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20190801-Summit Sustainability Report 2018 LR_切页转化失败

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20190801-Summit Sustainability Report 2018 LR_切页转化失败

20190801-Summit Sustainability Report 2018 LR_切页转化失败

1

This Sustainability Report contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the federal securities laws, which involve risks and uncertainties. Forward-looking statements include
all statements that do not relate solely to historical or current facts, and you can identify forward-looking statements because they contain words such as “believes,” “expects,” “may,” “will,”
“should,” “seeks,” “intends,” “trends,” “plans,” “estimates,” “projects” or “anticipates” or similar expressions that concern our strategy, plans, expectations or intentions. In light of the signif-
icant uncertainties inherent in the forward-looking statements included herein, the inclusion of such information should not be regarded as a representation by us or any other person that the
results or conditions described in such statements or our objectives and plans will be achieved. Important factors could affect our results and could cause results to differ materially from those
expressed in our forward-looking statements, including but not limited to the factors discussed in the section entitled “Risk Factors” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year
ended December 29, 2018. Such factors may be updated from time to time in our periodic filings with the SEC, which are accessible on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov. We undertake no
obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statement as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. The numbers and data contained in this Sustainability Report
have not been audited.
2

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Our Vision ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2
Letter from our CEO .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 4
SUM Numbers ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 6

Employees Initiatives ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 10
Safety Program ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 12
Diversity & Inclusion .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 16
Wellness & Recruiting .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 18
Employee Engagement ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 20

Environment Initiatives ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 22
Environmental Spotlights ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 24
Recycling ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 28
Conservation Initiatives ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 30

Community Engagement ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 38
STEM Education ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 40
Community Service ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 42
Volunteering & Philanthropy .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 44

Sustainability Team ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 46

1

2

OUR VISION

Across North America, we are deeply rooted in our communities,
dedicated to being responsible stewards of the environment,
and focused on programs to build and engage our employees.
Our sustainability program strives to focus on the most
material topics to our stakeholders, implemented in unique
ways in every company and community where we operate.
We believe that with continued involvement of our employees,
and the completion of each action, Summit becomes a better
company. By tirelessly and consistently working towards a more
sustainable Summit, we are ensuring profitability and building a
company that will thrive for generations to come. The following
pages and programs represent the progress and initiatives that
we have undertaken in 2018 to deliver long-term value to our
stakeholders.

3

DEAR FRIENDS OF SUMMIT MATERIALS, We have taken active, creative, and wide-ranging advantage of our
abilities to improve eco-efficiency throughout our operations and supply
As a company that supplies essential construction materials to customers chain. Our Smart Energy Campaign helped us reduce energy losses
across North America, we make possible the building of facilities and and downtime, and has positively impacted energy demand in all of
infrastructure that are critical to commerce, and the health and wellbeing our lines of business. For our cement plants specifically, we obtained
of a growing population. Inside of every ton of rock we deliver and mile approximately 43% of our thermal energy from alternative and waste
we pave, there are an incalculable number of hours dedicated to making sources. These efforts culminated in our being awarded an Energy Star
our products stand for more than just building materials. They are designation for our plant in Hannibal, Missouri. Further, our largest
made of thousands of hours of safety discussions, career development, capital improvement project to date in Vancouver, British Columbia has
solutions for maximizing efficiency with respect to every mile driven and enabled us to triple the materials produced per hour and thus reduce
kilowatt hour used, programs to keep our people healthy, communities our energy-per-ton by over 10%. We ramped up our waste reduction and
cared for, and so much more. The stories and data herein truly represent recycling programs, showing important improvements to our systems on
our deeper sense of purpose. a company wide basis to reduce waste whenever possible.

Safety remains our number one priority and we continue to invest in our Within our communities, our companies have deepened their
people and processes, to constantly work toward improvement in our contributions to improving society through philanthropy, volunteerism,
safety programs with every task we do. In 2018, our lost time injury rate and providing educational opportunities for students. In 2018, we hosted
was the lowest yet at 0.12 per 200,000 hours worked. more than 1,200 students on our sites for STEM education events.
Additionally, our employees volunteered more hours than ever before
We invested in our people this year by expanding our wellness program in Summit’s history. We are particularly proud of our clean-up efforts
to include spouses, in effort to reduce healthcare costs for our 6,000 along the Mississippi River where we removed more than 13,500 pounds
employees and their families. We provided more than 125,000 training of trash from the river corridor amounting to over 250 volunteer hours.
hours for our employees, and proudly received recognition for diversity in
the workplace at our Kansas operations.

4

Our focus on land conservation with the Wildlife Habitat Council has RISKS AND OPPORTUNITIES
increased our total certified programs to six, including more than 1700
acres under active management. Through this effort, we are restoring native A part of our sustainability mission is to create long-term
landscapes and improving biodiversity. value, and in turn reduce risks to the business. We have
identified the following risks and opportunities to our
I am pleased to share the sustainability progression this report illustrates, business with relevance to both social and environmental
highlighting the cultural shift within our companies that has been at the factors of sustainability. This report details how we are
forefront of this initiative. I invite you to read the material that follows working to manage these risks and engage in these
and provide us your feedback, we are always open to new ideas. We are opportunities at our company.
committed to operating and investing to make our future both financially
and environmentally sustainable so we can continue to support our people, Social Opportunities
their families, our communities, shareholders and our stakeholders. Healthy employees
Local community engagement
Tom Hill, CEO of Summit Materials, Inc. and reputation management

Social Risks
Employment/labor risk
Occupational health and safety risk

Environmental Opportunities
Energy management
Recycling and material use
Biodiversity improvement

Environmental Risks
Greenhouse gases and energy intensity
Exposure to climate change/extreme weather
Land use risk
Compliance risk

5

WHO WE ARE MAP KEY Cement Region
Eastern Region
Summit Materials is a vertically integrated, Company Headquarters Western Region
heavy-side building materials company that Company Locations*
acquires and grows companies in the aggregates, No Op-Co Region
ready-mix concrete, cement, asphalt paving, and construction
industries. By teaming up with established local businesses, we are able
to focus on creating value, providing access to capital, implementing best
practices, and offering a safe place to work while striving to exceed our
environmental and social responsibilities.

6 *The above map features platform companies and bolt-on acquisitions. It is not a comprehensive map of all Summit subsidiary locations.

50,0500,,000000,000

PRODUCT 40,0400,,000000,000 2.8 BILLION
VOLUMES
SOLD IN 2018 GALLONS OF WATER
IN TONS RECYCLED

READY MIX CONCRETE: 5,433,000 30,0300,,000000,000 5,960 1.9 MILLION
EMPLOYEES
LBS. OF METAL
AGGREGATES: 47,624,000 ASPHALT: 5,404,000 CEMENT: 2,329,000 20,0200,,000000,000 MORE THAN RECYCLED

13 MILLION 15 MILLION
MAN HOURS
WORKED IN 2018 LBS. OF RECYCLABLES
SORTED & RETURNED
10,0100,,000000,000 TO MARKETS

43% OF OUR CEMENT
PLANTS’ ENERGY
CAME FROM
ALTERNATIVE
FUEL IN 2018

7

125,500 MORE THAN 8,750 FEET
OF AGGREGATE
TRAINING HOURS 92 MILLION
LOGGED MILES DRIVEN CONVEYOR
INSTALLED

FLEET PREVENTABLE 10
INCIDENT RATE IS
HYBRID LOADERS
0.64 REDUCING DIESEL

0.12 LOST TIME EMISSIONS

ON THE ROAD INJURY RATE PER
TO SUSTAINABILITY 200,000 MAN
HOURS
2018 YEAR IN REVIEW

8

1,650 1,200 STUDENTS 8,540 LBS

VOLUNTEER PARTICIPATED IN STEM LOST AND TRACKED
HOURS EDUCATION EVENTS THROUGH OUR

LOGGED WELLNESS PROGRAM

65% OF

EMPLOYEES

PARTICIPATED

IN OUR WELLNESS
PROGRAM

6 CERTIFIED WHC
PROGRAMS, INCLUDING

1,700 ACRES UNDER DIRECT
MANAGEMENT AND 2,300 ACRES
BEING USED FOR CERTIFICATION
PROGRAMS

9

10

EMPLOYEES

Our employees are the backbone of our business and we are
proud to stand behind them. This section details the many
programs that we have at Summit Materials to support our
employees and their work:

• Safety
• Employee Wellness
• Recruiting and Training
• Employee Engagement

Our employees’ commitment to safety and getting the job
done is the foundation of our company, which is why we work
hard every day to support them in their jobs. We consider
health and safety top priorities. With on-the-job training
and leadership development opportunities, it’s important
to us to help grow our employees’ respective careers. And
for those who’ve spent their entire careers dedicated to the
company, we thank them for their years of incredible service
and hard work.

We proudly stand behind our people, who represent a
diverse family of companies and the employees that make
us who we are.

11

SAFETY

Safety is a way of life. It is how we begin and end each day. We are disciplined in
our approach and aim for a world-class safety program. Across all of our business
lines, functions, and companies, we consistently work hard to deliver on that goal.

We use workplace organization tools like 5S (sort, simplify, shine, standardize,
sustain) to ensure that issues like housekeeping and storage don’t present safety
hazards like slips, trips, and falls.

Risk assessments and our 10 safety principles give us a framework for decision
making, helping to ensure that all tasks are carried out with safety first in mind. We
hold weekly safety meetings, tool box talks, and regular trainings to keep ideas fresh
and to develop a culture where safety is everyone’s job.

Our Journey to Zero campaign is about educating and encouraging our employees
to keep safety top of mind. We share weekly safety stats with employees across all
companies, challenge each other with site 5S initiatives, and welcome new ideas
with Safety Leadership Teams from each company. It’s a consistent drum beat
across all lines of business, in all locations, and we are proud of our results.

SAFETY 1 HAMM COMPANIES These results don’t come
TOP SAFETY WITH AN LTI OF 0.00 without hard work, and
a major company wide
PERFORMANCE 2 RK HALL focus and investment in
WITH AN LTI OF 0.00 safety. Great work to all of
our employees!
3 AUSTIN MATERIALS
WITH AN LTI OF 0.00

12

LOST TIME INJURY RATE

Summit Industry

01..8732 1.67 1.63 1.67 1.63 1.39 1.4
1.48
0.12 0.72 0.54 0.33 0.29
0.42
LOST TIME INJURY RATE 0.54 0.33 0.29
PER 200,000 MAN HOUR 0.19 0.42 0.19 0.13 0.12

0.19 0.19 0.13 0.12

22001010 22001111 22001122 22001133 22001144 22001155 20201166 20201177 20201188
Industry Summit

Summit
This graph represents our Lost Time Injury Rate (LTI), compared with the
MORE
MSHA mining industry average (including metal, non-metal, and sand and
13 MILLIONTHAN
MAN HOURS IN 2018 gravel). Reported injuries per 200K hours worked. Data source: National

Institute for Occupational Health and Safety (https://wwwn.cdc.gov/niosh-

mining/MMWC).

RECORReDcoArdBabLlEe InINjurJyURRateY RATE Our downward trend is an important indicator of the
effectiveness of our program over time. One third of our
3.4 recordable incidents are due to slips, trips, and falls. To
3.0 2.8 1.5 address these challenges, we’ve developed multiple
programs to emphasize situational awareness.
0.72 2.3 2.1 2.0
1.6 0.12
0.54 1.3

0.33 0.29 0.42 0.19 0.13
0.19

22001100 22001111 22001122 22001133 22001144 22001155 22001166 2017 2018
SSuummmmitit

13

5S: SAFETY IN STANDARDIZATION

Sort, simplify, shine, standardize, sustain. In recent years we have begun a
very impactful 5S campaign. This is about keeping workplaces, vehicles, offices,
and all locations tidy and organized. This is no small task when hundreds
of vehicles and employees are in and out every day with heavy equipment,
shops, and PPE (personal protective equipment). These images speak louder
than words and show that our commitment to safety goes beyond the
numbers. We believe that little things like organization and tidiness can have
a big impact on safer job sites and reduced injuries.

14

3.50 FLEET PREVENTABLE RATE

3.00 2.91

2.50 2.39

2.00
1.75

1.50
1.28 1.12

1.00 0.80
0.94

0.50 0.78 0.64

0.00
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

*Figures calculated based on incidents per one million miles driven.

We use fleet tracking software to better understand 92 FLEET PREVENTABLE
our drivers actions and, in turn, develop training, MILLION
safety improvements, and route efficiency tech- MILES DRIVEN 0.64INCIDENT RATE IS
niques. In 2018, we reduced our fleet preventable
rate yet again, despite an additional 860,000 work
hours, and nearly 10 million more miles driven.

15

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION

At Summit we seek to build our company as a broadly diverse and equal
opportunity place of employment for people of all genders, race, ethnicity, age,
and abilities. We aim to reflect this effort across our company from boots on the
ground to our Board of Directors.
Our operating company Cornejo & Sons, based in Wichita, Kansas, was named a
Leader in Diversity by the Wichita Business Journal for their inclusive and equal-
opportunity employment initiatives. The women pictured here represent an
exceptional team of employees who are helping us work toward advancing
women in construction.
The advancement of diversity is vital to the identity of Summit and the future of the
construction industry. We are proud to include each and every one of our people
in the Summit family, where respect, humility and ideas are valued from every
individual.

16



WEIGHT LOSS IN LBS

8,549

6,733

5,452 5,270

WELLNESS 2015 2016 2017 2018

Improving the long-term health of our employees is the goal of our wellness Obesity continues to be one of thlbes lgosret atest health risks among our
program. We have worked to foster a culture of health through multiple facets employees, this weight loss trend shows that our employees are
of wellness, including providing comprehensive health insurance, annual working to improve their health, year over year.
HSA contributions, free annual biometric screening, nutritional information,
and other powerful ways to improve and reduce the health risks. PARTICIPATION RATES

Wellness is about more than the initiatives. On a fundamental level we are 7777%%
working to shift the culture around health at our company. Because we
believe that health is so important we incentivize participation in our wellness 7744%%
program by offering monthly financial discounts on health insurance plans
for employees and spouses who visit their physician for a preventative care 6699%%
visit, receive a biometric screening, and utilize tobacco cessation tools.
6666%%
Since launching our wellness initiative in 2015, the program has proven its
value as our employees have continued to make some powerful and positive 22001155 22001166 22001177 22001188
changes to their health. The photo above shows our wellness champions
from across the organization who came together to train and ultimately Employee participation in our wellness program is critical for us to
climb Quandary Peak in Colorado, at 14,256ft. understand and better meet the needs of our employees’ health. In recent
years we have seen a reduction in total employee participation and are
18 tackling this challenge with new programs and incentives. This year we
included spouses and digitized our wellness platform online with the
ultimate goal of improving our employees and their families’ well being.

VETERANS AND RECRUITING EMPLOYEE TRAINING

We are proud to employ members of the active military, veterans, disabled vets We facilitate employee development through leadership
and their spouses at Summit Materials. In 2018 we were awarded as a “Best in and supervisory training, operational training, sales training,
Vets” employer from the Military Times. We are proud of this designation industry conferences and IT related/technical trainings.
and our growing population of veterans and military members. Our goal is to empower our employees and have a positive,
We believe that our work model translates well to former meaningful impact on their professional development
military and we work hard to promote a successful working within the Company. This year we logged more than 125,500
environment with mentorships, teamwork, and a major focus training hours across the organization.
on safety. We are focused on growing our veteran recruiting
and believe awards like this help us continue to ensure long- 19
term success for our military and veterans on the job.

Summit and our operating companies have formed partnerships with some
of the top mining universities in the country. Our internship program helps
us identify bright, young talent, and provides young professionals with an
opportunity to learn and deploy new skills in an experienced supervised
setting. In 2018 we started a corporate intern training program, “Summit
INCLINE” (Internship Collaborative LearnINg Experience), bringing students to
our corporate headquarters in Denver for a multi-day training. The program
is designed to provide a meaningful learning experience on Summit, our
culture and values, our industry, and personal career development. Working
with the next generation of employees and gaining perspective in new talent
is an important part of our company’s succession plans. Students reported
that this event helped expand their horizons and offered incredible learning
opportunities.

EMPLOYEE KENNETH SHELTON STEVE COTTON HENRY PERRY BILL MYERS
SHOUTOUT Con-Agg Boone Quarries Con-Agg Alleyton Materials Continental Cement
61 Years
Employee engagement 64 Years 46 Years 45 Years
and satisfaction are key ISIDRO CORTES
factors to the success of CURTIS MARTIN RK Hall SHREE RODDY LEE ANDERSON
businesses today. We at Hinkle 38 Years Alleyton Materials Kilgore: Altaview Concrete RMX
Summit and all of our
operating companies are 40 Years (retired in 2018) FELIPE PERALTA 36 Years 35 Years
lucky enough to have RK Hall
many individuals who have STEVE EMERICK 30 Years JEFF HEIBEL TIM NEVENNER
stayed at our companies for Razorback Concrete Continental Cement & Kilgore Companies
their entire careers, perhaps Green America Recycling
in part to the programs we 31 Years 15 Years
have developed to support 27 Years
their work. The individuals
here represent a few of our
longest running employees.
We are grateful for their
dedication and loyalty to
our companies, willingness
to learn and adapt as the
industry has changed
through the decades, and
their hard work along
the way.

20

PAT BLOSSER GEORGE HONEYCUTT ARLIE LEWIS, JR. ROB STROME ROB LYTLE
Hamm Companies Boxley Materials Hinkle: Cave Run Stone Hamm Companies Continental Cement
41 Years
45 Years 41 Years 40 Years 40 Years

ANDREW TILL CLINTON ARLITT LISA PATRICK TONY BEARD JAMES CARRUTH
Alleyton Materials Alleyton Materials Continental Cement Razorback Concrete Razorback Concrete

35 Years 34 Years 34 Years 32 Years 32 Years

JIM BATTOCHIO JOLYNN SALLEE RODNEY GREENHOUSE ANDREW CORNEJO MIKE SOSA
Kilgore Companies Cornejo & Sons Cornejo & Sons Cornejo & Sons Kilgore Companies
12 Years 11 Years
13 Years 13 Years 7 Years

21

22

ENVIRONMENT

Our environmental program starts with stewardship of our
land and resources, and is guided by the company wide
commitments laid out in our public environmental policy.

We work hard to look for new ways to reduce energy use, water
use, and waste creation. This is something that we are focused
on in each line of business at all of our companies. With some
proud achievements this year, our companies and employees
are more engaged than ever on reducing our impact on the
environment and restoring land value through rehabilitation
projects that improve biodiversity. This section includes
information on programs and projects we’ve implemented in
each line of business to reduce our environmental impact and
showcase our risk mitigation strategies advancing this effort.

23

SPOTLIGHT ON CEMENT 43% OF OUR CEMENT PLANTS’
ENERGY CAME FROM
Our cement division is, by percentage, the largest user of energy among our ALTERNATIVE FUEL IN 2018
companies. Through our energy management programs, we have made
investments to reduce energy usage, create efficiencies, and monitor progress In 2018, the coal we saved by co-
across our cement businesses. In recognition of these efforts, our Hannibal, processing alternate fuels was equivalent
Missouri cement plant achieved the Energy Star Award from the United States to the amount of coal used to power
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the second time. This signifies that more than 81,000 U.S. homes in one year.*
this site performs in the top quartile of similar facilities nation wide, meeting
strict energy performance levels set by the EPA. https://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.php?id=97&t=3

In 2018, our cement plants averaged more than 43% of their total energy derived
from alternative fuels. Our Hannibal plant co-processes both liquid and solid
hazardous waste as a fuel source, which would otherwise be incinerated. The
Davenport Cement Plant uses alternative fuels from surrounding industrial
factories, including items like off-spec seeds, byproducts from toothbrush
manufacturing, used tires and other materials that would otherwise be landfilled.

24

MAINLAND FLAGSHIP QUARRY 12%APPROXIMATELY
REDUCTION
OUTSIDE OF VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA INSTALLS NEW IN ENERGY USED PER TON
PLANT TO INCREASE PRODUCTION AND REDUCE ENERGY.

In late 2018, Cox Quarry came online with a new crushing plant. This
upgrade can triple production output per hour and has demonstrated
important upgrades to operations from an energy and environmental
standpoint. Based on the initial figures in six months of operation, the
new plant has decreased electrical consumption per ton produced in
comparison to prior years by an average of 12%. In addition, BC Hydro
Utility estimates that more than 90%* of their supplied energy is obtained
from hydroelectric energy, making this the least carbon intensive quarry
across our portfolio.

Another benefit to the new plant is that the location of the crusher is
nearly a mile closer to the mining face. This distance has decreased the
area fleet from five to three trucks, reducing fuel use, emissions, and road
dust, all from less truck traffic.

This flagship example showcases a high level commitment to ensuring
that our capital expenditures are helping to create energy efficiencies
along with production improvements.

*https://app.bchydro.com/accounts-billing/rates-energy-use/electricity-rates/residential-rates/generation-rates-co2-comparison.html

25

THERMOGRAPHY TOOL
IN ENERGY MANAGEMENT

Thermography is an infrared technology we are using at our
aggregate plants that allows us to more effectively manage our
equipment, downtime, and subsequent energy use. This technology
is another tool we are using in our smart energy campaign.

The infrared photos enable us to better see electrical components
that may not be functioning properly and, in turn, fix the issue
before it becomes a bigger problem with unnecessary downtime.
Electrical components that aren’t functioning properly can produce
energy leaks and the impact of reducing these leaks across the
majority of our aggregate locations is substantial.

We estimate that 75% of our aggregate plants are using this
technology on an annual basis and the results have helped us
to become more energy efficient. Since adopting this tool, our
facilities are experiencing less downtime, which means more
production, and smarter use of energy.

75%APPROXIMATELY OF OUR AGGREGATE
PLANTS ARE USING
THERMOGRAPHY

TRANSPORTING MATERIALS

We now have ten John Deere 944K Hybrid loaders operating at full
steam at our busiest quarries across the country. Our drivers report
that these vehicles are not only fun to drive, but help us reduce
fuel use, noise and carbon dioxide emissions. Each hybrid loader
consumes 9-14%* less fuel compared to a traditional diesel burning
equipment of this size. This year, we upgraded our vehicle fleet
with more than 500 pieces of equipment. We replaced decades
old, less efficient trucks with 15-20% higher efficiencies of fuel
use and reduced emissions. We’ve also worked directly with our
employees using software programs to reduce idling and track
our fleet driving routes, optimizing travel times and over the road
safety.

We installed more than 1.6 miles of conveyors across our aggregate
operations in 2018. Capital projects like this provide long-term
solutions to moving heavy materials over large distances. Reducing
individual loads moving via dump truck helps to reduce dust, fuel,
and emissions.

ASPHALT

Asphalt plants require a considerable energy pull to start and heat
the product for paving. As a part of our smart energy campaign, we
are working to more effectively manage our power use at asphalt
plants across the organization. Using facilitators and Variable
Frequency Drives (VFD’s) allows us to save money by working with
our utility companies closely to pull from the grid when it’s least
expensive. In addition, the majority of our plants now use natural
gas as a heating fuel, which is a clean burning low carbon energy
choice.

*https://www.deere.com/en/loaders/wheel-loaders/large-wheel-loaders/944k-wheel-loader/ 27

RECYCLING RECYCLING

Reducing, reusing and recycling are powerful ways for our IN TONS
business to manage our environmental footprint. In recent years
we have steadily grown our recycling campaigns to extend across 772222,0,00000 787080,0,00000 898900,,550000
the organization to all lines of business. This not only reduces 447722,0,00000
our environmental impact but is also shifting the culture and 664488,,000000
awareness around waste.
464644,0,00000
PRODUCTION WASTE
220033,,000000
We manage our production waste very carefully as the majority
of waste left behind can be turned back into sellable product. N/A 22010616 22001177 22001188
Products like recycled asphalt pavement and shingles are a way 2 02105 15 Concrete Recycling RAP/RAS
for us to turn old roadways and roofing material into new roads.
Recycled concrete is another example of waste material that can BUSINESS WASTE
be recrushed and used as a road base, reducing reliance and space
in landfills. As our operations broaden through acquisitions and Our business waste and recycling programs are managed carefully.
become more efficient, our recycled materials have seen important We recycle as many products as possible from our mechanics
gains in recent years. shops, equipment maintenance, and vehicles. These include items
like used or retreated tires, oil barrels, vehicle batteries and solvents,
CONSUMER WASTE and metals from old and retired equipment. In addition, we have
installed closed-loop water systems at many locations to help us
We are continuing to roll out a company-wide recycling program reduce reliance on city water systems.
to capture and manage consumer waste at our office locations.
This effort is as much of an educational campaign as it is a recycling
initiative. Paper products, plastics, glass and cans all receive a
second life through recycling and reuse. Our Material Recovery
Facility (MRF) outside of Lawrence, Kansas is solely dedicated to
reducing waste from landfills and returning household recyclables
back to markets. In 2018, the MRF sorted more than 15 million
pounds of recyclables, effectively saving 22,400 cubic yards of
landfill space, and more than 115,000 trees.

28

NEARLY 2.8 BILLION

1,930,000 GALLONS OF WATER

LBS OF METALS

RECYCLING

52,000 7,200

GALLONS OF TIRES RETREADED
USED OIL OR RECYCLED

1,300 29

VEHICLE BATTERIES

LAND CONSERVATION AND
COMMUNITY PRESERVATION

Mining is an interim use of the land. We take pride and ownership
in working with our government agencies and community
partners to develop positive solutions for our stakeholders and
the next generation of land use.

An asphalt plant and aggregate location outside of Provo, Utah
had plans to expand and found ancient cultural resources
consisting of nine different artifacts from what is thought to
be the Fremont Cultural Group, possibly dating from 300 A.D. –
1300 A.D. In connection with local community stakeholders and
the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), we participated in a
series of community meetings to find an appropriate alternative
to mining the area under the artifacts. Our proposed alternative
was to leave the artifacts in place, undisturbed. We believe that
cultural resources of this nature tell a story that is of value in
that place alone, and should be preserved in order to provide a
way for local community members to see and experience this
history.

Projects like this are an important way for us to demonstrate
that we are committed to being stewards in our communities
and working closely with our stakeholders to finding positive
solutions.

30

This rock is in the vicinity of our property,
but was not in the proposed mine expansion
area. Resident archaeologists believe these
petroglyphs were done by the Fremont Cultural
Group and date back to 300-1300 A.D.

Local archaeologists
believe these artifacts
depict how this area was
hunted by Native people.

31

The way we see it, every acre of land that we manage has WILDLIFE HABITAT COUNCIL PROG
potential beyond its primary use. That’s why we are dedicated
to conserving our land by promoting biodiversity through INCREASE AND IMPROVE
the development of wildlife habitat and using this restored
habitat as an educational tool in our communities. In 2014, we To annually improve the number of species
began a partnership with the Wildlife Habitat Council (WHC) managed, acres managed, and students
to advance our efforts in land and wildlife conservation. For 30 impacted with certified Wildlife Habitat Council
years, WHC has promoted and certified habitat conservation projects.
and management on corporate lands. WHC Conservation
Certification was developed to be accessible, credible, and to
drive change through strict requirements and rigorous third-
party evaluation. Since then, our conservation efforts and
subsequent certified habitat programs have expanded to
include thousands of managed acres. From planting pollinator
gardens to encouraging avian species, each of our Conservation
Certification programs is composed of unique projects that are
driven by the site’s landscape, the team’s objectives, and an
understanding of high value biodiversity areas.

In 2018, we added two new certifications into our portfolio of
Conservation Certifications. We now have six in total, with goals
to continue to expand and improve each year. We invite you to
take a look inside each program and the dedicated individuals
who commit their time to make these projects an important
part of how our company interacts with our communities and
the landscape.

32

GRAM GOALS GET INVOLVED

RESTORE NATIVE LANDSCAPES To increase employees and communities
involved with conservation projects – educating
For the restoration projects that may not be our stakeholders how we can all participate in
certifiable: continue to improve land rehabilitation conservation.
efforts by using native plants, effectively promoting
animal, bird, and pollinator habitat. 33

OUR CERTIFIED WILDLIFE HABITAT COUNCIL PROJECTS

ALLEYTON CONTINENTAL CEMENT HAMM

A pollinator garden outside of Alleyton Continental Cement Davenport Plant has Hamm Inc, outside of Lawrence, Kansas, has
Resource’s main office in Houston, Texas, two separate prairie areas and a pond with a native grass and forested landfill cap that
providing a home and resting place for a recently-installed aerator to keep algae also acts as an outdoor classroom for local
monarch butterflies and other native Texas and weeds at bay. Employees at the facility high school environmental science students
pollinators. The local team works hard to are able to enjoy the pond and work hard to to learn about waste and land reclamation.
bring in an educational component to this maintain the prairie with native grasses and
project, teaching employees about the value as habitat for upland fowl.
of pollinators and how to attract them with
native plants.

34

MAINLAND CORNEJO CONTINENTAL CEMENT

Mainland Materials Cox Quarry along the Fraser Enhanced bird habitat at a former sand plant Continental Cement Hannibal Plant has
River outside of Vancouver, British Columbia along the Arkansas River, outside of Wichita, an expansive STEM education program
houses three osprey nests in safe locations Kansas is a favorite birding location for many that works with hundreds of local students
throughout the property. Osprey return each Kansan birders. Their frequent observations each year. In addition, they have developed
spring and have raised four generations of help us monitor and keep track of the food plots and other forest management
offspring from the resident nesting platforms. thousands of species of birds that visit this techniques in conjunction with the Missouri
site every year. The bluebird nest pictured Department of Conservation to provide
above is in one of our installed nest boxes. habitat for birds and other mammals who
move throughout the Mississippi River
corridor.

35

4 AVIAN 3 POLLINATOR
SPECIES PROJECTS
PROJECTS

6CERTIFIED
PROGRAMS

3 FOREST 4GRASSLAND
PROJECTS PROJECTS

3 EDUCATION & 18
AWARENESS
PROJECTS NESTING
STRUCTURES

36

1000 300

3STUDENTS NATIVE
WILDFLOWERS
INVOLVED & GRASSES
IN OUR PLANTED
PROGRAMS

3600 65
ACRES OF LAND
USED FOR ACRES OF
CERTIFICATIONS WETLANDS &
PONDS IMPROVED
FOR CERTIFICATION

37

38

Summit supports STEM education by working with
local schools to educate through hands-on experience.
This student was the first to answer a tough question
during a quarry tour in Eudora, KS, and was given
the honor of pushing the blast button.

COMMUNITY

Summit Materials embraces the uniqueness of each of our
operating companies, their culture, and their established
local partnerships with their respective communities. Our
commitments are demonstrated through varied efforts across
our geographical reach with each operating company supporting
their local areas in impactful ways. From volunteering at food
banks to hosting educational programs for students and river
clean up initiatives, we are focused on giving back in meaningful
ways.

We believe that we are an integral part of the communities in which
we operate and we work hard to have a positive impact in these
places. We invite you to explore our most impactful outreach
programs that show our commitment to being responsible
corporate citizens and contributing to our communities. Find out
more about what is happening at each company on our website
at www.summit-materials.com/sustainability/community.

39

ENRICHING STEM
EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES

Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) is one of the
key focus areas of our community outreach and sustainability
program. Across the country, our operating companies are
dedicating efforts to help ensure that today’s students and
tomorrow’s leaders have access to great STEM education so
that they can gain the knowledge and experience needed to be
successful in their chosen field.

We have built dedicated educational programs that work with
local students and teachers year after year to inspire hands-
on curriculum focused on geology, environmental sciences,
chemistry and mining engineering. We believe that these efforts
help expand students’ knowledge of the working world and open
doors to our communities, enhancing dialogue and fostering
successful partnerships.

We provide resources to our companies to expand their STEM
programming, allowing us to build on valuable best practices.

40

TEACHING MINING
& RESTORATION

The cycle of mining and restoration is important
to us and our communities. In many of our STEM
programs, we show and teach students about how
we mine and the specific work that we do following
mining to restore, and rehabilitate lands.

GEOLOGY & CHEMISTRY

Our cement plant in Hannibal, Missouri helped
form the Mark Twain Area STEM Partnership and
takes pride in offering students a place to learn
hands-on science in an applicable setting. Our
teams give tours to hundreds of students each year,
teaching about rock layers, fossils, and the chemical
processes that go into manufacturing cement.

SAFETY & FUTURE JOBS

We hope that some of the students who take
our tours end up being our employees someday.
Showing students some of the best parts of our
work is important to us, from blasting, to paving
and everything in between. We often work with
local trade schools and universities to give students
hands-on learning opportunities and the chance to
get to know our company better.

41

KEEPING COMMUNITIES
VIBRANT & CLEAN

In 2018, six of our companies took on community
clean-up projects in an effort to improve the
places where we live, work and play. In Texas, we
adopted river miles on the Red River and the
Colorado River, both areas adjacent to aggregate
locations where we operate. In Roanoke, Virginia,
Boxley Materials’ employees participated in
a community-wide river festival event on the
Roanoke River, including a very popular ‘Recycle
Regatta’. Boxley helps sponsor the event each
year with the intention of celebrating and
educating the community about clean and
healthy waterways.

Continental Cement Company (CCC) partnered
with Livings Lands and Waters which is an
organization dedicated to cleaning and improving
major watersheds and rivers in the US. CCC
hosted clean ups in multiple mile-long sections
of the Mississippi River, including the four major
cities where we have terminals; New Orleans,
Minneapolis, St Louis, and Memphis. In 2018, their
community service along the Mississippi tallied
a total of 13,500 pounds of trash, more than 100
tires, and logged more than 250 volunteer hours.
CCC uses the Mississippi River to barge materials
to terminals along the river. Keeping this corridor
clean is an important way for us to give back to the
communities and environments that support our
business.

43

PHILANTHROPY & VOLUNTEERING

Participating in and improving our communities is a core value of Summit and our sustainability program. Our companies have steadily worked to
improve their volunteering and outreach programs in recent years, and their progress is notable. In 2018, we logged 1,650 volunteer hours across the
organization and are proud of our people for engaging and making a difference in their communities.

In addition to volunteering, we participate in our communities through meaningful philanthropy. Most notably in 2018, several employees near
Wilmington, North Carolina were very affected by Hurricane Florence. In response, we raised $15,000 from employee donations across the organization
which was matched by Summit Materials. In 2018, we donated more than $700,000 to organizations and communities across the country, helping
those in need. We’re proud of this work, and of our employees who volunteer their time and energy to efforts that make our communities and the
world a better place.

Several of our companies have philanthropic mixer trucks in their fleet. These vehicles often donate a portion of the proceeds from every yard of
concrete poured to the organization represented on the truck. This is an effective way to spread awareness while also contributing a percentage of
our proceeds to organizations that support those in need. Concrete Cares, an organization that supports those suffering from breast and childhood
cancer, is among our group of philanthropic ventures. Similarly, Camp Hope in Houston is an organization dedicated to veterans suffering from PTSD.
We love our big pink trucks, and the values they represent in our communities.

VOLUNTEER HOURS

2016 300

2017 1475

2018 1650

0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800

44

Eudora High All Night Prom
Perry Lecompton High School
Garwood Fire Dept. Topeka Public School Foundation McLouth Public Library Powell County Board of Ed
Jacob Davis Employee Race Car Lecompton Territorial Days Committee

Nat'l Assoc of Women in Construction Boys and Girls Club of AmericaGrace UMC
Baseball Sponsorship Colton's Benefit Run Adam Jones, Employee BBQ contest sponsor Pa ri s St or y t elli n g
Casa for KidsAlzheimer's Assoc Dress for SuccessLiving Lands and WatersEudora Cardinals Baseball
Riley Co Public Works MCHS Baseball
Magic Camp
Jeff Co 4-H Perry American Legion Lake Cumberland District Boy Scouts Festival UK Mining Competition Team NAWIC
Foundation Eudora School Foundation Paypal Aviation Expo Woodbine Fall

Topeka Community Foundation
St. Judes Children's Hospital TOYS FOR TOTS2018CookOff Mago n Co Rescue Squad

March of Dimes YMCANeedville Pro-Grad 2018
Wilmore Free Methodist Church Fisher House
CAossYocMiatCionAAKnniwuaanl iCsoCnlvuebnotifoPnaPriCs CHoSluAmthbulestLiicsleALndeeKarsgsoMunoeEtlSoermoCefntabtraraireylrlCSCNerySviSFcpeasolrltss Cancer charity
Kansas Contractors Lighthouse
Paris Bourbon Church
UNITED WAY Mayor's Christmas Tree Fund, Olathe Kingston Sing Lamar County Shelters Pearland Police Department Pearland Police Memorial Devon
High School

Butch Broesch Memorial Golf Tournament McConnell Susan G Koman for the CureRevitalize Eagle Lake Wayne County Historical society
Bourbon Co 4H Gracewood Homeaid Charity Our Lady of Guadalupe AFB Texas FFA Rodeo

Delta County Softball Kailee Mills Foundation Fusion Bible Church EUDORA PARKS & REC
Paris Girls Softball
Paris Rodeo & Horse Club Chaparal Baptist
CHILDREN’S ADVOCACYHopkinsCountyAllStars
Centerville Volunteer Fire and Rescue Jackson Police Dept
Bourbon Heights Nelson County Community Clinic SUPPORTING OUR Camp Hope Coastal Conservancy Assoc.
Somerset-Pulaski Chamber
Big Spring Area Chamber of Commerce Lady Rebels Basketball
Compass Bank Tournament TXAPA Scholarship COMMUNITIES

Future Forward, Inc Whitetails Unlimited
Howard County Junior Livestock ROHO Charitable Trust
Heroes' Night Out WITH DONATIONS Lake Cumberland Ducks Unlimited Bluegrass Oakwood
Glasscock County Junior Livestock Auction Pascales
SPECIAL OLYMPICSYoung Life of Kyle, TX
Redi Mix Concrete Sponsorship University of MO
Paris Education Foundation University of the Bumberlands BIG & SMALL Whitley Co Tourism Board Downtown Optimists Fussell School
Middlefork Fire Dept. Red River Valley Veterans Memorial Mexico Elks Lodge Coyote Hill Christian Golf NWTF Sponsor
MCLA Livestock Texas Rampage Baseball Powderly Volunteer Fire
American Cancer Society Somerset Parks and Rec City of Morehead Softball Callaway Bulldogs Country Club of MO Higbee FFA
Speeway Children's Charities

Dickinson Co Environmental Service KUEA Lied Center of KS

Kids Quest Trooper Jeffrey Nichols Sponsorship Pro Bull Riders RED RIVER VALLEY VETERANS MEMORIAL
Martin County Champion Banquet Texas Don't Use Sponsorship
Pops in the Park ESS Foundation Golf Classic Livingston County CART
North Lamar ISD Theatre City of Cherman Blossom Church of God Wicked Sticks Baseball Howard County Fair AGC of Texas Golf Tournament
Cooper County Commission Eagles Lodge Charity Golf Red Wolves Foundation NAWIC Golf Tournament
UNIV. MO CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL FESTIVAL OF TREES
Kansas Society Civil EngineersQuad City Inferno Foundation for Missouri State Tech St Joseph Const.
for Soapbox Derby
Clinton County Fairgrounds Flag Restoration Project Little Muskies Wrestling Club TXAPA Durant Community Schools Mike Mercer Co DARE
BIG BROTHERS, BIG SISTERSISU Student Chapter - Concrete Canoe Team Price's Cousin Benefit Sco County 4H SQ
QC Canine Assistance Network Davenport Falcons Fast Pitch Softball Team Kennidies Kisses
Fellowship of the Southwest Blue Grass Community Days Texas Elite Gymnastics QC Inferno Lamar County Chamber of Commerce BUFFALO FIRE WORKS DISPLAY
Chapmans Florist Pals Inc. AGC of Texas Golf Tournament Alfredo Lopez Donation

Pheasants Forever - Scott CountyLawrence School Foundation B.A.C.A. (Bikers Against Child Abuse) Circle of Hope NICU Foundation
CHRISTMAS FAMILIESKomen Quad Cities
Paris Optimist Club TXAPA Sponsorship West High School After Prom Party Paris High School Sports
Race for the Cure Bank of America Tournament Tenants to Homewoners Inc. Eudora High School RD Johnson Eudora Cardnial Baseball
Topeka Community Foundation Community Thanksgiving Dinner Foundation Topeka Community Foundation Seaman Football Sunflower Safety Council Ks Motor Carrieres Assoc.

46

OUR SUSTAINABILITY LEADERSHIP

At Summit, sustainability is a team effort. We have a cross-
functional sustainability council with representation from every
function of the business and each of our operating companies.
Our team meets on a quarterly basis to ensure that sustainability
is embedded into our business, having a positive impact in our
communities, and growing long-term value for our stakeholders.

As a part of our annual in-person meeting, we spend one day
doing a volunteer project in a community where we operate.
The photo adjacent shows our team after picking up trash on a
two mile section of Highway 9 north of Silverthorne, CO in the
Arapahoe National Forest.

Our team is a passionate group of individuals from across North
America, who are helping to advance sustainability in their
companies, communities, and beyond. Their time, energy, and
dedication to this effort is profoundly impactful and appreciated.

Thanks to our team, sustainability is continuing to fold into the
fabric of our company, who we are, what we do, and what we
believe in.

47

SUMMIT SUSTAINABILITY COUNCIL

ASHLEY SAKWA TODD SWENSON TALYA MAYFIELD
VP of Strategy, Financial Planning Senior VP, Risk Management and GAR: Environmental Health
and Analysis Safety & Safety Specialist

DANA GORTNEY JEN KREX MELISSA MYERS
VP of Safety and Risk Management HR Specialist Environmental Engineer

CHRIS GASKILL EMILY SCHNITZER DAMION SADD
VP, Deputy General Council Payroll and Accounting Supervisor Quality Supervisor

TIFFANY BRISENO PADRAIC DILLON MIKE CURRY
Hyperion Systems Administrator Austin Area Manager Director of Business Development
and Marketing
DEB COFFMAN BO FARR
Corporate Communications Quarry Manager AARON HIMES
Safety Specialist, Sustainability
AMANDA BOSWELL RANDY ROTHS Coordinator
HR Generalist Business Development Manager
LEE WARE
BROOKE McDERMEIT BRITTANY HITCHCOCK Environmental Director
HR Specialist Company Support Representative
DANI MILLER
SITA DAAVETTILA KYLE WYATT Safety & Technical Compliance
Sustainability Manager Finance Manager Manager

KRISTI KUETEMEIER NATALIE TIMMERMAN CODY WITHERS
VP of Project Management Office / IT HR Generalist, Executive Assistant Environmental Health & Safety

48


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