t want to hear, “I don’t
know what time the driver will be there. He has not called today, and I don’t know where he is.”

SECURITY
Customers need a strong feeling of security. They do not like change; they like staying with comfortable
service companies.

IMPORTANCE
Customers need to feel important. If they ask for service at a certain time, they do not want to feel ignored
or unimportant.

APPRECIATION
Customers like appreciation. They like courtesies such as “Please,” “Thank you,” and “May I help you?”

BELONGING
Customers like belonging to an organization or family. If you can, help them with information or do them a
favor to let them know you really care.

HONESTY
Customers want to know the truth. If there is a problem with the service, don’t lie. Tell the truth and keep
them informed.

When you are with a customer, ask questions about their operation and be sincere. You may find they are
unaware of BMT’s abilities to service other areas important to their operation. If the customer has a
complaint, don’t get defensive. Complaints are opportunities for Buddy Moore Trucking to improve its
service. Don’t be afraid of complaints; they are a healthy part of doing business if they are handled quickly
and properly. Learn to listen. It has been said that God gave us one mouth and two ears so we should listen
twice as much as we talk.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 12 of 89

ORIENTATION FOR NEW BUDDY MOORE DRIVERS

1. Driver Contacts
During working hours, a driver’s first contact should always be their Dispatcher. They will be able
to answer most of your questions and direct you to the proper department or person for further
information as necessary. Drivers will be issued a card upon hire with all necessary telephone
numbers/contacts. A contact card is located on the driver’s side sun visor.

2. Turning in Paperwork
Paperwork must be turned in as soon as you are able to turn it in. Use Transflo to turn in the
paperwork unless you know you will be coming to the yard within a couple of days. Please make
sure the driver’s name, signature, and truck number are easily readable on all paperwork. All
paperwork electronically submitted must still be turned in every time you return to the terminal.

Failure to turn in your paperwork in a timely manner will result in your check being held until
it is received.

All safety paperwork (DVIR’s, inspection reports, citations, etc.) is to be turned in to your assigned
safety department.

3. BMT Load Numbers
For each load you are dispatched on, you will get a BMT load number. Write it on the front of your
BOL for that load.

4. Fuel Cards
You will have an EFS card to purchase fuel and up to two (2) gallons of oil in a 24-hour period. If
you are on the yard and need oil, you may get it from the shop. Your unit # when you are fueling
is your truck number. Also remember to put in the correct HUB miles when fueling. Your
control # is the last four of your social. You may fuel at Pilot/Flying J. Do not run out of fuel;
get enough fuel to get you to your next fuel stop. If you lose your fuel card notify someone at
the office immediately.

5. Advances
Company drivers are allowed up to $150 advance (Friday to Friday midnight) off your paycheck
each week. Your advance will be on your fuel card and will reload every week. EFS charges a fee
of $3.00 each time you get an advance unless you get it when you fuel as one transaction.

6. Receipts
All receipts must be sent in for any repairs, lumpers, or anything that you receive an e-check or pay
cash for. Receipts must be submitted in a timely manner. You can Transflo them or deliver them in
person with your Bill of Ladings (BOLs). We must have the receipt to match to the e-check.

7. Pay
You will be paid every Thursday (Flatbed) or Friday (Van) for all BOL’s turned in for the previous
week. Your pay will be on your EFS card or deposited into your bank account, whichever you have
chosen at the time of your orientation. If you decide to change either of these options; contact the
payroll department with your changes. All settlement sheets will be mailed on Fridays to the
address provided to us at the time you are hired. If your address changes, you need to notify Human
Resources with changes. This is also where your W-2 will be mailed.

Driver Unloading Pay
Generally, van drivers do not unload freight. However, there are occasions when a driver is asked
to assist with or unload a trailer. If your Dispatcher notifies you that a load will require assisting with
or unloading, be sure to write it on your trip sheet so you will be paid correctly.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 13 of 89

Anything that has to do with hiring a lumper must be handled through dispatch. Do not pay cash
for a lumper. Always get an e-check from dispatch to pay a lumper. You must get a paid receipt
from the lumper. If a driver hires and pays a lumper without approval from dispatch, they will not
be reimbursed for the expense.

8. TWIC Cards
BMT goes into a lot of ports. We require drivers to have a TWIC Card. BMT will pay for the card.
National TWIC phone number: 855-347-8371, address: IdentoGO, 3201 Midtown Park S Mobile,
AL 36606; IdentoGO, 5323 W Hwy 98 Ste 118, Panama City, FL 32401. Two forms of ID are
required (driver license and birth certificate).

9. Camera
Make sure you have a camera with you at all times in your truck. If you do not have a camera, buy
a disposable camera and BMT will reimburse you. Cameras are needed for accidents and cargo
claims.

10. Scales
Be sure you scale at the customer or as soon as possible after you load. If you are overweight or
cannot axle out, call dispatch. If you do not scale or let dispatch know and you get a ticket, you are
responsible for that ticket. You can use your EFS card to scale at any truck stop where EFS is
accepted but if available, please scale at a Love’s with your EFS card and turn your receipt in with
your paperwork.

11. Inspections
Do a good detailed inspection every time you start or end your day. BMT will give you $200 bonus
for a “No Violations” Level 1, 2, or 3 Dot Inspection.

12. Cargo Policy
All transporting vehicles, prior to movement, shall have their cargo and any other items firmly and
adequately “tied down” or secured by the methods indicated by the cargo being transported.
Thereafter, the cargo must be closely watched and checked at times required by Federal
Regulations and as common sense indicates. BMT adheres to the North American Cargo
Securement Standards as well as the Department of Transportation regulations.

Make sure your trailer is locked with a padlock even if it has a seal. Buy a padlock if needed and
turn in your receipt to be reimbursed. Also, if there are any issues with your load (shortage or
damages) let your Dispatcher know immediately so it can be handled right then. If you do not call
anyone to let them know, you will pay for the shortage or damage.

Flatbed Load, Claim Protection
1. The load should fit properly on the trailer with no danger of over-width or over-length. If these

problems exist, you must obtain a permit to operate legally per state requirements.
2. The load should be secured properly on the trailer. If something falls off your trailer, it could

cause an accident. You should always check the load periodically throughout the course of
your trip, in accordance with DOT Regulations.
3. Your load should be protected from the elements such as rain, fire, dirt, wind, and salt from the
roads. Always remember, the customer may have reasons for tarping which are not apparent
to us.
4. Always feel free to discuss the load, its tie-down, and protection with your operations
management representative. Don’t be afraid to ask questions.
5. There is never a reason for a load to be rejected because it is wet. If we take every precaution,
there will be no problems.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 14 of 89

6. Always remember, you are signing for what the Bill of Lading (BOL) says is on your load. This
makes you the responsible party. Make sure you have what the BOL calls for; always check
the count.

Coil Securement
BMT trucks are equipped with chains, binders, straps, timbers, mats, and edge protectors in order
to properly secure metal coils. Chains are 5/16 and rated at 9,700 lbs. A 20,000 lb coil requires a
minimum of 3 chains and one strap. A 35,000 lb coil requires 5 chains and 1 strap. A 40,000 lb coil
requires 6 chains and one strap.

13. Trailer Loading, Unloading, and/or Dropping
Always check the trailer for holes in the floor, sides, and roof or water leaks in van trailers before
loading. Check door seals for water tightness. If any leaks are found, report them to your operations
management representative. He/she will direct you to repair minor leaks or will direct you to another
trailer. This may take a little more time up front but will save you many headaches later. All drivers,
when unloading freight, are to contact the assigned operations management representative and
report any cargo that is damaged due to a leaking or faulty trailer or tarp.

All loads must be tarped unless otherwise instructed. Tarping should take place at the point of
loading and not later.

No person shall be within or enter a van-type trailer while a forklift is picking up or dropping freight
within the trailer. The forklift operator is the responsible party and shall not enter a trailer without
specific authority and the presence of their supervisor while other personnel are inside the trailer.
If you think it is unsafe, contact your Dispatcher. It is the responsibility of the driver to free his empty
trailer of all debris such as packing material and nails, dirt, etc.

If you drop a trailer, please leave it like you would want to find it. Don’t leave a trailer that needs
tires, sweeping, or any repairs for the next driver to have to handle before they can leave with it.
Remember…the next time you may be the driver who picks one up in bad shape. Notify your
Safety Manager if you pick up a trailer with defects. Refrigerated trailers being dropped
anywhere should have a minimum of ¾ of a tank of fuel.

14. Straps
Make sure before you leave the yard that you have straps. They are available in the shop.

15. Seals and Pad Locks
It is mandatory for drivers to put a seal and a pad lock on every load they pull for BMT and to have
the receiver witness you break the seal and sign the bills “Seal Intact.” If the shipper does not
provide a seal, it is the driver’s responsibility to seal the load with a BMT seal. If you have a multi-
stop load, you must reseal the trailer after each stop and have the receiver notate the new seal
number on the bills so you can request the receiver at each stop to sign the bills “Seal Intact.” In
many cases, this is the only weapon we have to combat a claim if there is shortage discovered on
the load.

16. Load Locks
It is a requirement for every driver to carry at least two load locks and two straps. Check with the
shop for both.

17. Personal Property
BMT is NOT responsible for any personal items while on company premises or while in company-
owned vehicles. This includes your personal vehicle and any content. BMT has procedures in place
designed to help protect your personal items, but it is recommended you not leave high-dollar items

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 15 of 89

in your vehicle while on the road. This policy also includes any personal items left in a BMT-owned
CMV.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 16 of 89

POSITION DESCRIPTION – FLATBED DIVISION

(Revised 2019-06-20)

Job Summary or Purpose: To transport and deliver freight by driving diesel-powered tractor-trailer
combinations long distances.

Job Duties:
1. Hook and unhook trailers from the tractor itself, including cranking lever to raise and lower the
landing gear on semi-trailers.
2. Inspect the truck and trailer for defects and safe operating condition before, during, and after trips
and submit a written report on the condition of the truck and trailer in accordance with Department
of Transportation (DOT) regulations.
3. Check shipping papers to determine the nature of the load and to check for the presence of
hazardous materials.
4. If hazardous materials are found in your load, call Dispatch before leaving the customers site.
5. Remove spare tire from rack and return flat to rack.
6. Install and remove tire chains as required by weather conditions or when directed to do so by
Maintenance or Operations.
7. Drive truck to destinations in accordance with and maximizing the use of the Federal Hours of
Service regulations.
8. Apply knowledge of commercial driving skills in maneuvering the vehicle at varying speeds in
difficult situations, such as heavy traffic, inclement weather, construction sites or in tight loading
dock areas.
9. Ensure that all shipping documentation (e.g., manifest, bills of lading, shipping orders, etc.),
required to move with the shipment, are available for inspection and that the appropriate paperwork
accompanies the shipment when it is delivered.
10. Maintain records required for compliance with state and Federal regulations including driver’s logs,
roadside inspections, records of fuel purchases, mileage records, and other records required by
law.
11. Perform all duties in accordance with the company policies and procedures, and comply with all
Federal, State, and local regulations for the safe operation of a commercial motor vehicle.
12. Report all accidents involving driver or company equipment.
13. Report highway safety hazards noted in route.
14. Promptly report any delays due to breakdowns, weather, or traffic conditions or other emergencies,
or in the event of irregularities relating to pick-up or delivery of cargo.

Accountabilities:
1. Safe and legal operation of a commercial motor vehicle.
2. Safe and timely transportation of freight from origin to destination.
3. Proper loading and unloading of freight to assure safety and minimal risk of damage to cargo and
danger to persons by following all shipper/consignees/company instructions regarding securement
and tarping.
4. Demonstrate professional representation of the company and the trucking industry by practicing
good hygiene habits, wearing clean and appropriate clothing and by using responsible driving
habits.
5. All drivers must wear closed toe shoes with slip resistant soles. No sandals or flip flops of any kind.
No Exceptions.

Job Specifications:
Eligibility Requirements:

1. Must possess a valid Commercial Driver License from the state in which you reside.
2. Must meet minimum hiring standards.
3. Must have the ability to read, write, and perform simple mathematical calculations with the mental

ability to handle receipts, read maps, road signs, maintain logs, etc.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 17 of 89

4. Must have working knowledge of DOT regulations governing safe driving, hours of service,
inspection and maintenance, and transportation of hazardous materials.

5. Must be available for around the clock trips to accommodate freight movements and must be able
to be away from home for extended periods of time.

6. Must meet or exceed the medical standards or the U.S. Department of Transportation.
7. Must satisfactorily pass drug/alcohol test.

Physical Requirements:
1. Must be able to sit and remain alert while driving for periods of time up to maximum allowable
driving time governed by the Hours of Service regulations (14 hours).
2. Must be able to shift a manual transmission and operate foot pedals.
3. Must be able to bend, kneel or squat to inspect beneath the trailer bed.
4. Must be able to enter/exit the vehicle cab two (2) to ten (10) times a day. Cab floor is generally from
36 to 48 inches above ground level, with entry and exit achieved with the assistance of various
configurations of steps and handholds, also requires occasional bending, twisting, climbing,
squatting, crouching, and balancing.
5. Must be able to climb on and off the tractor platform and flatbed trailer.
6. Must be able to climb on and off loads to secure; release; and, when necessary, tarp and un-tarp
loads.
7. Must be able to walk along the top and edges of loads to secure it and, when necessary, tarp and
un-tarp it.
8. Must be able to exert very heavy pushing and pulling forces when securing and releasing loads.
9. Must be able to handle heavy tarps when necessary to tarp or un-tarp a load.
10. Must be able to balance while walking on uneven surfaces at delivery sites, truck stops, on the
truck’s bobtail platform, and on the trailer.
11. Must be able to balance while carrying a heavy tarp up to the top of a load.
12. Must be able to install and remove tire chains when required due to inclement weather.
13. Must be able to spend at least 5% of the day standing and 5% of the day walking on surfaces such
as concrete, wood, and metal, and sometimes on slippery and wet surfaces.
14. Must be able to hook/unhook various commercial vehicle combinations, manually lower and raise
landing gear, operate the fifth wheel release lever, lock and release pintle-hooks, attach and
release safety chains, enter in and out of vehicles, fuel vehicles, and check engine oil and coolant
levels
15. Must possess a full range of physical motion and mobility and demonstrate proper reaction timing
when maneuvering a unit or reacting to unexpected safety situations.

Work Environment:
1. Drivers may spend 1% - 5% of their time out of doors exposed to potentially difficult environmental
conditions.
2. Drivers may be subject to irregular work schedules, temperatures and weather extremes, long trips,
short notice for assignments, tight delivery schedules, delays in route and other stress and fatigue
related to driving a large commercial motor vehicle on crowded streets and highways in all kinds of
weather.
3. Drivers typically spend 90% - 95% of on-duty time in the truck. While driving, operators are exposed
to noise and vibration levels which may be higher than those typically experienced in passenger
cars.

Statements included in this job description do not necessarily represent an exhaustive list of all
responsibilities, skill, duties, requirements, efforts, or working conditions associated with the job. While this
is intended to be an accurate reflection of the current job, management reserves the right to revise the job
or to require that other or different tasks be performed as circumstances change.

(End of Position Description)

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 18 of 89

POSITION DESCRIPTION – FLATBED DIVISION ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

I have read and understand the demands of being a flatbed driver as outlined in the Position Description –
Flatbed Division with a revision date of June 20, 2019 and can fulfill the requirements to the job.

_____________________________________ _____________________________________

Driver Signature Witness Signature

_____________________________________

Date

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 19 of 89

POSITION DESCRIPTION – VAN DIVISION

(Revised 2019-06-20)

Job Summary or Purpose: To transport and deliver freight by driving diesel-powered tractor-trailer
combinations long distances.

Job Duties:
15. Hook and unhook trailers from the tractor itself, including cranking lever to raise and lower the
landing gear on semi-trailers.
16. Load and unload the trailer, either individually or with assistance of dockworkers, with or without
mechanical freight-handling equipment.
17. Perform frequent lifting, pulling, pushing, and carrying of freight.
18. Inspect the truck and trailer for defects and safe operating condition before, during, and after trips
and submit a written report on the condition of the truck and trailer in accordance with Department
of Transportation (DOT) regulations.
19. Check shipping papers to determine the nature of the load and to check for the presence of
hazardous materials.
20. If hazardous materials are found in your load, call Dispatch before leaving the customers site.
21. Remove spare tire from rack and return flat to rack.
22. Install and remove tire chains as required by weather conditions or when directed to do so by
Maintenance or Operations.
23. Drive truck to destinations in accordance with and maximizing the use of the Federal Hours of
Service regulations.
24. Apply knowledge of commercial driving skills in maneuvering the vehicle at varying speeds in
difficult situations, such as heavy traffic, inclement weather, or in tight loading dock areas.
25. Ensure that all shipping documentation (e.g., manifest, bills of lading, shipping orders, etc.),
required to move with the shipment, are available for inspection and that the appropriate paperwork
accompanies the shipment when it is delivered.
26. Maintain records required for compliance with state and Federal regulations including driver’s logs,
roadside inspections, records of fuel purchases, mileage records, and other records required by
law.
27. Perform all duties in accordance with the company policies and procedures, and comply with all
Federal, State, and local regulations for the safe operation of a commercial motor vehicle.
28. Report all accidents involving driver or company equipment.
29. Report highway safety hazards noted in route.
30. Promptly report any delays due to breakdowns, weather, or traffic conditions or other emergencies,
or in the event of irregularities relating to pick-up or delivery of cargo.

Accountabilities:
6. Safe and legal operation of a commercial motor vehicle.
7. Safe and timely transportation of freight from origin to destination.
8. Proper loading and unloading of freight to assure safety and minimal risk of damage to cargo and
danger to persons by following all shipper/consignees/company instructions regarding seals and
locks.
9. Demonstrate professional representation of the company and the trucking industry by practicing
good hygiene habits, wearing clean and appropriate clothing and by using responsible driving
habits.
10. All drivers must wear closed toe shoes with slip resistant soles. No sandals or flip flops of any kind.
No Exceptions.

Job Specifications:
Eligibility Requirements:

8. Must possess a valid Commercial Driver License from the state in which you reside.
9. Must meet minimum hiring standards.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 20 of 89

10. Must have the ability to read, write, and perform simple mathematical calculations with the mental
ability to handle receipts, read maps, road signs, maintain logs, etc.

11. Must have working knowledge of DOT regulations governing safe driving, hours of service,
inspection and maintenance, and transportation of hazardous materials.

12. Must be available for around the clock trips to accommodate freight movements and must be able
to be away from home for extended periods of time.

13. Must meet or exceed the medical standards or the U.S. Department of Transportation.
14. Must satisfactorily pass drug/alcohol test.

Physical Requirements:
16. Must be able to sit and remain alert while driving for periods of time up to maximum allowable
driving time governed by the Hours of Service regulations.
17. Must be able to shift a manual transmission and operate foot pedals.
18. Must be able to perform occasional squatting to handle and position freight.
19. Must be able to perform occasional crouching to handle and position freight.
20. Must be able to enter/exit the vehicle cab two (2) to ten (10) times a day. Cab floor is generally from
36 to 48 inches above ground level, with entry and exit achieved with the assistance of various
configurations of steps and handholds, also requires occasional bending, twisting, climbing,
squatting, crouching, and balancing.
21. Must be able to reach for freight at waist level and occasionally reach for freight below waist level
for maneuvering and directing the controls to operate the truck.
22. Must be able to install and remove tire chains when required due to inclement weather.
23. Must be able to spend at least 5% of the day standing and 5% of the day walking on surfaces such
as concrete, wood, and metal, and sometimes on slippery and wet surfaces.
24. Must be able to hook/unhook various commercial vehicle combinations, manually lower and raise
landing gear, operate the fifth wheel release lever, lock and release pintle-hooks, attach and
release safety chains, open and close cargo doors, enter into and out of vehicles, fuel vehicles,
and check engine oil and coolant levels
25. Must possess a full range of physical motion and mobility and demonstrate proper reaction timing
when maneuvering a unit or reacting to unexpected safety situations.
26. On limited occasions, a driver who is physically able may be placed on a customer load that
requires handling the freight. In this instance, the driver may be asked to move containers of
varying sizes and shapes that may weigh up to 75 pounds. These containers may need to be
moved at least one foot but usually no more than 53 feet.

Work Environment:
4. Drivers may spend 1% - 5% of their time out of doors exposed to potentially difficult environmental
conditions.
5. Drivers may be subject to irregular work schedules, temperatures and weather extremes, long trips,
short notice for assignments, tight delivery schedules, delays in route and other stress and fatigue
related to driving a large commercial motor vehicle on crowded streets and highways in all kinds of
weather.
6. Drivers typically spend 90% - 95% of on-duty time in the truck. While driving operators are exposed
to noise and vibration levels which may be higher than those typically experienced in passenger
cars.

Statements included in this job description do not necessarily represent an exhaustive list of all
responsibilities, skill, duties, requirements, efforts, or working conditions associated with the job. While this
is intended to be an accurate reflection of the current job, management reserves the right to revise the job
or to require that other or different tasks be performed as circumstances change.

(End of Position Description)

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 21 of 89

POSITION DESCRIPTION – VAN DIVISION ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

I have read and understand the demands of being a van driver as outlined in the Position Description – Van
Division with a revision date of June 20, 2019 and can fulfill the requirements to the job.

_____________________________________ _____________________________________

Driver Signature Witness Signature

_____________________________________

Date

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 22 of 89

MINIMUM HIRING STANDARDS

Drivers are expected to maintain and adhere to ALL Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA)
regulations. If, at any time, a driver becomes “disqualified” to operate a commercial vehicle under the
FMCSA regulations, their employment will be terminated. In addition, drivers are expected to perform their
jobs in a manner that protects their Commercial Driver License (CDL) and driving record and must maintain
company minimum driving standards related to their Motor Vehicle Records (MVR). Those who, at any
time during their employment, fail to exceed minimum acceptable standards are considered “unqualified”
and their employment will be terminated. Drivers must be insurable. Anytime a driver becomes
uninsurable, due to citations/accidents on or off the job, regardless of fault, he/she is subject to immediate
termination. Should a driver have his/her CDL suspended or revoked, they must notify the Safety
Department immediately.

DRIVER EVALUATION
Drivers will be evaluated and selected based upon their experience, safety, and job history. To evaluate
driver prospects, management will:

1. Review past driving performance and work experience through previous employer reference
checks.

2. Ensure prospective drivers meet or exceed all company and DOT requirements.
3. Ensure prospective drivers are qualified to operate the type of vehicle he/she will be driving. New

driver prospects are required to take and pass a road test.

DRIVER QUALIFICATION
The following criteria have been established to identify high risk drivers. A driver is unacceptable if the
driver’s accident/violation history in the past year includes one or more of the following:

1. Charge or conviction of DUI, DWI, or open container.
2. Leaving the scene of an accident (hit and run).
3. Failure to report an accident.
4. Negligent homicide arising out of the use of a motor vehicle.
5. Operating a vehicle during a period of license suspension or revocation.
6. Using a motor vehicle for the commission of a felony.
7. Operating a motor vehicle without the owner’s authority.
8. Permitting an unlicensed person to operate a vehicle.
9. Careless or reckless driving.
10. Speeding (3 or more in a 3-year period).
11. Two preventable accidents in a 12-month period.
12. Involved in a preventable rear end accident.
13. Having a DOT positive or refused drug/alcohol test.
14. Failure to pass a DOT physical or road test.

DRIVER TRAINING
Drivers hired by BMT will have the basic skills and credentials necessary to perform this function as
confirmed through the driver selection process. New driver prospects will receive formal orientation as
established to assure all drivers are aware of company policies, understand their responsibilities, and are
familiarized with their vehicle. Areas that must be addressed with the driver include:

1. Give a copy, review, and ensure the driver understands the BMT Driver Handbook.
2. Review with the driver their individual Motor Vehicle Report (MVR).
3. Ensure the driver understands the accident reporting and emergency procedures.
4. Ensure the driver understands the operational controls of the vehicle being assigned to them.
5. Inspect the vehicle using a Vehicle Inspection Form.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 23 of 89

SAFETY

It is the objective of BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. to maintain an effective loss prevention program.
This is to be achieved through continually focusing on preventing personal injuries and vehicle accidents.
Achieving this objective is the responsibility of all employees. BMT holds the safety, health, and welfare of
all employees as our first priority. Professional drivers are expected to operate motor vehicles safely to
prevent accidents which may result in injuries and property loss. It is the policy of BMT to provide and
maintain a safe working environment to protect our employees and the citizens of the communities in which
we conduct business from injury and property loss. BMT is committed to promoting a heightened level of
safety awareness and responsible driving behavior. Each of us working together, with a commitment to
safety, will help prevent vehicle accidents and reduce personal injury and property loss claims. You, the
driver, are in charge of a rolling profit center for Buddy Moore Trucking. Your care for the equipment and
freight will determine if a profit is made. This safety program requires the full cooperation of each driver to
operate their vehicle safely and to adhere to the responsibilities outlined in the Driver Handbook. Elements
of this safety program include:

 Assigning responsibilities at all levels.
 Vehicle use and insurance requirements.
 Employee driver license checks and identification of high-risk drivers.
 Accident reporting and investigation.
 Company Safety Committee.
 Vehicle inspection and maintenance.
 On-the-job training.
 Safety regulations.

RESPONSIBILITIES
The Safety Department will issue periodic instructions to drivers, either by a People-Net message, on the
company website, or in postings at the terminals. These instructions are vital to proper procedures and
general news. You are responsible for all instructions issued.

The objective of the safety program is to control loss and maintain compliance with regulations. Accidents
resulting in personal injury and damage to property and equipment represent needless suffering and waste.
The Safety Department’s responsibility is to provide the safest conditions and equipment possible for all
employees. In return, drivers are required to support and be involved in the loss/prevention program by
adopting the following rules and policies:

1. The safety of the employee, the public, and the operation is paramount, and every attempt will be
made to reduce the possibility of accident occurrence.

2. Safety will take precedence over expediency or short cuts.
3. Every employee will be expected to demonstrate an attitude, which reflects the safety policies of

Buddy Moore Trucking, Inc.

SAFE DRIVING

Buddy Moore Trucking, Inc. is strongly committed to safety on highways through focus on the following

principles:

1. Good vision
2. Alertness
3. Sound judgment
4. Fast reactions

BMT’s Safety Department personnel will conduct periodic performance checks to ensure we are staying
committed to our goal.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 24 of 89

While operating company or leased vehicles, drivers should always drive in the safest and most
professional manner possible. The likelihood of accidents will be minimized, and a positive image for the
company will be promoted in the eyes of the general public. Specifically, our drivers must operate company
vehicles in accordance with all provisions of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSA) Part
392 – Driving of Motor Vehicles.

Many factors impact the operation of the vehicles on the roadways. These factors include:

1. Light levels
2. Weather
3. Pavement conditions
4. Traffic conditions
5. Mechanical conditions
6. Operator conditions

A successful defensive driver exhibits five (5) main qualities: extensive knowledge, alertness, good
judgment, foresight, and driving skill.

The core concepts of defensive driving are to: 1) recognize hazard, 2) understand the defense, and 3) act
in time. If these principles are followed carefully, the result will be improved safety on the highways and a
resulting positive image for our company.

DRIVER SAFETY REGULATIONS
Seat Belt and Harness/Net Policy
Seat belts are required to be worn any time the vehicle is in motion. This includes backing and any team
co-drivers or properly authorized passengers that might be in the passenger seat. You are required to use
and make sure any team members or authorized passengers use the harness or net in the bunk area.

Impaired Driving
The driver must not operate a vehicle at any time when his/her ability to do so is impaired, affected,
influenced by alcohol, illegal drugs, prescribed or over-the-counter medication, illness, fatigue, or injury.

Traffic Laws
Drivers must abide by the local, state, and federal motor vehicle regulations, laws, ordinances, and
company policy.

Cellular Telephones
Federal law restricts a CMV driver from reaching for or holding a mobile phone to conduct a voice
communication, as well as dialing by pressing more than a single button. In short, the rule prohibits unsafely
reaching for a device, holding a device, or pressing multiple buttons. The following procedures apply to
employees driving on company business who wish to use cellular telephones in the vehicle:

1. An external speaker and microphone must be included to allow hands-free operation.
2. Telephone number memory and programming capabilities are to be included.
3. Drivers are to refrain from placing outgoing calls or responding to text messages while the vehicle

is in motion.
4. When your vehicle is in motion, answer incoming calls with “I am driving now. Please call back or

leave a message.”

No Texting While Driving
CMV drivers are prohibited from texting while driving. Texting means manually entering alphanumeric text
into, or reading text from, an electronic device. This includes, but is not limited to, short message service,
e-mailing, instant messaging, a command or request to access a web page, or pressing more than a single
button to initiate or terminate a voice communication using a mobile phone or engaging in any other form
of electronic text retrieval or entry, for present or future communication.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 25 of 89

If a driver is caught using a hand-held phone or texting while driving, the rule imposes sanctions including
civil penalties up to $2,750 and driver disqualification for multiple offenses. Motor carriers are also prohibited
from requiring or allowing their drivers to text or use a hand-held mobile phone while driving and may be
subject to civil penalties up to $11,000. Violations will impact CSA results. Texting and calling on a hand-
held phone carry the maximum violation severity weighting in CSA!

Passenger Policy
Under no circumstances shall any driver transport, or “pick up” to transport, any person(s) that are not
“authorized” to be transported by the company. “Authorized” passengers are other company drivers or those
authorized by the Safety Department and who also have the proper documentation.

The following guidelines must be met for drivers to be permitted to transport a passenger for any time period
no matter how long or how many times. BMT provides rider insurance at minimal cost to the driver, but for
the policy to be honored, the following rules must be met:

1. The passenger must be at least 16 years of age.
2. A Rider Authorization Form must be obtained from the safety department.
3. Copies of the passenger’s identification must be kept on file in the safety department and appear

on the authorized release form.
4. No passenger authorization will be given to passengers with a CDL license. Only BMT employees

and contract drivers can operate a CMV.

Passengers are not allowed to perform any driver job requirements.

GENERAL SAFETY RULES
Employees are not permitted to:

1. Have an unauthorized person in the truck.
2. Use any radar detector, laser detector, or similar devices.
3. Push or pull another vehicle.
4. Assist disabled motorists or accident victims beyond their level of medical expertise. If a driver is

unable to provide the proper medical care, he/she must restrict assistance to calling the proper
authorities. Your safety and well-being is to be protected at all times.

Loose bottles and cans are dangerous. Rags and papers can clog your heater filters and keep your heater
from working. Cleaning the trash out of the cab is each driver’s pre-trip and post-trip responsibility.

YEARLY VIOLATION STATEMENT
You are required to submit to the Safety Department, a Certification of Violation/Annual Review of Driving
Record annually. You must list on the prescribed form all of your traffic convictions, regardless of type, with
the exception of parking violations, setting forth your date of conviction, the offense, location, and type of
vehicle you were operating at the time of the offense for the past 12 months.

MEDICAL EXAMINATION
You are required to have a valid medical certificate, not over 2 years since it was issued, with you always
while operating company equipment. If BMT pays the charge for a medical examination by an appointed
physician, any employee who does not complete 90 days of service must make reimbursement to the
company.

SAFE DRIVING PROCEDURES
General

1. Drivers are required to put their training to use and exercise common sense when driving a
commercial vehicle. Traffic rules generally apply to passenger vehicles which are much smaller
and easier to maneuver. Therefore, a semi driver is to use extra caution under all circumstances,
always taking the size and weight of their vehicle and cargo into consideration when driving. Those

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 26 of 89

who do not exercise good judgment or common sense will be disciplined and depending on the
circumstances, may be terminated.
2. If in doubt – play it safe. Regardless of any other considerations, do not take chances. To arrive
safely is the goal.
3. Drivers need to report for work when scheduled. By doing this, there is adequate time allowed to
manage unexpected delays in route and still make a delivery appointment.
4. In addition to company rules, the driver is expected to be familiar with the regulations of the
Department of Transportation (DOT), and the laws of the states and cities through which they
operate. They must always have a valid CDL and a current medical certificate with them when
driving.
5. The physical condition of the drivers must enable them to efficiently perform their duties. A driver
suffering from illness or fatigue will not be allowed to work. Drivers becoming ill or unduly fatigued
on the road should stop at the nearest safest place and should notify their Dispatcher. Any delay
due to such illness or fatigue must be reported to Dispatch.

Speed
1. Drivers are required to obey all posted speed limits. Under no circumstance is a truck to be driven
at a speed greater than is reasonable under the existing weather, road and traffic conditions.
Drivers are responsible for all tickets; speeding, parking, etc. You are expected to report all
violations. Drivers will pay for any tickets resulting from improper parking or idling in prohibited
areas.
2. Any driver cited for exceeding the posted speed limit by 10 mph or more, or exceeding the
maximum posted speed on interstate highways, may be disciplined up to and including termination.
The Company will periodically run MVR reports on each driver to determine traffic violations and
license status.
3. Speed shall never be faster than a rate consistent with existing speed laws, road conditions, traffic,
and weather conditions. Posted speed limits on the open highway and in towns and cities must be
obeyed.
4. At night and when fog or other conditions restrict visibility, speed shall be reduced to a point which
will enable the driver to stop within the distance he/she can see ahead.
5. Weather and traffic conditions should be taken into consideration and may require a reduction in
speed in order to travel safely.

Right Turns
Here are some rules to help prevent right turn accidents:

1. Turn slowly to give yourself and others more time to avoid problems.
2. When driving large trucks that cannot make the right turn without swinging into another lane, turn

wide as you complete the turn. Keep the rear of your vehicle close to the curb. This will stop other
drivers from passing you on the right.
3. Don’t turn wide to the left as you start the turn. A driver following your vehicle may think that you
are turning left and try to pass on the right.
4. If you cross into the oncoming lane to make a turn, watch out for vehicles coming toward you. Give
them room to go by or stop. However, don’t back up; you might hit someone behind you.

Left Turns
When making left turns:

1. Be sure you have reached the center of the intersection before you start the turn.
2. If you turn too soon, the left side of your vehicle may hit another vehicle because of off tracking.
3. If there are two left turning lanes, always turn from the right lane of the two.
4. Don’t start in the inside lane because you may have to swing right to make the turn. This could

cause an accident with vehicles in your right-hand blind spot.

Right-of-Way
1. Always clear the intersection by looking left, right, and left again.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 27 of 89

2. Never attempt to exercise the right-of-way; always let the other driver go first. Above all, never use
the size of your vehicle to assert your right-of-way.

3. Keep to the right except when passing slow moving vehicles, or when getting into position to make
a left turn.

4. Emergency vehicles, such as fire trucks, police cars, and ambulances always have right-of-way
when giving warnings by means of sirens or warning lights. Upon the approach of such vehicles,
pull as far to the right as possible, stop where you are, and let them pass.

Tailgating
1. Never follow another vehicle so closely that you annoy this driver, or that you will not be able to
make a safe stop under any condition. Under adverse weather conditions, your following distance
must increase to assure you of being able to avoid an accident. There is NO acceptable excuse for
rear ending another vehicle.
2. Never follow another vehicle, especially another truck, closer than 500 feet on the open highway,
use the seven (7) second rule while behind other vehicles. Always leave enough space between
you and the vehicle ahead to allow faster traffic to pass you and get back into the right lane. Failure
to follow this policy may result in disciplinary action, up to and including discharge.
3. In a large vehicle, it is often hard to see tailgaters. If you suspect you are being tailgated:
a. Avoid quick changes. If you need to slow down or turn, signal early and reduce speed very
gradually.
b. Increase your following distance. Opening room in front of you will help avoid having to
make a sudden direction change. It will also make it easier for the tailgater to get around
you.
c. Don’t speed up. It is safer to be tailgated at a low speed than at a high speed.
d. Don’t turn on your taillights or flash your brake lights.

Traveling Next to Others
There are two dangers in traveling next to, or alongside, other vehicles:

1. Another vehicle may change lanes suddenly and turn into you.
2. You may be trapped when YOU need to change lanes.

Passing
1. Passing should be attempted only when you have adequate clear space ahead to complete the
pass without racing and without risk to you or the vehicle being passed.
2. Signals shall be given to indicate change of lane, both when pulling out to pass and when returning
to the right lane. The signal should be given for at least 100 feet before an actual change of lanes.
3. The signal is only an indication of intention. It does not give any right-of-way privilege, or any
guarantee that you can change lanes safely. You must check traffic conditions carefully and extra
caution should be taken when changing lanes.
4. Be alert for an unexpected move on the part of the driver being passed or merging into traffic.
5. Never attempt to pass when approaching the top of the hill, on a curve, at an intersection, on a
bridge, at a railroad crossing, or any place where you do not have a clear view of the road ahead.
6. School buses will be passed only with the greatest of care. A full stop must be made from either
direction for a school bus stopped to discharge or receive passengers and must remain stopped
until it is safe to proceed.
7. Drivers must be sure to check all mirrors before, during, and after every lane change.

Being Passed
1. When being passed by another vehicle, you must keep well to the right and reduce speed if
necessary. Never speed up to prevent another vehicle from passing.
2. Do not signal the driver of the passing vehicle that it is safe to pass. This is against regulations of
the DOT. To give such a signal may transfer part of the responsibility to you should an accident
occur.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 28 of 89

3. Be alert for the driver who tries to pass in an unsafe place. Do not try to block him but be ready to
do anything that may be necessary to avoid being involved in an accident.

4. At night, dim your lights after being passed to avoid creating a glare in the other driver’s mirror.

Courtesy of the Road
Each truck carries our company name and reputation. Therefore, the driver should set an example of the
best driving “manners”. The same courtesy that is extended to our customers should be exhibited in relation
to other vehicles on the road.

Meeting Other Vehicles
1. Always keep to the extreme right when meeting any on-coming vehicles. At night, dim your
headlights when within 500 feet of the on-coming vehicle.
2. If you see a vehicle approaching on your side of the road, slow down and pull as far to the right as
safely possible and stop. Never, under any circumstance, pull to the left to avoid an on-coming
vehicle in your lane.

Stopping/Parking
1. Never stop on the side of any major interstate or highway, unless it is an absolute emergency.
When you stop, there is always the chance of being rear-ended by someone who isn’t paying
attention. If you must stop, pull to the right as far as possible. Immediately put out your reflector
triangles so traffic will be alerted of your presence and be sure you are to the right of the fog line.
2. Always set the parking brakes after stopping. Never stop on a steep grade unless necessary. You
must never block a driveway or an emergency exit.

Backing Vehicles
1. Backing accidents can be prevented by using preventive measures.
2. Drivers must always get out of the truck and look the situation over before starting to back.
3. Routes should be planned to keep backing to a minimum. Never back into traffic if you can avoid
it. If it is necessary, call police to assist you.
4. Be sure to check the line of travel before backing. Drivers may have to get off their seat and onto
their feet.
5. Even when someone is directing you, YOU are still responsible for safe backing. Be sure your
helper is in a position where they have a clear view and where signals can be seen or heard.
6. Never allow anyone to stand or work behind the truck or trailer when it is in motion.
7. When doors of a trailer must be opened before backing up to a dock, be sure they are properly
hooked so they will not swing back and hit something.
8. Drivers must sound horn (tap only) and use four-way flashers when backing any vehicle.

Curves
1. Curves and turns must be taken at reduced speed consistent with available sight distance, the
sharpness of the turn, and other road and traffic conditions. Reduce speed before entering any
curve.
2. When making curves on the open highway, be sure to stay entirely within your own lane. Do not
swing wide or cut across lanes. To do so puts your vehicle into the opposing traffic lane and this
creates a potential accident situation.
3. When making turns in traffic, check traffic conditions before turning, and do not make the turn until
the way is clear. Then complete the turn without stopping in a position where you will obstruct traffic
and continue to check traffic while turning.
4. Always turn off your signal after making a turn.

Exiting a Highway
When exiting a highway, BMT drivers are expected to:

1. Signal and change into the right-hand lane early and safely.
2. Signal intentions to exit early.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 29 of 89

3. Check mirrors constantly.
4. Reduce speed and exit.

Railroad Crossings
1. Railroad crossings are always dangerous. Every crossing should be approached with the
expectation that a train is coming.
2. Never attempt to race a train to a crossing or permit traffic/road conditions to trap you in a position
where you must stop on the track.
3. Speed must be reduced in accordance with the driver’s ability to see approaching trains in any
condition.
4. Speed must be held to a point that will permit the driver to stop if necessary. The rail signals may
not always work.
5. Because the highway surface at many crossings is rough, crossings must be made at reduced
speed to prevent abuse to equipment and damage to cargo.
6. Drivers must have their trailer dollies up when crossing tracks.

Clearances
1. Bridges, tunnels, and alleys demand special care on the part of the driver to avoid accidents and
damage to equipment and/or cargo.
2. Road repairs, rough roads, and ice and snow build-up may reduce clearances that are otherwise
adequate.
3. Know your height. Note posted clearances on bridges and underpasses but do not rely on them
being accurate, as there are variables that contribute to trailer height such as whether your trailer
is loaded or not or if there is snow buildup on the road. Some high crown roads can cause the
vehicle to tilt. There can be problems with clearance at the side such as with trees and poles. Be
especially cautious when traveling on routes that are not designated as truck routes. Just because
you clear one overpass, does not mean you will clear the next one if there are several in a row and
just because the truck ahead of you cleared it, does not mean you will. There is NO excuse for
topping a trailer. As a driver, it is your responsibility to assure that you have proper clearance and
to plan so you do not use a route where there are low overpasses.
4. Watch for fire escapes, open windows, overhead obstructions in alleys, and low tree limbs.
5. When backing, get out and check all around. It is easy to miss trees, wires, and low overhangs.

Convoy Trips
When traveling in convoy, never pass another truck. Drivers should keep up with the truck in front but
maintain a distance of at least 200 yards.

U-Turn Policy
U-turns are prohibited regardless of the circumstances unless directed to do so by a law enforcement
official.

Yard Speed
Yard speed is 5 mph – entering or exiting. Unnecessary engine idling should be limited.

Out of Route Miles
Fuel costs and tractor maintenance are two of the costliest expenses for a trucking company. Due to this
fact alone, it is extremely important for drivers to pre-plan their trips to ensure they are running the nearest
route to avoid unnecessary out of route miles. Unnecessary, unauthorized, out of route miles will be
monitored by dispatch and charged back to the driver.

Special Precautions
1. Posted road warning and regulations must be heeded. These signs are placed for your protection.
No excuse will be accepted for failing to heed them.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 30 of 89

2. Give a “brake” to highway department crews and others who work on or near the roadway. Any
group of persons on or near the highway should be a danger signal to the driver.

3. Fog, snow, ice, and rain call for reduced speed and the utmost care in driving. When conditions
become too hazardous, pull off the road at the first safe place and wait until conditions improve.
Keep abreast of weather conditions for the areas you anticipate traveling into and do not wait to
look for a place to pull off until after the roads become dangerous. Parking spaces become limited
when the weather gets bad. Report any weather delays to your Dispatcher so they know where
you are and why you had to stop.

4. Animals on or near the road are a warning to keep your unit under close control.
5. Slow down in school zones. Remember that children cannot be expected to exercise good

judgment in traffic. Reduce speed in residential areas when passing through small towns along the
highway.
6. All hills must be descended with great care. Never use engine brakes in snow, ice, or rain. Where
gearing down is necessary, it should be done at the top of the hill before speed is built up to a point
where gearing down is impossible. Do not depend on the service brakes for complete control of a
unit on long downgrades. You could lose all the air, or the brakes may get too hot. Either way, you
may not be able to stop. Any driver found to have taken their truck out of gear while descending a
hill may be terminated.
7. When traveling on narrow roads or roads with very narrow shoulder area, extreme caution should
be taken, and drivers must reduce speed to compensate for road conditions.
8. No semi-tractor/trailer combination should ever attempt to perform a U-turn on a divided highway.

DRIVING IN EXTREME WEATHER AND ROAD CONDITIONS
Bad weather and other road hazards place special stress upon any defensive driver. The best rule in any
kind of bad weather or extreme road condition is to get off the road safely and as soon as possible. If you
absolutely must continue, slowing way down and increasing following distance is your best defense, along
with increased awareness. All BMT drivers should be aware of the dangers of, and the company’s
expectations for, driving in the following extreme weather and road conditions.

Fog
Fog reduces available visibility and impairs distance perception, making it perhaps the most dangerous
type of extreme weather condition. Because of this, it is BMT’s policy that, whenever possible, drivers are
to avoid driving in foggy conditions. Pull off the road and park safely until the fog dissipates or is burned off,
if possible. If you cannot safely pull off the road, follow these procedures:

1. You should never assume the depth or thickness of any fog. Fog can range from a momentary
blurring of the windshield to being several miles thick.

2. Slow your vehicle’s speed. Reduction in speed should be done gradually in order to avoid becoming
a hazard for other motorists. Determining a correct and safe speed depends on the thickness of
the fog and is left to your best judgment.

3. Use low-beam headlights only when driving in fog. Low beams serve two (2) purposes. They help
you see the immediate roadway and allow other motorists to see your vehicle.

4. Avoid the use of high-beam headlights while driving in fog. The water particles that make up fog
will reflect more light back at you than onto the roadway and will further reduce visibility for you.

5. You should make use of windshield wipers and the defroster when driving in fog. Driving in foggy
conditions will cause a constant fine mist of water to develop on the vehicle’s windshield, reducing
visibility in the process. Using the windshield wipers and defroster will alleviate this condition.

6. Avoid passing other vehicles while driving in fog.
7. You should avoid stopping on any roadway while driving in foggy conditions unless necessary. If

you must stop, use the emergency or breakdown lane, activate your emergency flashers, and turn
off the headlights.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 31 of 89

Rain
BMT drivers should understand fundamental safety procedures for driving in rainy conditions. Rain causes
roadways to become slippery, especially when it first begins. Roadways become covered with a thin layer
of oil and other residues.

When rain mixes with this layer, it results in an extremely slippery and dangerous road surface. This
condition remains until additional rain can break down and wash away the oily mixture from the pavement.
This process can take anywhere from a few minutes to several hours depending upon the severity of the
rain.

Water on the road surface can also create a potential hazard of hydroplaning. Hydroplaning happens when
a thin layer of water separates the vehicle’s tires from the road surface. When a vehicle is hydroplaning, it
is literally riding on water. When the tires ride on water, they lose all traction and create an extremely
dangerous situation. The faster a vehicle travels on standing water, the greater the chance of hydroplaning.
Reducing speed is the best and safest way to avoid hydroplaning.

Rain also reduces visibility. Because rain presents these hazards, BMT drivers are expected to adhere to
the following procedures when driving in rainy conditions:

1. You should slow the vehicle’s speed to avoid hydroplaning. Reduction in speed should be done
gradually in order to avoid becoming a hazard for other motorists. Determining the correct and safe
speed depends on how heavy the rain is and will be left to your best judgment.

2. You are expected to increase your following distance from other motorists. Since rain causes the
road surface to become slippery, you need to allow for greater stopping distance if the need to stop
arises.

3. You should make use of windshield wipers and the defroster when driving in rain. Driving in rainy
conditions will cause a constant film of water to develop on the vehicle’s windshield, reducing
visibility in the process. Using the windshield wipers and defroster will alleviate this condition.

4. You should drive with your headlights on when operating in rainy conditions.
5. You should avoid passing other vehicles while driving in rain. In addition, you are encouraged to

follow other vehicles at a safe distance since vehicles traveling ahead will throw water off the
pavement and leave “tracks.” Driving in these tracks will give you the best possible traction under
rainy conditions.

Snow
BMT drivers should understand fundamental safety procedures for driving in snowy conditions. Snow,
depending on the type and severity, can present a variety of dangerous conditions. Because of this, the
following procedures have been developed for this defensive driving policy:

1. Light, powdery snow presents few problems since it’s quickly blown off the road surface. However,
if there is enough of this type of snow to cover the roadway, it will form a slick, smooth surface. You
should reduce speed and increase following distance. Determining the correct speed and safe
following distance will be left to your best judgment.

2. Heavier, slushy snow can affect vehicle control. If snow becomes hard packed, it can cause an ice
hazard on the road surface.

3. All slow maneuvers such as starting out, steering, backing, and turning should be done smoothly
and with extreme care to minimize skids and slides.

4. Falling or blowing snow can make it hard to see the road, road marking, road signs, and off ramps.
If you must continue in snowy conditions, reducing speed and increasing following distance are the
best techniques a driver can use to maintain vehicle control.

5. As with driving in foggy conditions, the use of high beam headlights while driving in snowy
conditions should be avoided. The high beam “shooting” light will reflect off falling and blowing
snow and reflect back at you, further reducing visibility.

6. BMT drivers should also understand the dangers of “snow hypnosis.” Snow hypnosis occurs when
a driver is traveling directly into heavy snow and begins to focus on the falling snow instead of the

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 32 of 89

road ahead. This can cause a hypnotic-like effect on the driver. The danger of snow hypnosis is
especially prevalent at night. In extreme conditions, chains may be necessary.

Ice
Drivers should understand fundamental safety procedures for driving on icy roads. All BMT drivers need to
be aware of changes in road surface conditions that may affect the vehicles traction. To help our drivers
drive on icy roads, the following procedures have been approved:

1. As with all extreme weather conditions, if you must continue, the safest techniques to employ are
to reduce speed and increase following distance. But of these two, increasing following distance is
by far the most important. Depending on the temperature and road conditions, stopping distance
(distance needed to come to a complete stop) on icy roads can increase 4 to 10 times versus
stopping from the same speed on a dry road.

2. BMT drivers should be knowledgeable of the dangers of “black ice.” Black ice forms when
temperatures drop rapidly and any moisture on the road surface freezes into a smooth, almost
transparent layer of ice. What makes black ice particularly dangerous is that you may not realize
you are on it until it is too late. Determining the correct speed and safe following distance will be
left to your best judgment.

3. Bridges and overpasses are other areas to which you should give special attention. Ice will tend to
form first on bridges and overpasses because cold air circulates both above and below these
structures causing the temperature to drop more rapidly than on normal roads. Any moisture on
the road surface of a bridge or overpass will freeze quicker and harder than elsewhere on the road.
Extreme caution and a reduction in speed should be used by all BMT drivers while over bridges
and overpasses.

Night Driving
Drivers should understand safe driving techniques for driving at night. All BMT drivers need to be aware of
the potential hazards present when driving at night. These hazards include fatigue, reduced visibility, poor
lighting, other (impaired) motorists, and animals on the road. To help our drivers better prepare for driving
at night, BMT has adopted the following procedures for this defensive driving program:

1. Fatigue is perhaps the most dangerous hazard of driving at night. Nothing we do at Buddy Moore
Trucking is worth anyone getting hurt. Fatigue usually sets in at night, but a tired driver, at any time
of the day, is an unsafe driver. Fatigue reduces a driver’s reaction time and perception. All drivers
are to review the following fatigue warning signs:

 Your eyes close or go out of focus by themselves

 You can’t stop yawning

 You are experiencing trouble keeping your head up

 You experience short-term memory loss. For example, you can’t remember the last several
miles you have driven

 Your thoughts wander or you begin to daydream

 You start drifting into other lanes of traffic, tailgate, or miss traffic signs

 You experience an inability to maintain a constant rate of speed

 You must jerk the steering wheel hard to correct a drift and get back into your lane
If you experience any of these signs, it is time to get off the road as soon as safely possible and
get some rest.
2. Reduced visibility is a hazard driving at night. At night, visual acuity (degree of perception) and
peripheral vision (side vision) are reduced, and the eyes may have difficulty adjusting from light to
darkness. The best and safest techniques to counteract these night driving hazards are to reduce
your speed and increase your following distance so that you can stop in the distance that you can
see. Reducing speed is also the best way to prevent “out driving” your headlights.
3. Poor lighting in the open highway or on rural roads is another hazard BMT drivers should be made
aware of. At night, with poor or no lighting aside from the vehicle’s headlights, hazards in the road
are much more difficult to see and avoid. You should reduce speed and use extra caution when
traveling on poorly lit or unfamiliar roads.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 33 of 89

4. Your headlights need to be clean, adjusted, and working. High beams will allow you to see about
300 to 500 feet, low beams about 250 feet. Remember to dim your lights within 500 feet of another
vehicle to avoid blinding others.

5. Impaired motorists (drunk drivers) are a hazard to everyone on the road. BMT drivers should be
especially cautious when driving between the hours of midnight and 0300 (typical bar and tavern
closing times). Drivers should be wary of motorists driving in an erratic manner including weaving
in and out of traffic lanes, having difficulty maintaining a constant rate of speed, or braking suddenly.
If you, as a driver, suspect that you are sharing the road with an impaired motorist, reduce your
speed, let the motorists pass, and increase following distance.

6. For night driving, it is important that the windshield and mirrors are clean. If they are dirty, scratched,
or pitted, the nighttime glare can greatly reduce vision. Even dirty, scratched eyeglasses will reduce
vision and cause eye strain and fatigue. Those items, coupled with night driving and the possibility
of being tired, can increase the chance of an accident.

7. Animals on the road present another kind of hazard while driving at night. BMT drivers are to be
especially alert when driving on roadways lined by woods or tall grass. Animals, especially deer,
can jump out in front of an oncoming vehicle with little or no warning. The best techniques to avoid
collisions with animals are to not “outdrive” your headlights and to reduce speed. If a collision with
an animal is unavoidable, you should drive “through” the animal. This will help prevent a jackknife
or rollover type accident.

Road Construction
Buddy Moore Trucking realizes that our drivers will be faced with having to drive on roadways that are being
repaired or under construction. Road construction presents several hazards. Because of this, our drivers
are expected to approach road construction work zones the same way they would any adverse driving
situation and follow these procedures:

1. You should reduce speed and maintain a safe following distance. Safe following distance will be
left to your best judgment.

2. You should drive at or under all special or reduced posted speed limits while traveling through road
construction work zones.

3. You should be constantly aware of your immediate surroundings, anticipate the possible actions of
other motorists, and expect sudden stops.

4. You should watch for construction workers or vehicles crossing the roadway.
5. You should avoid sudden lane changes and use headlights and four-way flashers when traveling

though construction zones.

Road Hazards
BMT drivers should be aware of the potential danger of encountering various types of road hazards
including: 1) soft shoulders or severe pavement drop-offs that can cause rollover type accidents and 2)
road debris such as tire recaps, metal or lumber that can cause severe damage to tires, tire rims, electrical
systems, and brake lines. You should be aware of the road ahead to identify potential road debris early and
take safe appropriate avoidance maneuvers.

Fixed Objects and Special Intersections
A good defensive driver will observe items in the area around the vehicle that might cause problems.
Checking to be certain there is adequate clearance is the primary thing to watch. In the areas of driveways,
alleyways or plant entrances, the effective defensive driver will analyze the situation carefully, slow down,
sound a warning when appropriate, and be ready to yield to the other driver involved.

Other Roadside Emergency Procedures
The following additional steps may be necessary when an emergency arises:

1. Keep unauthorized persons away
2. Keep open flames away
3. Set up warning signals on the highway
4. Prevent leakage onto the highway by damming up the leak with the BMT spill kit provided for you

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 34 of 89

5. Make sure you replace the spill kit or any other equipment as soon as possible.

DEFENSIVE DRIVING

A professional driver is a top defensive driver! He seems to have eyes (or mirrors)

in the back of his head! He stays out of the other fellow’s way.

The Professional Driver:
1. Knows and obeys the company rules for the operation of his vehicle.
2. Knows and obeys traffic rules and regulations applicable to the area in which he is driving.
3. Is aware of the traffic situation far ahead on both sides and to the rear of his vehicle.
4. Is constantly alert to illegal acts and errors of others.
5. Is willing to yield the right-of-way to prevent accidents and does not tailgate.
6. Is particularly cautious approaching intersections. He lessens the odds of an accident by taking his
foot off the gas and putting it on the brake to shorten his reaction time for stopping.
7. Knows and adjusts his driving to the special hazards of: a) pedestrians b) the road c) weather d)
traffic e) degree of light and f) the added dangers brought on by his own emotions such as anger
and worry.
8. Requires and ATTITUDE of confidence that he can drive without ever having an accident. He is
POSITIVE about accident prevention.
9. Drives as though every child in the street is his own and every motorist is a dear relative or friend.
10. Knows the secret of safe driving: DO IT THE SAFE WAY EVERY TIME.

S.A.F.E.
Whether starting the day, completing a delivery, making a pickup or returning from a break, professional
drivers take the opportunity to be S.A.F.E.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 35 of 89

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE) POLICY
In order to protect you from certain recognized hazards you may come into contact with while performing
you job responsibilities on a daily basis, BMT will issue you appropriate PPE on a one-time basis. These
items might include safety glasses, hearing protection, tear-proof gloves, hard hat, and reflective vest. Re-
issue will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Misuse or loss of PPE may result in the employee being
charged for the costs of re-issue.

A PPE Assessment will be conducted for those positions that require the use of PPE. BMT is required to
train each worked required to wear PPE to know:

 When it is necessary
 What kind is necessary
 How to properly put it on, adjust, wear, and take it off
 The limitations of the equipment
 Proper care, maintenance, useful life, and disposal of the equipment

PROPER FOOTWEAR REQUIREMENT
Good, sturdy footwear with slip-resistant soles are required. No flip flops, no open-toe shoes, no sandals,
no slick bottom cowboy/work boots, and no tennis/gym shoes. When out of the truck or when required by
the customer, hard-toe shoes such as steel toe must be worn in a work environment where the potential
for injury to your feet is present. Examples of this include, but is not limited to, forklift traffic and elevated
movement of materials.

FIREARM POLICY
Many of our customers prohibit firearms on their property. Therefore, it is the policy of Buddy Moore
Trucking that drivers are NOT allowed to have firearms in any truck owned by Buddy Moore Trucking.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 36 of 89

INJURIES/ACCIDENTS

OFF-DUTY INJURIES
If you are injured off duty, you must notify Dispatch immediately of your inability to work. Should you be
seen by a doctor for your personal injury, we must have a written release signed by the doctor stating the
date of the injury and the date you are available to return to work. The release to return to work must be
given to the Safety Department prior to your being released to operate any equipment related to Company
operations.

ON-THE-JOB INJURIES
If you are injured on the job, it is your responsibility to contact your Safety Department as soon as
possible to report the injury.

Work Status
Each time you see a doctor due to an on-the-job injury, you will need to obtain a work status slip signed by
the doctor. This will advise BMT, per the doctor’s evaluation, as to what you are able or not able to do and
assist us in planning with you. You are to contact the Safety Department following each doctor visit and
report your work status. The written status slip, or a copy, is to be mailed or brought to us.

Post Injury Call Process
Buddy Moore Trucking will conduct a Post Injury Call with you should you sustain an injury while employed
with us. The purposes of this call will be to determine the root cause of the injury and determine what
processes/procedures, if any, can be put in place to keep the injury from happening again.

Return to Work/Modified Duty Program
Buddy Moore Trucking participates in a modified duty program for on-the-job injuries. This Program is
designed to bridge the gap between a recent serious or long-term injury and a return to employment by
physically and psychologically reconditioning the employee in order to facilitate the return to fully duty
status. Every effort will be made to return injured employees to temporary modified duty within the treating
physician’s medical restrictions.

SLOW DOWN! USE COMMON SENSE! BE AWARE OF YOUR SURROUNDINGS! Safe driving and
staying out of accidents should cut your chances of being injured considerably. Remember the three-point
stance and proper lifting techniques and know your limits. Always stay alert to conditions and activities
around you. Don’t get in a hurry! Many injuries happen when drivers are trying to save time by cutting
corners, and they are not following proper procedures.

BACK SAFETY AND PROPER LIFTING TECHNIQUES
A back injury may occur as a result of improper lifting, falling, stretching, overextending, or another
workplace mishap. Of these, using improper lifting techniques is the single largest cause of back pain,
strain, and injury. When lifting is required, use proper lifting techniques as outlined, and in the graphic
below:

1. Keep chest up and forward
2. Maintain normal spinal curve and do not twist while lifting
3. Stand with feet separated (one foot forward)
4. Keep weight balanced
5. Prepare muscles for action, set abdominal muscles
6. Use leg muscles; stoop, don’t bend
7. Stand close to the task, flex hips and knees

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 37 of 89

Other work-related back safety issues include:

1. Extended Sitting/Standing – The driver’s role requires long hours of sitting behind the wheel. When
taking breaks, drivers should stretch frequently to reduce lower back strain.

2. Poor Physical Condition – An employee’s physical condition can lead to back pain. Being
overweight can cause extra strain on the spine. It is estimated that every extra pound up front puts
ten (10) pounds of strain on the back. Being out of shape or overweight increases the chances for
chronic back pain. Infrequent exercise is a major factor, too. A sudden strain on generally unused
back muscles can lead to trouble, particularly when there is a sudden twisting or turning of the
back. BMT requests its employees exercise regularly and maintain a proper diet.

3. Stress Factor – Stress can lead to back pain. Tied in with an individual’s general physical condition,
stress can cause muscle spasms that affect the spinal nerve network. Although stress is part of
everyone’s life, and a certain amount of stress is normal, excessive stress causes backaches. BMT
requests its employees strive to achieve a proper work/life balance.

4. Entering/Exiting Vehicles – All BMT employees are always expected to enter and exit company
vehicles using three (3) points of contact. Jumping from any vehicle or other equipment is strictly
prohibited.

PUSHING VS PULLING
When pushing freight is required, use proper pushing techniques as outlined below:

1. The preferred method of moving freight is pushing rather than pulling it
2. Lean slightly forward
3. Prepare muscles for action, set abdominal muscles
4. Use leg muscles
5. Stand close to the task

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 38 of 89

SLIP, TRIP, AND FALL PROTECTION PROCEDURES
It has been shown that most work-related injuries within the trucking industry are related to slip, trip, and
fall events. These types of injuries are preventable if all employees will demonstrate a respectful and
common-sense attitude towards safety. Consequently, all BMT employees will:

1. Use the proper method for entering and exiting vehicles.
2. Use proper footwear and clothing to help prevent these types of injuries. Flip flops are not proper

footwear.
3. Recognize and avoid slip, trip, and fall hazards.
4. Use proper load securement techniques.

THREE-POINT CONTACT – ENTERING AND EXITING EQUIPMENT
The three-point contact method of entering and exiting equipment described below is required.

1. Wear proper footwear. Good, sturdy footwear with slip-resistant soles provides the best traction.
Use the ball of your foot on step surfaces, not the tip of your toes.

2. Know your equipment. This is especially important if you drive a different unit each day. Know
where the steps, ladders, grab bars or handles are before you enter or exit. Always start to enter
or exit the cab with your right foot. Don’t use tires or wheel hubs as a step surface.

3. Use the three-point system. Always have three limbs in contact with the cab – two feet and one
hand, or two hands and one foot. Don’t ever jump out! Always climb out.

4. Look before exiting. Know where you are going to step. Look for potholes, cracks, oil, ice, snow,
and foreign objects while you are still in the cab.

5. Exit in the correct direction. The safest procedure is to get out in the same direction you got in. In
other words, if you face the cab getting in, face it getting out.

6. Keep your hands free. Don’t climb in our out while holding anything – papers, clipboard, a bag, etc.
Place objects in the cab before you climb in. Take them out after you get out. Get a firm grip with
your hands, not your fingertips. Don’t use the doorframe as a handhold.

7. Use extra caution in bad weather and in the dark.
8. Don’t climb right out after a long run. Make certain your muscles are “awake” and ready for the

climb down.

NO JUMPING POLICY
Buddy Moore Trucking does not allow any jumping out of trucks/tractors, off of loading docks, off of trailers,
or any elevated surface at any time. Jumping from an elevated surface causes great stress on your body
and could result in an injury.

5TH WHEEL PIN PULL POLICY
5th wheel pin pullers are provided by BMT and you are required to use them any time you pull the 5th wheel

pin.

ACCIDENTS/VIOLIATIONS/CITATIONS
BMT considers the elimination of motor vehicle accidents a major goal. To meet this objective, all accidents
will be reported to management, investigated, documented and reviewed by the Safety Department. The
investigation identifies the need for:

1. A more intensive driver training and/or remedial training
2. Improved driver selection procedures
3. Improved vehicle inspection and/or maintenance activities
4. Changes in traffic routes

Motor vehicle accident recordkeeping procedures consist of documentation of causes and corrective action,
management review to expedite corrective action, and analysis of accident to determine trends, recurring
problems, and the need for further control measures.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 39 of 89

The following definitions relate to motor vehicle accidents:

1. A motor vehicle accident is defined as “any occurrence involving a motor vehicle which results in
death, injury, or property damage, unless such vehicle is properly parked. Who was injured, what
property was damaged and to what extent, where the accident occurred, or who was responsible,
are not relative factors.”

2. A preventable accident is defined as “any accident involving the vehicle, unless properly parked,
which results in property damage or personal injury and in which the driver failed to do everything
he/she reasonably could have done to prevent or avoid the accident.” Accident prevention depends
upon the elimination of all contributing factors such as driver indecision and/or poor decisions;
mechanical defects; and the environment.

3. A properly parked motor vehicle is one that is completely stopped and parked where it is legal and
prudent to park such a vehicle or to stop to load/unload property.

Note: parking on private property will be governed by the same regulations that apply on public streets and
highways. A vehicle stopped in traffic in response to a sign, traffic signal, or the police is not considered
parked.

ACCIDENT DETERMINATION – Preventable or Non-Preventable
Preventability is established by determining if you handled the vehicle in such a way that you committed no
errors and controlled the vehicle in such a way that you made due allowance for the conditions of the road,
weather, and traffic, and was assured that the mistake of the other drivers did not involve you in the
accident.

The final decision on preventability is determined by careful study of:

1. The facts of the accident
2. The investigative information and recommendations of:

 The investigating law enforcement officer
 The independent investigative adjuster (if needed)
 The Safety Department investigating the accident
3. The final decision will be the judgment of the Safety Department

Reporting Accidents
If you are involved in a vehicular accident, remember that you are a professional driver and must conduct
yourself accordingly. Use common sense, be polite and professional. Do not discuss the accident with
anyone except Buddy Moore Trucking or the investigating law enforcement officer(s). DO NOT apologize,
admit guilt, or assume liability.

1. Stop Immediately. Protect the scene by placing emergency warning devices to warn other motorists
of impending danger; or at the consent of law enforcement authorities, move the vehicle to a safe
location out of the way of traffic. In the event of injuries to involved parties, call 911 and notify law
enforcement officials of the need for medical assistance.

2. Offer assistance to any injured person but DO NOT move him/her unless absolutely necessary.
Moving an injured person may cause additional harm.

3. Identity yourself and Buddy Moore Trucking to the other party (or parties) involved. Show your
license and registration upon request. Above all, be courteous.

4. Secure the names and addresses of drivers and occupants of any vehicle involved, their operator’s
license number, insurance company name and policy number, as well as the names and addresses
of injured persons and witnesses. Record this information. Do not discuss fault with, or sign
anything for anyone except an authorized representative of Buddy Moore Trucking, Inc., a police
officer, or a representative of the insurance company representing BMT.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 40 of 89

5. Immediately notify the BMT Safety Department. If any injuries were involved, and the Safety
Department is not available, contact the Director of Operations, the Director of Human Resources,
or your Dispatcher immediately. This applies to hazardous spills as well.

6. You will be contacted by the Safety Department to advise what other steps are necessary and how
to proceed with repairs to your vehicle. Do not have the vehicle repaired until you receive
authorization.

7. You may be asked to take a post-accident drug/alcohol test.

Make sure to collect the following information:

1. Date and time of occurrence
2. City, county, and state of occurrence.
3. Accident location by highway number or name and also the nearest milepost number, landmark,

distance and direction from the nearest intersection/town.
4. Type of area such as residential, rural, industrial, or business
5. Type of road surface.
6. Other driver’s name, address, driver’s license number, date of birth, and telephone number (home

and work). Also take the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of all vehicle occupants.
7. Make, year, model, and license plate number of the vehicle(s). NOTE: If the driver of the vehicle(s)

is not the same as the owner, be sure to get the owner’s name, address, and telephone number. If
the vehicle is insured, be sure to get the name of the insurance company and the policy number if
available.
8. Any injuries, especially if an injured person was taken away from the scene for treatment (record
the location to where they were taken), and the names of any person(s) treated at the scene. Also
note anyone complaining of injuries resulting from the accident. Take their names, addresses and
telephone numbers.
9. Names, addresses, and telephone numbers (home and work) of any witnesses.
10. Name and badge number, phone number, and address of the department of the investigating
officer(s).
11. Whether or not citations were issued and to whom they were issued.
12. At the scene of the accident, draw a rough diagram making sure you have all pertinent landmarks
such as intersections, signs, traffic signals, etc. Make a written description in your own words and
handwriting.
13. If you have a camera, get pictures. Take pictures anytime there is damage, or could have been
damage, to company equipment, cargo, or other property owners. If there is a possibility that
someone could say you caused damage to anything, take pictures and get as much information as
you can.

If at any time after the accident you are contacted via telephone, mail, or in person and requested to give a
statement, contact BMT management immediately! Only Company management personnel can authorize
you to give a statement.

When there is theft or damage to your vehicle only:

1. If you did not witness the damage to the vehicle, you must notify the local authorities immediately.
2. Immediately notify the Safety Department
3. You will be contacted by the Safety Department or the Maintenance Department to advise you how

to arrange for repairs or replacement of the vehicle. Do not have the vehicle repaired until you
receive authorization.

All vehicle collisions will be investigated and analyzed by the Safety Department. A determination of
accident preventability will be made and if the collision was preventable by the company driver, the driver
may be disciplined up to and including termination.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 41 of 89

However, this does not absolve management from improving safety of the work and driving environment.
The Safety Department, drivers, and management personnel should each participate in the analysis.
Management deficiencies and/or lack of management action should also be part of the accident review.
Management has the obligation not only for driver safety, but the safety of the general public as well.

Determining Preventable Accidents
The heart of any safe driving program is the careful determination of the preventability of each accident in
which a driver is involved. This must be done in light of all the facts pertinent to the accident’s occurrence.
Unearthing of these facts is sometimes difficult in practice, but it can be made easier by training drivers to
report the accidents in which they are involved completely and accurately. Complete investigation by
management is equally necessary.

The first step in reviewing the accident is to determine if the driver involved adhered to the Defensive Driving
Policy. That is did he/she “Drive in such a way that he/she committed no errors him or herself, and so
controlled his/her vehicle as to make sure allowance for conditions of road, weather, and traffic, and to
assure that mistakes of other drivers did not involve him/her in an accident.”

It should be the objective of any person discussing or judging accidents to obtain as many facts as possible
and to consider all conceivable conditions. Adverse weather conditions, actions of other drivers, or other
such excuses must not influence the judgment of preventability. If procedures, scheduling, dispatching, or
maintenance procedures out of the control of the driver were found to be factors, that should be considered.
The Company must take responsibility for the work environment and recognize that drivers cannot control
some aspects. It is critical that drivers can refuse to operate an unsafe vehicle without reprisal from
management.

At a minimum, all preventable accidents will involve a written warning and follow-up safety training as
deemed appropriate by the Safety Department. Based on the seriousness of and circumstances
surrounding the accident, further actions may be taken which include suspension or termination regardless
of the number of accidents in the driver’s employment history. If it is determined that the accident was
preventable, the driver may be responsible for the cost of damages up to a certain amount determined by
all parties involved.

The Safety Department will conduct a post-accident investigation of all accidents. The results of that
investigation will determine what course of action may be taken.

1. The first preventable accident may result in a reprimand, no matter what the severity or cost.
Multiple preventable accidents may result in further discipline up to and including termination of
employment.

2. In the event of a second preventable accident, the driver may receive a suspension without pay,
be put on probation for a period of time, or have their employment terminated, depending upon the
circumstances.

3. Being involved in a third preventable accident in a 12-month period may result in termination of
employment.

4. Being the cause of any major preventable accident that causes a fatality, injuries treated at or away
from the scene, and/or disabling damage to any vehicle that requires towing may result in
termination of employment.

5. Being the cause of or making a decision that anyone who is trained to operate a commercial vehicle
would not typically make that results in any kind of disabling damage to a company vehicle while
in a driver’s possession may result in termination of employment.

Despite the fact each must be judged individually, experience in fleet safety over the years has shown that
certain types of accidents are generally non-preventable on the part of the professional truck driver and
certain others, in absence of extenuating circumstances could have been prevented by defensive driving.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 42 of 89

The types of accidents listed below cannot cover every accident, which may occur, but they are intended
to provide guidance in determining the eligibility of drivers for any safe driving awards.

Non-Preventable Accidents
1. Struck in rear by another vehicle – non preventable if:

 Driver was proceeding in his/her own lane of traffic at a safe and lawful speed

 Driver was stopped in traffic due to existing conditions or was stopped in compliance with
traffic sign or signal or the directions of a police officer or other person legitimately
controlling traffic

 Driver was in proper lane waiting to make a turn
2. Struck while parked – non preventable if:

 Driver was properly parked in a location where parking was permitted

 Vehicle was protected by emergency warning devices as required by DOT and state
regulations, or if the driver was in process of setting out or retrieving signals. These
provisions apply to the use of turn signals as emergency warning lights under DOT
regulations.

Preventable Accidents
1. Accidents at intersections – preventable if:

 Driver failed to control speed so that he/she could stop within available sight distance

 Driver failed to check cross-traffic and wait for it to clear entering intersection

 Driver pulled out from side street in the face of oncoming traffic

 Driver collided with person, vehicle, or object while making right or left turn

 Driver collided with vehicle making turn in front of him/her
2. Striking other vehicle in rear – preventable if:

 Driver failed to maintain a safe following distance and have his/her vehicle under control

 Driver failed to keep track of traffic conditions and note slowdown

 Driver failed to ascertain whether vehicle ahead was moving slowly, stopped, or slowing
down for any reason

 Driver misjudged rate of overtaking

 Driver came too close before pulling out to pass
 Driver failed to wait for the car ahead to move into the clear before starting up

 Driver failed to leave enough room for passing vehicles to get safely back in line
3. Sideswipe and head-on collisions – preventable if:

 Driver was not entirely in his/her proper lane of travel

 Driver did not pull to his/her right and slow down and stop for vehicle encroaching on his/her
lane of travel when such action could have been taken without additional danger

4. Struck in rear by another vehicle – preventable if:

 Driver was passing slower traffic near an intersection and had to make a sudden stop

 Driver made a sudden stop to park, load, or unload

 Vehicle was improperly parked

 Driver rolled back into vehicle behind truck while starting on a grade
5. Squeeze plays and shutouts – preventable if:

 Driver failed to yield right-of-way when necessary to avoid an accident
6. Backing accidents – preventable if:

 Driver backed up when backing could have been avoided by better planning of his/her
route

 Driver backed into traffic stream when such backing could have been avoided

 Driver failed to get out of the cab and check proposed path of backward travel

 Driver depended solely on mirrors when it was practical to look back

 Driver failed to get out of the cab periodically and recheck conditions when backing a long
distance

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 43 of 89

 Driver failed to sound horn while backing

 Driver failed to check behind the vehicle parked at a curb before attempting to leave a
parking space

 Driver relied solely on a guide to help him/her back

 Driver backed from a blind side when he/she could have made a sight-side approach
7. Accidents involving rail-operated vehicles – preventable if:

 Driver attempted to cross tracks directly ahead of a train or streetcar

 Driver ran into the side of a train or streetcar
 Driver stopped or parked on or too close to tracks
8. Accidents while passing – preventable if:

 Driver passed where view of road ahead was obstructed by a hill, curve, vegetation, traffic,
adverse weather conditions, etc.

 Driver attempted to pass in the face of closely approaching traffic

 Driver failed to warn driver of vehicle being passed

 Driver failed to signal change of lanes

 Driver pulled out in front of other traffic overtaking from rear

 Driver cut-in short returning to the right lane
9. Accidents while being passed – preventable if:

 Driver failed to stay in his/her own lane and hold speed or reduce it to permit safe passing
10. Accidents while entering traffic stream – preventable if:

 Driver failed to signal when pulling out from the curb

 Driver failed to check traffic before pulling out from the curb

 Driver failed to look back to check traffic if he/she was in a position where mirrors did not
show traffic conditions.

 Driver attempted to pull out in a manner which forced other vehicle(s) to change speed or
direction.

 Driver failed to make a full stop before crossing from a side street, alley, or driveway

 Driver failed to make a full stop before crossing a sidewalk

 Driver failed to yield right-of-way to approaching traffic
11. Pedestrian accidents – preventable if:

 Driver did not reduce speed in an area of heavy pedestrian traffic

 Driver was not prepared to stop

 Driver failed to yield right-of-way to a pedestrian
12. Mechanical defects accidents – preventable if:

 Defect was of a type which the driver should have detected in making a pre-trip or in route
inspection of the vehicle

 Defect was of a type which the driver should have detected during the normal operation of
the vehicle

 Driver’s abusive handling of the vehicle caused the defect
13. All other types of accidents – preventable if:

 Driver was not operating at a speed consistent with the existing road, weather, or traffic
conditions

 Driver failed to control speed so that he/she could stop within an assured clear distance
 Driver misjudged the available clearance

 Driver failed to yield right-of-way to avoid an accident

 Driver failed to accurately observe existing conditions

 Driver was in violation of company operating rules or special instructions, the regulations
of the Federal or State regularity agency, or any applicable traffic laws or ordinances.

PROGRESSIVE DISCIPLINARY PROCESS FOR PREVENTABLE ACCIDENTS
Buddy Moore Trucking defines safety as the number one priority for all drivers. Therefore, a separate
disciplinary process has been established regarding preventable crashes. BMT conducts a comprehensive

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 44 of 89

investigation of all accidents which, based upon the findings, could result in immediate termination of
employment, regardless of where the employee might fall within the progressive disciplinary process for a
preventable accident as listed below:

1st Preventable Accident – Written Warning and a possible one-day dispatch suspension without pay.

2nd Preventable Accident – Final Warning and possible two days’ dispatch suspension without pay.

3rd Preventable Accident – Termination of employment after a review of all relevant circumstances has
been conducted.

REMEDIAL TRAINING
Drivers may be required to attend a safe driving school (National Safety Council Defensive Driving course
or equivalent) or an alcohol/drug abuse program on their own time and at their own expense if a review of
the driver’s MVR indicates: 1) one or more violation convictions within any one-year period or 2) a conviction
for driving while under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Also, depending on the severity of the conviction,
the employee’s driving privileges may be revoked and/or the employee may be terminated.

ACCIDENT DOCUMENTATION KIT
You received a complete “Accident Documentation Kit” in orientation. You have also received a
demonstration/training on the proper use of the instrumentation enclosed in the kit. The accident kit is
assigned to the driver and not the truck. It is the driver’s responsibility to keep up with the assigned accident
kit. If the accident kit is not returned to the safety department when you terminate employment, whether by
resignation or termination by BMT, you will be charged $25.00 through payroll deduction.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 45 of 89

CITATIONS/INSPECTIONS

Reporting Traffic Citations
Any driver who operates a BMT truck must immediately report the receipt of or conviction for traffic citations
involving any violations to BMT management. This must be done whether you received the citation while
driving a company truck or a personal vehicle (DOT-MCSR 383.31). Failure to report a conviction could
result in disciplinary action up to and including termination.

Overweight Fines/Driver Control Violations
It is the driver’s responsibility to weigh each load and assure that it is legal before proceeding. All overweight
fines will be paid by the driver. Drivers are to phone their Dispatcher if there is a weight problem before
leaving the loading site. Their instructions should be followed.

Any violation resulting in a fine or costs which is under the control of the driver, including but not limited to
being on a posted road, speeding, unsafe driving, mechanical violations missed during a pre/post trip
inspection, illegal parking, log violations, etc. are the responsibility of the driver.

Roadside Inspections/Citations
Roadside inspections must be reported to the Company immediately, whether they are clean or have
violations. Defects or violations must be reported to Maintenance immediately and arrangements will be
made to get a mechanic to you or route you to the nearest repair service to get the defect(s) corrected.
(This will depend on the nature and seriousness of the defect.)

Out of Service Violations
Federal regulations require that out of service defects must be corrected prior to permitting or requiring a
driver to operate the vehicle and that the driver shall certify that the defect(s) has been repaired prior to
operating the vehicle again. IF YOU ARE PLACED OUT OF SERVICE; BE SURE TO LET MAINTENANCE
KNOW SO THEY CAN GET THE MECHANIC TO YOU. NEVER MOVE THE TRUCK UNTIL THE
DEFECT(S) IS CORRECTED AND CERTIFIED BY THE REPAIRING MECHANIC.

Notification of a Moving Violation
It is the responsibility of the driver to notify the Safety Department, within 48 hours, when he/she has been
charged with a moving violation.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 46 of 89

DRIVER DISQUALIFICATION

MEDICAL DISQUALIFICATION
Even though you have a valid medical card, if your abilities to perform your normal duties have been
impaired by a physical or mental injury or disease, you are required to get a new medical examination in
accordance with Part 391.45. If you have any questions, contact the Safety Department for clarification.

NOTIFICATION OF LOSS OF DRIVER LICENSE
Any suspension or revocation of a state-issued driver’s license MUST be reported to BMT management by
the end of the next business day after receiving notification (DOT-MCSR 393.33). For example; if you
received notification on Friday, you must report your suspension or revocation to us by 5:00p.m. the
following Monday.

LOSS OF A DRIVER LICENSE
1. A driver is disqualified for the duration of their loss of license regardless if by suspension,
withdrawal, denial, or if he has not license.
2. Operating a motor carrier’s vehicle while under the influence of alcohol, amphetamines or narcotics,
or formulations and derivatives of narcotics may result in loss of a driver license.
3. Using a commercial motor vehicle to commit a felony involving the manufacturing, distribution, or
dispensing of a drug may result in the loss of a driver license.
4. Leaving the scene of an accident involving a commercial motor vehicle may result in the loss of a
driver license.
5. A felony involving the use of a motor vehicle may result in the loss a driver license.

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 47 of 89

CARGO CLAIMS, LOSS PREVENTION, AND CONTROL

When loading any load, you, as a driver, are responsible for the proper loading, tie-down, protection, and
safety of the load. You are responsible for the entire load, in all respects, during transit and completion of
the unloading. If you will treat the load as though it were your own, you should have no problems. If you are
careless, you will have problems.

Anytime there is an overage of, or shortage of, damage to or a claim on cargo, a driver must call the Safety
Department before departing any customer. An incident number will be assigned to each claim and the
driver will be provided with instructions. This number must appear on related paperwork and returned cargo.
Drivers should never break a seal on a trailer unless instructed to do so by the Director of Operations or
the Safety Department. Drivers who do so without authorization may be held accountable for a resulting
claim.

If any damage, shortage, or claim is the result of driver carelessness or negligence, the amount may be
deducted from their pay.

CARGO CLAIMS
Overages, Shortages, and Damages (OS&D)
The driver is responsible for the accuracy of the count and condition of the freight upon delivery. If you are
delivering a load and OS&D are discovered, you must report it immediately to dispatch for instructions
before leaving the customer.

Note: it is important that you be very thorough when reporting OS&D. The information you acquire from
the customer is the only defense we have against a cargo claim.

Freight Claim Prevention
In order to provide our customers with the service they expect, we must pay attention to every detail
concerning their products. Many freight claims are preventable. Please follow these steps:

1. The BOL is a legal document. Verify that what is listed on the BOL is actually what is being loaded
into your trailer. It is your responsibility to request the shipper to allow you to witness and count the
product being loaded into your trailer. (Keep in mind the shipper has nothing to lose if shortages
are discovered when you deliver the load, but BMT does.)

2. If the product is already palletized and shrink-wrapped when you arrive at the shipper, make sure
you verify “pallet count” and verify the shrink-wrap is intact before the product is loaded into your
trailer.

3. Seal every load. If the shipper does not provide a seal, make sure you use a BMT seal. Make sure
the seal numbers are written on the BOL and signed by the shipper. If your load has stop offs, you
must have the receiver verify the seal is intact and sign the bills “Seal Intact” and re-seal the trailer
with a BMT seal. If shortage is noted on your bills, double check the bills (their copy and your
copy) to see they are signed “Seal Intact” and call dispatch immediately.

4. If you notice any wet, damaged, or missing product; make sure you notify dispatch before leaving
the shipper.

5. If you have concerns with how the freight is being loaded into the trailer, make sure you bring your
concerns to the shipping supervisor’s attention.

6. Use your load locks whenever possible to help secure the load.
7. Always look at the bills before you leave the customer to verify they have signed the product and

no OS&D’s are notated.
8. Take pictures if damage is notated on the bills and the cause of the damage is in question.
9. Never admit liability for damage and make sure the type of damage is notated on the bills. If the

receiver states it is the “shipper” damage, ask them to notate this on the bills.

To protect the company from claims, drivers must pay attention while their trailer is being loaded or
unloaded to avoid claims for damaged freight. Before loading, drivers should have the shipper make a note

Title: BUDDY MOORE TRUCKING, INC. Document: HR10-02
Issue Date: 09/16/19
Informational Document Supersedes: 07/09/18
DRIVER HANDBOOK
Page 48 of 89

of any present damage to the freight on the bills before he/she signs for the material. If the shipper will not
comply, the driver should call their Dispatcher and follow instructions. If the freight is damaged during
unloading, the driver needs to make note on the bills and have the consignee sign below the notation.


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