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Environments for Aging Session E42 - Households Version 2.0: A discussion on the Interaction of Operations & Architecture

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Published by EUA Marketing, 2017-02-10 16:19:59

EFA E42 - Households v2.0

Environments for Aging Session E42 - Households Version 2.0: A discussion on the Interaction of Operations & Architecture

E-­‐42
 HOUSEHOLDS-­‐Version
 2.0:

A
 DISCUSSION
 ON
 THE
 INTERACTION
 
OF
 OPERATIONS
 &
 ARCHITECTURE

Jeffrey
 Anderzhon,
 FAIA Lorraine
 G.
 Hiatt,
 Ph.D.

Senior
 Planner
 /
 Design
 Architect Environmental
 Psychologist
 /
 Gerontologist

Andrew
 Alden,
 M.Arch

Senior
 Planner
 /
 Designer

Continuing  Education  Credits

Architects  -­ 22  Credit  Hours  available
• Have  your  conference  badge  scanned  by  the  room  monitor  at  the  start  of  each  session  you  attend.    
• Complete  the  AIA  verification  form  (be  sure  to  check  off  the  sessions  you  attend)  and  retain  it  for  your  

records.    
• CE  credits  will  be  uploaded  to  the  AIA  transcript  system  within  4-­6  weeks  of  the  close  of  the  conference  

and  you  will  receive  a  certificate  of  completion  via  email.

Interior  Designers  -­ 22  Credit  Hours  available
• Have  your  IDCEC  verification  form  STAMPED  by  the  room  monitor  at  the  start  of  each  session  you  

attend.
• This  is  the  ONLY  proof  of  attendance  that  will  be  accepted.    
• You  will  self-­submit  your  credits  to  the  IDCEC  system  at  the  conclusion  of  the  conference.  
• If  you  have  questions  about  reporting  your  credits,  contact  the  interior  design  association  that  is  

responsible  for  monitoring  mandatory  continuing  education  to  fulfill  membership  requirements.

EDAC  -­ 10  Credit  Hours  available
• EDAC  Approved  Sessions:  T01,  D01,  D02,  D03,  E01,  E03,  E09,  E10,  E12,  E13,  E15,  E16,  E18,  E21,  

E22,  E23,  E24,  E25,  E27,  E30,  E34,  E35,  E36,  E38,  E39,  E40,  E41,  E42,  E43,  E44,  E47,  E49
• Complete  the  EDAC  verification  form  and  retain  it  for  your  records
• You  will  self-­submit  your  CE  credits  to  Castle  Worldwide  at  the  time  of  your  EDAC  renewal.    Renewal  

notices  with  login  instructions  will  be  sent  from  Castle  Worldwide  six  months  and  three  months  prior  to  
the  candidate’s  renewal  date.
• The  verification  form  is  your  proof  of  attendance  in  case  of  an  audit.        

EFA  Mobile  App  and  Session  Evaluations

Mobile  App  -­
If  you  have  not  done  so  already  download  the  mobile  app  through  your  device  
app  store.  If  you  have  any  questions  or  need  assistance  please  visit  the  mobile  
help  desk    

Session  Evaluations  -­ Rate  Sessions  Through  the  Mobile  App
Instructions  :
1. Open  and  load  mobile  app
2. On  the  top  navigation  bar,  select  the  screen  icon
3. Locate  and  select  the  session  you  are  attending  – they  are  listed  by  day,  

track  or  type
4. After  clicking  on  the  individual  session  a  navigation  bar  will  appear  on  the  

left.  Click  the  clipboard  icon  and  evaluation/survey  will  begin.  

LEARNING
 OBJECTIVES

• Understand
 how
 the
 physical
 environment
 impacts
 
direct
 caregiving,
 staffing,
 food
 service,
 and
 social
 
interaction;

• Learn
 about
 trends
 that
 are
 helping
 to
 shape
 the
 physical
 
environment,
 care
 program
 and
 operations;

• Discuss
 and
 appraise
 contemporary
 architectural
 designs
 
created
 for
 older
 adult
 care
 environments
 and
 the
 
operational
 methodology
 assumed
 for
 those
 layouts;

• Gain
 knowledge
 through
 interactive
 discussion
 focusing
 
on
 participant
 experiences
 with
 their
 own
 operational
 
and
 environmental
 designs.

Jeffrey
 Anderzhon,
 FAIA Andrew
 Alden,
 M.Arch Lorraine
 G.
 Hiatt,
 Ph.D.
Senior
 Planner
 /
 Designer Psychologist
 /
 Environmental
 Gerontologist
Senior
 Planner
 /
 Design
 Architect

@JeffA_EUA @AndrewA_EUA /lorraine-­‐g-­‐hiatt-­‐ph-­‐d-­‐83569627
/jeffreyanderzhon/j /andrewalden1 [email protected]
[email protected] [email protected]

THE
 AGENDA
• Recap
 from
 Households
 V1.0
• History
• Architecture
• Lessons
 Learned

THE
 EVOLUTION
 OF
 
SEANIBORRIE
 LFIVHINISGT
O  CARRYEOF
CONGREGATE SENIOR

CARE HOUSEHOLDS

Civil
 War
 Hospital
Washington
 D.C.
 1863

THE
 EVOLUTION
 OF
 
SENIOR
 LIVING
 CARE

Origins
 :
 Double
 Loaded
 Corridor

Double
 Loaded
 Corridor
1980s

Exploded
 Corridor
 

Divided
 Floor
 Plan
1990s

Household:
  Household:
 
Short
 Corridor
 Style Hearth
 Style

Combination
 /
 Hybrid
 Household
 Styles

Household
 /
 Neighborhood

Household
 Layout
 Comparison Hybrid
 
Short
 Corridor
  Household

Household

Hearth
  Renovation
 
Household Household
Eppstein
 Uhen
 Architects,
 2016

THE
 EVOLUTION
 OF
 
SENAIORRC
 LHIVIITNEGC
 TCUARREE-

LESSONS LEARNED

Physical
 Environment
 Comparisons
 Between
 Models
 of
 Care

TRADITIONAL
  CONTEMPORARY
 HOUSEHOLD
LONG
 TERM
 CARE
 MODEL RESIDENT
 CENTERED
 CARE
 MODEL
Large
 Centralized
 Activity
 Space Small
 Decentralized
 Activity
 Spaces

Large
 Centralized
 Dining
 Space Small
 Decentralized
 Dining
 Spaces

Centralized
 Staff
 Space
 (Nursing
 Station) Small
 Decentralized
 Staffing
 Spaces

Centralized
 Care
 &
 Service
 Spaces
  Decentralized
 Care
 &
 Service
 Spaces

Institutional
 Style
 Finishes
 &
 Furnishings Residential
 Interior
 Finishes
 &
 Furnishings

Lack
 of
 Natural
 Light
 &
 Exterior
 Views Natural
 Light
 &
 Options
 for
 Exterior
 Views

Majority
 of
 Multiple Occupant
 Rooms
 
  Private
 Rooms
 with
 Private
 3
 Piece
 Bathrooms.
 
(2,
 3,
 or
 4
 people)
 Shared
 2
 Piece
 Bathrooms.
  Limited
 Number
 of
 Companion
 Rooms,
 “Smart
 
Doubles”
Limited
 Private
 Rooms
 
Variety
 of
 Interior
 Colors
 &
Monochromatic
 Interior
 Colors
 & Mixture
 of
 Textures
Lack
 of
 Textures
Outdoor
 Access
 with
 a
 Variety
 of
 Spaces
Limited
 Outdoor
 Access
 and
 Garden

Operational
 Comparisons
 Between
 Models
 of
 Care

TRADITIONAL
  CONTEMPORARY
 
LONG
 TERM
 CARE
 MODEL RESIDENT
 CENTERED
 CARE
 MODEL

Ailment/Disability
 
 Focus Resident
 as
 Individual
 Focus

Staff
 Control
 of
 Daily
 Routines Resident
 Choice
 and
 Control
 of
 Daily
 Routines

Maximization
 of
 Staff
 Efficiency Optimize
 Resident
 Quality
 of
 Life
 &
 Independence

Rotated
 Staff
 Assignments Permanent
 Staff
 Assignments

Specialized
 Job
 Tasks
 (Hierarchical) Wide
 Range
 of
 Tasks
 (Team
 Oriented)

Quality
 of
 Care
 Emphasis Quality
 of
 Care
 &
 Quality
 of
 Life
 Emphasis

Majority
 of
 Food
 Preparation
 & Majority
 of
 Food
 Preparation
 &
 Serving
 of
 Food
 at
 
Plating
 of
 Food
 Behind
 Closed
 Door Decentralized
 Dining
 Spaces
 In
 View
 of
 Residents

THE
 EVOLUTION
 OF
 
SENPIORRO
 LGIVRINAGM
 CAARNED

DESIGN







THE
 EVOLUTION
 OF
 
SOEPNEIORRA
 TLIIOVINNGS
 ACANRDE THE
BUILT ENVIRONMENT

RESIDENT
 ROOM















THE
 EVOLUTION
 OF
 
SOEPNEIORRA
 TLIIOVINNGS
 ACANRDE THE
BUILT ENVIRONMENT

RESIDENT
 BATHROOM





THE
 EVOLUTION
 OF
 
SOEPNEIORRA
 TLIIOVINNGS
 ACANRDE THE
BUILT ENVIRONMENT

DINING





TOHPEE
 ERVAOTLIUOTNIOSNA
 ONFD
  THE
SBENUIIOLTRE
 LNIVVINIRGO
 CNAMREENT

SOCIAL
 &
 ACTIVITY
SPACES





THE
 EVOLUTION
 OF
 
SOEPNEIORRA
 TLIIOVINNGS
 ACANRDE THE
BUILT ENVIRONMENT

SUPPORT
 SPACES

INTUITIVE
 CAREGIVING

• See,
 Hear
• Touch
 Downs
 and
 “Home
 

Inspired”
 Work
 Areas
• Share
 Care
 Partners

Assistance
 on
 Request
Supplies
 clean
 and
 soiled
 
where
 needed
 available
 less
 
visible
• In
 Room
 Clean/Soiled
 
• Reach-­‐In
 Equipment
 Alcoves
• Linen/Supplies
 in
 Residential
 
“Built-­‐ins
• Planned
 with
 Game
 boards
 

STEALTH
 SERVICES:
 Single
 
and
 Multi-­‐Story
 Examples
 

DESIGNING
 TO
 STREAMLINE
 SUPPORT
 
AND
 GET
 BACK
 TO
 RESIDENTS

Examples:
 Rhode
 Island
 Veterans
 Home
 SFCS,
 Inc.
 Mease
 Manor
 Memory
 Care,
 Dunedin,
 FL,
 Slator
 Group
 Architects
 PC
 
and
 Parker
 at
 Monroe,
 Spiezle
 Group
 Architects.

MULTI-­‐STORY
  14
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 14
CONNECTED
 FOR
 SERVICE
 ONLY

• SEPARATE
 HOMES
 OR
 
 PAIRED
 
“NEIGHBORHOODS”

• BOTH
 CONNECT
 FOR
 SERVICE
• HOUSES
 NOT
 

SOCIALLY
 CONNECTED
• EACH
 CONNECTED
 TO
 

COMMUNITY
 LIFE

10
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 10

Right
 Above:
 
 Sponsor
 Driven
 Design.
 
Levindale
 Hebrew
 Home,
 Hord|Coplan|Mach,
Baltimore,
 MD
Above:
 Leonard
 Florence
 Center
 for
 Living
 Greenhouse™
 
 DiMella Shaffer,
 “Design
 for
 Aging-­‐International
 Case
 Studies
 
of
 Building
 and
 Program,”
 Anderzhon,
 etal,
 2012,
 Wiley,
 also
 in
 VA
 CLC
 DESIGN
 GUIDE
 2012,www.clcdesignguide.gov

DESIGNING
 SERVICES
 ARE
  Each
 
INTEGRATED
 
 INTO
 RESIDENTIAL
  HOUSEHOLD
 (
HOUSEHOLD
 (12-­‐16
 Each)
 and
  Neighborhood
NEIGHBORHOOD
 (24-­‐32
 Each)
√ √
Neighborhood
 Services:
 “Hub
 Staff”*
√ √
Home
 Office,
 Team
 Care,
 “Touch
  √ √
Downs,”
 Medications √ √
Launderette √
Clean Linen;
 Soiled
 Linen,
 Lift
 Storage √
Neighborhood Prep
 Kitchen Example
 with
Home
 Style,
 Kitchens,
 Plating,
 Aromas Brenda
 Landis,
 AIA
 SFCS
 
 NNVH
 CLC

“Stealth”
 Service
 “Alley”
 Exits,
 Janitor,
 
Mech’l ,
 Wheelchair
 Wash/Charge
HOUSEHOLD
 Porch Entries
 

Activities/Project
 Room /
 Therapy
and
 Storage

THE
 EVOLUTION
 OF
 
SENIOPRU
 LTITVIINNGG
 CTAHREE

HOUSEHOLD
TOGHETHER

CASE
 STUDY:
 PARKER
 AT
 
MONROE
 SMALL
 HOME
 
LIVING
INTEGRATING
CARE
SOCIAL
 CHOICES
MOVEMENT
and
 
“STEALTH”
 
SERVICES

Images
 with
 permission,
 Parker
 at
 Monroe©,
 Spiezle
 Group
 Architects,
 LG
 Hiatt,
 Environmental
 Gerontologist,
 2016

THE
 EVOLUTION
 OF
 
SENIOR
 LIVING
 CARE

CONCLUSIONS

BENEFITS
 OF
 CONTINUING
 TO
 IMPROVE
 HOUSEHOLDS

Residents
  Caregivers Sponsors

• Freedom,
 Dignity • Streamline
  • Layouts
 supporting
 
• Exercise
 Choices Assistance ADL’s/Memory
 are
 
 
• Easier
 Bathroom
 Use Consistent
 with
 MDS
 
• Agitation
 Reduction • Safety
 for
 All values
 and
 $
 per
 day
• Improved
 Memory
  • Eases
 Personal/
 
• Images
 Improve:
 
 Living
 
Retention
 for
 Many Bathroom
 Care Rather
 than
 Sedentary
 
• Improved
 Way
 Finding
  • Redesigns
 Time
 for
  Social
• Energy
 Improved
Person-­‐Focused
  • Important
 to
 
Roles Stakeholders:
 
 Families,
 
• It’s
 Rewarding! Residents,
 Staff
 and
 
Reviewers

Key
 Take-­‐Aways

• The
 physical
 environment
 can
 elevate
 or
 hinder
 the
 
experience
 of
 place
 from
 the
 perspective
 of
 
residents,
 family,
 and
 staff
 members.

• When
 effective,
 environments
 are
 a
 24
 hour
 a
 day
 
partner
 in
 vitality
 and
 memory
 enhancement…
 when
 
falling
 short,
 they
 render
 the
 elder
 a
 “patient”
 and
 
divert
 precious
 care-­‐ and
 service
 partner
 time
 to
 the
 
short-­‐comings
 of
 design
 rather
 than
 elders’
 potential.

• There
 are
 lessons
 in
 the
 history
 of
 design
 and
 present
 
progress
 suggesting
 that
 it
 is
 to
 soon
 to
 fix
 one
 plan,
 
size
 or
 feature
 as
 the
 icon
 of
 healthy
 aging.

Contact
 Information

[email protected] Andrew
 Alden,
 M.Arch.
Mobile:
 917.297.8239 [email protected]
@AndrewA_EUA
Jeffrey
 Anderzhon,
 FAIA Mobile:
 414.687.7403
[email protected]
@JeffA_EUA
Mobile:
 402.598.3167


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