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Published by GNRF, 2018-01-18 19:34:04

GNRF 2015/2016 Annual Report

GNRF_Annual_Report_2015-2016

2015-2016 Annual Report


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Letter From the Chair ................................................................................................................... 2
Board of Directors ....................................................................................................................... 3
2015-2016 Balance Sheet ....................................................................................................... 5
Projects Funded in 2015 ....................................................................................................... 7-14

State Parks & Historic Sites ......................................................................................................................... 7
Coastal Resources Division ..................................................................................................................... 8-9
Law Enforcement Division .................................................................................................................... 9-10
Historic Preservation Division .......................................................................................................... 11-12
Wildlife Resources Division ............................................................................................................... 13-14

Projects Funded in 2016 ................................................................................................... 16-20

State Parks & Historic Sites ...................................................................................................................... 16
Coastal Resources Division ..................................................................................................................... 17
Law Enforcement Division ......................................................................................................................... 17
Historic Preservation Division ............................................................................................................. 18-19
Wildlife Resources Division ................................................................................................................. 19-20

Division Contacts ....................................................................................................................... 22
Special Events ..................................................................................................................... 16-17

Weekend for Wildlife ............................................................................................................................... 16
Annual Donor Appreciation Reception ................................................................................................ 17

2015-2016 Donors .............................................................................................................. 25-27


LETTER FROM THE CHAIR

Dear Friends:

It has been an exciting and dynamic year at the Georgia Natural Resources
Foundation (GNRF). On behalf of the board of directors and staff, I offer sincere
appreciation to our many contributors and supporters. The GNRF’s success this
past fiscal year is rooted in a strong and growing network of donors, volunteers,
and an enthusiastic constituency of Department of Natural Resources staff, who
implement the vital programming which the GNRF supports. We are fortunate to
have so many partners to thank this year.

Created in 2010, the GNRF is a Georgia non-profit corporation that supports the work of the Georgia Department of
Natural Resources (DNR) with funds raised through private individuals and corporate sponsors. The GNRF awards these
funds directly to divisions within the DNR through its directed giving, grant awards, and scholarship programs. Since its
inception, the GNRF has awarded grants and directed giving dollars exceeding over $1,000,000 to DNR programs and
initiatives. These charitable dollars inhere to the direct benefit of all of Georgia’s citizens, corporations and visitors, by
helping to preserve Georgia’s natural, cultural and historic resources.

Our board of directors presents directed gifts and awards program grants biannually. Program grants are awarded upon
recommendations made by the board’s programs & grants committee, with input from the Director of the DNR. This
past year, the GNRF awarded grants to the State Parks, Recreation & Historic Sites Division (PRHSD), Wildlife Resources
Division (WRD), Coastal Resources Division (CRD), Historic Preservation Division (HPD), and the Law Enforcement Division
(LED). These grants provided vital resources for important initiatives ranging from providing support to enlist a new K-9
officer, to helping restore Georgia’s oyster reef and living shoreline, to underwriting Historic Preservation publications,
to aiding the installment of a universal access trail at Smithgall Woods State Park. Some of the projects funded are the
first of their kind. With this support from the GNRF, the Georgia DNR continues to lead the way with innovative systems
and cutting-edge technology to ensure Georgia remains a leader in natural resource preservation and environmental
stewardship.

As we move forward through 2017 and beyond, I am proud of what the Georgia Natural Resources Foundation has
accomplished and am excited for its future. We have withstood the challenges associated with launching a new
charitable foundation and emerged as a strong and vibrant partner of the DNR. In its short history, the GNRF community
has successfully increased fundraising by over 32% each year, and for us, this is just the beginning. I am pleased to
present our 2015-2016 Annual Report in order provide you, our supporters, with an update on the good works that your
charitable giving has accomplished.

Yours in stewardship,

Amy L. Hillman
Georgia Natural Resources Foundation Chair, 2015-2016

Page 2


2015-2016 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

The men and women who comprise the Georgia Natural Resources Foundation Board includes a diverse
cross section of volunteers who are dedicated to the preservation of Georgia’s natural, cultural, and
environmental resources.

Amy Hillman Ross King Mike Clanton Glen Wilkins
Chairwoman Vice-Chairman Secretary/Treasurer Immediate Past

Chairman

Philip Wilheit, Jr. Rob Leebern, Jr. Robert Brown, Jr. Steve Levetan

Sara Clark Bill Jones, III Jeff Foxworthy Dr. J. David Allen
Chairman Emeritus

Paul Babaz Dr. Richie Bland Kali Beyah-Wilson Mark Williams
DNR Comm.

Page 3


2015-2016 BALANCE SHEET

Page 4


BALANCE SHEET
JULY 1, 2015- JUNE 30, 2016
STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES
JULY 1, 2015- JUNE 30, 2016

Page 5


PROJECTS FUNDED IN 2015

Page 6


STATE PARKS RECREATION & HISTORIC SITES DIVISION

PRHSD manages over 60 properties that preserve Georgia’s environment and history. These state treasures
offer a variety of activities including hiking, biking, fishing, golf, picnicking and camping. PRHSD hosts
more than 11 million visitors to Georgia’s state parks each year. In 2015, the GNRF funded two important
initiatives for the State Parks and Historic Sites Division.

Handicapped Accessible Fishing Dock

The PRHSD identified an unfunded need to provide accessible
fishing opportunities on Lake Seminole at Seminole State Park in
Donalsonville, Georgia. Seminole State
Park is located in the southwestern
part of the state, near its borders with
Alabama and Florida. The 604-acre
park is located on picturesque Lake Seminole, a 37,500 acre reservoir with
excellent boating, fishing and birding opportunities. Cottages, campsites
and picnic shelters near the water’s edge offer visitors excellent water views
and quick access to the lake. In order to make fishing opportunities more
accessible for all guests of the park, regardles of any disability they may have,
a new accessible fishing dock, pictured above, was constructed with grant
funds awarded by the GNRF.

Restoration of Brick Oven at Fort King George Historic Site

The PRHSD also sought and was awarded grant funds from the GNRF for the
restoration of the original brick oven at Fort King George Historic Site. Located
in Darien, Georgia, Fort King George is the oldest English fort remaining on
Georgia’s coast. It served as the southern outpost for the British Empire in North
America from 1721-1736. Among the site’s several amenities is a reconstructed
18th century frontier fortification houses a colonial brick oven that was in need
of rehabilitation. The GNRF grant was utilized to restore the colonial oven to
its original historic functionality, creating an
opportunity for experiential living history.

Support for projects such as these enables PRHSD to reach more people
through inclusionary features and to continue to serve as a national model
for the interpretation of Georgia’s heritage.

Page 7


COASTAL RESOURCES DIVISION

The CRD has primary responsibility for managing Georgia’s marshes, beaches, and marine fishery resources.
Based in Brunswick, Georgia, the CRD administers permitting programs under two important state laws; the
Coastal Marshlands Protection Act, and the Shore Protection Act. The CRD also issues revocable licenses
for use of state-owned water bottoms, monitors coastal water quality, and manages shellfish harvest areas.
The CRD conducts research, management and development activities associated with recreational and
commercial fishery resources, represents Georgia on regional marine fishery boards and commissions, and
builds boat ramps, artificial reefs and fishing piers. In 2015, the GNRF funded several important initiatives
for the Coastal Resources Division.

Enhancements for Annual CoastFest Event - Mobile Aquarium

CoastFest, hosted by the CRD, is the largest annual celebration of
Georgia’s diverse coastal resources. CoastFest offers visitors an
opportunity to experience interactive environmental, educational,
and recreational activities that showcase the natural and cultural
assets of Georgia’s coastal region. Activities range from learning
archery and kayaking, to live music, marine touch tanks, living
history demonstrations and student art contests. Each year the
CRD plans and conducts this regional event at the its headquarters
in Brunswick, Georgia. Over 70 environmental, educational and
resource organizations from the southeastern United States
contribute to the success of CoastFest to ensure it will be both
entertaining and educational. After the 20th anniversary of CoastFest in 2014, additional grant funds were
awarded to the CRD to continue the development and support of this well-attended event. Over 8,500
visitors attended CoastFest in 2015.

In response to public interest to learn more about local marine life at
CoastFest, the CRD staff set up touch tanks and mobile aquaria that
afford visitors a hands-on opportunity to experience marine animals.
The popular touch tanks house a variety of marine species from
horseshoe crabs and shrimp to stingrays. Funds provided by the GNRF
were used to operate the 5,000-gallon mobile aquarium, which was
filled with filtered seawater and specimens of several iconic species of
saltwater fish from the Georgia coast. The CRD staff interacted with visitors and explained the life history of
the fish and their importance to the ecology and economy of coastal Georgia and the South Atlantic region.

Page 8


Marine Sportfish Carcass Recovery Project

In the fall of 1997, the CRD initiated the Marine Sportfish Carcass Recovery
Project to take advantage of the fishing efforts of hundreds of anglers by
turning filleted fish carcasses that anglers would normally discard into a
source of much needed data on Georgia’s marine sportfish. The approach is
simple, yet effective. Chest freezers are placed near the fish cleaning stations
at selected locations along the Georgia coast. Each freezer is marked with an
identifying sign and a list of target fish species. Inside the freezer is a supply
of plastic bags, information cards, and pens. Anglers can place the filleted carcasses, with head and tail intact,
in a bag, drop in a completed angler information card, and then place the bag in the freezer. The CRD staff
recover the frozen carcasses, and process them for biological information used to describe the size, age and
gender structure of the recreational harvest. This recycle-for-research information is then combined with
other surveys and inventories to determine the status of the species in Georgia waters. The program is a true
partnership between anglers, marine businesses, conservation groups and the
CRD. Nearly 2,000 unique anglers have donated over 65,000 fish carcasses
since the program began. Funds provided by the GNRF were used to purchase
additional chest freezers, to repair existing freezers and purchase signage to
promote the program and supplies for anglers donating the carcasses.

LAW ENFORCEMENT DIVISION

The LED is responsible for protecting Georgia’s wildlife, natural and cultural resources, DNR properties,
enforcing boating, litter and waste laws, teaching hunter and boater education classes, and providing public
safety for Georgia citizens and visitors. In 2015, the GNRF funded several important initiatives for the Law
Enforcement Division through both project grants and directed giving allocations.

Hunting Incident Training School

GNRF project grant funds were utilized to send eight rangers to
attend the International Hunter Education Association (IHEA)
“Hunting Incident Academy,” hosted by the Georgia Public
Safety Training Center in Forsyth, Georgia. The LED rangers
received instruction on investigative techniques for hunting
incidents, and methods for processing crime scenes related to
hunting incidents. This advanced training is crucial to the ability of LED rangers to maintain up-to-date skills
for handling hunting related incidents in Georgia.

Page 9


Law Enforcement Division 2015 Directed Giving Grants

The LED was also the recipient of a $25,000 directed giving grant through the GNRF’s annual Weekend for
Wildlife fundraising event. Funds, made available through this grant, enabled the LED to procure much
needed protective and investigative equipment. Examples are highlighted below.

Point Blank Body Armor & K-9 Officer

Directed giving support was provided for two areas where replenishment in the
LED is an ongoing necessity. This includes protective gear and the recruitment and
training of additional four-legged officers. The GNRF was able to provide funding
to assist with both needs. Funds from the directed giving
grant facilitated the replacement of 119 expired vests
with new Point Blank Body Armor. The new vests are
thinner, lighter, and offer better protection for the officer.
Funds from the GNRF also enabled a new K-9 officer to
be commissioned in the Southeast Georgia Region Office
based in Metter, Georgia.

Deer Decoy

For years, deer decoys have been used to help catch poachers. Funding from
the directed giving grant enabled the LED to purchase a deer decoy for Region
5, which encompasses Southwest Georgia and Albany. This decoy will aide
LED rangers in apprehending poachers who choose to illegally shoot from the
road, hunt without permission, and hunt at night.

Side Scan Sonar Equipment for Search and
Recovery Pontoon Boat

The LED was able to add its second dedicated search and
recovery pontoon boat to its fleet in 2015. This specialized
pontoon boat will be primarily used in Middle and South
Georgia. Directed giving funds from the GNRF were used
toward the purchase of a side scan sonar device for this
pontoon boat. The sonar equipment provides the latest in
underwater recovery technology, which is used to search for
missing persons and other evidence that may lie under water.

Page 10


HISTORIC PRESERVATION DIVISION

The HPD promotes the preservation and use of historic places for a better Georgia. Serving as Georgia’s
state historic preservation office, the HPD administers federal and state programs, including: archeology;
protection and education; environmental review and compliance; grants; historic resource surveys; tax
incentives; community planning and technical assistance; and the National Register of Historic Places.

DNR Oral History Project - An Enduring Reverence

The purpose of this HPD project is to assist in the preservation of DNR’s
history through the stories and personal interviews of the individuals
who have led the DNR over the years. The DNR has a unique culture,
in part due to the agency’s broad responsibilities. There is virtually
no aspect of Georgia’s natural or built environment that DNR doesn’t
touch. The culture of the DNR is a product of the people the agency
attracts. By and large, employees of the DNR work for the agency
because they want to make a better Georgia for Georgians. For over
four decades the people that comprise the DNR have played a critical
role in Georgia’s stewardship of her natural and cultural resources.
However, the individuals, events, and social trends that shaped the
agency and its policies had never been adequately documented—for the public, state policymakers, or
future employees. The DNR oral history project captures the challenges, achievements, and character that
make the DNR such a dynamic agency.

To facilitate this project, each of the DNR divisions helped

An Enduring Reverence captures identify former staff for factual and anecdotal material
the key moments in DNR’s history, and to provide old photographs and other valuable
told from the perspective of the content toward the completion of the DNR Oral History
individuals who helped make Project. Interviews were conducted and recorded from
that history. all five former DNR commissioners, as well as the current

DNR Commissioner. Interviewees were asked to discuss

the time they spent as Commissioner and to highlight the notable achievements during their respective

terms. Funding from the GNRF made this important living history possible. The end result is a visually

engaging video tool that will benefit the DNR, policy makers, new DNR employees, and the broader public

for generations to come. An Enduring Reverence was completed in December 2015 and a copy was included

in every Weekend for Wildlife guest bag in 2016. It is now an assigned text for the new DNR Leadership

Academy, which is focused on supporting succession planning in the agency. It is also available on HPD’s

website as a PDF.

Page 11


Georgia’s Living Places

The goal of this project was to develop an updated version of Georgia’s Living

Places ((“GLP”) originally published in 1991). GLP is intended to serve as

a comprehensive guide to Georgia’s historic house types and landscapes

and their care. The GLP publication is aimed at the generalist reader, be

they a homeowner, tax project developer, or local economic development

administrator. Since its original publication over a quarter of a century

has passed. As such, a broader range of resources, including mid-century

modern buildings, have been

recognized as historically The original Georgia’s Living Places
significant by the National was completed in 1991, long before
Park Service and state historic the internet. It remains one of HPD’s
preservation offices across the country. Using internal funding, most sought-after publications
the HPD paid an intern to develop a detailed outline for a despite its age because the
revised GLP. The GNRF grant will be used in conjunction with information is accurate
and well-presented.

funds from the Georgia Department of Transportation to

develop a comprehensive revision of GLP.

“Under the leadership of GNRF Board
Chair Amy Hillman and Lonice Barrett, the
foundation has really taken off over the
last year. HPD has been the beneficiary
of the foundation’s grants, to the tune
of nearly $100,000 over the last several
years. These grants have paid for projects
ranging from the augmented reality proof-
of-concept project at Camp Lawton and
a new database system for our environmental review and tax incentive programs, to the completion of the
first-ever history of DNR publication, which is now in final revisions. HPD is particularly lucky in that Chair
Hillman has a background in urban planning and historic preservation. In fact, she was a participant in the
nomination process for the Alberta Drive-Mathieson Drive-West Shadowlawn Avenue National Register District,
in Buckhead!”

Dr. David Crass, Director, HPD

Page 12


WILDLIFE RESOURCES DIVISION

The WRD regulates hunting, fishing, the operation of watercraft in Georgia, protects non-game and
endangered wildlife, and maintains public education programs to ensure that Georgia’s natural resources
will be conserved for its present and future generations.

Lifetime License Contest

The WRD gave away three adult and three youth lifetime
hunting licenses over the previous two years. The purpose of
the contest is to promote the DNR lifetime license program
and to help raise awareness of the WRD through social media.
Without GNRF’s support and funding, these contests would
not be possible. As testament to their benefit, the contests
have increased
DNR’s social
media presence with over 25,000 new followers and over
50,000 contest entries. The publicity generated by the
contests has also increased DNR’s lifetime license sales.
2015 was the first year in which over $1,000,000 worth of
lifetime licenses were sold. This represents an increase of over
$400,000 since the beginning of the contest promotion.

Teacher Conservation Workshops

The GNRF continues to help fund important initiatives
in education and educator training through support of
WRD’s Teacher Conservation Workshop (TCW). TCW is a
weeklong workshop that uses Georgia forests as a window
to environmental education. Activities are led by foresters,
wildlife biologists, educators, and other industry professionals.
The workshop has an interdisciplinary format and focuses on
the environmental, economic, and social benefits of Georgia’s
forestry and wildlife communities. Educators visit numerous
sites including Plum Creek, Barkaloo Farm, Gully Branch, several
lumber mills and the Flint River Nursery.

Story continues on next page >

Page 13


Teachers are educated on a variety of environmental
concerns including water quality, timber management,
and wildlife management. Participants study various
habitats and learn the relationship between them.
Participants are also trained in Project WILD, Project
Learning Tree, and Project WET. This is an extraordinarily
popular annual program and teachers repeatedly report
that it is the best workshop they have ever attended.

Teen Adventures Learning Ornithology and
Nature (TALON) Camp

Held on Georgia’s St. Simons Island, camp TALON is a
unique opportunity for teens with a strong interest in
the outdoors, birding and ecology. Camp Talon enjoys
a 3:1 student teacher ratio. Field trips and classes are
led by biologists, ornithologists and environmental
educators - each with more than 20 years of experience.

Camp TALON 2016 was the most successful since its inception in 2009. It drew
an overwhelming response from prospective campers, and for the first time,
there was a wait list for participation in the program. A total of fifteen campers,
ranging from ages 12 to 18 years, attended camp TALON. Six were new to
the camp and eight were retuning campers. One camper joined the camp on
scholarship from the Apalachee Audubon of Tallahassee, Florida. Two returning
campers earned the opportunity to serve as TALON interns. This year’s itinerary
included field trips to Gould’s Inlet, Little St. Simons Island, Altamaha WMA,
Wassaw Island NWR, Jekyll Island, Sapelo Island, and Harris Neck NWR.

Page 14


PROJECTS FUNDED IN 2016

Page 15


STATE PARKS RECREATION & HISTORIC SITES DIVISION

Public School Field Trip Scholarship Funds

The PRHSD endeavors to provide Georgia public schools with limited financial resources the opportunity
to bring their students to Georgia parks and historic sites for academic enrichment field trips. With funds
provided by the GNRF, the PRHSD will establish a scholarship fund for Georgia public schools. Schools
that apply to the program and demonstrate financial need will be awarded funding to cover their field trip
expenses including transportation, admission and program fees. A small sampling of the kind of exciting
opportunities available to Georgia’s school children through the PRHSD are depicted below.

Standing Boy Creek State Park Master Plan

The PRHSD contracted with Lose & Associates Inc., a land planning and
landscape architecture firm that specializes in recreation planning, to assist
with a park master plan for Standing Boy Creek State Park in Columbus,
Georgia. The master plan is a document to aid the Department in planning the
arrangement and development of the site. The master plan includes a detailed
review of the existing site conditions; engagement of the public and local
community in the development of a conceptual plan; a preliminary master
plan; and a final master plan with a detailed assessment of development costs.

Universal Access Trail at Smithgall Woods State Park

A new Universal Access Trail was opened at Smithgall Woods State
Park with a ribbon cutting held in August 2016. Park Manager, Will
Wagner, stated that this is “part of a park within a park.” The trail
runs along Dukes Creek for about half its length, and is located
near the front of the park at the visitors parking area at the visitors
center. The trail will continue to be upgraded, not just for mobility
impaired, but for those with visual and other impairments. It is unique as it will give access for all to enjoy
the beautiful surroundings and environment of at least a part of the 6,000 acres of wilderness at
Smithgall Woods.

Page 16


COASTAL RESOURCES DIVISION

Living Shoreline Treatment at Wormsloe Historic Site

Funding from the GNRF was utilized to complete site assessment, engineering and design work for a living
shoreline treatment to arrest erosion along the shoreline of a tidal creek at Wormsloe Historic Site. This
project advanced the CRD goal of evaluating living shoreline treatments as an alternative to traditional hard
armoring such as rock revetments and bulkheads. Living shoreline treatments are a more environmentally
sound method to arrest and prevent erosion while preserving ecological functions of a natural tidal
waterway shoreline. This project also addressed a need of the PRHSD to stabilize eroding tidal waterway
shorelines at coastal historic sites to protect irreplaceable natural and cultural resources.

LAW ENFORCEMENT DIVISION

Rogers Shooting School

GNRF grant funds were utilized to allow one of the LED firearms
instructors to attend the renowned Rogers Shooting School in Ellijay,
Georgia. The school teaches advanced firearm techniques, such
as handling real-world confrontations, as opposed to focusing on
precision target shooting. This state-of-the-art training was shared
with other LED firearms instructors and incorporated into the training curriculum, thus increasing the skills
and abilities of the LED’s officers.

Annual “Off the Pavement” Awards Banquet

The LED was also awarded a grant, a portion of which was used to help fund the Annual “Off the Pavement”
Law Enforcement Awards Banquet. This event allows the DNR to recognize the outstanding, dedicated
officers of the LED and to thank them for their faithful service to the people of Georgia. Georgia’s
LED officers are routinely recipients of national and even international awards for their programs and
accomplishments. The GNRF is proud to sponsor this important event which helps to foster a positive
atmosphere of accomplishment and gratification for those officers honored as award recipients.

Page 17


HISTORIC PRESERVATION DIVISION

”Good News in Tough Times” - The Economic Impacts of Historic Preservation
in Georgia

In 2010, as the State of Georgia climbed out of the economic depression, the HPD published “Good News
in Tough Times.” The publication is a compact study of carefully selected statistics and case studies that
document the economic benefits of historic preservation. A critical aspect of the publication and study
its the focus on the HPD’s tax incentive program for the rehabilitation of historic buildings, which has a
very direct and measurable effect on Georgia’s economy. Recognizing this, in 2015 the Georgia General
Assembly passed HB308. This bill substantially improved the benefits to developers of the tax incentive
program. Based on some very rudimentary numbers, the HPD projects that the bill will have a significant
beneficial impact on historic preservation investment and the Georgia economy. For example, from 2000 to
2015, $750 million was spent on the rehabilitation of historic buildings statewide. In FY 2016 alone, $700
million was spent. Results of the study provide critical information to educate both local and state policy
makers, developers, and community historic preservationists on the benefits of the State Office of Historic
Preservation and its programs.

Tax and Environmental Review System (TI/ERS)

The goal of this project was to complete Phase I of a three phase project to increase the efficiency and
transparency of the HPD’s environmental review and tax incentive programs. Currently these programs run
on dBase II (ca. 1980s) databases. TI/ERS is a completely new system built in the Windows 365 environment
and is written in Windows Share Point, one of the most advanced document sharing programs on the market.
This was the critical first step that had to be completed prior to Phase II (building a web-based interface)
and Phase III (making the web-based tracking system available to the development community). Phase
II is underway. GNRF funding was critical to help make Georgia a leader in these tax incentive programs,
statewide and across the Southeast.

Maritime Remote Sensing Survey

The goal of this project was a reconnaissance-level remote
sensing survey of St. Catherine’s Sound in the vicinity
of Ossabaw Island. While several areas, including the
waterfront of the colonial town of Sunbury were targeted,
the highest priority was given to USS Enoch Dean, a steamer
that hit a snag and sank in the sound in April 1865 while
carrying a full load of supplies for freedmen on Ossabaw Island. Working with the Lighthouse Archaeological
Maritime Program (LAMP), located in St. Augustine, Florida, DNR researchers located a debris field at the
mouth of the Bear River, which had been identified as a high-probability search locale based on the account

Page 18


of the sinking and bathymetric data. Augmented by internal funds, the HPD intends to use GNRF grant
monies to conduct bounce dives on the target in an effort to confirm/disconfirm that the debris field is in fact
that of the Enoch Dean.

WILDLIFE RESOURCES DIVISION

Charlie Elliott Wildlife Center Teacher Workshop Grant

Charlie Elliott Wildlife Center (CEWC) is dedicated to providing a comprehensive wildlife education program
to the citizens of Georgia with the overall goal of encouraging environmental stewardship. CEWC serves as
a wildlife and natural resources training center for children and adults and provides a learning environment
that cannot be duplicated in any classroom. CEWC offers numerous public programs, live-animal outreach
programs, as well as day and overnight programs for students. CEWC also assists science and environmental
educators in learning new methods for teaching wildlife and environmental education via Project WILD.
Education staff strive to assist K-12 educators to
find innovative and fun ways to teach students
environmental education.

Through funding from GNRF, the Charlie Elliott Wildlife
Center Teacher Workshop Grant provides scholarships
to teachers in order to assist them in attending two
different teacher conservation workshops at CEWC: the
Outdoor Wildlife Leadership School (OWLS) and the
Teacher Conservation Workshop (TCW).

Outdoor Wildlife Leadership School

The OWLS program is a workshop focused on wildlife conservation for K-12 educators. Participants spend
five days completely immersed in Georgia wildlife education through both hands-on activities and day
trips with the biologists researching these areas. The 2016 OWLS program had 31 participants involved in
caving, mist-netting bats, bird banding, learning about black bear research, studying the unique ecosystems
of Panola Mountain, exploring granite outcrops—along with several other activities that occurred on CEWC
property. Day trip locations included Crockford-Pigeon Mountain Wildlife Management Area (WMA), The
Go Fish Center and Panola Mountain State Park. By learning basic conservation biology concepts through
exploration of these areas, participants can take this knowledge back into their classrooms and educate
students about the value of our state and its natural areas. This project has been a recurring favorite for the
GNRF, as it includes educational related programs and training for our conservation and environment.

Page 19


Teacher Conservation Workshop

The annual TCW is the premier forestry and environmental
education workshop for teachers and educators in Georgia.
The TCW focuses on topics related to the benefits of forestry,
including the cycle of growing trees, the utilization of trees
for common consumer products, and the management of trees
for water and wildlife. Participants are certified in Project
Learning Tree, Project WILD and Project WET. Each attendee
receives a certificate of course completion upon the completion of a follow up activity.

Hook and Learn Program Events

The Hook and Learn Program encourages parents and their children
to get outside and fish! These events teach children an outdoor sport
in which the entire family can be involved. Each program is designed
to make lifelong anglers out of the children and adults participating.
Without funding from the GNRF, these programs would not be available
to the public. The Hook and Learn Grant funding also provided the
opportunity for 14 local schools to attend programs at CEWC. Over 350
students visited CEWC, where they were able to participate in a fishing class and an aquatic or wildlife
conservation class.

One-day Kids Fishing Events

With grant funding from the GNRF, the WRD was able to host twelve, one-day, Kid’s Fishing
Events at CEWC. Nearly 1,500 kids and parents attended these fishing events, which were
staffed by experienced volunteers and held at ponds that were specifically stocked with
channel catfish or trout to improve the chances for the kids to catch something. Three of
these events hosted children from Camp Warrior King, an Atlanta-based program designed
to broaden children’s horizons through education, activities and character-based exercises in a fun and safe
environment.

Hook and Learn Weekend Program

The Hook and Learn Program places the adult/child participants with an experienced angler to take the next
steps in becoming an active and safe outdoors person. Grant funding from the GNRF was used to host two,
weekend-long workshops at CEWC for ten adult/child pairs. During these workshops, new anglers had the
opportunity to learn the basics of fishing. WRD biologists and technicians taught classes on fish management
and fish habitats. Volunteers educated the participants on various types of equipment and bait. Each adult/
child pair was able to fish from the banks of ponds on the property, on boats from the larger lakes, and on a
local river.

Page 20


DIVISION CONTACTS

Page 21


Becky Kelley, PRHSD Director
770.389.7270
Becky.Kelley@dnr.ga.gov

Doug Haymans, CRD Director
912.264.7218
Doug.Haymans@dnr.ga.gov

Jeff Weaver, LED Assistant Director
770.918.6408
Jeff.Weaver@dnr.ga.gov

Dave Crass, Director
770.389.7844
David.Crass@dnr.ga.gov

Rusty Garrison, WRD Director
770.918.6400
Rusty.Garrison@dnr.ga.gov

Page 22


SPECIAL EVENTS

Page 23


Weekend for Wildlife - January 29-31, 2016

Weekend for Wildlife has become the GNRF’s largest annual fundraiser and
stands as one of the nation’s most successful, long-standing, conservation
events. Held on Georgia’s Sea Island, Weekend for Wildlife is an unparalleled
experience. Patrons enjoy the opportunity to become “wildlife VIPs” and
personally encounter Georgia’s wild coastal places and learn about the
DNR’s conservation initiatives. Weekend for Wildlife began as a program to
benefit the non-game conservation section of the WRD, which is responsible
for the stewardship of hundreds of special concern species of plants and
animals. Though the non-game conservation section of the WRD has been
in existence since 1998, 2016 marked the first year the Georgia legislature
directly allocated funding dollars to it. Prior to that time, it had to rely almost
exclusively on charitable donations to fund its programs. Buoyed by this
legislative recognition of the non-game section’s invaluable contributions to
Georgia’s environment and economy, the GNRF was able to expand the reach
of Weekend for Wildlife to benefit all five divisions of the DNR, furthering its
mission to sustain, enhance, protect and conserve Georgia’s natural, cultural and
historic resources for present and future generations.

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Annual Donor Appreciation Reception - November 17, 2016

Each year GNRF’s donors and stakeholders are hosted to a reception at the Georgia Governor’s Mansion.
This is our opportunity to personally thank the GNRF patrons, sponsors and volunteers who have helped
support and further Georgia’s wildlife conservation efforts during the preceding year. This exciting event
also allows the GNRF to update its supporters on notable achievements and awards earned by individual
DNR employees, as well as showcase interactive examples of the DNR’s outstanding and comprehensive
programs.

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2015-2016 DONORS

Page 26


The Broadfield Foundation Governor’s Circle ($50,000+) Knobloch Family Foundation
The Community Foundation MGM Resorts International
Altria Mildred Miller Fort Foundation
Dr. John David Allen
Platinum ($25,000+)

Georgia Power Company
Georgia Power Foundation, Inc.

Honeywell International Inc
Walmart Foundation

AT&T Benefactor’s Council ($15,000+) Georgia Transmission
M. Bulkley Philip A. Wilheit
The Coca-Cola Company C. Henderson Carol Wood
Fieldale Farms Jinks Private Foundation Delos H. Yancey III

Bobolink Foundation Will McKnight
Georgia Southern University J. Mark Mobley
State Mutual Insurance
Joe M. Hatfield
The Longleaf Alliance Inc. Gold ($10,000+) Paul & Amanda Shailendra
John D. Stevens
Tom Lowe III Aaron S. McWhorter
Jonathan Pannell The Vaughn Family Foundation
Oglethorpe Power Kathy Wallgood

The Rayonier AM Foundation Williams Family Foundation of Georgia
Rayonier Operating Co LLC

Harold Reid Reynolds

McLendon Acres Silver ($5,000+) Metro Atlanta Chamber
Nancy A. Addison Mark Mobley
Patricia Barmeyer Evans Family Fund AGL Resources
Communities of Coastal Georgia Foundation John Flournoy Laura Richards
Bibb Distributing Company John F. Flournoy
James Blanchard Bodine Sinyard
Sara & Roddy Clark Gardiner Garrard Southern Ionics
Dwight J. Davis Georgia Regents Health System King & Spalding
Delta Air Lines, Inc. Troutman Sanders Public Affairs
Haydon Consulting Turner Foundation Inc.
Brink’s Incorporated William A. Hines
J. Cashin Lee Hunter Reiner Rietig
Terry Cook J. Walters Mgmt Schwab Charitable
E. McLead Winburn E. Stewart, Jr.
Edens Davis William Stribling
Fidelity Charitable Fund Bronze ($2,500+)
GA State Charitable Contributions Program Lindsay Thomas
Charles J. Hall J. Wheeler
Ben H. Hall HCA Caring For The Community
Philip Wilheit, Jr
Amy Hillman
Duncan N. Johnson

David Leach
Dwight McLaurin
Nantahala Outdoors Center LLC

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Helen Albrightson Fellows ($1,000+) N.C. Community Foundation
Stewart Ambler Quality Deer Management Association
Nicki Gillispie
Association of County Commissioners of Kristina C. Graham David Ratcliffe
Georgia William A. Gudenrath Rayonier Advanced Materials

William Bagwell Ben Hail W. Rice
Howard Baker Bill & Ginger Hodges William C. Robbins
Homestead Investments, LLC
James R. Bland, III J. Rundorff
J. Booker Charles Hopkins Matthew Sawhill
Jimmy Allgood Rental, LLC SG Property Services, LLC
C. Brookshir Hugh F. Smisson
Homer Bryson William Johnson
Bunnell-Lammons Engineering Lewis Jones A. Sowatzka
Carroll Daniel Construction Co. J. Kilberg Joe Tanner
Brad & Meredith Courts Ray Lambert N. Thomas
Dwight Davis Marcy Lane Mark Williams
Carolyn Dehaven Williamson For Walton
Rob Leebern, Jr.
P. Deveau Elvira M. Mannelly C. Wood
C. Dickey D. Wright
D. McLaurin
J. Ellis Randall Morris Connie Henderson
The Nature Conservancy Candice Henderson
Stephen Adams
Nancy Addison Patrons ($100+) Walter Hoyt
Tommy Hopkins, MD
Trip Addison John P. Coyle
C. Addison David Crass Brad Hutchins
Brad Alexander Carroll Daniel Honorable Johnny Isakson
Bradley Loyd Alexander Daniel Davison
Nicole Alexander Jane Dawsonsmith William Johnston
Merritt Alexander Terry Dbartels Alfred W. Jones
James Anderson Patricia Deveau Brooks A. Keel
Jill H. Andrews Jerry L. Donovan
Paul Babaz J. Eavenson John Keith
Howard L. Baker Teresa Ervin Katie Kirkpatrick
Lonice Barrett Winthrop Foundation Ryan A. Klesko
Kali Wilson Beyah Susan Foxworth Susan Kolodkin
Ann Victoria Blalock Steve Friedman
Jaime E. Fuentes II Mary Kyearta
R. Bland Dr. Jeffrey Gallups James Laine
David R. Bowen Gogo, Inc. Leadership Georgia Foundation
Trenton Brown III Richard Golden
Chandra Byadav Robert Guy S. Lee
Camden Hospitality Svc Inc. Chuck Hall Joy Lee
Elizabeth Camp Zach & Casey Harris Steven Levetan
Holly R. Capp Carol T Harris Little St. Simons Island, LLC.
James A. Capp Zachary Harris Douglas M. Long
Don E. Chandler J B Mannelly
John P. Charron D. Harris R. Marshall
Lewis Hays Elizabeth McLean
Page 28 Karen D. Hays Sandra McLean


Charles McMillan Patrons Continued ($100+) Bryan Tolar
Municipal Development Services Leslie Turner
National Fish & Wildlife Foundation Simpkins & Cantera LLC. Susan Tuttle
Joe E. Slaughter Jon Walker
W. Newton George Smith Dr. Philip Watt
Thomas H. Paris III Christopher Whelchel
Thomas C Parker Adam G. Sowatzka Mark Whitney
Stephen Green Properties Nicole Wilkins
Mary Pfaffko Hugh B. Williamson
Kathie D. Rabon Morgan Stanley Hugh B. Williamson, III
Thomas Regan N. Swain McGuire Woods
Thomas Regan, Jr. Christine Woodward
Richard Roccopesce Elizabeth Sweltner A.G. Woodward
Robert A. Sargent Scott Tanner
Brooks Schoen Shawn Tech David Sayre
TERN, Inc. James W. Shelton
Jaydee Ager Nancy Thomas Abner S. Silverio
Robert Andrews Cynthia Simpson
Matthew E. Thomas
Sheila Barrie Stacy Smith
Elaine H. Bolton Up to $99 Carol D. Stowe
Patricia King Vanhoy
Linda Buell Shirley Hall Mr. Ramsey T. Way
Lee Chunter Clark R. Hampton Theodore Andrew Will
Joseph E. Colbert Clement Hilton Damon Anthony Winters
Cybergrants, Inc. H.B. Katzenbach Jenifer Wisniewski
Michael Desrosiers
Robert L. Dickey William Leahy
Gregory C. Dozier Teresa Mervin
Daniel Forster Matthew Middleton
Robin M. Freeman Charles J. Mueller
Breanna Ondich
Partners Risk Services LLC
Dolores W Perrin
Katrina Rose
Brie Sansotta

Page 29


2 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive SE
Suite 1252 East

Atlanta, GA 30334

404.463.0274 | gnrf.org


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