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Published by mikeahart, 2016-02-02 11:26:41

Waterway Guide Magazine 2016 Issue

2016 Magazine


6 Regions and Featured Destinations Marinas
Things to Know Before You Go


CONNECT WITH US:
Strategic Partners
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A NEW SPECIES of OUT ISLAND living


Teaming with adventure, nestled amidst the sheltered privacy of Elizabeth Harbor, discover the crown jewel of freestyle Bahamas living, February Point.
Located just minutes from the conveniences of downtown Georgetown, this private gated community offers spectacular overwater Penthouses, custom private residences, oceanfront condominiums, as well as luxury private villa rentals.
Whether you are vacationing or looking for a new place to call home, the authentic out island life is waiting for you at February Point.
Visit FebruaryPoint.com to receive a FREE issue of Freestyle Magazine.
T: 239-691-4455
2
WATERWAY GUIDE MAGAZINE 2016


South Florida’s Premier Port of Call
It’s the Place To Be!
Voted one of the Top 25 Marinas by Power & Motoryacht Magazine!
• 200 slips for yachts up to 250'
• State-of-the-art concrete loating dock system
• Fitness center, catering kitchen, wet bar, billiards and
gaming room
• Steps to downtown West Palm, minutes to the airport
and beaches
• Ideal “stopping point” between North and South
destinations
For a full list of our exceptional amenities visit
PalmHarbor-Marina.com
400 North Flagler Drive, Suite A | West Palm Beach, Florida 33401 561.655.4757 | 800.435.8051
BUY or RENT


fThe World’s
• smallest package • lightest weight
• least expensive
4-6 Man 4"x12"x14" 12 lbs. $1510
9-13 Man 5"x12"x14" 18 lbs. $1960
New!!! FAA TSO Approved Life Rafts
Emergency Liferaft
Call Survival Products, the manufacturer, for customer/distributor/ service information Made in U.S.A.
Phone: 954-966-7329 • Fax: 954-966-3584 5614 S.W. 25 Street • Hollywood, FL 33023 www.survivalproductsinc.com [email protected]
WWW.WATERWAYGUIDE.COM 3


Table of Contents
DEPARTMENTS
6 Advertiser Index 9 Editor’s Letter
By Ed Tillett
11 On the Waterfront
By Mike Ahart
13 Tech Tips
By Steve D’Antonio
16 Anchoring & Docking
By Captains Chris & Alyse Caldwell
21 Safety at Sea
42
By Capt. Henry Marx
23 Book Excerpt
By Rudy & Jill Sechez
28 Boater Interview
SOUTHERN
40 Excerpt from Waterway Guide 2016 Southern Edition


By Brad Whitmore
30 Special Initiatives
By Ed Tillett
DESTINATIONS
BAHAMAS
32 Excerpt from Waterway Guide 2016 Bahamas Edition
34 Bahamas Sea Base: Scouting’s Sailing
Adventure
The Bahamas Sea Base program, described by Dennis Mullens, offers a dozen different week-long programs for Boy Scouts, many of which have never seen a real sailboat before.
37 The Iguanas of Allen’s Cay
Susan Schultz spent a tough five and a half days with a 24-person research team studying the beautiful, gentle iguanas of Allen’s Cay, recording growth and development patterns.
39 MARINA CLOSE-UPS
4 WATERWAY GUIDE MAGAZINE 2016
42 Marathon Cruising
It’s time to chart a southerly course for a larger-than- life excursion that docks in the “Heart of the Florida Keys.” Bobbye Kenyon takes us to Marathon, FL, and details the “must sees.”
45 MARINA CLOSE-UPS
ATLANTIC ICW
78 Excerpt from Waterway Guide 2016 Atlantic ICW Edition
82 Charleston: A City of Superlatives
Local Liz Rennie says spend a few days in Charleston, and you’ll see why folks consider this spot to be one of the most special on the planet. There’s no better way to appreciate all of her splendor than by boat.
90 Exploring the Albemarle Loop
Follow Ken & Amy Braswell from their homeport of Edenton to the historic cities of Plymouth, Columbia, Elizabeth City and Hertford, with stops along the way to explore their own family history.
50
99 MARINA CLOSE-UPS


124
128
132
140
142
CHESAPEAKE BAY
Excerpt from Waterway Guide 2016 Chesapeake Bay Edition
Tiffany Yachts’ Fourth Generation
Follow along as Ed Tillett explores this 75-year- old family boatyard on the Great Wicomico River, known for building sound and timeless vessels bearing the name of the founder, Tiffany Cockrell.
Exploring Oxford: By Water and Wheels
A tidy beach, shops, galleries, a bookstore and several restaurants are some of the attractions Oxford provides. After exploring on foot,
Jani Parker takes you along on the 26.4-mile “Oxford Loop” on her bright green rental bike.
Mast-Up Cruise to the Nation’s Capital
Many boaters sail right past the 11-mile-wide opening of the Potomac River without giving it a second thought. Scott Berg explains why this often ignored “mast-up” trip to the nation’s capital, where you can ind a secure anchorage in the shadow of the Jefferson Memorial, should not be passed up.
MARINA CLOSE-UPS
NORTHERN


174
178
182
186
189
fExcerpt from Waterway Guide 2016 Northern Edition
New Jersey: Beyond the Barrier Islands
Touring, beaching, shopping and biking are just a few of the activities offered in Cape May. Let Carol Pierini show you around this boater-friendly town.
Destination Newport: World’s Sailing
Capital
Carol Pierini describes firsthand the excitement of being in Newport as the large sailing vessels prepared to cross the Atlantic
in the Transatlantic Race, a 3,000-mile journey that began in Newport and ended in Cornwall, England.
Where the Mountains Meet the Sea
There could not be a more perfectly laid out harbor in Maine than Camden, according to summer resident and sailor Rick Caroselli. As an added bonus, Mt. Megunticook rises majestically 1375 feet above the harbor and is flanked by seven additional mountains, creating a stunning backdrop for evening sunsets from the harbor.
MARINACLOSE-UPS
GREAT LAKES
222 Excerpt from Waterway Guide 2016 Great Lakes Edition
226 Already Here
There are 1,864 islands in the 1000 Islands, to be exact. Local resident
Sarah Riddoch takes us on a boat ride with her husband and two “river rats” and shows us why “every boat ride seems to be a new experience, a new adventure and a new interaction with this beautiful land.”
230 A Superior Voyage
Those who sail Lake Superior know all
too well, it is a lake in name only. Michael O’Reilly describes a spring journey that proves that travelers must be self sufficient, carry good anchoring gear, and should enjoy their own company.
234 MARINACLOSE-UPS
WWW.WATERWAYGUIDE.COM 5
182
b


ADVERTISER INDEX
1000IslandsHarborHotel......................... 225 AlbemarlePlantationMarina........................ 93 BahamasMinistryofTourism,....................... 31 BaldHeadIslandMarina........................... 89 Beaufort,SCRegionalChamberofCommerce .......... 81 BoatOwnersWarehouse........................... 25 Campbell’sBoatyards............................. 137 CanyonClubMarina/SouthJerseyMarina.............. 177 CharlestonCityMarina/CharlestonCityBoatyard........ 80 CharlestonHarborResortMarina .................... 86 CaptainChrisYachtServices ....................... 19 CityofKingstonMunicipalMarinas................... 224 CityofPoquoson ................................ 136 CityofPortsmouth,VA ............................ 130 ClaytonTransientDocking.......................... 232 CoastalProperties ............................... 126 DatawIsland ................................... 95 DowntownMarinaofBeaufort,SC ................... 85 EastonPointMarina.............................. 130 FawcettBoatSupplies ............................ 131 FebruaryPointResort. ............................. 2
LandfallNavigation. .............................. 20 MacDougalls’CapeCodMarineService................ 176 ManteoWaterfrontMarina.......................... 86 MarineMaxatChelseaPiers......................... 176 Mojo’sontheHarbor ............................. .97 MorningstarMarinas. ............................. .26 MoxyMarineServices. ............................ .96 NationalHarbourMarina........................... 139 NewportYachtingCenter. .......................... 181 NortonYachts.................. ...... .....BackCover OceanYachtMarina............................... 127 OspreyMarina................................... .84 PalmHarborMarina.................................3 PassportYachts.................................. .12 Piccozzi’sDeringHarborMarina...................... 181 PortofOrillia.................................... 233 PortRoyalLandingMarina.......................... 84 ReefpointMarina................................. 229 RiveredgeResort................................. 232 RiverforestYachtingCenter. ........................ . 3 Snag-A-Slip..................................... 24 St.JohnsYachtHarbor............................. 88 SteveD’AntonioMarineConsulting. .................. 15 SuntexMarinas.................................. . 1 FerryPointMarina................................ FishersIslandYachtClubMarina..................... GananoqueMunicipalMarina. ...................... 135 181 225


SurvivalProducts................................. . 3 SwanBayResort&Marina. ........................ 232 SwansboroAreaofChamberofCommerce. ............ 86 TGM Anchor Point Marina. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Back Cover TiffanyYachts,Inc................................ 27 TownofBelhaven................................. 87 TrinityMarineElectric,Inc........................... 14 Utsch’sMarina................................... 180 Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS).. . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 WestrecMarinas-ChicagoParkDistrict. .................7 WhitePointMarina. .............................. 138 ZimmermanMarine............................... 131
HarborEastMarina. .............................. HarborIslandMarina.............................. HarbourTownYachtBasin(SeaPinesResort). .......... HiltonHeadHarbor. .............................. HolidayInnSolomonsHarborMarina.................. HorizonThousandIslandClubMarina. ................ HutchinsonBoatWorks............................ Island Global Yachting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Front Cover IsleofPalmsMarina. ............................. 84 JenningsBoatyard................................ 130 KingstonMarina. ................................ 224 KnappsNarrowsMarina&Inn....................... 137
138 131 85 93 138 228 225
6 WATERWAY GUIDE MAGAZINE 2016


Unbelievable!
A guaranteed slip in one of Chicago’s premier harbors.
It’s true! With the addition of 31st Street Harbor, boaters are guaranteed a slip in the coveted Chicago harbor system. We are currently taking reservations and harbor change requests for 2014. Visit www.chicagoharbors.com for more information!
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• 1000 Floating Slips from 35’ - 70’
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• Heated Winter Storage • Fuel Dock
• Harbor Store
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p: 312.742.8520 • f: 312.747.6598
WWW.WATERWAYGUIDE.COM 7


Featured
Waterway Guide’s
WATERWAY GUIDE MAGAZINE
Marina Close-Ups
COMPREHENSIVE INFORMATION ON FEATURED MARINAS FROM THE GULF COAST TO CANADA
Haven Harbour Marina resort & Marina | boatyard | inn
|
Rock Hall, MD
N 39° 08.517 W 076° 14.950
APPROACH & DOCKING
Situated in the scenic harbor town of Rock Hall, MD, known for its deep-water access, our award-winning resort and marina, boatyard and inn serve families and boating enthusiasts alike, traveling from states across the mid-Atlantic region. From our convenient location in the protected cove of The Haven on Swan Creek, Haven Harbour is a short distance to several major ports, including Annapolis, Baltimore and St. Michaels.
INTERNET/WIFI: Yes/Yes PHONE/CABLE: No/No
PET FRIENDLY: Yes
SHIP’S STORE: Yes
MARINE SUPPLIES: Yes
MEETING FACILITIES: Yes REPAIRS: All, Full-Service Boatyard LIFT/TONS: Yes/50T CRANE/TONS: Yes/15T RAILWAY/TONS: No
STORAGE: Wet & Dry
YACHT BROKERAGE: Yes, On site RESTAURANT: Yes TRANSPORTATION: Rock Hall Tram
Waterway Guide’s Marina Close-Ups are featured marinas shown at the end of each section of this magazine. It is a detailed presentation that includes photos and in-depth descriptions of the facility.
These featured marinas are accessible through our customized Waterway Explorer that overlays content on NOAA charts and through our Marinas App.
Find details on approach and docking, facilities, nearby attractions, what to expect, WHAT TO EXPECT ...
WHAT TO EXPECT...
HAVEN HARBOUR MARINA, LLC
HAVEN HARBOUR MARINA, LLC
SWAN CREEK
20880 Rock Hall Avenue
Rock Hall, MD 21661
P 410-778-6697 F 410-639-2971 www.havenharbour.com [email protected]
NEARBY
ATM/BANK: 1 mile POST OFFICE: 1 mile FEDEX/UPS: 12 miles HARDWARE: 1.5 miles GROCERY: 1 mile LIQUOR STORE: 1 mile BEACH: 0.5 miles
DRY CLEANER: 12 miles
HOSPITAL: 12 miles
CREDIT CARDS: Visa, MC, Discover, AMEX HOURS: 8am to 5pm
TRANSIENT/TOTAL SLIPS: 30/201
VHF MONITOR/WORKING: 16/68 DOCKSIDE DEPTH: 6 feet
APPROACH DEPTH: 6 feet
LOA MAX: 65 feet
DOCKS: Fixed, Blue & white docks & Floating, Red dock
ELECTRIC: 30/50 amps
FUEL: Gas & Diesel
PUMP-OUT: Yes
RESTROOMS/SHOWERS: Yes/Yes
LAUNDRY: Yes
POOL/GRILLS: Yes/Yes
ICE/SNACKS: Yes/Yes
DESCRIPTION OF FACILITIES


and special deals.
DOCTOR: 12 miles
DENTIST: 2 miles
PHARMACY: 1.5 miles
VETERINARIAN: 12 miles
LODGING: On site, 20 guest rooms/suites
DOCKMASTER
Hal Hopkins
The staff at Haven Harbour consists of the most experienced professionals in the industry. If there is anything we can do to make your stay more enjoyable, please do not hesitate to ask.
• Two Swimming Pools • Onsite Restaurant, Passages Bar & Grill
• Fuel Dock With Pump-Out • Full-Service Boatyard With 50-Ton Lift & Crane • Inn at Haven Harbour with 20 guest rooms/suites • Fully-Stocked Marine Store • Captain’s Lounge with Business Center • Conference Room • Fitness Room • 18 Private Heads & Showers • Laundry Facilities • Complimentary WiFi • Picnic Pavilions & Grill Areas • Recreational Areas With Private Beach, Gazebos, Playground, and Scenic Nature Trail • Complimentary Bicycles, Kayaks & Paddleboards • Onsite Brokerage & Charter Company
Marinas App
WG
o
r Marinas App, available free from App Store and Google Play Store.
o
Get a close-up view of our featured marinas on our Explorer and in
G
G
u
u
r
Explore Marina Close-Ups at www.waterwayguide.com
8 WATERWAY GUIDE MAGAZINE 2016


EDITOR’S LETTER
Many thanks for including Waterway Guide among the Loop Cruising Association, Seven Seas Cruising Association,
listofmagazinesandbooksyouintendtoread.This
2016 edition is a particularly large publication, so you have plenty to peruse this year as you plan your boating adventures – or relax on board. I’m sure that the founders of Waterway Guide in 1947 did not anticipate that the company would publish seven distinct guides covering the Great Lakes, Mississippi River, Gulf Coast, Cuba, the Bahamas, the entire east coast of the U.S. and a magazine every year. Certainly there were no interactive web sites, mobile apps, weekly email newsletters or YouTube channels in their plans.
Having joined the company in early 2015, I was curious about our history and went in search of, and found, a copy of an original Waterway Guide, which was designed in 1947 and published as the 1948-49 edition. Since this company has changed ownership several times over the years, none of the earliest editions are in our archives and can only be located using online auctions or similar postings from vintage bookstores. I also located a few books from the 1950s. What a delight it is to look through the old guides and see how boaters, cruisers, ishermen and families were spending their time on the water – and what products were being promoted – in those early post WWII years. Boat builders, motor manufacturers, purveyors of paint and electronics engineers presented their ads and endorsements in the guides while writers illed the Marine Trawler Owners Association, National Marine Manufacturing Association, Marine Industries Association of South Florida, Marina Operators of the Bahamas and all of the big boat shows work with us to advance boating, travel and tourism. Waterway Guide is a voice for the industry and an indispensable resource for boaters and yacht owners. We have now migrated key information onto mobile devices, tablets and our web applications because we know that boaters like all the information they can get, whether from books, apps, charts, magazines or websites.
In this latest edition of Waterway Guide magazine you will see submissions from our on-the-water cruising editors, expert advice from contributors, excerpts from our guides, advertising from our partners and full-page details on Featured Marinas in the 6 regions we cover. The magazine is intended to serve as a resource for your planning and enjoyment of boating, travel and cruising. We thank our sponsors and advertisers for participating this year and hope you will appreciate the articles that our editors and contributors have written for this year’s edition. Whether you are onboard a 65 foot Viking headed south for the winter, a 33 foot Tartan day sailing your local bays, or a 22 foot runabout out for a picnic with the family, Waterway Guide Media produces information


ffcolumns with stories, advice and observations. Waterway Guide then was “All about All the places to stop...All the places to see.” Almost 70 years later, we still are.
In the coming months, Waterway Guide Media, as we are now known, will begin updating and producing our 2017 guides. This is an important milestone for the company, as we are on the way to celebrating our 70th anniversary. Editors, graphics designers and staff are beginning to formulate ideas for how we can present a retrospective of boating, yachting and cruising from those early years of our company, along with our annual updates and revised content. Waterway Guide was born as WWII veterans were settling in at home after fighting tyranny and insanity in Europe and the Pacific. The greatest generation, as Tom Brokaw called them in his book by the same name, came back to the U.S. with optimism, hope and renewed commitment to building families and communities. Pleasure boating was high on their list of leisure activities. Builders and manufacturers were poised to fulfill orders using their war-time plants, technology and labor force. The perfect blend of demand and capacity created a boom in boating that lasted well into the 1980s.
Waterway Guide contributors, editors and designers set the stage over the years for our success by covering the water, communities along the way and providing insight and advice. We developed great partnerships and friendships throughout the boating community. The American Great
and content designed to make your time on the water more safe and enjoyable. While proofing some of the stories, I was transported to my boat and my senses refreshed to the solitude and comfort of the cockpit while cruising, often within only a few miles of the hustle and bustle of some of America’s busiest cities. That’s one of the joys of boating – you can be very far away even while being close to a busy community that doesn’t even know you’re there.
If you haven’t seen one of our cruising guides, please take time to look one over at your local ship store, book store or marine retailer. We are the “Cruising Authority” for a reason. And don’t hesitate to drop us a line or post a review or comment on our Waterway Guide Explorer (waterwayguide. com). You’ll find great charts, planning tools and thousands of data points that you can use to plan your trips. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter that provides up-to-date and relevant news and events. The vision in 1947 may not have included production of all the media that Waterway Guide produces today, but from what I read in that first edition from 1948-49, the spirit of the founders’ intent was to give boaters information and insight to make their time on the water fun and safe. To that end, we are meeting their goal. Thank you from all of us at Waterway Guide. See you on the water.
Ed Tillett
Editor-in-Chief
WWW.WATERWAYGUIDE.COM 9


Publisher
Editor-in-Chief
Managing Editor
Graphic Design/ Production Manager
Marketing &Advertising Trafic Manager
Product Manager Book Sales Manager
JEFF JONES
[email protected]
ED TILLETT
[email protected]
JANI PARKER
[email protected]
SCOTT MCCONNELL
[email protected]
SANDY HICKEY
[email protected]
HEATHER SADEG
[email protected]
LINDA JERNIGAN
[email protected]
Wanted: Contributors
Interested in writing about your extended travels or weekend cruises on the waterway and along the coast? Can you provide helpful updates and interesting information on places and events to share with others?
Become a contributor to the Waterway Guide family!
To submit story ideas, articles, information or photography, please contact Managing Editor Jani Parker at [email protected]
We want your letters.
Waterway Guide Magazine
welcomes your comments and News Editor
Web Master Comptroller
Ofice Assistant
MIKE AHART
[email protected]
MIKE SCHWEFLER ARTHUR CROWTHER
[email protected]
LEON HOLZMAN
WATERWAY GUIDE OFFICES
Corporate/Production Ofice 16273 General Puller Hwy. P. O. Box 1125


fsuggestions. Send letters to
the editor via email to [email protected] Fax: 804-776-8999
Attn: Jani Parker Waterway Guide Magazine, P.O. Box 1125 Deltaville, VA 23043 Waterway Guide Magazine reserves the right to edit letters
for length and content.
Send your photos.
Waterway Guide Magazine seeks digital photos from our readers. Identify each digital photograph (300 pixels per inch or greater) and provide corresponding photo captions. Also include your name (as you would like your credit to read), address and phone number. Send via email to [email protected]
ffDeltaville, VA 23043 804-776-8999
ADVERTISING SALES
BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER
GRAHAM JONES
[email protected]
REGIONAL SALES
Maine to Georgia
Florida East Coast & Great Lakes
Florida West Coast & Gulf Coast
Bahamas National Sales
MIKE KUCERA
[email protected]
PETE HUNGERFORD
[email protected]
DOUG PARPART
[email protected]
BOB BOWER
[email protected]
GRAHAM JONES
[email protected]
BOOK SALES:
WaterwayGuide.com/shipstore 800-233-3359
The Waterway Guide Magazine is published by Waterway Guide Media, LLC, P.O. Box 1125, Deltaville, VA 23043. POSTMASTER: Please send address changes or corrections for Waterway Guide Magazine to P.O. Box 1125, Deltaville, VA 23043. Copyright 2016 by Waterway Guide Media, LLC.
We encourage your comments as well as article and photography submissions. We reserve the right to edit submitted text. Submissions will remain on file but we cannot assume responsibility for loss or damage. Direct all editorial inquiries to: [email protected] Advertising inquiries can be directed to [email protected] com.
ON THE COVER: Jay and Karen Campbell (jaycampbellphotography.com) 10 WATERWAY GUIDE MAGAZINE 2016


ON THE WATERFRONT
By Mike Ahart, Online News Editor
When cruising, it’s easy to ind something new and unexpected just off the beaten path–and even the beaten path shifts with the ebb and low of time. Here’s a recap of some recent events and changes.
Weathering the storm. The 2015 hurricane season was barely noticed in most of our coverage area, except for Hurricane Joaquin, which ravaged several Bahamas out-islands and sank the freighter El Faro. In April, a freak squall line toppled the Dauphin Island Regatta in Mobile Bay, claiming six souls. Recent looding on the inland rivers has affected several waterway towns. Massive rains fell during the East Coast fall southbound migration causing high waters, low bridge
The island experience. The Bahamas’ new Value Added Tax has made cruising the cays a bit more expensive. New development projects in the Biminis and in Little Harbour Abaco have many cruisers concerned. The southeastern out- islands are trying to recover from the wrath of Hurricane Joaquin.
Changing course. The Coast Guard has torn down or abandoned several Chesapeake Bay lighthouses and has continued to convert many automatic sound signals to “Marine Radio Activated” (MRASS).
Lots of fun aloat! Waterway Guide’s “Sail to the Sun ICW
clearances, and worries of debris and obstructions; a few unrelated bridge restrictions didn’t help the low either.
Dropping the hook in Florida. Although the Anchoring and Mooring Pilot Program is still underway, State lawmakers attempted to enact a law that would restrict anchoring near residential properties. The 2015 legislation failed, but a new bill for 2016 has already been introduced. Other legislation would deine and regulate vessels at risk of becoming derelict.
Rally” safely led the leet “from party to party” all the way from Deltaville, VA, to Miami, FL. Stay tuned...We may do it again this year.
What’s new on the waterway? New facilities include Trent Port Marina in Ontario, Port City Marina in Wilmington NC, and the New Whitehall Marina on the Lake Champlain route. The new Oriental, NC, free town dock now offers restrooms and pump-out service, and River Forest Marina in Belhaven, NC, has undergone a major transformation.


ffffffTake me to Havana! Cuba has become a new destination for U.S. citizen cruisers due to changes in federal policy, but travel must still follow certain guidelines and cannot be for “tourism”– at least not yet. NOAA Coast Survey is working with Cuba to improve navigational charts, especially in the Straits of Florida. See Cuba Bound, Waterway Guide’s newest edition for details.
Clearing the way. Long-awaited dredging is being performed on a badly shoaled portion of the South Carolina ICW. A group in Beaufort, North Carolina, managed to get a clogged channel dredged.
Technology marches on. Waterway Guide introduced a new interactive website, launched its Marinas mobile app, and now offers a geo-referenced data layer package on the popular iNavX app. AIS is becoming commonplace on cruising boats (transmission off when you’re docked...please), and hundreds of new apps are available covering just about every boating task, including the U.S. Coast Guard Boating Safety App.
Taxes, taxes, taxes. New Jersey lowered its boat sales tax, and several localities in a number of states have lowered or eliminated personal property taxes for boats. North Carolina’s “Coastal Boat Fee” bill died on the on the State Assembly floor.
fSafety first. High-profile boating incidents have prompted the proposal of new laws and policies, including minimum operator age rules, stricter boating under the influence (BUI) laws and incentives for electronic emergency beacon use. Ethanol meets its match. Biobutanol has passed a test as a better marine fuel to blend with gasoline, compared to ethanol, which hasbeenblamedforcausingenginedamageandfailure.
The winds of change. The first of many wind farms is under construction off the East Coast. Turbines will likely be a common navigational reference...and a potential hazard. Keep those charts up-to-date! WGM
About
Mike Ahart
Mike is Waterway Guide’s News Editor. He writes
and edits online articles and is also the author and producer of the popular Cruiser’s Weekly Update email newsletter, sent each Thursday afternoon to thousands of subscribers. Mike, his wife Jan, and their cats have cruised the East Coast and Bahamas aboard their
Gemini catamaran sailboat, Cat Lady. They reside in Virginia’s Northern Neck on the Chesapeake Bay.
WWW.WATERWAYGUIDE.COM 11


2016 BOAT OF THE YEAR & Best Full-Size Cruiser Over 50 Feet Passport Vista 545 At Cockpit
2016
2016
“ It was conceived for voyaging, and yet this is the one
I would want to take for daysails. ” Tim Murphy, Cruising World
Best Full-Size Cruiser Over 50 Feet
2016 Boat Of The Year
Passport 545
Passport 545


fThey don’t build them like this anymore...but we do.
www.passportyachts.com
326 First Street, Suite 404, Annapolis, MD 21403 | 410-263-0008
456AC | 470AC | 470CC | 480AC | 515AC | 515CC | 545AC | 545CC | 585TC | 615TC


TECH TIPS
Proper Propeller Installation
By Steve D’Antonio
I recently carried out an inspection, during which I discovered that the 45-foot diesel-powered cruising vessel’s propeller was loose; so loose in fact that I was able to unscrew the nuts—by hand—and then move the propeller fore and aft on the shaft taper. As disquieting as this was, of greater concern was the fact that this isn’t unusual. I routinely encounter propellers that are either loose or otherwise improperly installed. It comes as a surprise to many boat owners, and even some industry professionals, just how many steps are involved in properly installing a propeller. Failure to follow these guidelines can, at
best, lead to vibration and damage and, at worst, loss of the propeller all together.
The process begins with a visual inspection, carefully scrutinizing both the prop shaft taper and the propeller bore (the cone-shaped hole in the center of the hub) for dents, scoring, potting or defects of any kind. It’s important that these surfaces be clean and free of any irregularities. Be sure to inspect the keyways (the rectangular troughs) on both the shaft and prop as well, along with the key for similar issues. Keyways in shafts should include a illet—that is, the bottom corners should be rounded, and the ends should be spooned or Propeller installation, particularly when a prop is mated to a shaft for the irst time, requires the two to be interfaced using a process known as lapping, which is being carried out by the crew shown here.
shaft, over which the lapping compound is applied; the latter has the consistency of ine wet sand. The propeller is then placed onto the shaft taper and rotated by hand 180 degrees in either direction a dozen times or so. Doing so grinds away


frounded. Square shapes produce stress risers, which is often where cracks begin. The key should fit into the propeller and shaft keyways with only slight effort, and it should be snug; if it’s too loose it will rock, allowing the propeller to move independent of the shaft. If it’s too tight, the propeller might bind while being installed, which will lead to a balance and vibration problem.
The first time a propeller is mated up with a shaft, whether both or either are new, they should be fit using a process known as “lapping” to ensure a proper fit. Lapping is essentially custom fitting a prop to a shaft using an abrasive compound that’s designed for installation of intake and exhaust valves in engine cylinder heads. The process involves applying machinists’ dye (sometimes known as Prussian blue) to the
Before the lapping process begins, a dye is applied to the propeller shaft taper to provide a visual indication of contact between propeller bore and shaft.
ffsome of the material in the prop bore, establishing a custom fit. The prop is then removed and the lapping compound washed off. The dye that remains tells the installer if he or she has completed the lapping process; roughly 85 to 90 percent of the shaft taper should be dye-free, exposing the silver shaft material beneath. If this level of fit has not been achieved, then the process must be repeated until the 85 to 90 percent engagement is achieved.
Once the lapping is complete, all of the lapping compound should be thoroughly washed from the taper and propeller bore. (It’s water soluble, making it easy to wash off.).
The propeller should then be placed onto the shaft as far as it will go, without the key installed. Using a sharp awl, scribe a line in the shaft at the point where the forward section of the propeller hub ends. Remove the prop, install the key and then apply a light coating of liquid lubricant such as CRC 6-56 or WD 40 to the shaft taper and key. Only a few drops of lubricant are required; don’t overdo it. The purpose of the lube is to reduce the likelihood of binding as the propeller is installed over the shaft, not to aid in propeller removal in the future.
I’ve routinely encounter props that have been installed over greased shaft tapers, in the well intentioned, yet misguided belief that doing so will make propeller removal easier in the future. While it may achieve this goal, it thwarts one that is more important: Ensuring the propeller is thoroughly wedded to the shaft; the two must always move and stop as one. Under no circumstances should grease, anti-seize or other viscous compounds be used. Doing so creates a hydro-lock of sorts,
WWW.WATERWAYGUIDE.COM 13


preventing the propeller bore from mating with the shaft taper, allowing them to move independently of each other each time the transmission is shifted into and out of gear, loading and unloading the prop. As the shaft spins with each cycle of this process, it pushes the key laterally into the props keyway, which eventually causes the prop’s keyway to gall, ultimately ruining it. Once a propeller’s keyway is galled, it’s nearly always impossible to repair, thereby necessitating replacement of the propeller. To reiterate, only a light coating of liquid lubricant should be used to aid propeller installation.
The beauty of the tapered engagement
such as the one used for propeller and shaft installations is that it is designed to ensure both components remain irmly attached to each other. (Some would say seized or stuck.) Little thought should be given to future separation when a propeller is installed; when the correct tools are used it rarely presents a problem.
The next step calls for the inal installation of the propeller onto the propeller shaft. Push the propeller into place and then install the large, full height nut using a smooth jawed, hex wrench. Do not use a pipe wrench; pipe wrenches are designed to grip round surfaces, like pipes, by cutting into them with hardened, serrated teeth, which is the last thing you want to use on a hex nut. The prop can be held in place by wedging a
sturdy block of wood between a propeller blade and the vessel’s hull. While this method sounds crude, it’s well accepted and prescribed by propeller manufacturers.
Once the large nut is tightened, inspect the forward end of the propeller hub to ensure it has reached or overtaken the line scribed in the shaft earlier. If it has, then you can rest assured that the key and taper are not causing any binding. Now, remove the large nut and install the smaller, half height nut, tighten it and then reinstall and tighten the large nut. While this may appear counterintuitive, half height nuts (sometimes known as jam nuts) are often installed last. ABYC, the Society of
Automotive Engineers, the USCG and others call for this “small nut irst” approach. This isn’t just boatyard lore, it’s born of physics; when the irst nut is installed and tightened, it carries the entire load. When the second nut is installed, much of the load is transferred to it, and logic dictates that the nut with the most threads should carry the bulk of the load. Installing the large nut irst initially draws the shaft fully onto the taper using the maximum number of threads. Removing it, and installing the half-height nut, and then the full height nut, ensures the latter’s additional threads carry the lion’s share of the load.
If the shaft and its nuts are both made from stainless steel alloys, there’s a danger of thread galling, also known as “adhesive wear”, wherein material is transferred from one thread surface to another, leading to increase friction and seizure. To prevent this from occurring a light, liquid lubricant Only a smooth-jaw wrench designed for use with hex nuts should be used to install propeller nuts. Never use a pipe wrench for this process.


ffSpecializing in:
• Digital Switching • Electrical Systems • Corrosion
• Design
• Installation
• Repair
ABYC Certified
Electrical & Corrosion Control
772-781-6981
[email protected] www.trinitymarineelectric.com
fff(once again, not ant-seize or grease, as it will almost certainly lead to loosening of nuts) may be used on the threads. Alternatively, a thread locking compound such as LOCTITE® may be used, which will initially lubricate the threads, preventing galling. Once it sets, however, it will prevent the nuts from loosening.
Yet another alternative, and the one that is the most preferable of all, relies on the use of a naturally gall-resistant alloy, manganese bronze, rather than stainless steel. Manganese bronze prop nuts are readily available; they are essentially self- lubricating and require no thread lubricant, although a thread locking compound may still be used to prevent loosening.
Finally, install a new stainless steel, not brass, cotter pin that is large enough to fill the entire hole in the shaft’s end protrusion. (Cotter pins should not be re-used.) Undersized cotter pins can vibrate enough to wear away and eventually fall from the hole.
Following these propeller installation guidelines will ensure that the prop stays put until there’s a good reason to have it removed. WGM
About
Steve D’Antonio
A former marine mechanic and electrician, full service boat yard manager and long-time technical writer, Steve now works with boat builders, owners and others in the industry as “Steve D’Antonio Marine Consulting Inc” (www.stevedmarine.com). He has written a book on marine systems, which will be published by McGraw Hill next year.
14
WATERWAY GUIDE MAGAZINE 2016


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ANCHORING & DOCKING
Hooks or Lines Successful Strategies for Anchoring or Selecting a Marina
A By Captains Alyse & Chris Caldwell
t the end of the day we all end up somewhere. We are either swinging on the hook in a quiet anchorage or nestled in the perfect marina. The reasons for selecting one inale over another are sometimes based solely on our fear of the unknown. For some boaters an anchor is merely a hood
ornament on the bow of the craft, a magnet that pulls us back to the dock every night. For others, the thought of docking sets a tummy ache in motion far worse then Mal De Mer on the high seas. Let’s look at some of these trepidations and turn them into


fa sense of well-being.
Confident cruisers make the choice between Hooks or Lines every time they set out on an adventure. Will we end the day anchored in our favorite cove because we prefer solitude, fishing or quietly taking in the sunset? Or, is visiting with others securely tied up in a slip with all the amenities more to our liking? This is pleasure boating y’all! What excites us is as varied and numerous as the stars in the sky. But you might be amazed at how similarly our anxieties are founded.
A Journey Of One Thousand Miles
Begins With A Single Step
Most of us don’t start out as marathon runners. First we get a new pair of sneakers, then pant and sweat through a few miles before applying band-aids to our blisters. We discover our tolerance and adjust to our bumps and bruises before we run more miles on our course. So why would boating be any different?
Confident cruisers become adept at the basics of anchoring and docking before relying on skills not yet mastered. You can refine your anchoring and docking talents by doing a little research before you ever leave the dock. Studying the founda- tions of anchoring and learning about the equipment required is a great warm-up to a successful night at anchor...but have patience before you drop that hook for the first time. And mas- tering close-quarter maneuvering begins far away from the dock where you can’t hurt anything while you figure out your turning radius and how much throttle to use.
16 WATERWAY GUIDE MAGAZINE 2016


What We Don’t Know Can
Hurt Us
Understanding all of the equipment you have aboard, how it works and what it can and cannot do is essential. Magazine articles, boat show seminars, power squadroncoursesandtrainingvideoscan add to your knowledge base of anchor and docking skills, even if you are starting from square one. While you may have certain gear that came with your boat, consider if that gear is the right tool for the right job. And it is essential to know
how to use the gear with all the what-if possibilities calculated in your planning.
Unfortunately, the best options aren’t always what come standard with pur- chase. Do you have the right anchor to sleep well overnight? Are there enough lines and fenders to keep your boat securely fastened to the dock? And is your gear in good condition? We will start with some anchoring basics then move into docking tips to make everyone feel more in control.
Anchor ABCs
If you haven’t been to an anchor class then this might get you thinking about one. Your anchor should be appropriate for the size of your boat and the places that you plan to anchor. Most anchors are meant for speciic water bottoms so pay close attention to the information written on your chart: grass, sand, mud, rock. and even ooze! While a hinged luke-style anchor like a Danforth may work ine in the sands of the Florida Keys, a scoop anchor such as a Bruce is often preferred when trying to hook into the mud bottom found elsewhere in the state. There is no And then you must consider the tide. More rode will be required for higher tidal waters. Calculate your water depth consid- ering the highest tide expected while you are anchored. Additionally, you must be aware of the weather forecast to determine theneedforgreaterscopeifhigherwinds are anticipated.
Don’t forget to allow for enough swing room when you select the location to lower your anchor. The more scope you use, the greater the swing radius. If you are close to other anchored boats you may believe that you will all swing together. Think again! Sailboats swing irst with the tidal change with their deeper keel and lower cabins. Power boats usually swing irst with wind changes as the higher cabins act as a sail. Eventually you may end up pointing in the same direction. But be aware if you are too close with a greater scope and swing irst, you could end up tangled with your neighbor. Not a great way to meet new friends.
All chain rode requires another piece of equipment called a snubber. The elastic character of a rope snubber will protect the windlass shaft from the jarring shock of bar taut chain in a rough and wavy


f..ffsuch thing as the perfect anchor but some have more success than others. Our favorite multipurpose anchor is the concave plow called the Ultra anchor because it works in numerous and varied bottom conditions. Many opinions can confuse the issue but a conscientious cruiser will have a fundamental understanding of how their particular style anchor is supposed to set. And then you should prove your anchor a few times before trusting it overnight.
Deciding how much anchor rode requires that you know the water depth. For every foot between the water bottom to the anchor roller you need to let out at least 5 feet of anchor rode (line and/or chain). That 5:1 ratio or scope is for calm weather and waves or when you and your crew are awake. To sleep peacefully anchoring at night you should at least con- sider a 7:1 scope, which will lessen the possibility of the anchor popping out of the water bottom. When the forecast is for stormy conditions increase your anchor rode with a 10:1 scope. The rougher the weather, the more line or chain you should deploy.
fffanchorage. Additionally, all chain rode should be secured to the boat with rope for the last 15-20 feet called the bitter end. If
the chain is directly bolted in the chain locker it cannot be effortlessly separated from the boat. If the connection is secured with a rope then the chain and anchor can easily be disconnected with a serrated knife in an emergency. You can always come back when the emergency is clear to retrieve your chain and anchor if you secure a fender to the end of the rope.
Make a plan to anchor and be prepared for a few changes in that plan. Captain and
WWW.WATERWAYGUIDE.COM 17


Mate should both know the plan and what their role is before stepping away from the helm. Anchoring often takes place in the wind which can affect how well everyone hears. A few simple ARM signals can help keep the peace. We emphasize arm vs hand signals because there is less to interpret with large sweeping motions.
Docking Doctrines
So you’ve decided to tie up for the night. Maybe you will be docking back at your home port or perhaps your adventure takes you further down the waterway into brand new territory. Once you select your marina you will discover if you should prepare for loating or ixed docks. Floating docks require fenders lowered almost to water level to protect your hull as you slide into your slip. We usually place fenders and adjust them after we come to a stop in ixed dock settings as the fenders may snag on the piling while moving into your slip. We have a walking fender ready for immediately placement in the event of an unplanned kiss with another hard surface. This is an unsecured fender that can safely protect you or your marina neighbor from an unwanted crunch.
No matter which side you plan to tie to the pier, we sug- gest having available lines secured to all port and starboard bow, midship and stern cleats. As you venture out you will come to value these extra steps in preparation. While you may be assigned to slip A-21 with a port side tie, having lines available on your starboard deck will make the reassignment to slip 22 less stressful. Particularly when A-21 has a boat already in it.
Learning to tie a proper cleat knot is quite simple but it is already hear some of you saying, “I put the loop on my boat’s cleat and then dockhand ties the cleat knot on the dock.” Then you have no option to tighten or loosen your line from your boat. This brings me to our No Jumping Off The Boat rule.
We haven’t yet igured out a way to grow younger although our hips and knees might appreciate that trick. So, how can we stick to the No Jumping rule? When we are without marina help we use a breast line to stop the boat. This line comes from the cleat on the centermost part of the side deck. A proicient mate learns to cast the already cleated-off line from your boat, around the dock cleat or piling, then back to the boat. Unlike a spring line, this breast line prevents the boat from blowing away from the dock and allows the mate to more easily step on to the dock. Then the remaining lines and fenders can be secured thinking about the tides and expected wind direction.
Docking comes with equipment concerns as well. Check your lines for signs of chaing before you rely on their strength and security. Two boat poles will usually get the job done when the need arises for securing to a piling that’s just beyond your reach. We choose to have three, with a least one being telescopic out to 12 feet. Redundancy here is essential when one pole takes a swim.
If you are coming in to a marina for the irst time, con- sider stopping for fuel and pump-out service before going to your reserved slip. Before you leave the fuel dock, walk over to your assigned location and see what’s what. A visual inspection in advance can prevent surprises when you arrive in your boat.
Lastly, a small tip can go a long way in recognizing the


fffthe most essential knot you can master. Try throwing a line to a dockhand and have your end slide right off the cleat. I
ffffhelp that marina staff provides. We always carry a few extra $5 bills to show our gratitude. It’s human nature to want to do more when you are appreciated. That goes for showing thankfulness between Captain and Mate too!
Now Let’s Practice
When you dock and dock and dock some more, frustration rears its ugly head. Too much practice at one time becomes less enlightenment and more a study of survival. So, practice when the wind and weather are calm and unchallenging. Practice when you have no audience. Practice when you have enough time to dock at least twice then go for a fun boat ride before tying up one last time. Remember this is pleasure boating. Plan your trip, watch your weather and decide for the hook or the lines. Anchor or marina – What’s your pleasure? WGM
About
Chris & Alyse Caldwell
Captains Chris & Alyse Caldwell are USCG 100 ton Masters and Cruising Coaches who offer Personal Boat Training Online or Onboard your boat anywhere! The Caldwell’s help build your cruising confidence with hands-on training and with their AskCaptainChris.com training videos filled with tons of tips for the boater who loves learning.
If you have additional questions for Captains Chris or Alyse, please email them at [email protected]
18 WATERWAY GUIDE MAGAZINE 2016


PERSONAL BOAT TRAINING ONLINE OR ONBOARD YOUR BOAT


Docking • Locking • Anchoring
With Captains Chris & Alyse Caldwell, your cruising coaches.
Ready to start living the dream? Try our TRAINING VIDEOS
772.205.1859 • AskCaptainChris.com
WWW.WATERWAYGUIDE.COM 19


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WATERWAY GUIDE MAGAZINE 2016
©2014 Landfall Navigation. All rights reserved.


SAFETY AT SEA
The Plight
of M/V Royal
Majesty
T_______________________________ here is a lot that can be learned by other mariners’ mistakes. One particular marine accident comes to mind could have been avoided by better decisions, more training and experience, and less fatigue. These “errors” are unisex and apply to both power and sailboats, regardless of vessel size.
This accident and resulting loss of vessel were caused by:
1. Poor bridge management and navigational complacency.
2. Lack of proper equipment maintenance.
3. Lack of proper watch keeping and Towers, which should have been 30 miles away and invisible due to the curvature of the earth.
c. The Sankety Head Lighthouse (a 7.5-second lashing white light), with a visible range of 24 nautical miles, was visible 10 miles away–much too close!
d. The water had changed color, as had the wave action, indicating shallow water.
e. The radar, which was set on the 6-mile range when it should have been on the 12- to 15-mile range, would have clearly shown the wrong buoy patterns, as well as Nantucket Island.
f. The Fathometer alarm, which was set at 0 to avoid unnecessary false alarms while at sea, should have been reset before approaching the Trafic Separation Lane and proximity to shore. Also, the minimum depth in the Trafic Separation Lane is 50 feet, signiicantly more than was showing prior to the grounding.
g. There was no indication of increased vigilance by the bridge watch as they By Capt. Henry E. Marx USMM President – Landfall
satellite readout of the ship’s actual position. As of that moment, the effects of the Gulf Stream current, wind, waves and steering errors were no longer factored into the screen display of the ship’s position. However, the Loran C receiver mounted on the bridge continued to give a proper position ix, which, as time passed, grew farther away than shown by the GPS display.
Approximately 34 hours later, a ishing vessel off Nantucket saw the cruise ship “where she should not have been” and tried to warn her on Channel 16 VHF, but the Royal Majesty did not acknowledge the call.
(I might note here that I was recently on the bridge of a ferryboat that was


fatigue.
M/V ROYAL MAJESTY – June 1995
The cruise ship Royal Majesty left Bermuda for Boston on her regular passage on 9 June 1995. Two days later she hit the Rose and Crown Shoal just off Nantucket, MA–17 NM off course! How could this happen in the “age of electronic navigation” with a licensed and qualified bridge crew?
Apparently 52 minutes after clearing Bermuda, the antenna lead on the GPS receiver became unplugged when someone stepped on it while topside. This event sounded a brief alarm on the bridge, which went unnoticed in the activity of clearing the harbor. The GPS, as it was supposed to, shifted to the dead reckoning mode and a small “DR” appeared in a corner of the screen. Apparently this too went unnoticed...for the next two days! What this meant was that the GPS readout was based on elapsed time, and the ship’s last known heading and speed, rather than the
ffffapproached a potentially busy Traffic Separation Lane and land.
h. There was no crosschecking of the GPS position, the Loran C position, the Fathometer reading, or the radar, any one of which would have raised an alarm.
After all, these officers had made this run many times; it was “routine”. In short, they had become complacent. Fortunately, there was no loss of life, no one was injured, and there was no oil spilled; however, the accident did cost the cruise line over 7 million dollars! WGM
About
Capt.
Henry E. Marx
Capt. Henry Marx is the President of Landfall,
a Marine Chandlery specializing in Marine Navigation & Safety
Products and a life-long sailor having grown up around boats. He served in the U.S. Navy Submarine Service, the Norwegian Merchant Marine and for the past 35 years has delivered yachts along the East Coast of the U.S. He is a member of the Storm Trysail Club and the Cruising Club of America as well as being a U.S. Sailing Safety @ Sea Seminar presenter.
ffhailed on VHF 16 by an 85-foot motor yacht concerning a right of way issue entering a harbor. For reasons I will never understand, the bridge crew chose to ignore the call and did not respond or acknowledge it. I believe they were either not paying attention or did not feel it was important “because they were the Island Beach Ferry and this was their harbor”. This is not a long-term way to operate a vessel! I might also add that particular crew did not return the following year.)
Shortly thereafter, the Royal Majesty “struck”! What happened? Why did she hit the Rose and Crown Shoal, a few miles south east of the Island of Nantucket?
Here are the facts and clues that were missed by the bridge watch:
a. The Boston Traffic Separation Lane that runs southeast of Cape Cod is divided by a series of flashing yellow buoys, none of which were in sight by Royal Majesty but would have been if she was where she “was supposed to be”.
b. The lookouts did see the red flashing lights on the Nantucket Loran C
WWW.WATERWAYGUIDE.COM 21


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By Rudy and Jill Sechez
When it’s time to anchor, it’s “The Big Five”- size, shape, strength, scope, and anti-chafe techniques that count. Get all of them right and dragging, tripping or breaking loose will be a thing of the past.
Each of “The Big Five” performs a speciic function, a function that cannot be performed by one of the others. Substituting one of “The Big Five” to perform the function of one of the others only increases the odds for dragging, tripping or breaking loose. For example, your anchor may be big enough to handle an approaching gale (28-47 knot winds), but what about the other components in the ground tackle system? Are your shackles and all of the other components strong enough to handle the loads?
Size
Classiication societies recommend that anchors have twice the holding power of that of the load on the ground tackle. In order to determine what the load on the ground tackle will be, you will need the information found in some of the books on anchoring; our book, Anchoring- A Ground Tackler’s Apprentice, provides this information.
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ffWhile this may appear straightforward, it is somewhat misleading, as the anchor must have this amount of holding for the softest bottom in which it will be used. For example, since mud has 1/3 to 1/6 the resistance, as compared to firm sand, even though the load on the anchor has not increased, due to the seabed’s lower resistance, the anchor must be 1 to 3 sizes larger for use in mud, if it is to have the same holding power as it would in firm sand.
Shape
The anchor must have a design that allows it to set, and then hold, in the specific type of bottom in which it will be used. These two functions, setting and holding, depend on the anchor having a fluke angle that is specific to the type of bottom in which it will be used. If the anchor has any other fluke angle, the anchor has to be bigger, 1 to 2 sizes bigger; this increase in size must be over and above any additional size increase made, when sizing for soft bottoms.
Strength
Each piece of gear in the ground tackle, from the anchor up to and including the belaying point, must not only have enough strength, it must also have some strength kept in reserve, a Safety Factor, in case the load on the ground tackle exceeds that which was calculated.
In order to have this reserve strength, only an item’s Work Load Limit (WLL) is to be used to size the item, with the WLL equaling or exceeding the load that was calculated for the ground tackle.
For rope, since it does not come with a WLL, only its tensile strength is provided, the ABYC standards specify that, for ground tackle, a rope’s tensile strength should be at least eight times the maximum load on the ground tackle.
Scope
The smaller the angle formed by the rode relative to the bottom, the rode-to-bottom angle, the better that the anchor will hold. Scopes of 10:1 for all rope rodes, 7:1 for rodes that are 1/2 rope-1/2 chain, and 5:1 for all chain rodes, work, but only in mild conditions because the catenary, that sag in the rode due to the rode’s weight, allows the rode to form a zero rode-to-bottom angle.
As the wind rises, the rode lifts off the bottom and the catenary starts to decrease, increasing the rode-to-bottom angle. To emphasize the risk that is associated with a decreasing catenary:
• Fortress Anchors points out that anchors with a 5:1 scope have only half the holding power as they would with a 10:1 scope. Other entities have data that mirrors this finding.
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