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Published by info, 2019-12-10 16:15:28

Mahi Tahi - Xmas Edition 2019

Mahi Tahi - Xmas Edition 2019

MAHI TAHI ISSUE 3 | December 2019

#BETTER TOGETHER WHAT WILL YOU LEARN IN 2020?
SHAPING THE FUTURE BOLD BUSINESS, DREAMS AND THEMES
2019 EDNZ AWARD WINNERS ATTRACTING DIGITAL TALENT


EDITORIAL THE TEAM

A WARM WELCOME Editor in Chief
LINDA STEWART
A warm welcome to the 2019 Christmas edition of Mahi Executive Editor
Tahi. SUSAN HOUSTON
Miri Kirihimete
The 2019 EDNZ Conference was ‘brilliant in Blenheim’ and Contributors
our community is still buzzing as it reflects on the many PAM FORD
highlights from the three days. FLETCHER TABUTEAU
A quality line up of speakers from Aotearoa and beyond, AMY ROBENS
a very special and unique conversation with former Prime JOHN HUTCHINGS
Minister, the Rt Hon. Helen Clark, the excitement and KERRY TOPP
glamour of the Gala Awards night, a celebration of the first NICK DAVIS
cohort of AcED graduates, the thought provoking workshops
and the many connections made between people from Production Manager
around the country and the globe - all of these elements SUSAN HOUSTON
contributed to a memorable conference, not to forget the
beautiful location of Blenheim. Head of Design
This edition of Mahi Tahi Journal gives those unable to attend SUSAN HOUSTON
the conference a glimpse of what they missed, including
insights into the best practice award winning initiatives. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING
On behalf of EDNZ a big thank you to all who contributed CONTRIBUTIONS TO MAHI TAHI PLEASE
to the success of the conference - sponsors, speakers, MCs, CONTACT THE PRODUCTION MANAGER
award entrants and winners, graduates. and most importantly ON 027 204 4715 OR BY EMAIL| [email protected]
our delegates. ECONOMICDEVELOPMENT.ORG.NZ
Pam Ford,
Chair of EDNZ 29 JEFFS ROAD, DAIRY FLAT, 0794

2 MAHI TAHI 2019


IN THIS ISSUE

4 37

#BETTER DSA WINNER
TOGETHER

42

2019 GRADUATES

CONTENTS

10 BOLD BUSINESS, 26 2019 AWARD
DREAMS AND THEMES WINNERS

16 SHAPING THE FUTURE 43 WHAT WILL YOU
20 CLIMATE CHANGE LEARN IN 2020?

AND OUR REGIONAL 44 ATTRACTING DIGITAL
ECONOMIES TALENT

3MAHI TAHI 2019


#BETTER TOGETHER

#BETTER TOGETHER

“Achieving ‘an inclusive economy’ in Aotearoa
will require a collective effort, underpinned by
challenge, change and risk”. said the Rt Hon
Helen Clark

A report from the EDNZ
Conference

Rt Hon, Helen Clark, former Prime Minister of NZ, Fletch

Achieving ‘inclusive growth’ is a topic high on the Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Regional Economic
Development, Fletcher Tabuteau, opened the 2019 EDNZ
international agenda, reflecting the fact that New Zealand annual conference themed ‘delivering inclusive growth’ say-
is not alone in experiencing unacceptably high levels of ing economic development agencies are a critical part of this
sustained economic inequality. work, possessing the knowledge and experience critical to
When addressing around 200 EDNZ annual conference good decision making, thereby ensuring that New Zealand’s
delegates in Blenheim, a common theme emerged amongst tax dollars are invested wisely.
New Zealand and international speakers. Economic Development Minister Phil Twyford told dele-
There was a clear consensus that an inclusive economy gates that growth is central to wellbeing.
cannot be achieved through silo efforts, rather it demands In detailing the Government’s Economic Plan, he spoke of
significant collective effort that is underpinned by challenge, eight key shifts, with policy actions related to each shift, that
change and risk. will be fundamental to tackling the long-term challenges
The hashtag #BetterTogether became the conference take that the New Zealand economy is facing.
out.

4 MAHI TAHI 2019


her Tabuteau, Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Regional economic development, Susan Houston, CEO of EDNZ, Pam Ford, Chair of EDNZ

THE HASHTAG #BETTER
TOGETHER BECAME THE
CONFERENCE TAKE OUT.

Hon Phil Twyford, Minister for Economic Development

5MAHI TAHI 2019


#BETTER TOGETHER

ECONOMIC INEQUALITY IS THE DEFINING ISSUE OF OUR TIME.
SAID THE RT HON HELEN CLARK

The Rt. Hon. Helen Clark, an internationally Todd Greene, ED of Atlanta University Centre Consortium

renowned campaigner for inclusive growth through Ed Cox, from the Royal Society of the Arts in the UK
her time both as New Zealand Prime Minister and shared his vision of a world where everyone is able to
Administrator of the United Nations Development participate in a brighter future. In his address, ‘Think
Programme (2009-2017), described economic like a system, act like an entrepreneur’ he called for
inequality as “the defining issue of our time” during unity in resolving one of the key challenges of our
her interview session with EDNZ Chair Pam Ford. time. “Inequality is a systemic problem that can’t be
“The challenge of achieving inclusive growth in New resolved by isolated interventions,” Ed Cox said.
Zealand is ‘very real;, said Ms Clark. Cox categorised Inclusive growth into four
As economic development experts from councils, domains,;livelihoods, wealth, voice and futures.
central government and regional and local de- Inclusive livelihoods is about developing skills
velopment agencies gathered at the conference and labour market programmes that connect
the growing appetite for bolder interventions and people to good quality jobs and skills development
experiences to deliver economic growth became opportunities, with inclusive voice about giving
increasingly evident. people a greater say and influence over economic
Throughout the world, including the USA, France, decision making.
Italy, Japan and Australia, there is a growing per- New Zealand speakers included CEO and Founder of
ception that economic strategies are not deliver- the Be. Lab, Minnie Baragwanath, who believes New
ing the kinds of societies where people can thrive. Zealand can become a thought leader, a visionary,
International speakers Todd Greene and Ed Cox and a global powerhouse in access innovation.
highlighted this increasing recognition.
Greene, executive director of Atlanta University
Centre Consortium, described inclusive growth
as “the design and maintenance of an economy
that benefits everyone, with investment in work-
force development key to productivity”. He told
delegates that the wealthiest one per cent of the
world’s population own half (50.1%) of household
wealth in the world, and that in the USA racial
inequality is rampant. “Workers in the USA are
beginning to understand that they are not bene-
fiting, despite seeing stock market increases and
that they are being squeezed in so many ways,”
Todd Greene said.

6 MAHI TAHI 2019


#BETTER TOGETHER

From left to right: Chair of EDNZ, Pam Ford and the Rt Hon Helen Clark

Minnie revealed that ‘’as many as 30% of millennials
have an access disability – these are our future leaders
and entrepreneurs – therefore accessibility is not just a
social issue, it is very much an economic development
issue.’’

Ed Cox: Royal Society of the Arts UK Minnie Baragwanath, CEO and Founder of Be.Lab

INEQUALITY IS A SYSTEMIC PROBLEM
THAT CAN’T BE RESOLVED BY
ISOLATED INTERVENTIONS. SAID ED
COX FROM THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF
THE ARTS (UK).

7MAHI TAHI 2019


#BETTER TOGETHER

A CONSENSUS

Pacific Business Trust CEO Pelenato Sakalia Dr David Wilson, Cities and Regions NZ, believes
New Zealand has what it takes to be a world leader
shared a new customised service delivery model to in regional economic development “if we take a
help meet some of the complex challenges facing multi-level fit-for-purpose approach”. In his address,
Pasifika businesses such as unique socio-economic ‘Powering up the Regions: Improving the mechanisms
and cultural barriers including discomfort around for delivering world class regional economic
using mainstream support networks and business development’, Dr Wilson said there is a stark imbalance
practises which often conflict with Pasifika values. in funding and resourcing between central and regional
agencies and he goes on to describe the obstacles
as issues of ‘capacity’ and ‘alignment’ rather than
‘capability’.

Pelenato Sakalia, CEO of Pacific Business Trust

8 MAHI TAHI 2019


#BETTER TOGETHER

The conclusion of the conference, if our Todd Greene, Rt Hon Helen Clark, Pam Ford
economy is to be truly inclusive it must
embrace and build social, cultural, economic
and environmental wellbeing.
Creating shared prosperity by building
inclusive economies is a long-term
endeavour that should make climate change
and environmental concerns a core part
of strategy development, so that future
generations benefit from the decisions we
make today.
#BETTERTOGETHER

Author: Amy Robens, Director of
CAMPFIRE

Dr David Wilson, Executive Director Cities and Regions NZ THERE IS A STARK
IMBALANCE IN FUNDING
AND RESOURCING
BETWEEN CENTRAL AND
REGIONAL AGENCIES,”
SAID DR DAVID WILSON

9MAHI TAHI 2019


BOLD DREAMS AND THEMES

BOLD BUSINESS
DREAMS AND
THEMES

BY PARLIAMENTARY
UNDER-SECRETARY
FLETCHER TABUTEAU

It’s an exciting time to be part of economic One of Keynes’ definitive views on the economy
was his, ‘Trickle up effect.’ When I was in
development in New Zealand. So much of what we opposition, I took every opportunity to remind
are all doing is big and bold. It’s ambitious. the government of the day that the business
We feel like we can dare to dream about real case for inclusive growth is strong. That is to
opportunity for everyone, no matter what their say, actually the argument for ensuring those
circumstances, or what part of the country they in the ‘middle-class’ or at the ‘bottom’ should
are in. Much of what we are all trying to achieve is be a significant or even the main driver for an
simply about bringing everyone along for the ride. economy’s financial wealth creation.
New Zealand has not escaped the realities of the Whilst Keynes spoke of the middle class and
disparities in growth. We have seen inequality ubiquitous government spending, my view is
increase as previous Government settings blindly that today’s vision of inclusive growth speaks
encouraged the narrow pursuit of growth in to empowering and facilitating opportunity
GDP. As you will no doubt have heard more and through smart investment for the benefit of all
more recently, Kuznets, the creator of the modern New Zealanders.
concept of GDP said at the time of its first in use Why is inclusive growth a vision that should be
in 1934, it would be imprudent to use GDP as a our way forward? As the OECD has reported,
measure of welfare. And yet for most of our recent “On a macro level, more equal societies benefit
history, it has somehow been the benchmark. business through a larger middle class and
Today in New Zealand, especially in our regions, growing consumer purchasing power, enhanced
we see the folly of this myopic focus. government capacity to invest in education,
health and infrastructure, and improved
economic and political stability.”

10 MAHI TAHI 2019


BOLD DREAMS AND THEMES

Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development, Fletcher Tabuteau

On a human and personal level, witnessing our Our Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) is about
regions regenerate and become reinvigorated, unlocking potential and building sustainable
watching people re-engage in the work force, regions, and overall the PGF has committed $2.5
and seeing more and more people improve their billion – as at 30 September 2019 – to helping our
standard of living, motivates everyone involved in regions reach their full potential.
economic development here in New Zealand. As I’ve moved around the country investing in
In this parliamentary term, we have had the infrastructure and people, and unlocking new
opportunity to remake economic development. To business opportunities, I’ve seen more optimism
invest our energies and resources into economic and positivity in our provincial towns.
development strategies to undertake what the It was an honour delivering the opening address to
markets alone have not and cannot do. We know the Economic Development New Zealand annual
that we have the power to make a difference, and conference in Blenheim.
when markets fail, the Government has a moral The PGF and Economic Development New Zealand
obligation to intervene for the wellbeing of all New go hand in hand and I believe the knowledge and
Zealanders. experience within each EDA, under the umbrella
What is the goal? To put the regional economy of the EDNZ that provides strategic support and
on a trajectory of higher growth, with a focus leadership, is critical in affecting good decision
on improving productivity, and prosperity, in a making, ensuring that New Zealand’s tax dollars are
sustainable and inclusive way. invested wisely.
As Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Regional It is truly about people and together we are helping
Economic Development, I’ve had the pleasure make a difference.
of being part of the team working to deliberately
achieve these goals.

11MAHI TAHI 2019


BOLD DREAMS AND THEMES

THE OUTSTANDING WORK OF THE PROVINCIAL

DEVELOPMENT UNIT I believe the inclusive growth approach should
always focus on productive employment rather
Iwant to acknowledge the outstanding work of than relying on direct income redistribution as
a means of increasing incomes for all peoples in
the Provincial Development Unit (PDU) in tran- our society.
sitioning from managing $16 million per annum,
to $1 billion, which created huge pressure on the
system.

The PDU has seen first-hand the difficulties and The conference was held during Tokelauan
the challenges of delivering a programme that is language week, the 7th of the Pacific Island
meaningful, robust, and proves itself fiscally, with language series.
every decision made. The theme for Tokelauan language week was
The Minister for Economic Development Phil “Tiutiuga a Tautai ma Figo auā te lumanaki o
Twyford skyped in and reinforced the point that Fānau” or in English, “Mastery of traditional
a strong economy provides decent jobs, higher knowledge, skills, expertise and leadership help
incomes, and opportunities for current and fu- shape the future”.
ture generations, and that a key driver of this is a This theme was apt for the inclusive growth
nation’s overall wellbeing is comprised of finan- conference because if we believe in inclusive
cial, human, natural and social capital. growth, we should acknowledge the traditional
Equality of opportunity and inclusiveness are knowledge, skills, expertise and leadership right
the essential ingredients of a successful inclusive across all peoples.
growth strategy.

12 MAHI TAHI 2019


BOLD DREAMS AND THEMES

Paul Casson, receiving the Distinguished Service Award The chair of EDNZ, Pam Ford, described Paul as
one of the real heroes and that his contribution
It was truly a pleasure to be amongst people at to EDNZ is extraordinary having been both a
the conference who shared their ideas about what board member and deputy chair as well as chair
can achieved with a concerted focus of collective of the audit and risk committee. He did all this
minds. Because the complexity of economic and while providing leadership in shaping the future of
social issues facing many of our regions are too EDNZ.
complicated for individual organisations to fix on Rural success stories were also acknowledged. The
their own. Kai Ora initiative in Northland received a Com-
And to this end I thank the team at EDNZ for their mendation for Inclusive Growth to recognise its
valuable expertise, leadership and passion that community-led and collaborative approach to the
they bring. provision of sustainable, fresh and healthy food
produce to deprived communities in Northland.
AWARD WINNERS
IT IS TRULY ABOUT PEOPLE AND
The conference concluded with an awards night TOGETHER WE ARE HELPING MAKE
with the top ten winners recognised by the A DIFFERENCE.
EDNZ for their outstanding contribution to the
wellbeing and prosperity of their communities. 13MAHI TAHI 2019
I want to congratulate all the winners and in
particular the Marlborough District Council who
took the top award for its Marlborough Smart
and Connected initiative.
I’d like to personally acknowledge all the winners
but I also want to make special mention of
Paul Casson from Dunedin who received the
Distinguished Service Award.


BOLD DREAMS AND THEMES
THE PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT GROWTH FUND

The Provincial Growth Fund is coming to the The other area of investment for iwi and Māori
was digital connectivity. One of the digital projects
end of delivering the $1 billion budget per year to was for marae digital connectivity to help Māori
the regions. Most of the investments were made in communities seize business and education oppor-
the regions that needed the most help, Northland, tunities while living in rural areas.
Bay of Plenty, Tairawhiti, Hawke’s Bay, Manawa- The PGF has also provided $80 million in waste
tu-Whanganui and the West Coast. and energy allocation. $40 million went towards
In February 2019, the PGF set aside $82.4 million waste minimisation with a focus on projects which
in funding for regional employment, skills and minimise plastic waste. $40 million was allocated
capability and in October the PGF invested in to clean energy projects, with a focus on job crea-
Tairawhiti with a further $1.6 million in workforce tion, maximising labour redeployment opportuni-
development from the employment programme, ties and strengthening the capital infrastructure of
Te Ara Mahi. New Zealand’s energy sector.
$100 million was allocated towards projects to Regional Economic Development Ministers also
support Māori, with investment ready projects approved a wind power project on Stewart Island
to develop their land and lift the performance of and that was announced at the end of November.
Māori owned assets.

Pam Ford, Chair of EDNZ thanks the Parliamentary Under-Secretary with some local product

14 MAHI TAHI 2019


BOLD DREAMS AND THEMES

Laree Taula, Fletcher Tabuteau and John Sheridan listen attentively to Minister Phil Twyford’s address to the conference.

Sector investments complemented the PGF’s wider IT’S AN EXCITING TIME TO BE PART
investment strategy to increase the productivity OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
potential of the regions. By working with firms IN NEW ZEALAND. SO MUCH OF
directly on projects that provide employment and WHAT WE ARE ALL DOING IS BIG
deliver other benefits, the Government can achieve AND BOLD. IT’S AMBITIOUS.
some of its wider social objectives.
As the Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Region- 15MAHI TAHI 2019
al Economic Development, I’m proud of what we
have achieved so far in raising the prosperity of re-
gions, stimulating economic growth, creating jobs,
improving infrastructure, providing upskilling
and training opportunities, and supporting Māori
economic development.
This could not have been achieved without the
PGF, and the expertise provided from EDNZ and
the Economic Development Agencies.
I look forward to watching bold and innovative
businesses grow, creative projects flourish, and
regions and people reaching their full potential.
Have a safe and festive holiday period.


FUTURE CHALLENGES

HELPING SHAPE THE
FUTURE IN REGIONAL
DEVELOPMENT
Structural changes are needed, including further
Julian Moore, lead author of the report, said there
investment in skills and infrastructure, to underpin a were some clear insights into what the industry
fast-changing economy that can encompass inclusive now values, for instance, well-being indicators are
growth in New Zealand. This was just one of the advocated by many as appropriate measures of
learnings from a recent nation-wide study by consultancy success alongside economic indicators. But there
HenleyHutchings. is a need to re-set the relationship between the
“Our survey indicates that the regional development regions and central government in terms of policy
sector is maturing fast but has some way to go before it can setting, national strategy, engagement mechanisms
play a full role in a mixed national/regional development and funding arrangements. “What we found is that
approach,” says partner Geoff Henley. while central government funding is welcomed
After conducting interviews with 18 thought leaders, and has had a positive impact, there is a view that
including chief executives from EDAs, Regional Councils this could be directed more strategically, and that
and representatives from academia, iwi, urban planning some decision-making could be devolved.”
and economics, HenleyHutchings formed an initial
picture. Then they tested this by inviting responses to an
online survey sent out to the EDNZ database. Finally, they
shared data, insights and a set of proposed actions with
delegates at the October 2019 EDNZ Inclusive Growth
Conference.

OUR MOTIVATION WAS TO CAPTURE
AND REPORT BACK ON THE VIEWS OF
THOSE OPERATING AT THE REGIONAL
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COAL
FACE,” SAID JOHN HUTCHINGS

Julian Moore, lead author of the report - HenleyHutchings

16 MAHI TAHI 2019


FUTURE CHALLENGES

John Hutchings, Partner of HenleyHutchings

The actions proposed by HenleyHutchings affect both The report notes ‘we are now in an era in which
central government and regional leaders. “For the regional development is recognised as important – and
regions, there’s a great variation in the institutional having the Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) as a funding
arrangements and mechanisms for delivery. Regions source has unlocked development opportunities that
do not necessarily all need to operate the same way, but otherwise would have languished. The question now is
there’s much we could learn from good examples in how we can make the most of this unprecedented level
structural arrangements that optimise outcomes, engage of commitment.’
business and deliver effective ‘’all-of-region’’ planning,”
says Julian Moore.In terms of focus for the Government, 1The nine key findings from the report are as follows:
the report proposes that, along with a focus on skills and There is no common definition of the term
infrastructure, the job is to collaborate with regions to ‘regional economic development’. It means
review the current policies, take a more co-ordinated different things to different people, often
approach to strategic planning, and frame the “next influenced by the needs of their particular region.
generation” Provincial Growth Fund for the forthcoming There is, though, a clear view that there is a need to go
3-5 years with a view to it operating as a more explicit beyond traditional definitions and to include social
national regional partnership. and environmental factors (a four well-being/qualify of
The team at HenleyHutchings is keen to continue life approach).
the conversation, facilitate engagement between
Government and the regions and link in with further
work conducted by others such as Dr David Wilson’s
work Powering up the Regions. There is a sense of
collective purpose to the timing of these studies.

17MAHI TAHI 2019


FUTURE CHALLENGES

REGIONS DO NOT NECESSARILY ALL NEED TO OPERATE THE
SAME WAY, BUT THERE’S MUCH WE COULD LEARN FROM GOOD
EXAMPLES IN STRUCTURAL ARRANGEMENTS THAT OPTIMISE
OUTCOMES, ENGAGE BUSINESS AND DELIVER ‘ALL OF REGION’
PLANNING’, SAID JULIAN MOORE.

2GDP is no longer seen as the ‘one and only’ 6The relationship between central and local
performance measure. The focus on the lived government requires recalibration. A
experience of people is growing in importance as partnership, rather than a top-down approach,
an indicator of regional development success. Well-being is advocated. There is a need for a co-ordinated national
indicators were strongly advocated by many as more plan, demonstrating the distinctive comparative
advantage and latent potential contribution of each
3appropriate measures than solely economic indicators. region to the national economy, with supporting
The consensus was that the current delivery of funding and a higher level of delegated decisioin-
economic development services is ‘moderately making.
successful’. Bright spots and successful projects were
identified, but overall there is a lack of ‘all of region’
vision, strategy and collaboration - a systemic approach
to regional development. There is under-investment in
infrastructure, with workforce issues (including skills
development) generally not being adequately addressed.

4There needs to be a longer-term focus.
Infrastructure and skills are the increasing focus
as the key enablers of economic development.
There were two main camps among respondents:
one focused more on infrastructure as the key lever and
the other focused more on people (capability and skills
development). The two positions were not exclusive.
Skills shortages are a major concern.

5There is low engagement of the regions in
national economic development policy setting.
There is a pressing need to re-set the relationship
between central and local government and for the
two to work better in partnership to define and deliver
against regional economic development objectives.

18 MAHI TAHI 2019


FUTURE CHALLENGES

THE NEXT STEP IS USING THE FINDINGS AND ACTIONS IN THE
REPORT TO HELP FRAME FURTHER DISCUSSION AND PLANNING.”
SAID JOHN HUTCHINGS.

7New mechanisms are needed to enable more 8The current organisational arrangements in
effective engagment across government. Regions regions lack integration. There is no general
indicate that it is difficult to engage with central agreement on who the players are in economic
government due to the number of ministers and agencies development and what their roles are or should be. The
involved in different aspects of regional economic roles, governance structures, funding and shareholding
development. There is a need to make engagement easier. models of EDAs vary by region and the general view was
there are ‘too many cooks in the kitchen’. The following
view emerged as the ideal EDA model:
- Operates across the whole of the region.
- Has broad shareholding and is not simply ‘council

controlled’.
- Makes good use of data to inform the best

development strategy for the region.
- Facilitates relationships and connections between all

the players in the region.
- Facilitates the development of an agreed regional

strategy.
- Develops and markets a ‘regional story’ to attract

visitors, talent and investment.
- Advocates for the region on economic development

matters with central government.
- Has the capability to support ‘enabler’ initiatives that

enhance regional performance (e.g. skills and
capability building, catalyst projects, transport
investment needs, innovation ecosystem).
- Has the funding required to make a difference.

9Funding arrangement needs to be reviewed.
While central government funding is welcomed
and has had a positive impact, there is a view that
this could be directed more strategically, and that some
decision-making could be devolved.

To read the entire report go to www.henleyhutchings.
co.nz. Do these findings resonate with you? Please send
feedback on the report to [email protected]

19MAHI TAHI 2019


CLIMATE CHANGE

CLIMATE CHANGE
AND OUR REGIONAL
ECONOMIES

WITH NICK DAVIS

MartinJenkins Director Nick Davis draws on his recent presentation at the EDNZ annual conference to
write about both the challenges and the opportunities that climate change presents for local government
and regional economic development agencies in Aotearoa.

20 MAHI TAHI 2019


CLIMATE CHANGE

The recent passage of the Zero Carbon We can expect to see more policies and
government initiatives aimed at energy
Bill is an historic moment for climate system transitions, including a significant
change action in Aotearoa, paving the way shift to more renewable and low-emissions
for a period of significant policy reform to electricity generation; switching of pro-
achieve a low-carbon future. An effective cess-heat fuels; electrification of private
climate change response will involve passenger vehicles and public transport;
not just addressing the immense risks of and use of potential new energy sources.
climate change, but also seizing the major There’s also likely to be significantly more
economic opportunities that this global investment in science and research geared
threat presents for New Zealand businesses towards reducing the costs of and barriers
and communities. It’s also clear that those to emissions reduction and towards a bet-
risks and opportunities will be different ter understanding of the risks and implica-
tions of climate change.
A BOW WAVE OF NEW We can also expect to see changes in
CLIMATE POLICIES government procurement practices, as well
as financial sector reforms to mitigate the
We are already seeing what I believe is the risks that climate change presents to the
bow wave of the coming climate-related banking system, to encourage companies
policy reforms. Key changes so far to report transparently on the risks they
include reforms to the Emissions Trading face, and to fund investments in climate
Scheme; the planned introduction of adaptation in vulnerable areas.
farm-level emissions pricing in the This is not a Business as Usual policy
agriculture sector by 2025; the proposed environment. If we are to put ourselves
Clean Car Standard and Feebate scheme; on a credible path towards our long-term
the $230 million Sustainable Land Use targets, then many of these policies must
Budget package for transition support to be in place within the next five years.
the agricultural sector; the ban on future
oil and gas exploration; and new funding 21MAHI TAHI 2019
of $26 million for a satellite to measure
methane emissions from space.


CLIMATE CHANGE

There is significant uncertainty about the There is uncertainty in the local effects of climate
change in New Zealand, but some of the expected
shape and timing of policy change, and around effects include rising average temperatures,
how households and businesses will respond particularly in the North Island; rainfall increasing
to new policies. There is also significant in the west and decreasing in many eastern
technological uncertainty, with many of the regions, with droughts more likely and more
solutions not yet commercialised. But we do intense in the east; and rising seas, which are
know that delay could be very costly and that expected to increase coastal erosion and cause
acting early means more to gain and less pain. more frequent breaches of coastal protection
structures and low-lying areas.
THE PHYSICAL IMPACTS Some economic sectors will be affected more than
OF CLIMATE CHANGE: THE others. For example land-based primary industries
LOCAL EFFECTS are expected to face significantly more droughts
and extreme high temperatures. The transport
Climate change discussions are often framed sector’s most significant climate vulnerabilities are
around future risks – but the physical impacts from higher temperatures, extreme short-duration
of climate change are already starting to be precipitation events, flooding, and sea level rise.
felt. These translate into significant economic Electricity generation and transmission could be
costs, including lower crop productivity, significantly affected by rising temperatures and
damage to infrastructure and other assets, sea levels. Demand for electricity is expected to
disruption to transport networks, and adverse grow significantly, and large-scale investment in
health effects. wind and solar will be needed within the sector.
Our forestry sector could be significantly affected
22 MAHI TAHI 2019 by an increase in bushfires, and a significant
increase in supply may push prices downward.


THE COST OF THE CLIMATE CHANGE
TRANSITION: UNEVEN
OUTCOMES ACROSS Those sectoral impacts translate into uneven
DIFFERENT SECTORS WILL impacts across regional economies, creating
CREATE WINNERS AND regional winners and losers.
LOSERS
THE REGIONAL IMPACT
As well as the physical impacts, the process of OF THE ECONOMIC
transitioning to a low-emissions economy will TRANSITION AND
entail significant economic costs, including a PHYSICAL IMPACTS
rising price of carbon on emissions-intensive
activities. When considering the regional impacts of climate
change, it’s important to look at the combined
The implications of the transition will not be effects of the physical impacts and transition
evenly distributed across New Zealand’s economic impacts.
sectors. In certain sectors some particularly big For some sectors, particularly agriculture, the
shifts are needed. For example, our electricity physical impacts of climate change are expected to
generation and distribution sector will need add to competitive pressures from the transition
significant investment in wind, solar and process, causing a double-whammy effect.
geothermal energy sources, and some high- Regions with high-emissions profiles will be the
emissions plants will need to close. The transport most significantly affected, including those with
sector will need investment in electrification significant concentrations in non-renewable
of public transport and to encourage uptake of electricity generation and large-scale high-
electric vehicles, and will also need to shift to emissions industrial processes. About two-thirds
lower-emissions methods for moving freight. of employment in emissions-intensive, trade-
Our manufacturing sector will need to replace exposed industries are outside of Auckland,
inefficient industrial heat processes with lower- Wellington and Christchurch, and some of these
carbon alternatives. Process-heat changes are businesses are significant contributors to regional
also likely to be needed in schools, hospitals and GDP.
homes. Potentially significant changes in land Rural and provincial regions that depend
use are needed, away from high-carbon farming significantly on land-based industries are also
systems towards lower-intensity systems and very exposed to both physical and transition
forestry. Our tourism sector will need to respond impacts. They may also benefit from increased
to risks such as a significant change in global investment in forestry. In urban areas, the biggest
consumer attitudes to long-haul air travel. exposures relate to transport and infrastructure,
particularly in low-lying and coastal areas. The
Trade-exposed sectors that are emissions- implications for tourism are harder to call, but it’s
intensive are most exposed to transition risks, likely that tourism-dependent regions will also
with potential for declines in output and loss of need to adapt and create climate-resilient forms of
jobs. Some of our most exposed industries include tourism.
some of our largest firms, such as Fonterra and
Methanex, which are significant employers in their 23MAHI TAHI 2019
local communities and significant contributors to
regional GDP.


CLIMATE CHANGE

BUT SIGNIFICANT As with mitigation, international evidence shows
ECONOMIC there are significant payoffs from early action to
OPPORTUNITIES EXIST build resilience. A recent report by the Global
Commission on Adaptation demonstrates that
Although our low-emissions transition will adaptation can provide a triple dividend in the form
of avoided losses, economic gains, and social and
strand assets and reduce competitiveness in some environmental benefits.
sectors, it also offers significant opportunities
for investment, including through the search for The potential savings from investments that
lower-carbon alternatives. Over the medium term, increase resilience are large when you consider
a rising carbon price can be expected to stimulate that over the 10 years to 2017 climate change cost
higher rates of innovation, leading to higher the New Zealand economy at least $120 million
productivity. for privately insured damages from floods and
a further $720 million for economic losses from
A changing climate may also alter what can droughts. These costs are only going to increase
be grown where. The agricultural sector has under a 1.5 degree global warming scenario.
opportunities to increase productivity and
diversify in the face of climate change. WE NEED TO FACTOR
CLIMATE CHANGE INTO
There are likely to be opportunities in many OUR ED STRATEGIES AND
sectors – for example, renewable energy (solar, PLANS
wind, geothermal and biomass), distribution
technologies (metering and software), waste (waste So, what are the central and local government,
efficiency, landfill natural gas production and development agencies and economic
distribution), livestock (manure management, and development practitioners? There are six key
lower methane emissions improving feedstock takeaways:
efficiency), forestry consulting (expertise in
degraded land, waste disposal, and conservation #1 Build climate-change risk and opportunity
estates), transport (electric vehicles and battery assessment into regional development plans
technologies) and building (heating, cooling and – Climate change risks and opportunities
insulation products). should be a key consideration when
development strategies and plans are
A ‘TRIPLE DIVIDEND’ FROM produced. It’s important to bring scientific
BUILDING MORE RESILIENT and economic understanding together to
COMMUNITIES develop a bottom-up picture of the potential
impacts on large employers and key sectors,
Much of our built environment and and of how businesses are responding to
productive sectors are in vulnerable locations, climate-related challenges.
including coastal areas and flood plains.
Not all communities have the same capacity
to adapt, and socially and economically
disadvantaged communities are among the
most vulnerable.

24 MAHI TAHI 2019


CLIMATE CHANGE

#2 Take early action to build resilience in the face A KEY ECONOMIC DRIVER
of risks to the built environment and infrastructure FOR THE NEXT 30 YEARS
– Many communities on the coast and in low-
lying areas will face significant challenges and hard Climate change is a planetary-scale issue and
choices, including managed retreat. Infrastructure despite New Zealand’s relatively small contribution
will also come under significant pressure in certain to it, the physical impacts of climate change
areas from rising sea levels and extreme weather. and the policy response will have significant
It’s important to anticipate these challenges and implications for our country over the next 30 years
put processes in place for building resilience and at least.
addressing these risks. Along with demographic changes, and
#3 Catalyse change in our cities – In urban areas, technological changes shaping the future of work,
local government can play a role in catalysing a we can also expect climate change to be one of the
transformation to low-emissions transport, for major drivers of New Zealand’s economic strategy
example by ensuring there is adequate EV charging for decades to come, with significant consequences
infrastructure and by accelerating the electrification for jobs, incomes and livelihoods. This is a
of public transport. challenge and an opportunity that our regions
#4 Enable low-cost renewable electricity and clean need to respond to with early and energetic action.
energy projects – In some parts of the country,
councils and EDAs will have opportunities Nick Davis, Director, MartinJenkins
to support and enable investment in low-cost
renewable energy, and to work with large industrial 25MAHI TAHI 2019
manufacturers to explore alternatives to fossil-fuel
sources for process heat.
#5 Enable land use change to support more
sustainable land use and reduction of agricultural
emissions – The agricultural sector faces big
challenges but there is much they can do to improve
their emissions profiles – through good farm
management practices, through smart decisions
about alternative land use, and through offsetting.
This will require significant behavioural change in
the sector, and that needs to be supported.
#6 Provide targeted support to communities to
ensure a just transition – And finally, there will be
some communities that may potentially be hard-hit
and need support to transition, including workers
who may need retraining and businesses who need


SMART + CONNECTED

Winner of the Premier Award for best practice - Marlborough District Council

SMART +
CONNECTED
ECONOMIC AND
COMMUNITY
DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMME

26 MAHI TAHI 2019


SMART + CONNECTED

A Marlborough organisation’s “can-do” approach to “They struck me because they have shown results, it’s
about forming to performing,” Ford said.
economic and community development has won national “The conference has been about inclusive growth, about
recognition. deep collaboration.”
Marlborough Smart+Connected was awarded the She said a lot of the messages at the conference had been
Economic Development New Zealand (EDNZ) Best looking after people’s social wellbeing as well as income
Practice Award for Inclusive Growth at the EDNZ quality and economic growth.
conference in Blenheim on Saturday. “Inclusive growth is a contested term, and inclusive
Smart+Connected labour and skills steering group growth is challenging to deliver,” she said.
chairman Vance Kerslake and Marlborough District “The Marlborough Smart+Connected programme
Council’s small township’s community advisor Adi James was seen as an early adopter of two critical elements of
shared the group’s vision as part of the “Marlborough contemporary economic development theory – first, a
story” to the conference on Friday. focus on environmental, social and governance (ESG)
The pair outlined the group’s economic and community outcomes as well as economic objectives; and second a
development programme, which after starting up in 2012, focus on inclusivity and participation by industries and
now had nine groups and 25 working groups active in the communities in structured co-design processes.”
community. C​ ouncil strategic planning and economic development
“The Marlborough smart and connected vision is of a manager Neil Henry said the award was “fantastically
globally connected district of smart, progressive high pleasing”.
value and pride, known for economic efficiency, quality “One of the things this conference has reminded me is
lifestyle and wellbeing, care and community and desirable how long you’ve got to work at things,” Henry said.
location and a healthy, natural environment,” she said. “The smart part of Smart+Connected is getting locals
“As you can tell from that vision, we want it all.” who know things, the strategy comes from the people
She said that vision had also been adopted by the that are already here.” To learn more on the Smart+
Marlborough District Council which was “an interesting Connected programme contact Neil Henry on neil.
connection”. [email protected]
The council’s role was to bring the groups together and
provide funds for an independent facilitation process.
Kerslake and James presented the various challenges
Marlborough has faced - including labour, skills and
housing shortages.
Marlborough Smart+Connected groups have about 200
members who meet once a month to collaborate and
discuss community issues and solutions.
“The best thing about it is we’re an open door, everyone is
welcome,” Kerslake said at the presentation.
Economic Development chairperson Pam Ford said
Marlborough Smart+Connected was the perfect recipient
for the award.

27MAHI TAHI 2019


NELSON TASMAN INNOVATION

Winner of the Award for best practice for collaboration: Nelson Tasman Innovation Neighbourhood: From left to right Kerry Topp
(Datacom), Hannah Norton (NRDA), Mark Rawson (NRDA) and Pam Ford, Chair of EDNZ

NELSON TASMAN
INNOVATION
NEIGHBOURHOOD

28 MAHI TAHI 2019


NELSON TASMAN INNOVATION

Hannah Norton, Destination Identity Manager, Nelson Regional Development Agency

Nelson Regional Development Agency (NRDA), in To date this has included a range of research, marketing,
intern and graduate programmes over the year.”
partnership with Datacom, was awarded the Best Practice
Award for Collaboration. Rawson said it was “humbling” to be recognised with the
The NRDA won the award on behalf of the Nelson award when the group was “only at the beginning”. For
Tasman Innovation Neighbourhood (NTIN), a group of more information contact Hannah Norton on hannah.
organisations that came together to collectively handle [email protected]
common issues and find common opportunities.
NRDA chief executive Mark Rawson said the NTIN was THE GROUP IS AN EXAMPLE OF HOW
“a different style of collaboration” and it was the first time PARTNERSHIPS BASED ON HIGH
it had been used in the Nelson Tasman region. LEVELS OF TRUST, A LONG TERM
“NTIN has aligned a common vision and strategy not just COMMITMENT AND THE ‘BETTER
for their own neighbourhood but for the region,” he said. TOGETHER’ PRINCIPLE CAN ACHIEVE
“They have gone straight to the heart of addressing one of REMARKABLE THINGS,” SAID PAM
the biggest issues for our businesses and our community FORD, CHAIR OF EDNZ.
– talent attraction and retention – and have proven that
through collaboration results can be delivered quickly.

29MAHI TAHI 2019


MY NEXT MOVE

MY NEXT MOVE

Nigel Davenport, CEO of Aoraki Development, Pam Ford, Chair of EDNZ, Mark Rawson, Deputy Chair of EDNZ

Aoraki Development’s My Next Move programme “With the Timaru District unemployment figures at
record lows – currently sitting at 2.3 per cent there’s
was among 10 recognised in Blenheim at the Economic a big flow-on effect to our businesses as they struggle
Development New Zealand (EDNZ) Best Practise to find skilled staff to fill positions and keep their
Awards for its contributions to the wellbeing and the businesses growing,” Davenport said.
prosperity of its communities. “We’ve been targeting youth as one of the key age groups
The initiative, launched in Timaru District, aims to help that can have a significant impact on employment in
address the skills shortage in the area by finding new this region. To do this, we have needed to show the
and innovative ways for businesses and school students young people what is going on in our businesses, de-
to interact with each other, Aoraki Development chief mystify the workplaces and encourage them to look at
executive Nigel Davenport said. career pathways that lead into our industries in South
Canterbury. This is what makes up the My Next Move
30 MAHI TAHI 2019 Youth Initiative.”


MY NEXT MOVE

MY NEXT MOVE, CREATED BY AORAKI DEVELOPMENT
IN TIMARU, IS A GROUND-BREAKING SOLUTION TO A
PERENNIAL PROBLEM IN PROVINCIAL NEW ZEALAND,” SAID
PAM FORD, CHAIR OF EDNZ.

Davenport said for the year to June 30, 2019, “Students are expressing excitement when they
discover new pathway options that they have never
5736 interactions between students and local heard of before.
businesses took place. This was 79 more than the 4815 “Students are also more easily able to recognise the
in the first year of the initiative. link between what they learn in school and how they
“Whilst as the facilitator of the My Next Move can use that knowledge and skills in the future,” Shaw
initiative we are thrilled with the recognition, the said.
award is really a testament to the commitment and EDNZ chairperson Pam Ford, said many rural regions
enthusiasm of our wider community. struggled to retain their youth after secondary school
“Local business and industry, careers advisors, schools and this created problems for employers keen to
and local organisations have all come together to recruit locally.
do all they can to help inform the next generation “My Next Move, created by Aoraki Development in
on their career pathways and further education Timaru, is a ground-breaking solution to a perennial
opportunities.” problem in provincial New Zealand.
He said Aoraki Development’s focus in the “My Next Move is a shining example of how that
programme fell first and foremost on the needs of the exodus can be arrested through a strong focus,
students. information sharing and building bridges between
“The success is based on the commitment of the wider school leavers and employers. It is admired around
community on doing the right thing for our next the country and is a best practice approach that
generation, ensuring they are as informed as possible deserves to be highlighted and rewarded.”
when making their important next move decision on For more information on ‘My Next Move’ contact
career pathways and further education opportunities. Nigel Davenport at [email protected]
“We at AD are also elated that MyNextMove is also
the initiative on which the new nationwide education
to employment brokerage service, announced recently
by Minister Hipkins, will be based on.”

Opihi College careers advisor and president of the
South Canterbury Careers Transition Educators
Group, Jo Shaw, said success stories from the initiative
include students being offered work experience,
apprenticeships, and part-time/full-time employment.

31MAHI TAHI 2019


MANAWATŪ AGRITECH STRATEGY

MANAWATŪ
AGRITECH
STRATEGY

The Manawatū Agritech Strategy, created CEDA Business Development Manager, John Morris, CEDA CEO, Linda Stewart

in partnership between the Central Economic “Having the Manawatū Agritech Strategy recognised
Development Agency (CEDA) and Sprout, has won for integrated planning is a testament to the leadership,
the Best Practice Award for Integrated Planning at people and organisations in the region who were
Economic Development New Zealand’s annual Best involved in its creation. This is a win for all of us,” says
Practice Awards. CEDA’s Chief Executive Linda Stewart.
The award was presented at the Economic Agritech was recognised as a strength and point of
Development New Zealand Annual Conference difference for the region through CEDA’s work with
in Blenheim at the weekend, which was focused McKinsey & Company in 2017, given the cluster of
on the theme, ‘Delivering Inclusive Growth.’ Ten businesses and organisations that are based in Manawatū.
organisations were recognised in the awards for These include Massey University, UCOL, FoodHQ,
their outstanding contribution to the wellbeing and the crown research institutes AgResearch, Plant and
prosperity of their communities. Food Research, and the Ridddet Institute, Fonterra
Research and Development Centre, Sprout, and now
the Rural Innovation Lab. Representatives from all these
organisations and more, including iwi and Māori, were
involved in the creation of the strategy.

32 MAHI TAHI 2019


MANAWATŪ AGRITECH STRATEGY

SUCCESS AND
SUSTAINABLE ED BUILDS
ON THE STRENGTH
OF A REGION AND
ITS COMPARATIVE
AND COMPETITIVE
ADVANTAGES,” SAID
LINDA STEWART, CEO OF
CEDA.

t, EDNZ Chair Pam Ford, Deputy Chair Mark Rawson.

“Successful and sustainable economic development “Agritech has emerged as a strong point of difference for
builds on the strength of a region and its comparative the Manawatū region. CEDA and Sprout have built on that
and competitive advantages. This strategy, and those difference to create an agritech cluster strategy that achieves
involved in its creation, demonstrate collective a virtuous dynamic cycle of attracting top academics,
commitment to all playing a part in creating growth, researchers, students, venture capitalists, and businesses.
expansion and investment opportunities, and quality The judges were impressed by the high level of integration
well-paying jobs that offer training and career pathways evident and said it was a great example of good practice,”
in Manawatū and beyond.” Ms Ford said.
Economic Development New Zealand’s Chairperson For more information contact Linda Stewart (linda.stew-
and Awards Judge Pam Ford says the award winners [email protected])
reflect the importance of an inclusive approach and
have been honoured for initiatives which have had a real
and positive impact on the wellbeing and prosperity of
communities and regions.

33MAHI TAHI 2019


VENTURE TARANAKI WINS TWO AWARDS

VENTURE TARANAKI
PICKS UP TWO
AWARDS

Justine Gilliland, CEO of Venture Taranaki, Mark Rawson, Deputy Chair of EDNZ, Pam Ford, Chair of EDNZ

Venture Taranaki received two of the assist exporting enterprises. The project came
about when a search for existing accurate local
ten awards handed out to New Zealand’s data proved fruitless. Venture Taranaki took up the
leading practitioners of regional and economic challenge and conducted a comprehensive survey
development, with a Best Practice Award for of local exporters and presented a range of both
Primary Research for the Export Taranaki project focused and generalised insights to businesses to
and a Commendation for Integrated Planning for help them assess and leverage export opportunities.
the H2 Taranaki Roadmap. On the back of this data, a network has been
Export Taranaki is a Venture Taranaki initiative developed with training, knowledge sharing, and
aimed at better understanding our region’s export events provided to help the region’s exporters grow
landscape and using this information to better their international markets and volumes.

34 MAHI TAHI 2019


VENTURE TARANAKI WINS TWO AWARDS

THERE WAS A SIGNIFICANT GAP IN USEABLE AND
ACCURATE DATA ABOUT OUR EXPORTERS AND EXPORT
ACTIVITY. THE EXPORT TARANAKI PROJECT, FILLED
THAT GAP,” SAID JUSTINE GILLILAND, CEO OF VENTURE
TARANAKI.

Justine Gilliland, CEO, Zara Ryan (Senior Business Adviser), Michelle Jordan (GM Business Partnerships and Skills.

The Awards panel saw great value and timeliness economy, grow.

in the original research undertaken by Venture “There was a significant gap in usable and accurate
Taranaki in its efforts to better understand its region’s data about our exporters and export activity. As
export landscape,” said EDNZ Chair Pam Ford. we look to grow the value of our exports, Venture
“In awarding Venture Taranaki the Best Practise Taranaki conceived and undertook a significant
Award for Primary Research, the panel was keen to project over the last year to fill this gap,” Justine says.
showcase it as an initiative worthy of duplication
across New Zealand” “The research we have undertaken has provided us,
Venture Taranaki Chief Executive Justine Gilliland and our exporters, with detailed data on regional
has welcomed the award, saying the project’s outcome export activity. The information is collected, collated
will help Taranaki exporters, and the regional and analysed, and presented in a graphic format to
ensure it is easily utilised.”
35MAHI TAHI 2019


VENTURE TARANAKI WINS TWO AWARDS

On the back of that insight we’ve established a launched by Prime Minister Rt Hon Jacinda Ardern in
New Plymouth on 14 March this year.
range of programmes to work with our existing and new “New Zealand is moving to a low-emissions future, and
exporting enterprises to upskill, collaborate and elevate we needed to look at a wide range of options to support
their export activity,” Justine said. that transition,” Justine said.
Venture Taranaki’s development of the H2 Taranaki “As a region, we expect the global energy landscape
Roadmap – the plan for hydrogen to play a key role to change, and we want to be part of that change.
in the region’s new energy future – also picked up a The H2 Taranaki Roadmap is part of a plan to help
commendation in the Integrated Planning category. ensure Taranaki’s skills, experience, knowledge and
“The H2 Taranaki Roadmap is an exemplar of a proactive infrastructure can maximise the opportunities this
work by the local RDA to explore new opportunities for transition provides.”
its regional economy,” Pam said. “The Roadmap set out a range of initiatives that could
“The roadmap is a tool that will prove invaluable as New see hydrogen developed as a viable energy source, and a
Zealand’s economy transitions to a low-emissions future. number of projects have already been announced in this
The Awards Panel was impressed with the innovation space.”
and integration underlying this initiative and felt that it “These awards demonstrate the value that Venture
was deserved of a commendation.” Taranaki is delivering for the region’s enterprises and
The H2 Taranaki Roadmap was developed by Venture residents and reinforce the agency’s position at the
Taranaki in partnership with Hiringa Energy and New forefront of regional development in New Zealand,”
Plymouth District Council, with support from the Justine said. For more information on either initiative
Provincial Growth Fund, and contact Justine Gilliland on ([email protected])

36 MAHI TAHI 2019


PAUL CASSON WINS
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE
AWARD

Former Venture Southland chief executive Paul Pam Ford, Paul Casson, Mark Rawson

Casson received Economic Development NZ’s premier Nominated by his peers, Paul had won the attention of
individual honour. the judges because of his strong, dedicated and tangible
Casson was chief executive at Venture Southland in commitment to economic development in his role with
Invercargill for seven years, then in June took up a new Venture Southland and his leadership role with EDNZ,
role in Dunedin as lower South Island executive manager Ford said.
for Oranga Tamariki (the Ministry of Children). As deputy chairperson he had worked in “a thoughtful,
The distinguished service award recognised his committed and energetic manner that has made a crucial
“immense” contribution to the image and practice of difference to the development of the organisation”.
economic development, EDNZ chairperson Pam Ford “He has been tireless in his roles, has provided leadership
said. in shaping the future of EDNZ and, most importantly,
has been a stalwart in securing and championing the
organisation’s survival during challenging times.”

37MAHI TAHI 2019


GRID AKL INNOVATION LABS

GRID AKL
INNOVATION
LABS

Creating innovations to solve complex city- GridAKL Innovation Labs is a joint initiative between
GridAKL and Innovate Auckland, the respective
scale problems has seen Auckland secure national innovation teams from Auckland Tourism, Events
recognition at the 2019 Economic Development New and Economic Development (ATEED) and Auckland
Zealand (EDNZ) awards. Council.
GridAKL Innovation Labs won the EDNZ Best The labs are made up of two physical spaces, Hatchbox
Practice Award for Innovation, while Go with Tourism and the Pop-Up Incubator, within the Madden St and
– a game-changing job matching platform now being Lysaght buildings of the GridAKL innovation campus
rolled out nationally – earned a commendation in the in Wynyard Quarter. The adaptable and flexible spaces,
same category. operated by ATEED’s GridAKL team, are designed
Mayor Phil Goff says Auckland Council and its to encourage creativity and collaboration. Auckland
economic development agency are leading the Council’s Innovate Auckland teams bring their
charge on how a city can be smarter about tackling expertise, skills and technological know-how to run
urban challenges. cross-agency workshops.
Together they provide neutral ground and collabora-
IT’S INITIATIVES LIKE THIS THAT tive opportunities for government, businesses, aca-
HELP POSITION AUCKLAND AS A demia and communities to develop ideas that address
MAJOR HUB FOR INNOVATION IN some of Auckland’s complex urban, economic, and
ASIA-PACIFIC AND ESTALISH US sustainability challenges.
AS A PLACE WHERE INNOVATIVE, Projects the labs tackle include Auckland’s real-time
WORLD-LEADING IDEAS ARE swimming conditions and water quality Safe Swim
CREATED, USING NEW AND website; how to use city-wide data better in deci-
EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES. sion-making and safeguard Aucklanders’ data and
privacy in the Smarter Cities project; technological
38 MAHI TAHI 2019 and sustainability improvements to farming and food
production practices; and climate action planning.
Mark Rawson, EDNZ awards judge and Nelson
Regional Development Agency Chief Executive says
GridAKL Innovation Labs is an extraordinary example
of an economic development agency fulfilling its role
as an instigator of long-term systemic change where
there is market failure, in this case in the innovation
ecosystem.


GO WITH TOURISM

From Left to Right: GridAKL Innovation Labs team: Catriona Stewart, Marissa Brindley, ATEED, Mark Rawson, Deputy Chair of

AEDNZ, Pam Ford, Chair of EDNZ
TEED’s game-changing online
job-connector platform Go with
Tourism received a commendation
in the same category from the EDNZ
judges.

Go with Tourism was developed in
partnership with Tourism Industry
Aotearoa (TIA) in response to a sector
experiencing significant skills shortages
(an estimated 40,000 new tourism
workers needed by 2025).

It was a key project to emerge from From Left to Right: Go with Tourism team, Hannah Norton and Melissa Hall, ATEED, Mark
Auckland’s Destination AKL 2025 Rawson, Deputy Chair of EDNZ, Pam Ford, Chair of EDNZ
visitor economy strategy which
launched in 2018.

The initiative has since secured $5.2 39MAHI TAHI 2019
million from the Government’s new
International Visitor Conservation
and Tourism Levy (IVL) to expand
the platform into a wider national
programme of activity to build the
nationwide tourism workforce.


KAI ORA FUND

Winner of a commendation for inclusive growth, Northland Inc’s Joseph Stuart

KAI ORA FUND

THE MOST EXCITING THING ABOUT THE PROJECT
IS THAT BY IDENTIFYING, CONNECTING AND
SUPPORTING THOSE LEADERS, WE ARE CREATING
SOMETHING PRECIOUS – SOMETHING THAT HAS
SO MUCH POTENTIAL FOR FUTURE GROWTH AND
SYNERGY. ALREADY WE ARE STARTING TO SEE GREAT
THINGS HAPPEN. SAID JOSEPH STUART

.

40 MAHI TAHI 2019


KAI ORA

The Kai Ora Fund – an initiative supporting projects Since its inception in 2015, 92 projects have been
supported through the fund. This year 37 new projects
that enable people to grow and eat nutritious, sustainably- have been funded, with 33 projects led by Māori
grown local food in Northland – has been rewarded with communities and whānau, resulting in an investment of
the Commendation for Inclusive Growth at the Economic just under $80,000 this year in hapori Māori.
Development New Zealand 2019 Best Practice Awards.

“The Kai Ora initiative has been recognised for its Tui Marsh, Regional Manager Te Puni Kōkiri, has been
inclusive approach to the provision of sustainable, fresh delighted by the quality and progress of this year’s
and healthy food-produce to those communities within applications. “It’s so exciting to see the aspirations and
Northland that are suffering from higher deprivation,” energy in the community around growing food,” she said.
said Pam Ford, chair of Economic Development New “It is a privilege to work with groups who want to make a
Zealand (EDNZ), at the gala awards dinner in Blenheim difference for their wider whānau and community. Many
over the weekend. of these projects will have a lasting impact on whānau
“The initiative has been community-led and driven – a around Tai Tokerau.”
prerequisite for good practice inclusive growth. The high The Kai Ora Fund identifies and embraces seven key
level of community collaboration forged as a result of priorities: a focus on projects that increase the availability
the initiative, and its focus on sustainability, impressed of healthy food; the growth of economic prosperity
members of the awards panel who wished to showcase it in Northland; resilience in times of emergency or
as an exemplar of its kind.” vulnerability; connecting people who are passionate
The fund is a flourishing partnership between Te Tai about sustainable local food; having a community-
Tokerau Primary Health Organisation, Manaia Health led approach; the ability to try new ideas; and the
PHO (now collectively Mahitahi Hauora), the Far North improvement and wellbeing of groups and communities
District Council, Whangārei District Council, Kaipara that are most vulnerable.
District Council, Te Puni Kōkiri, Northland District Stuart added: “The fund is rebuilding strength in local
Health Board, and Northland Inc, the regional economic communities and encouraging as many people as possible
development agency. to contribute to and to benefit from growth. Through
The partnership supports projects that increase access for this, we have identified and supported many leaders in
Northland communities to an affordable, safe food supply our local communities who are passionate about food,
for current and future generations. By empowering sustainability and health.
communities to take action to work towards greater food “The most exciting thing about the project is that by
security, the fund is also enabling people to improve and identifying, connecting and supporting those leaders, we
increase control over their health. are creating something precious – something that has so
“The beauty of the Kai Ora Fund is that the dynamics of much potential for future growth and synergy. Already
it are boundless,” said Joseph Stuart, General Manager, we are starting to see great things happen.”
Business Innovation and Growth at Northland Inc, one of To learn more about the Kai Ora Fund contact Joseph on
the driving forces behind the initiative. [email protected]

“It is a great example of how, on one hand, a partnership
like this supports and benefits a community and helps
to reframe it; on the other, it demonstrates just what a
community can achieve by working together and looking
forward with optimism. The initiative succeeds so well
because it brings together both sides of the fence.”

41MAHI TAHI 2019


WHAT WILL YOU LEARN IN 2020

WHAT WILL YOU
LEARN IN 2020?

The first cohort of AcED Graduates passed with flying colours and were celebrated at the Gala Awards Dinner held

in Blenheim as part of the annual EDNZ conference: From left to right: Mark Rawson, Deputy Chair EDNZ, Pam Ford,

Chair of EDNZ, Rebecca Jenks, Mary Jensen, Gerard Quinn, Joseph Stuart, Peter Harris, Miles Dalton, Toka Teinaki
Amidst the glitz and
In speaking on behalf of THIS IS WONDERFUL NEWS, THANK
glamour of the annual all graduates Ceri told
Gala Awards dinner our of her reaction to advice
community celebrated that she had achieved the YOU SO MUCH. I OPENED THE EMAIL
AcED.
the first nine learners to DURING ANOTHER MEETING AND HAVE
complete the Accredited HAD TO CONTAIN MY EXCITEMENT
Economic Developers
qualification.
ALL AFTERNOON! I’M ABSOLUTELY

DELIGHTED,” - CERI MACLEOD

42 MAHI TAHI 2019


WHAT WILL YOU LEARN IN 2020?

EDNZ’S 2020 CONTINUOUS PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMME IS THE MOST AFFORDABLE, QUALITY
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT LEARNING THAT WILL EVER
HAPPEN IN AOTEAROA, WHAT WILL YOU LEARN IN 2020?

Ceri Macleod, also one of the first cohort of graduates spoke on behalf of all graduates

Congratulations to all - we ED for elected representatives; You can check out all
look forward to celebrating the Putting professional into prac- of the new and existing
achievements of a larger cohort tice; and Economic Gardening. courses that will be
of graduates in 2020. Remember if you are a member presented in a place near
If you haven’t joined the World of EDNZ the cost of a course you in 2020 by clicking
of Learning yet you won’t have reduces by between 30-50%. on this link.
seen the many new courses on
offer in 2020, including: Becoming a member can cost
Trade and Investment; From as little as $380 per annum.
monitoring to evaluation; Read more ...
Engaging with Maori;

43MAHI TAHI 2019


ATTRACTING DIGITAL TALENT

New Zealand businesses are feeling the squeeze for talent. As

our economy continues to grow, and the unemployment rate

hovers at 4 %, the limited availability of capable, digitally-fit

talent is a growing handbrake on regional growth.
In this article, Kerry Topp, associate
• the latest research from Southern
director of Transformation & Cross shows that workplace stress
Innovation at NZ - owned technology has risen 23.5 per cent in the last
services company, Datacom, shows two years, and
how regional businesses can harness
the power of collaboration to compete
and win against big cities in the war on • another survey, this time by Korn
talent. Ferry Institute, showed 76 per cent
of respondents said that stress at
work harmed their relationships, 66
If we look at the New Zealand workforce per cent of respondents said they
as a whole, we are seeing some interesting lost sleep due to workplace stress,
trends;
and 16 per cent said they had to
• a 2018 report on staff turnover in leave their jobs due to stress.
New Zealand by Lawson Williams
shows voluntary employee Regional businesses should be reading
turnover is over 17 per cent, this and thinking one thing: what an

44 MAHI TAHI 2019


ATTRACTING DIGITAL TALENT

HOW
REGIONAL
BUSINESSES
CAN ATTRACT
DIGITAL
TALENT

Kerry Topp, Associate Director of Transformation & Innovation, Datacom

The regions are booming with 14 out of 15 Secondly, and most challenging for regions
regions’ GDP increasing for FY 2018. So, in our view, is the perception by candidates
how might regions compete with the big that if things go wrong with one employer
cities and create opportunities to appeal to they’ll have no ‘Plan B’ in a role within a re-
capable, digitally-fit and future-ready talent? gional business. The risk of up-rooting family
for one job in a region where you are not well
WHY AREN’T MORE PEOPLE connected is off-putting for many.
CONSIDERING REGIONS? The key challenge we see regional businesses
need to overcome is to show candidates that
Research by the Nelson Tasman Innovation there are options for them if things were not
Neighbourhood (NTIN) indicates that the to work out with the company that brings
concept of “sunshine wages” is holding back them into the region.
regional talent attraction and growth. Rather Fighting the war for talent as a solo
than paying market rates, regional centres business can only get you so far, and can
rely on employees moving there for the leave companies in a constant cycle of
lifestyle - for the sunshine - and pay less as a interviewing lukewarm candidates with low
result. offer acceptance rates. Business leaders need
Skilled employees who are in short supply to present a united front and promote the
nationally need to achieve pay parity at least, region, the businesses and the roles available
acknowledging the expertise they bring to to the world. The appearance of actual
the table. The advice from the report was to options is critical.
focus on the overall package, including the
benefits and things like flexi-working.

45MAHI TAHI 2019


ATTRACTING DIGITAL TALENT Centre of NZ viewpoint, Nelson City

LET’S LOOK AT THE The collective impact that NTIN businesses working
NELSON TASMAN · Having the key companies in the region (thr
REGION FOR A
VIEW ON HOW their principal business challenge. This mand
SOME REGIONAL with a higher level of impact than otherwise
BUSINESS LEADERS · This focus enabled research to be commissio
ARE WORKING employee perspective. The results provided d
COLLABORATIVELY talent attraction and retention programme w
TO PROMOTE THEIR · NTIN aligns with the Nelson Tasman region
COMBINED IDENTITY It is an authentic representation of the region
to engage, share and spread the story of Nels
NTIN is an excellent example of how business leaders can allowed it to be strengthened, anchored and
· NTIN has developed a shared Summer Inter
come together to solve their region’s most significant issues. critical challenge for the region and by gettin
NTIN was founded in 2018, and led by Datacom with support NTIN was able to gain trust quickly and show
from the Nelson Regional Development Agency (NRDA). • Individually, Nelson Tasman businesses find
working together they have been able to crea
NTIN is a cross-sector collaboration of non-competing collaboration has created a point of differenc
organisations. Its members include a range of businesses (who and joint projects. The first interns programm
together contribute 30-40% of the region’s GDP), education and programme is planned for 2019/20 and grad
the Regional Economic Eevelopment Agency. The founding (those beyond NTIN members).
members are: New Zealand King Salmon, Sealord Group,
Intepeople, Nelson Regional Development Agency (NRDA),
Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology (NMIT), Wakatū
Incorporation, Datacom, Pic’s Peanut Butter and Cawthron
Institute.

How might regional leaders
work together to attract
a greater pool of talent
collectively, to benefit
individually?

46 MAHI TAHI 2019


ATTRACTING DIGITAL TALENT

Innovative Placement Through
Collaboration

g together have unlocked to date include: Sometimes there is more than one way to approach
rough NTIN) being focused on talent attraction and retention as recruitment, such as this innovative ‘win-win’ for a
date created a focus for NRDA and enabled them to drive activity recent placement that evolved between three Nelson
possible. Tasman Innovation Neighbourhood companies - Pic’s
oned to understand the challenge from both an employer and Peanut Butter, SeaDragon and Interpeople.
direction for the development of an employer-owned regional Pic’s Peanut Butter and SeaDragon both needed an
which the NRDA will implement over the next year. implementation manager and Interpeople found Tim
nal identity, the development of which was led by the NRDA. Ward, who specialises in lean implementation. Tim is
n and what it wants to be and includes a range of tools for people very experienced and an ideal fit for either company -
son Tasman more readily. NTIN’s support of the identity has also but now shares his time between the two.
amplified within the broader business community. It’s a great example of two businesses thinking cleverly
rn and Graduate Programme. Talent attraction and retention is a and partnering in an innovative way to access a
ng some practical runs on the board and having some shared wins permanent senior skillset – without a full-time cost
w the value of collaborating. outlay.
d it challenging to compete with larger national employers. By The key message I’d like to leave with regions is
ate programmes which provide significant benefits. The that regional businesses can harness the power of
ce for interns and grads, who are exposed to a range of businesses collaboration to compete and win against big cities
me rated their experience on average as 9.43/10. The second intern in the war on talent. They can do this by being better
duates for 2020, with a broader scope of organisations taking part together.
If you’d like more information, you can find more
details on NTIN in Kerry Topp & NRDA’s Hannah
Norton’s LinkedIn blog entitled, “The Collective Impact
of Community Working ‘Better Together”.

NTIN IS AN EXCELLENT EXAMPLE
OF HOW BUSINESS
LEADERS CAN COME TOGETHER
TO SOLVE THEIR
REGION’S MOST SIGNIFICANT
ISSUES.

47MAHI TAHI 2019


48 MAHI TAHI 2019


TARANAKI 2050 ROADMAP

The Taranaki 2050 Roadmap is a vision Children of the ????
for Taranaki in 2050 with a low-emissions
economy. As a result, Taranaki is the first
region internationally to use a co-design
approach to create a Roadmap to transition
to a low-emissions economy.

Hon. Megan Woods said of the project “I
truly believe the Taranaki 2050 work is
world-leading” (National Just Transition
Summit, 9 May 2019).
The Taranaki 2050 Roadmap illustrated
above is a picture, but it is also a 46-page
report, and while it focuses on Taranaki, it
also considers how the rest of New Zealand
will be taken along on the journey to a
low-emissions future. The Roadmap and
its co-design process also offers significant
opportunities for other regions to leverage
when planning their own transition.

A JUST TRANSITION IS ABOUT MANAGING
THESE EFFECTS TO CONTINUE TO BUILD A
FAIR AND INCLUSIVE NEW ZEALAND.

The Taranaki 2050 Roadmap was the
culmination of over 70 workshops
and consultation sessions around
the community and gathered ideas
from thousands of organisations and
individuals around the region. The
workshops mixed the diversity and
talent of the region with specialist
expertise from around the country
and a variety of online, event and
street surveys also took place to
gather peoples’ views.

Justine Gilliland, CEO of Venture Taranaki, Hon Prime Minister, Jacinda Ardern, ????

49MAHI TAHI 2019


TARANAKI 2050 ROADMAP To ensure transparency and inclusivity, outputs
from all workshops were scanned and put online
During the sessions, discussion topics before analysts at Ministry of Business, Innovation
and Employment (MBIE) worked through
included peoples’ vision for Taranaki, what is extracting key themes and ideas.
unique about Taranaki, the major challenges Since the Roadmap has been finalised, 12
ahead and what we need to do to move forward transition pathway action plans are being
towards a low-emissions economy. The ideas and developed progressively to mid-2020 and will
visions of Taranaki youth were captured through a be published sequentially. These action plans
creative challenge, launched by the Prime Minister, articulate the short-term actions and medium-
and a targeted youth workshop – attended by term strategy to meet the long-term goals of
representatives from 11 of 13 Taranaki high Taranaki 2050. For more information,
schools. visit www.Taranaki2050.org.nz.

Paul Casson, receiving the Distinguished Service Award

50 MAHI TAHI 2019


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